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'Zodiac Island' Makers Say ISP Worker Wiped an Entire Season

timothy posted about 3 years ago | from the when-backup-day-comes-too-late dept.

Data Storage 228

itwbennett writes "The creators of 'Zodiac Island' say they lost an entire season of their syndicated children's television show after a former employee at their Internet service provider wiped out more than 300GB of video files. eR1 World Network, the show's creator, is suing the ISP, CyberLynk of Franklin, Wisconsin, and its former employee, Michael Jewson, for damages, saying CyberLynk should have done a better job of protecting its data."

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228 comments

Backups (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686068)

This is why you need them.

Torrents (5, Funny)

White Flame (1074973) | about 3 years ago | (#35686086)

They preserve culture.

Re:Torrents (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686112)

"Stealing" does not mean same thing as "preserving".
(Neither does P2P mean same thing as stealing, but in this case, it is about RAW videos and not about lousy HDTV/DVD rips)

Re:Torrents (1)

White Flame (1074973) | about 3 years ago | (#35686164)

Correct, but preservation is an interesting and real side-effect, especially as those who are interested in particular content are generally the ones to keep that content alive & hosted.

Re:Torrents (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686214)

Or one could just decide not to be a stupid moron and make at least just one fucking backup, for fuck's sake. Instead of infringing the copyright by spreading it without license.

Re:Torrents (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686224)

300GB is not a lot of raw video.

Re:Torrents (4, Insightful)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 years ago | (#35686230)

A good point though. Businesses go out of business. Some television of the past has even been deliberatly destroyed for legal reasons, or because it is embarassing to the company today. Still more can no longer be shown for the same reason, and remains locked up in a vault somewhere. VHS tapes degrade quickly, but now the pirates have digital technology, they do serve to preserve - thousands of people with their own stores, independant, backups for each other. They can't be legally compelled to destroy anything, because they just don't care. Companies come and go, but so long as someone is willing to replace the occasional failed hard drive, a pirate collection is forever.

Re:Torrents (2)

dadelbunts (1727498) | about 3 years ago | (#35686358)

Kind of like abandonware. Most abandonware titles are impossible to find in a hard copy. In many cases the companies that own the rights arent around anymore. Kind of seems like digital media is harder to preserve than physical media to me sometimes as we take it for granted how easy it is to backup, then no one backs it up.

Re:Torrents (2)

Cederic (9623) | about 3 years ago | (#35686420)

Some television of the past has even been deliberatly destroyed for legal reasons, or because it is embarassing to the company today.

Or because it cost too much to retain it.

There's a distressing amount of BBC material that's gone forever, very intentionally, primarily due to cost reasons.

Re:Torrents (1)

evanism (600676) | about 3 years ago | (#35686582)

if they did, there would be 6897 copies on BT right now!

Maybe the fact their stuff wasnt, indicates the value more! (i.e ZERO)

Re:Backups (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686090)

Just finished backin up. My daddy taught me good.

Re:Backups (4, Informative)

bmo (77928) | about 3 years ago | (#35686108)

"Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it ;)" - Torvalds, Linus (1996-07-20)

--
BMO

In their defense (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 3 years ago | (#35686222)

It sounds like their ISP was supposed to do that. I've nothing wrong with paying other companies to do something for you. Not every company has the resources to do everything. You outsource things to experts. However that means you presume they do it right, and do what they say. The ISP said "Ya no problem we back this up." And then it turned out they didn't.

Re:In their defense (2)

Cylix (55374) | about 3 years ago | (#35686268)

It's fairly common practice to keep the raw video in case you need to do something with it. It's generally higher quality, free from effects and can be remixed as needed. In the event the finished product is wiped out then the show can be reproduced at some cost.

With one of the previous companies I was with we spent so little on technology that it wasn't uncommon to lose the primary file server. Eventually, after the third or fourth reload plus reproducing they eventually opted to invest in some backup technologies and secondary file servers.

While it is April fools day I have seen this scenario too many times. I believe there is some rule to humor that indicates a situation is humorous when it is on the unbelievable side. This doesn't strike me as terribly unbelievable.

