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China Detects 10 Cases of Radiation Contamination, 2 In Hospital

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the clickaclicka-click-click dept.

Japan 150

According to an article at The Sydney Morning Herald, "China has detected 10 cases of radioactive contamination among passengers, aircraft, ships and containers arriving from Japan since March 16, quarantine authorities said on Saturday. On Wednesday, radiation exceeding permitted levels was detected on two ships from the Japanese port of Chiba, near Tokyo, in the ports of Nantong and Zhangjiagang, Li Yuanping, spokesman of the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, said on its website." Meanwhile, airborne radiation from Japan is detectable in China, but thus far not considered a danger.

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The next trend in air travel? (4, Funny)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703538)

Abnormally high radioactivity was first detected on a ship that arrived from Japan at the southeast port of Xiamen on March 22.

Two Japanese travellers were briefly hospitalised the next day with elevated radiation levels after arriving in eastern China on a commercial airliner from Tokyo. Their clothing and luggage was destroyed.

Not destroying your luggage: 60 dollars ($50 if paid at least 24 hours before check-in).

Re:The next trend in air travel? (4, Interesting)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703562)

Abnormally high radioactivity was first detected on a ship that arrived from Japan at the southeast port of Xiamen on March 22.

Two Japanese travellers were briefly hospitalised the next day with elevated radiation levels after arriving in eastern China on a commercial airliner from Tokyo. Their clothing and luggage was destroyed.

How do you destroy radiation?

Re:The next trend in air travel? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703694)

You do it like with radiation (uranium, thorium, etc.) in coal - you burn the stuff where radiation is and then you say you don't have radiation anymore since it went "up the chimney"! Problem solved!!

Maybe the nuclear industry could take a hint from coal - just burn the radioactive waste on big pile! Problem solved! DUH!!

Re:The next trend in air travel? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703786)

They had a big BBQ in chernobyl some time ago but the assholes who lived next door complained and called the fire department.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

lennier (44736) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703810)

just burn the radioactive waste on big pile! Problem solved! DUH!!

TEPCO is way ahead of you. They've been applying that remediation strategy at Fukushima since right after the tsunami. They're called "spent fuel pools".

Re:The next trend in air travel? (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703802)

In China what you do is mix it into the baby formula and pet food, along with anything else toxic you happen to have lying around.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (3, Insightful)

Hittman (81760) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703872)

And then you ship it to the US.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (5, Funny)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704084)

Man, you punched that joke right in the face.

AND THEN AMERICANSKIS BUY IT CUZ 10% CHEAPER !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704216)

Serves them right, being baby killers donchano !!

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704438)

And the joke had to put a band-aid on to try to cover the wound. Too bad even band-aids are made in China...

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705184)

Who is he, Chuck Norris?!?

Re:The next trend in air travel? (1)

kinabrew (1053930) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703892)

The same way you destroy lead and other heavy metals.

Wrap it up. Call it new. Sell it to unsuspecting Americans.

Problem solved.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

alostpacket (1972110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704018)

Nuke it from orbit, it's the only way to be sure.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704142)

How do you destroy radiation?

Mix it with red dye, paint some plastic toys with it and ship them to America...?

How do you destroy radiation? (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704260)

Set phasers on 'destroy'

Re:The next trend in air travel? (4, Funny)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704390)

How do you destroy radiation?

Detention then disappearance?

China already has processes to stop undesirable elements.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704494)

One of the best comments I have read all week. +1 Internets to you sir.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704574)

Baaa-dum psssh!

Re:The next trend in air travel? (2)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705080)

ROFL

Sadly, they are not the only ones with such an advanced process. The USA has a research facility placed in Cuba, so in case things go wrong only muslims and communists will face the consequences.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (5, Informative)

cyfer2000 (548592) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704550)

I think it is lost in translation or that Aussie news website is spreading FUD. The Chinese news [tutechanw.com.cn] I read has information like this

  1. 1, Two tourists, one 70 years old the other one is 77 years old, were found radioactive March 23. Both were from places far away from Fukushima Daiichi site.
  2. 2, The 77 years old showed strong but harmless radioactivity. The other one had less radioactivity.
  3. 3, Both were sent to hospital at March 23:15.
  4. 4, The 77 years old took a hot water shower in hospital.
  5. 5, The 70 years old did nothing but sleep.
  6. 6, Both left hospital at March 24 00:20am with their own clothes.
  7. 7, No mention about luggage.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705178)

Very odd since the highest level of radiation spreading far away from the exclusion zone outside Fukushima or Miyagi was detected in Ibaraki 15/march/2011, around 7 am at 1.5 uS/h, when fire destroyed the outer shell of unit 4. Even the radioactivity in the ships is very doubtful since the sea currents go south-north in Fukushima's coast and the ports mentioned in the article are in the Yangtze delta. Maybe the chinese should look upstream the Yangtze river from more radiation.

Re:The next trend in air travel? (1)

DFurno2003 (739807) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704378)

They must have gone nuts when their cameras were destroyed

Glowing Green (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703546)

I for one welcome our new radioactive overlords.

from china ... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703550)

this being from China, we must assume this is a political maneuver, and that any truth behind it is incidental.

Re:from china ... (1)

uninformedLuddite (1334899) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705458)

this being from China, we must assume this is a political maneuver, and that any truth behind it is occidental.

Fixed that for you

PR perhaps? (3, Insightful)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703558)

Given the long standing animosity between the Japanese and the Chinese, and the Chinese Gov't's total control of information, now much of this is true and how much is PR to smear Japan?

My personal guess is that it has just enough truth in it to be irrefutable but little basis in actual fact. The chinese immigration goons could just have been told to grab 2 passengers at random and tell them they're contaminated and haul them off to the gulag^W hospital.

Re:PR perhaps? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703670)

There a wide margin between analysis and throwing shit at the wall to see what will stick...

Guess on which side you are...

How aboot 'unrelated considerations'. Yes Japan and China are not always in good terms. But China immediately send support and search teams after the quake/tsunami/nukesplosion.

They are close to Japan. The plant is throwing up 24/7 for the last month or so.

And when a neighbouring country detect radiation from ships or people coming from japan you decide it's a political move ? /yeah sure...

Re:PR perhaps? (3, Interesting)

DMiax (915735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703856)

If radioactive contaminant can get on a ship to China (btw the plant and the port are on the other side of Japan wrt china) no place in Japan is safe from it which probably means the end of the country altogether. Japanese and foreign authorities agree that radiation did not reach other cities in Japan. It may be false, of course, but it looks probable.

And if you think that helping with the tsunami means they will not do something relatively innocuous like creating a PR stunt to smear Japan (remember: no lives are put in danger with this news) your understanding of international politics is poor at best.

Re:PR perhaps? (4, Interesting)

Renraku (518261) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704198)

You have to understand the scope of the situation. Most likely they had radiation detectors set to the most sensitive level. As in, they'll detect you if you ate a banana three days ago because of the isotopes present in the banana.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705276)

Detectors in Hiroshima are picking up no radiation whatsoever [windows.net] .

Good to know that China has better detectors tho.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

xnpu (963139) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705398)

You don't think that's weird when even measurements in Europe and US show heightened radiation likely to be from Japan? In this particular case I'm going with the Chinese measurements rather than the Japanese ones.

Regarding the Chinese having better detectors, that's unlikely but certainly possible. Don't forget China is building fairly modern nuclear plants like they are McDonalds franchises.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

Odinlake (1057938) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704228)

Mod parent up please. While I wouldn't go so far as to say that there's a nefarious plot from the Chinese government, cptdondo and DMiax make good points.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704338)

Absolutely. And while I don't personally claim to know whether President Obama was born in the U.S., I think the birthers make good points.

And while I'm not sure whether life on Earth evolved to its current state, or if our heavenly father put it all here, I think the creation scientists make good points.

Hey Odinlake, go see if there are any spots open at Fox "News". You're a natural.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

cptdondo (59460) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704666)

Absolutely. And while I don't personally claim to know whether President Obama was born in the U.S., I think the birthers make good points.
 

Hehe. I grew up under Communism. And I lived in Japan. And I did business with the Koreans and the Chinese. So my opinion is not based on a brain fart but on a fairly decent amount of knowledge of the culture and the politics.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

Aeternitas827 (1256210) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705166)

Absolutely. And while I don't personally claim to know whether President Obama was born in the U.S., I think the birthers make good points.

Sounds like you're the natural there, pal.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704124)

Japanese people travel to many countries in the world. Funny that only China discovered radioactive travelers. Let me know if/when Canada detects radioactive travelers.

Small but measurable contamination is believable, especially that close to the source, but amounts that make a trip to the hospital and disposal of clothing necessary is a bit suspect.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

swalve (1980968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704392)

Radioactive travelers were discovered at O'Hare airport that same week.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

jordanjay29 (1298951) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704524)

Radioactive travelers were discovered at O'Hare airport that same week.

[Citation Needed]

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704654)

You can find plenty of citations with a simple google search [google.com] .

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704832)

The O'Hare report is much more believable. Detectable traces are not surprising as I said.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704802)

You don't need to import radioactive travelers in the US, the TSA will irradiate them for you.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705188)

How about in Chicago in the US?

http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/ktla-flight-japan-radiation,0,1995241.story

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705370)

That was a detectable trace, not anything like enough to need decontamination or a trip to the hospital. I find that much more believable and consistent with what we know about the leaked radiation from the plant.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

xnpu (963139) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705404)

No clothing was disposed. Please read the original Chinese article, not the Aussie anti-nuclear propaganda.