Re:In their defense (2)

yeshuawatso (1774190) | about 3 years ago | (#35686274)

Mod parent up; someone read the article. This is exactly on point to why this will be settled out of court with a couple million exchanging hands, and A LOT of the ISP staff will be terminated for not doing their jobs. Plus, there's the PR stuff to reassure customers, dealing with those that lost non-essential data, and of course, the loss of customers who will simply exit and go somewhere else. The worse thing this could have done was make it to a lawsuit.

Re:Backups (2)

mwvdlee (775178) | about 3 years ago | (#35686282)

You mean like the backups that a company might pay an ISP to make?
As was the case in this story, according to TFA.

Re:Backups (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#35686334)

When the data is worth something, you don't rely on only one backup. Especially if it's done by another company.

Re:Backups (1)

malkavian (9512) | about 3 years ago | (#35686518)

If you're a small company, with highly distributed work, and a single repository for all these to check in, and very little in the way of hard tech, why not?
Would you trust your car repair to just one garage when you get a service? Yes? Well, that's because you trust them to do what you pay for..
Not everyone has the money to get multiple offsite backups for each site, or even the resource to perform more than one backup (from the sounds of TFA, a lot of this work of contribution has been ad-hoc by highly distributed, and not particularly technical people, so their onsite backups are going to be flakey).

Re:Backups (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686502)

But 300gigs of data? In a world where 1TB hard drives are under $50, who can spare $17 word of hard drive space on a backup?

Phew (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686084)

I can just see the relief on their faces when they learn that the whole series is still available at yourmegasupertorrentdownload.com

World Backup Day (2)

erice (13380) | about 3 years ago | (#35686096)

I guess they didn't hear that it was World Backup Day [slashdot.org]

Re:World Backup Day (5, Funny)

toastar (573882) | about 3 years ago | (#35686106)

Who's fucking idea was it to make April fools day World Backup day?

Re:World Backup Day (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#35686130)

Actually March 31st was world backup day.
Ironically, in my time zone the Slashdot article about it appeared less than an hour before the day ended ...

Re:World Backup Day (1)

Kilrah_il (1692978) | about 3 years ago | (#35686366)

You meant coincidentally, right? Not ironically.

Re:World Backup Day (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#35686498)

No, I didn't mean coincidentally. Coincidentally it appeared on March 31 in my time zone (it was a coincidence because (a) it was about March 31, and appeared on March 31, abd (b) due to the time zones, it wasn't a given that it appeared on the right day). However that it appeared less than one hour before that day ended was not a coincidence (what would it have coincided with?). Also "coincidentally" doesn't include a valuation. The irony (or whatever; if you don't like "irony" in that context, provide a suitable replacement) in the situation is that due to the the time when it appeared, it was quite unlikely to be read in time to actually make a backup at that day in response to seeing that article (indeed, when I saw the article, the day was almost over, so making a backup in the remaining time of the day was basically impossible).

Re:World Backup Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686574)

epic correction fail, grammar nazi - you should be banned from posting

Re:World Backup Day (1)

Nermal6693 (622898) | about 3 years ago | (#35686450)

In my time zone it appeared 10 hours after the day ended. So my first thought was also about "why on April Fools' day?"

Re:World Backup Day (1)

RenHoek (101570) | about 3 years ago | (#35686154)

It's not.. it's on March 31st, i.e. yesterday

Re:World Backup Day (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 3 years ago | (#35686226)

Yeah, timed so when your coworker pulls a so-called prank on you by deleting all your files, you'll have just completed your backup...making it trivial to recover your data.

Re:World Backup Day (4, Insightful)

Kilrah_il (1692978) | about 3 years ago | (#35686364)

Re: April fools.
I am now announcing that for the next 24h I will not believe any story not originating from Fox News. Since all the major (i.e. serious) papers print fake/prank stories today, I guess it's Fox's time to pull the major prank - print out a real, accurate, fact-filled news item, for once.

Re:World Backup Day (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 3 years ago | (#35686168)

TFA is very clear about this: the ISP was responsible for making backups, and failed to do so.