Re:PR perhaps? (4, Insightful)

MidnightBrewer (97195) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704262)

I live in Japan and I can tell you that China did not immediately send support; they sent a handful of people after several days, and finally ramped things up when it became the media circus it is now and people started commenting that China wasn't really participating much.

The Chinese government's radiation scare is just that; with the exception of Japanese TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company) workers, nobody's been allowed close enough to suffer any significant exposure. If they were exposed, then they voluntarily traveled inside the 20-km evacuation radius and it's their own damn fault. The cases of contamination were mostly due to radiation detected on ships, which was most likely on the ships' hulls themselves, picked up from trace amounts in the ocean.

The Chinese themselves say it's trace amounts. However, they also don't usually use radiation detectors at the airport, either, and they don't disclose their definition of abnormally high levels.

This is business as usual for relations between Japan and China. Google last year's scuffle when a Chinese trawler rammed a Japanese coast guard ship and see what you get.

Re:PR perhaps? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705010)

What a troll. A quick search of Google shows China sent a search and rescue team not 2 days after the quake, and has been continuously sending aid since then.

But when I see the words "wasn't really participating much" it only sounds to me like somebody just wants more.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705272)

They are close to Japan. The plant is throwing up 24/7 for the last month or so.

Lets take an actual look at the data around Japan and see whether it matches up.

In particular, lets look at data from (courtesy of [mext.go.jp] ) Hiroshima [windows.net] (inland, southwest), Tokyo [windows.net] (east coast), Fukuoka [windows.net] (coastal, southwest), and Osaka [windows.net] (south).

All of those show near zeros across the board for environmental radioactivity-- with the highest reading @ Tokyo a mere 2% of the "notify your local official" level. Of them, only tokyo has detectable radiation in its water.

Im not nuclear scientist, but I think its fair game to call shenanigans when folks a thousand miles away start claiming that the radioactivity skipped over Hiroshima and landed in China.

Re:PR perhaps? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703688)

Add to this that it was first reported more than a week ago (25th March) and nothing more has been mentioned.

Once again the media trawling for best scare stories for their readers.

I stopped reading mainstream tabloid stories and instead tend to visit, World Nuclear News [world-nuclear-news.org] that seem to filter out the hysteria and present the known facts, including actual reading instead of meaningless 'x' times.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704028)

Are you seriously saying that you turn to the nuclear industry mouthpiece for all your unbiased news? Just have a look at the membership list of the World Nuclear Association [world-nuclear.org] . This is an association made up of companies who profit from the from the continued use of nuclear energy.

Who could really believe that any genuine problems with nuclear power will be accurately reported by a body set up to defend the industry? Why is it that absolutely EVERY story in the media about this incident has been labelled as histrionic scare stories? Sure, the media might collectively receive millions of dollars in advertising revenue for the news reports on this topic, but the nuclear industry stands to earn billions from new power plants, continued uranium mining etc.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

tsotha (720379) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704480)

Are you seriously saying that you turn to the nuclear industry mouthpiece for all your unbiased news? Just have a look at the membership list of the World Nuclear Association. This is an association made up of companies who profit from the from the continued use of nuclear energy.

And yet they've had better reporting than any major US news outlet.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704694)

And yet they've had better reporting than any major US news outlet.

Is that based on the criteria of reports that match your existing beliefs? How do you know that what the PR site says is more accurate than any other reporting? I suppose that it is possible that you might actually be onsite at the nuclear facility and would therefore know the real truth, but I suspect that you would not be wasting your time posting if that were so.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705058)

Are you seriously saying that you turn to the nuclear industry mouthpiece for all your unbiased news? Just have a look at the membership list of the World Nuclear Association. This is an association made up of companies who profit from the from the continued use of nuclear energy.

And yet they've had better reporting than any major US news outlet.

I will add that better than any news outlet with the sole exceptions of Al-Jazeraa and NHK. The mayor TV networks from Mexico were particularly bad, mistranslating everything and misquoting stuff left and right safe in the knowledge that people that knows japanese will not be looking their POS transmissions; but talking about how Tokyo was a phantom town using as a backdrop an anonymous street far away from Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, Sibuya or Akihabara at 6 am but calling it "one of Tokyo's main streets". Of course that the street would be and look empty. Damn SOBs.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704592)

Because industry rags don't snow the industry insiders. It just doesn't work. If you want to learn about an industry, read the industry rag; it's a fundamental that doesn't correlate with your irrational worldview.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705208)

But that is not an industry rag. It is a PR website.

According to their About WNN page, they state: "The goal of WNN is use plain English to place comprehensive coverage of nuclear power in context using background information, expert commentary and links to relevant authoritative sources."

That does not sound like they are writing for industry as an audience, but the general public. Also, they state: "The WNN service is supported administratively and with technical advice by the World Nuclear Association and is based within its London Secretariat."

So it is run from within the association that represents the companies in the industry. By all means read the site, but don't kid yourself that you are reading an unbiased source that all the industry insiders read.

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

tsm_sf (545316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704062)

That site is run by a trade association. I'd be curious to hear more about its editorial policies.

Re:PR perhaps? (3, Insightful)

DMiax (915735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703706)

Given the long standing animosity between the Japanese and the Chinese, and the Chinese Gov't's total control of information, now much of this is true and how much is PR to smear Japan?

It does not look even remotely true. The ship where they found "radiation" arrived in china on 22nd of March, which does not look enough for the contaminants to reach the ship. Moreover the stopped passengers are Japanese, and China has already an experience of stopping Japanese men for bogus reasons (some of them were taken as "spies" for retaliation in the Fisherman incident a few months ago).

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704586)

It's not just past animosity, China has a HUGE economic interest in trying to smear Japan. A lot of Japanese factories have been knocked offline(a lot of Japanese factories with key technologies to boot), and you can bet your bottom yuan that China is licking it's lips trying to get as much of that capacity(and technology) moved over to China as they can. By making people think the case is much worse than it is, you will make investors get nervous and be much more willing to agree to the PRCs terms for doing business in China(the transfer of all that technology to the PRC government) so they can get their factories online somewhere "safe".

Re:PR perhaps? (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705024)

It's not just past animosity, China has a HUGE economic interest in trying to smear Japan. A lot of Japanese factories have been knocked offline(a lot of Japanese factories with key technologies to boot), and you can bet your bottom yuan that China is licking it's lips trying to get as much of that capacity(and technology) moved over to China as they can. By making people think the case is much worse than it is, you will make investors get nervous and be much more willing to agree to the PRCs terms for doing business in China(the transfer of all that technology to the PRC government) so they can get their factories online somewhere "safe".

Yup, to factories built with bricks done by child slave labor, for example. The top brass of PRC government has done many things right, but making China a worker's paradise and building a welfare state sadly are not among them.

Re:PR perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705588)

I'm not exactly a fan of China's policies, but they are much better than in other comparable nations. See the shitstorm of no-government and population explosions in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, etc. etc. I think Chinese did make mistakes, but in hindsight, they are doing OK considering there is 1,400,000,000 people there and growing. If you want to criticize nations over bad bad work conditions and no safety standards, see India, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Pakistan, etc. etc. etc. China is not perfect, but they are improving their conditions very quickly...

But otherwise, Chinese patriotism is only second to Japanese, so they have their spats over the ages. :P

They really don't like Japan huh? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703606)

With the radiation level dropping lower and lower to 0.1-2 uSv/h, way below what you'd get from a single flight (40 uSv), this is just another case of the Chinese hating the Japanese. Maybe I'm not so used to the way "mainlanders" think anymore, having move from liberal Hong Kong to Europe years ago, but IMO it really is time to leave the past behind. Sadly, judging from the timing of broadcasting nationalistic WW2 documentary directly after the quake and now this, I guess it will take another generation at least.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

DMiax (915735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703758)

One generation and one big political change. Nationalistic pride and/or xenophoby only needs a little effort to keep alive. If there are political reasons to keep hating Japan, then hate will continue as long as it will be useful. Happened and happens everywhere. In Italy it is the Muslim and Roms for example.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (5, Insightful)

lennier (44736) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703860)

With the radiation level dropping lower and lower to 0.1-2 uSv/h

I'm sorry, but - what?

Which "radiation level" are you referring to? There's not one "the". There's the trace emissions in the jetstream worldwide, there's the iodine and cesium contamination locally within the evacuation zone (in one hotspot measuring higher than in the Chernobyl exclusion zone), there's the over 1Sv/hr extremely hot water (like, stand next to it for an hour and you get radiation sickness) in the drainage pit under the plant, there's the thousands times normal iodine contamination leaking into the seawater, with the potential to either make a lot of fish very sick or worse, bioaccumulate in fish tissue for decades to come. There's the "jumpers" being recruited to work onsite in multi-Sievert conditions where you get your lifetime's exposure in 15 mins...

Somewhere in the world, yes, there is "a" radiation level associated with this Situation Normal All Fukushima'd which is still in the microSievert range. That does not mean everything everywhere associated with it is peachy keen and shiny.

It's entirely possible, for instance, that the 20km zone might not be usable for farming for the next 300 years.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (3, Insightful)

compro01 (777531) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703938)

there's the thousands times normal iodine contamination leaking into the seawater, with the potential to either make a lot of fish very sick or worse, bioaccumulate in fish tissue for decades to come.