Re:World Backup Day (2)

erice (13380) | about 3 years ago | (#35686216)

TFA is very clear about this: the ISP was responsible for making backups, and failed to do so.

Yes, but anyone who relies on ISP backups for important data, on an ftp site, no less, is an idiot. The only way this story makes any sense is if all they managed to trash all their local copies, including backups (if any), and then looked to the ftp site as a backup of last resort. The ftp site files were almost certainly not in condition to broadcast. Their loss means that the creators can blame someone else for the screwup and not have to redo all their work.

Re:World Backup Day (2)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | about 3 years ago | (#35686262)

Yes, but anyone who relies on ISP backups for important data, on an ftp site, no less, is an idiot.

The only way this story makes any sense is if all they managed to trash all their local copies, including backups (if any), and then looked to the ftp site as a backup of last resort. The ftp site files were almost certainly not in condition to broadcast. Their loss means that the creators can blame someone else for the screwup and not have to redo all their work.

A cheap idiot at that. We're talking about 300Gb of data. I'm guessing a production company can cough up 50 bucks for an external 500Gb hard drive. They might have even have had enough left over to splash out on a second one.

Re:World Backup Day (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 3 years ago | (#35686378)

I think you're being a little judgmental there. We don't know what kind of contract terms they had with the ISP; from TFA it sounds like CyberLynk was providing a full data-hosting solution, and that's why there weren't good local copies: they expected the ISP to provide that. This was a collaboration server, remember, so no one group necessarily ever had a full copy of all the source materials. I agree that, given the size of the materials, it should have been trivial for each group to keep a full copy, but perhaps they were avoiding this practice to try and keep everything synchronized (i.e. one master copy) or were in the middle of a major resynch. We simply don't know whether or not they deserve (much) blame. I don't think it's unreasonable to expect to be able to subcontract data protection.

On top of that, the employee responsible for the data loss was on a post-firing rampage. Those tend to be pretty good at overcoming mechanisms meant to protect against natural disasters.

Re:World Backup Day (1)

bjourne (1034822) | about 3 years ago | (#35686398)

They had to rely on someone. If you want to renovate your bathroom and you don't know how, then you have to rely on a craftsman to do a proper job. If you are an ISP which provides backup services and you don't do any, you're not doing your job. The whole point of a specialized economy is that you shouldn't have to be an expert on everything to get any job done. Most people are not, and should not have to be, experts on all the technical and procedural problems which you need to understand to run a proper backup scheme (of which there are many).

Re:World Backup Day (2)

cgenman (325138) | about 3 years ago | (#35686228)

If you're relying upon the ISP to have backups, you don't have backups. What if that ISP goes under? Gets hit with a flood? Servers locked up by an FBI investigation? Or, as in this case, an employee goes on a deleting rampage?

Don't just backup your data. Backup your providers. Backups are about redundancy.

And never personally verifying that the ISP had backups? They might as well have used prayer as a data-protection methodology.

Re:World Backup Day (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 3 years ago | (#35686394)

To be honest, when I read that part of the article, it sounds more like CyberLynk is trying to cover up more problematic employees.

But let's not kid ourselves. We need to backup the backups! Backup the providers' backups! Backup the providers' backups' providers! Let the madness never end!

To be honest, I somewhat doubt they had the money to carry it that far, though.

Re:World Backup Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686464)

More than that:

"The problems started in February 2009 when CyberLynk terminated Jewson's employment for an undisclosed reason. One month later, on March 26, Jewson allegedly logged back into his former employer's systems and went on a data-wiping rampage."

Why the hell did they not revoke the user accounts of the guy they'd just fired?

Sorry, but (1)

fivevoltforest (2012744) | about 3 years ago | (#35686098)

there is no scenario AT ALL in which this should be possible. You shoot, makes backups the same day. Edit the show on your own computers, hopefully backing up to a remote location daily, or more realistically, weekly. (Sneakernet, I'd assume.) When you're done editing your show, you want to have backups all over. Why the fuck did the ISP have control of the only copy of their show?