What exactly is going to bioaccumlate for decades? Iodine-131 has a half life of 8 days and decays into stable Xenon-131.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704152)

The question is whether or not they are detecting Iodine-129, which decays into Xenon-129, but has a half-life of 15.7 million years. I know nuke bombs and fission reactors create it, but haven't heard how much of this isotope has been found.

Unlike I-131, I-129 IS a problem in the environment over the long term.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (3, Insightful)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704286)

What exactly is going to bioaccumlate for decades? Iodine-131 has a half life of 8 days and decays into stable Xenon-131.

The question is whether or not they are detecting Iodine-129, which decays into Xenon-129, but has a half-life of 15.7 million years. I know nuke bombs and fission reactors create it, but haven't heard how much of this isotope has been found.

Unlike I-131, I-129 IS a problem in the environment over the long term.

On the other hand, to detect comparable rates of beta emission, you'd need about 700million times as much I-129 as I-131. The half-life determines not just the time scale of the emission process, but also its intensity per gram of material.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704164)

Damn those Pesky Facts!

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

klingens (147173) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704558)

Cesium-137 is. In Bavaria, quite a long way from Chernobyl, all wild sows are radiation tested after been shot, and most of them treated as nuclear waste since the radiation they get from eating fungi is too high for consumption. This is 25 years after.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704828)

In soviet russia, pigs cook you

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704928)

Wow FUD much? about 2% of all boars shot have radiation levels too high to eat, and the level of radiation found is no where near the level linked to cancer.
http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/312515/germanys-radioactive-boars-a-legacy-chernobyl

You would have to eat 3 lbs of boar meat that is 10x the legal limit to get the same dose as just living one year longer.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705214)

There are still wild boar in Germany??? On less panicky note:

About 2 percent of the 50,000 boars hunted are above the legal radioactivity limit, Reddemann said. And the government's radiation protection office says some mushrooms have registered up to 20 times the legal cesium limit. .......
European officials insist that occasionally eating contaminated boar meat or mushrooms does not pose an immediate health risk. Public health agencies are typically conservative in setting limits for radioactivity in food.

Eating 200 grams of mushrooms tested seven times above the legal cesium limit, for example, would amount to the same exposure as the altitude radiation taken in during a 2,000-mile flight, according to Germany's Office for Radiation Protection.

In Austria, authorities say that eating the unlikely amount of 2 pounds of contaminated boar meat that is 10 times above the legal cesium limit would amount to two-thirds of an adult's normal annual radiation intake by food.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2014654517_apeugermanyradioactiveboars.html

So, in reality, in Bavaria people panic lots it seems. You would have to eat boar meat every day for months and months to be affected by this. There ain't that many animals left in ALL of Germany! There is only a problem if you plan on actually farming certain crops in soils that received lots of cesium fallout.

Anyway, here are some facts,
http://www.epa.gov/radiation/radionuclides/cesium.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium#Health_and_safety_hazards

Radiocaesium does not accumulate in the body as effectively as many other fission products (such as radioiodine and radiostrontium). As with other alkali metals, radiocaesium washes out of the body relatively quickly in sweat and urine.

So while Cesium is a problem and somewhat persistent, it is not as dangerous as Strontium-90. It acts kinda similar to Potassium in our bodies. And here's how Cesium decays,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cs-137-decay.svg

vs. Potassium-40 we have in our bodies (and no, not from bombs)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Potassium-40-decay-scheme.svg

So what does this mean???

It means that Cesium is no more dangerous than Potassium-40 for most of us.

Potassium-40 is the largest source of natural radioactivity in animals and people. An adult human body contains about 160 grams of potassium, of which a small fraction is potassium-40. From the isotope abundance and half-life it can be calculated that this produces about 300,000 disintegrations per minute continuously throughout the life of the body.

Therefore we need to achieve 5,000 Bq dose of Cesium-137 in our bodies to get the same level of exposure to similar level radiation as from Potassium-40. So what is the limit in Germany? 600 Bq/kg for meat while 0.5Bq/kg is background. So, how much of the meat would you have to continuously eat per day to maintain at least 5000Bq in your body?? Not sure, but certainly more than recommended amount of meat in a healthy diet!! (maybe Bavarian "healthy diet" is all meat though)

PS. Potassium-40 accounts for most of our radiation dosage. But that is only about 390uSv/year! Safe levels are 10mSv, meaning that safe levels of Cs-137 in your body seems to be closer to 125,000 Bq. Cancer limit is about 100mSv/yr, meaning 1,250,000 Bq Cs-137. So, 600 or 2000Bq/kg, I would certainly destroy that, but eat it. But then I don't eat that much meat to get me even within 1mSv, never mind 100.

Anyway, this is just to put something in perspective. Cs-137 is not that great to have, but I would trade that for smog or coal any day. At least one can monitor how much Cs-137 is in your body - I can't monitor how much soot and microparticles of carcinogens I ingest/inhale/absorb thanks to fossil fuels.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

EvilAlphonso (809413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705202)

It's entirely possible, for instance, that the 20km zone might not be usable for farming for the next 300 years.

Unlike the fields that are now perma-flooded by a mix of sea water and oil, or the ones were the topsoil got washed away and simply soaked in the same mix of sea water and oil? For what it is worth, a sizable portions of the fields in that region are going to be unusable for farming for some time. There are talks of moving a larger portion of the food production to Hokkaido as it was untouched and still has loads of unused space.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705316)

Which "radiation level" are you referring to?

All of them. take your pick [mext.go.jp] ; of all the prefectures listed, the only one with remotely "interesting" levels is Fukushima, and its levels are getting rather low as well-- until you get about 30km away, there isnt much in the way of radioactivity there either.

Its not peachy keen; the tsunami wrecked whole villages and people wont be living there again for some time. The radiation issue will be over long before the rest of the problems are dealt with. The tragedy in all of this is that when the japanese finally sort these reactors out once and for all, the world wont be letting out a collective sigh, or cheer, or congratulations; it will be far too busy bickering about whether this was another Chernobyl or not.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

Malc (1751) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705340)

Does the leaking water only carry iodine out of the plant? If so, why isn't it carrying anything else, like caesium?

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705606)

bioaccumulate in fish tissue for decades to come.

Iodine, the stuff that has half-life of about 8 days?

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703876)

...IMO it really is time to leave the past behind

It's amazing that no one ever says that to the Jews.....

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

jordanjay29 (1298951) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704552)

It's amazing that no one ever says that to the Jews.....

What is that, like Inverse Godwin's Law?

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704096)

Sadly, judging from the timing of broadcasting nationalistic WW2 documentary directly after the quake and now this, I guess it will take another generation at least.

Well, I didn't know that. But at least there is hope in China-Japanese relationship. Now see Israel-Palestinian shitstorm.

PS. China still wants Japanese to apologize over the arrest of that Chinese fishing boat in the disputed waters between southern Japan and China. As for destroying cloths that were contaminated, that's retarded. They could have just washed them, but I guess that doesn't make the headlines.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705088)

As expected from someone from Hong Kong. I wouldn't consider the place culturally liberal, but rather culturally lost. But that's what you get when your own culture is seen as weak and your education actively seeks to stamp what little of it remains out.

Hong Kong's problems notwithstanding, Chinese people are suspicious of Japan for a variety of reasons, likely the same reasons the Japanese are suspicious of China. Though given the interesting fact that Unit 3 runs on MOX [wikipedia.org] (funny nobody mentions that), I think China has a better case. After all, it's hard not to be suspicious of someone storing nuclear weapons-grade material for someone else in your backyard. I believe it's called Terrorism or accessory to Terrorism these days, but oh wait, when governments do it, it's not actually terrifying anymore.

That having been said, it's probably wise to not be mired in the many issues of the past, but it's also equally wise to remember it. After all, those who forget the errors of the past are bound to repeat them. And it isn't as if the Japanese have a squeak clean record on keeping their nationalistic pride in check either, but I don't see much complaining about their indiscretions.

But it's ok. I hear it's very Chinese to criticize oneself before others (or so someone from Hong Kong told me very recently). At the very least, you haven't lost all of your cultural values.

Re:They really don't like Japan huh? (1)

data2 (1382587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705490)

Sorry, I don't know what it is on here all the time, comparing dosage with an hourly dose. While real levels in the vicinity, OUTSIDE the evacuation zone, were measured more like 10-100uSv/h (still not that much), going with the low level of just 2 uSv/h you get a higher radiation dosage than your example flight every day. And since this has been going on for quite some time, people have gotten quite a few additional flights. Why don't we just start giving the dose per minute. It will sound even less... This is just another way of making dosages sound even smaller than they are, so you can compare them with different things like x-rays, CTs, or flights.

YEH It's finally happening... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703662)

The end of the world is near!!

Boycott Chinese stuff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703762)

You thought lead is bad, not you have radio-active lead in the stuff.

"Made in China" - it's even worse than you thought.

Everyone Hates Muslims (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35703796)

Destroy all Islam!
Nuke Mecca!
Nuke All Islam!

Slashdot should know better (5, Insightful)

RanBato (214181) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703848)

Than to allow these type of false alarm / fear mongering articles on their main page. No actual numebrs mentioned in article 1. Article 2 makes it pretty clear there is no danger. Nothing to see here, please move on.

Re:Slashdot should know better (1)

olsmeister (1488789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703884)

Amen.