Re:Sorry, but (1)

fivevoltforest (2012744) | about 3 years ago | (#35686104)

And sorry, I keep forgetting that I have to manually add in line breaks.

Re:Sorry, but (1)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | about 3 years ago | (#35686340)

No you don't.
Go to the top, click account.
A rectangular screen will pop up.
Click posting in the top bar on the rectangular screen.
Set the "Comment Post Mode" to "Plain Old Text".
For each return in your post a br will be included automatically.

Re:Sorry, but (1)

Nursie (632944) | about 3 years ago | (#35686162)

'ISP' seems to be a bit of a misnomer here, they were hosting a collaboration server that contained the data so I'd call them a hosting company.

And it looks like the production company relied on the hosting company to keep backups, which they neglected to do.

Otherwise I agree with you - you should have backups of the raw footage and the animation separately, you should have the finished product on the collab server, sure, but also on tape or HDD in secure storage somewhere. And if it was me I'd have it stored on a machine in our office, and I'd have my very own private set of blurays in my desk draw or even at home, 'just in case'

Re:Sorry, but (2)

White Flame (1074973) | about 3 years ago | (#35686184)

They used the ISP's FTP hosting as a collaboration point between the different companies spread across the planet (animation studios, live action studios, editing, etc), and it was part of the deal that backups be done at the ISP itself. Yes, it's a non-redundant setup as opposed to having replication across all sites, but they did have a paid-for backup service that unfortunately didn't do their job.

Re:Sorry, but (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | about 3 years ago | (#35686438)

So what? Are they better off now with no movies and trying to sue the hosting company for damages, or would they have been better off with movie backups and optionally sueing the hosting company?

Some decisions are just boneheaded, no matter how many pages a contract is long.

Re:Sorry, but (2)

jjohnson (62583) | about 3 years ago | (#35686190)

If I'm paying the hosting company to maintain backups, then that's my backup plan, and it's not unreasonable for a small business to rely on it if IT isn't a major part of their business. If they had 300GBs of storage in use, then they had a serious account that almost certainly included guarantees of regular backups. The ISPs admission that their backup system failed says as much.

Re:Sorry, but (3, Insightful)

Eivind (15695) | about 3 years ago | (#35686252)

It's unreasonable to "rely" on ANY backup-plan whatsoever, without actually regularily testing RESTOREs.

If you buy backup - which is fine - make sure to actually test a restore, and do so REGULARILY.

Re:Sorry, but (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | about 3 years ago | (#35686300)

If I'm paying the hosting company to maintain backups, then that's my backup plan, and it's not unreasonable for a small business to rely on it if IT isn't a major part of their business. If they had 300GBs of storage in use, then they had a serious account that almost certainly included guarantees of regular backups. The ISPs admission that their backup system failed says as much.

It'd be a backup plan if they'd still had the originals. This was more like a data storage plan where they paid for backups. While it's not unreasonable to assume that you're actually getting what you pay for there is some risk involved as this clearly shows. Further more the risk is unknown because companies are often stunningly incompetent behind the scenes. In the end the consideration they should've made is "if everything is lost will we be content with whatever damages we get from suing ?" Only if the answer to that question is yes then they made the right decision by not keeping a local copy.

Today is World Backup Day (1)

cbope (130292) | about 3 years ago | (#35686100)

How ironic: http://www.worldbackupday.net/ [worldbackupday.net]

Re:Today is World Backup Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686510)

That is not ironic. That is coincidental.

What would have been ironic would have been if the back-ups were deleted whilst participating in World Backup Day.

Am I missing something here? (1)

future assassin (639396) | about 3 years ago | (#35686102)

Did these video just magically appear on the server or where they uploaded to the server after they were created somewhere else?

Re:Am I missing something here? (1)

White Flame (1074973) | about 3 years ago | (#35686126)

From TFA:

The lost data included an entire season of "Zodiac Island" -- 6,480 files -- that was stored on a CyberLynk FTP server. The show's producers had been using the server for nearly a year as a drop box where contributors from the U.S., Manila, Beijing and Hong Kong could collaborate on episodes.