Re:Slashdot should know better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704348)

You sound like all the Internet physicists that kept saying how it could never get as bad as it actually is now (containment breach, etc).

There has been a serious lack of real solid comprehensive information and every time we learn something it's much worse than what these "it's not that bad" morons are saying. Sure it doesn't look that bad if you take only the face value of the tiny crappy information we have but if you add up all the little details you can see a situation that's much, much worse.

Re:Slashdot should know better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705468)

Ah the "nothing happened, radiation is good for your health" shills are back today. I was wondering why you guys didn't work on the weekend.

I still want to go to Japan! (1)

WonderingAround (2007742) | more than 3 years ago | (#35703946)

I must hunt and kill my very own Totoro! This earthquake is ruining everything...

Long term health tracking (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704040)

There seems to be problems tracking long term health records in societies with lots of nukes.

  Recording health records of radiation related health problems of radiation from a long term leak like Daiichi seems to be non-existent. In fact, will be difficult to establish as it can only be bad news and there are interests that would not want to keep tracking this information. The interests that would want to track public health are general and dispersed, the interests that do not want to track this information are concentrated and rich.

I can make no sense of the just the radiation tracking, multiple groups and schemes seem to be doing a patchy job. Obvious conflicts of interest in the radiation tracking groups especially TEPCO seem to be weak. Can no one stick a sensor in those clouds of white and black smoke coming out of the plant? We are not electing a pope here. Do some science already.

People blame the media, but the transparency of the radiation tracking is obviously lacking.

Re:Long term health tracking (4, Informative)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704358)

France, UK, US and Canada have the right idea - just dont track it. Any issues are in the distant past and shrouded in national security, nation building, export deals, patriotism and commercial secrets.
If the press still keeps on digging, the patients privacy kicks in to stop any questions about epidemiology. Still having issues? Stop offering/teaching so much about epidemiology.
Back to simple industrial toxicology, long term old people get sick... any detectors that spike are faulty and get removed for servicing for a few weeks.
With no hard data its your expert vs nothing.
If your still interested read and watch http://www.zerohedge.com/article/tellurium-129-presence-proof-inadvertent-recriticality-fukushima [zerohedge.com]
"Newly released TEPCO data provides evidence of periodic chain reaction at Fukushima Unit 1"
http://vimeo.com/21881702 [vimeo.com]
The hard data is been released, the press is just not very good. http://cryptome.org/0003/fukushima-areva.zip [cryptome.org]
http://www.zerohedge.com/article/attempt-pour-concrete-fukushima-pit-crack-generating-1-sieverthour-fails-new-unmanned-drone- [zerohedge.com]

Does not compute (1)

John Saffran (1763678) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704300)

From what news sources in Korea (much closer to Japan than China) have been saying throughout, increased radiation is being detected but it's not to the level where you'd have health concerns or need to destroy anything. Similarly I don't recall reading of radiation levels in japan itself (eg. Tokyo) that might point to the need to destroy luggage or hospitalise people .. maybe the people from near the reactor might cause concern but I think their concern would be for their homes and family rather than with travelling to china.

I have to say that this sounds like propaganda from the CCP.

Re:Does not compute (1)

xnpu (963139) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705426)

How's voluntary check up on the hospital propaganda? Oh wait, you read the Aussie version, which claims destroying clothes and other things which didn't happen.

Why can't people see this for what it is? Australian anti-nuclear propaganda. Are the immune to criticisms because they're supposedly western?

The Scots hate Japs too (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704464)

Coz they also found elevated radiation from Japan in Glasgow (google it).

On a serious note, how can you tell the difference between a Jap and a Chink?
A: The Jap glows in the dark.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35704582)

...nazis will ride on dinosaurs if we decide to let in political refugees. You can imagine that in their editing room, nuclear power is not a clean source of energy but a flaming torch of danger and destruction with which to insite the masses.

Just so you can read with appropriate de-biasing.

Detectable means nothing! (4, Insightful)

kombipom (1274672) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704718)

You can detect (and identify) the radiation from the atmospheric bomb testing that took place decades ago! Radiation detection equipment is extremely sensitive. Without numbers (and units) "detected" means absolutely nothing. Please /. stop reporting this non-news, it's just infuriating to anyone with even a basic understanding of radiation safety/physics.

Re:Detectable means nothing! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705278)

Okay everyone! Put your fingers in your ears and hum really loud! Anyone notice that any stories of radiation are lies and stories of no major releases are the truth? So far the stories from the Japanese government have been understated and the stories from the power company have been found to be largely lies. I don't bloody care who is lying and who is telling the truth but we have to seriously pull some heads out of asses over the who nuclear power issue. This situation is fucked. The whole plan of pumping the leaking pipe full of polysorb to stop the leak isn't much better than pumping it full of runny oatmeal. The chances of that working are zero. Can we send in the experts and send the bloody Keystone Cops home? This situation went from bad to trainwreck from shear incompetence.