CyberLynk was supposed to have backed up the data, but CEO Adam Hobach told WeR1 that his company's backup procedure "had failed and/or was not properly instituted," WeR1 said in a lawsuit filed last week in U.S. District Court for the District of Hawaii.

Re:Am I missing something here? (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#35686166)

Probably the worker saw the FTP server full of copyrighted movies, and thought "better wipe them before we get any legal trouble; to be sure, better also delete the backups." :-)

This is (1)

Konster (252488) | about 3 years ago | (#35686114)

This is the 21st century and some people still haven't wrapped their heads around proper safeguarding of data.

It sucks to be them, but it's their own responsibility to make sure their data is replicated on as many devices in as many places as is convenient and affordable to do so.

Re:This is (1)

Per Wigren (5315) | about 3 years ago | (#35686424)

That depends. It really should be possible to outsource that to another company, like this "ISP" for example, and then leave it up to them to keep your data safe. After all that's what you pay for. I don't know the details of the service they offered though, maybe it was a cheap "Here is a network drive. Use it however you want but don't expect anything." kind of service. In that case you're correct. However, if it was a premium "Trust us, we take care of your data!" kind of service then it's another thing.

Re:This is (3, Informative)

martin-boundary (547041) | about 3 years ago | (#35686472)

That's easy to say, but the trend is the other way. How many people here on slashdot even use gmail as their primary email provider and don't ever back up the messages?

You might say it's not the same thing, but it's not so different for a company to keep some of their most valuable assets in the cloud in one place, and for a person to keep some of their most valuable communications and contacts in the cloud in one place.

If something is valuable, never trust it wholly to the cloud.

Re:This is (1)

LordNacho (1909280) | about 3 years ago | (#35686562)

This is the 21st century and some people still haven't wrapped their heads around proper safeguarding of data.

It sucks to be them, but it's their own responsibility to make sure their data is replicated on as many devices in as many places as is convenient and affordable to do so.

This is the 21st century and some people still haven't wrapped their heads around proper safeguarding of data.

It sucks to be them, but it's their own responsibility to make sure their data is replicated on as many devices in as many places as is convenient and affordable to do so.

Agreed. At the end of the day, you're responsible for your own property. Particularly when it's something irreplaceable like your own work, you can't rely on someone else, even if that's the whole point of their business. People screw up things all the time, and even if you can sue them, you're still screwed out of your work.

I wonder how much was really lost. Surely they don't just make the video, upload it, and then delete all the stuff they used produce it?

Wait a minute .... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686120)

DEL doesn't stand for "Deliver"????

Where's the April Fool's post? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686140)

I would have loved to see "Canonical bought by Apple Inc." or "Linus Torvalds dies in skydiving incident".

I heard Nokia is switching to Windows Phone 7! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686278)

April fool!!!! Bwa, ha, ha, sucker, ha, hee, ho, ho, ho...

Haven't you the master copy or just any copy? (2)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | about 3 years ago | (#35686142)

Backup is a very big word, guys.
I mean, haven't you any other copy?
Who designed your production processes, Pinocchio?
Information technology is not just a bulb light that just works by plugging it in. It's (just a little bit) more complicated and yet (much) more powerful.
Shame on you, then!

Welcome to /. hell day!!!! (3, Insightful)

Dutchmaan (442553) | about 3 years ago | (#35686146)

Story post time is officially Apr. 1.... it's /. hell day...

Re:Welcome to /. hell day!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686314)

http://wcca.wicourts.gov/simpleCaseSearch.xsl

And nothing of value was lost. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686158)

At least not if this is this is a clip of the show:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJfpH7K1_Qc

If the data is that critical... (1)

Platinum Dragon (34829) | about 3 years ago | (#35686178)

... don't leave it in a place where a random disaster (or random disgruntled third-party employee) can wipe it from the face of the Earth. Terabyte-size drives are cheap nowadays. Buy them. Buy many of them. Back up elements to them on a regular basis. Don't destroy raw material until the editing is done and the master has been copied at least twice purely for long-term storage, never mind how many copies need to be made available for distribution. Don't even rely on just hard disks - dump masters to tape if you can afford it. HDCAM's not completely overpriced; hell, even standard-definition Digital Betacam is better than, quite literally, nothing.

If they're lucky, the animated contributions and sound elements may be retrievable should the individuals responsible for those be more scrupulous about their material retention than the studio (the story didn't quite make clear what, if anything, they've been able to recover), but any location shooting lost is going to be a pain to redo.

This should be a very expensive lesson for their technically-inclined production crew and, if they have any, actual IT staff.

Welcome to the future of cloud computing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686188)

Can not wait to see the kind of complaints that arise after some twat somewhere wipes your entire life in the clouds.

No offline copy? (1)

webdog314 (960286) | about 3 years ago | (#35686194)

Sure, 300GB is a lot of data, but it's not *that* much data. We're talking about TWO FREAKING YEARS worth of work from multiple companies and NOBODY had enough sense to back the whole thing up offline?? $50 at Fry's would easily buy you a terabyte drive. Forget the ISP, it's a total FAIL on the part of all involved I'd say.

Re:No offline copy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686238)

Again this comes down to, "if you're paying for a service (the ISP was supposed to provide backup to the digital dropbox they were using), you should reasonably feel that you're getting what you paid for."

Re:No offline copy? (1)

Barryke (772876) | about 3 years ago | (#35686270)

To be fair, it was used as a dropbox to collaborate on new material.

I expect that material changes every day, so doing this in situ seems like a wise thing to do. They paid that company to take care of that.
This is a fair deal.

Now for recoverability; i expect each of those collaborators didn't lose their most recent product, and as such that the entire contents is not lost. Perhaps some temporary files/videoedits that nobody really needs anymore.

And seriously, since when is 300GB enough to do video collaboration? Do they edit/distribute compressed SD quality video or something?

Re:No offline copy? (1)

mad_minstrel (943049) | about 3 years ago | (#35686558)

I can't imagine how they managed to squeeze (and lose) a season's worth of data into 300GB. Sintel, which is just 15 minutes long, has 650GB of raw frames, excluding any work files.

Backup and Not Restore... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686218)

You notice they always call it backup software, not restore software.

Yeesh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686234)

I totally feel for the production company, but I have to make one point...

Why wasn't any of this stuff being copied locally? You can buy a 2TB drive for 160$. Yes it may take a goddamn month to download all of it with todays shitty american and canadian ISP's throttling, but you wouldn't lose years of work. Better yet, have someone physically go down to the ISP with a portable drive and have them copy it for you, so the most you may ever lose is whatever your time is worth.

If backup was in the contract, why wasn't the backups being tested. I know between two machines I have at one colo, it takes about 21 hours to backup 500GB of data over the GigE interface when the machine is in full use.

RTFA and it does not make much sense (3, Insightful)

Ecuador (740021) | about 3 years ago | (#35686260)

It was an off-site FTP server for collaboration, are they telling us none of the collaborators had the full set of data? It was "just" 300GB, meaning it could fit easily on an average hard drive.
Furthermore, they say they require all the data to reconstitute the episodes, so every time they needed the episodes, they would download all those 300GB of 6000+ files from FTP and rebuild their episodes? What kind of idiocy is this.
And lastly, did that employee secure erase everything? It was more than a simple rm -rf ?

The only people I feel pity for is the ISP (1)

bedouin (248624) | about 3 years ago | (#35686290)

I have been in a situation like this, though definitely not of the same magnitude. I lost an entire year's worth of work on a non-profit site I was working on. I was under the impression that backups were being made.

I had written a simple shell script to connect to the server and backup my SQL data and other files. The problem was I hadn't run it since I started the site. Who do I blame? Me.

The funny thing is that I tend to backup religiously, but for some reason didn't backup the site's database. You can have 20 year old backups survive, even if on shoddy media, but the one time you decide not backup you're screwed.

More pertinent to the story -- I shot and edited a documentary with hours worth of footage. After every interview I would go home, plug in my DV cam, and import the video to Final Cut Express. The tape was then put away for safe keeping. Next I would backup all the capture and project files to an external hard drive. So, if I have a HD crash then the backup exists. If both hard drives die I have the original tapes. My only flaw would be keeping them all in the same building.