Bad title (1)

Matchstick (94940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704880)

The /. article title helps propagate the widespread popular confusion between radiation and radioactive materials. Radiation helps you detect contamination with radioactive materials, similar to how light helps you detect the sun. The editor should have stuck with either of the phrasings from the first link -- "10 cases of radiation" or "10 cases of radioactive contamination" -- rather than combine them.

the only thing worse (0, Troll)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#35704972)

than the fear and hysteria in the media, are comments like you see under slashdot articles about this nuclear tragedy claiming, basically "no big deal"

false alarmism: wrong

false complacency: equally wrong

do you know how much fucking radiation that plant is leaking into the environment? if an appreciation of how much nuclear radiation is going into the environment from fukushima does not sober you up, you are a grade aaa usless asshole

at least the hysterical can plead ignorance. what's your excuse asshole?

Re:the only thing worse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35705306)

Do you have any idea how fucking retarded you just sound? (just trying to use your language Bro!)

As for REAL numbers, how about a FUCKTON more than it can possibly leak?!?

Retards explodified nukes in the air in 1950-1960 releasing some radiation. Now most soils around the world have stuff like Plutonium! This extra fallout adds about 1% of background radiation sources, like you know the evil sun that wants to kill you and ground and the alien x-rays. Then we have Chernobyl, that released another 1% of that 1% - Chernobyl released radiation about about 10-20 nukes, US+Russia "tested" about 2000 nukes.

Now, Funuskima has so far released about 1% of Chernobyl. That means it released radiation from about 10% of one typical nuke, much less than what was dropped by US on Nagasaki or Hiroshima.

So what is my fucking excuse? My fucking excuse is called reason. If you want to panic over radiation, don't panic over 1/1,000,000 (or something quite larger if you live in Fukushima area). Panic over the THOUSANDS of nuclear weapons that are ready to release radiation amounting to 100s of Chernobyls at ANY SECOND. I'm not worried about Fukushima or Chernobyl in terms of radiation to me - I'm worried about US and Russia and their arsenals. I'm even more worried that some nuts in Iran or Israel will start to nuke each other. Or pick more nuts in Pakistan and India. What do you think will happen when Al Queda gets their hands on nukes in Pakistan??? They'll probably nuke India, but whatever happens, it will release hell of a lot more radiation than Fukushima can possibly ever do.

If you have any brain left for abstract thought, you could figure out that the world needs to get rid of things in following order,

    nuclear weapons -> chemical/biological weapons -> coal -> oil -> gas -> nuclear

So for power source, I want more nuclear over fossil fuel crap. Reason? Because nuclear waste only affects people, actually our psyche (see your comments for proof!!). We will try to do our best not to spread nuclear waste around ourselves, something we are doing with fossil fuels to our detriment and detriment of our children. I sincerely hope you can agree at least on these points.

I'd love to live in la-la land and have massive orbital energy collection arrays that beam down power to areas that need it, but alas, we live in the REAL WORLD, where such projects are Sci-Fi and will not become reality for at least another 50-100 years. I'd like to live in a world where only nuclear is fusion power, but alas, that ain't happening either. So I have to settle for fission over coal. Coal that is being dug up today 2x faster than only 25 years ago... so when they talk about limiting global warming to +2C increase? We will be lucky if it is less than +8-10C! Coal usage is expected to be 4x 1990 levels in 2050!

Typical Slashdot China-hating (2)

compucomp2 (1776668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705068)

Par for the course, the Slashdot crowd hates on China irrationally, and it gets moderated up due to the ridiculous groupthink. What, you need another Soviet Union to blame everything on and which you can reflexively call evil everything that comes out of there? Aren't you still busy hating on the Arabs?

Take some simple precautions against radiation (0, Troll)

Homeopathic (2033194) | more than 3 years ago | (#35705236)

Here is how Radiation effects the human body: http://www.standeyo.com/News_Files/NBC/radiation.human.body.html [standeyo.com] http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/radiation-dosage-chart/ [informatio...utiful.net] Radioactive water found leaking into sea from pat at Japan nuclear plant. This can be devastating to say the least to all humankind! The effects of radiation sickness and poisoning include cancer, genetic and reproductive damage, hormonal damage, and thyroid blockage (that's why they want you to take potassium iodine, another dangerous toxin) but I wouldn't. There are much safer substances like Zeolites [thehealingfrequency.com] . A couple good articles on radiation sickness protection that shows what you need do to test radiation levels, treat water, and what to take internally to not get sick: Water Purification Tablet [thehealingfrequency.com] Radiation Sickness [thehealingfrequency.com]
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