When the entire project was finished I backed it up in its entirety again. I can still go back to that project if I'd like. I also burnt it to a DVD, exported it back to my DV cam, and even made a Digital 8 copy. Still not satisfied I made a VHS copy, and two more 'master' copies of the DVD.

That was nearly 2 years of work, and there was no way in hell I was going to lose it. I made no money for this and had nothing material at stake. The Zodiac Island people have big money and a reputation at stake, but were not professional enough to backup? I just don't feel much pity for them; if they want to sue someone, sue the disgruntled former employee -- not the ISP.

Anyone actually looked up this show? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 years ago | (#35686324)

From the show website: "The stories of the twelve Kids of Zodiac Island share family values of loving, respect, and ethical behavior while learning to enjoy Nature. The loving, joyful Zodiac Kids are role models for children across the globe, and help everyone realize we are all peaceful, loving, happy beings."

So... nothing of value was lost? Sounds anvilicious to me.

http://www.zodiacisland.com/characters/index.html [zodiacisland.com] -- IT BURNSES ME! Really, children deserve better than that.

Re:Anyone actually looked up this show? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686482)

To be fair though, it looks better (and saner) than Teletubbies. Still makes me want to punch the wall but not quite as hard.

Plus, it's not those stupid My Little Ponies. You've got to give them that. No matter how bad something is, at least if it's not about those wretched Ponies, it has its redeemable qualities.

I think they all should be out of a job. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686328)

Definitely smells like incompetence on everyone's part, especially Cyberlinks. But to not keep a copy of your own data, but trust it entirely to a cheapo ftp site? Whoever made that decision also deserves the boot.

They probably fired him for bitching about backups (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 3 years ago | (#35686354)

.. that weren't being done ; a lot of management just don't want to hear that they have to actually spend money on hardware and staff to run it. Instead, squash the problem by removing that squeaky cog.

And then he made his point rather more obvious.

Just speculatin'

missing monkey hymen validates fake math/history (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686376)

it's in the book of the chosen (to survive us?).

get ready to die for god/his country. it's in the last chapter to the superficial sacrificed paygonites.

gossamer wings or under chariots of fire, choice? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686408)

reads better then that right to remain silent over&over forever? the fantastical vs. the fatal finale? now the babys are yet unable to fly, however, do appear to have a more realistic concept of 'gravity' than many of us. fractal reasoning? intentional healing? yet still infants? may as well explode them?

The rules (4, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about 3 years ago | (#35686410)

Rule 1, if you upload it to your ISP, keep a backup.

Rule 2, if they say they keep backups, keep a backup, theirs may not be very good.

Rule number 3, if they agree contracturally to make full backups, keep one of your own. They don't care as much about your stuff as you do and they probably have a get out of jail free clause buried somewhere in the fine print.

duh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35686412)

If you care about any of your data, you always have a backup offline in your own physical possession. You definitely can't trust service providers who claim they backup, often those backups are never tested and they do not function. Even if they do, what if their facility is hit by a natural disaster? Most aren't going to have an off-site backup. Moral of the story is you cannot trust anyone else to keep your data safe.

300 GB is not a lot of data (1)

wesw02 (846056) | about 3 years ago | (#35686492)

The makers of this show should have done their own backups. You can buy a 2TB drive for ~$100, fill it up and put it away for safe keep. Simple as that.

Nice setup (1)

medoc (90780) | about 3 years ago | (#35686580)

Precious archival data stored in a single location on a machine that they don't control. It's not the ISP employee who should be fired...

Good luck seeking your claim. (1)

SpzToid (869795) | about 3 years ago | (#35686588)

The company is "seeking restoration and restitution for all damages and destruction of our proprietary materials," WeR1 CEO Ingrid Wang said Thursday in an e-mail message.

Good luck with that. Backups are sort of like buying fire insurance aren't they? They seem like a separate service to purchase, aside from ftp hosting. Like in case something inane occurs, like for when the ftp-hosting ISP's cheap labor (allegedly) effects disks with circumstances of disgruntlement.

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