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Elderly Georgian Woman Cuts Armenian Internet

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the no-net-for-you dept.

The Internet 282

welcher writes "An elderly Georgian woman was scavenging for copper with a spade when she accidentally sliced through an underground cable and cut off internet services to nearly all of neighboring Armenia. The fibre-optic cable near Tiblisi, Georgia, supplies about 90% of Armenia's internet so the woman's unwitting sabotage had catastrophic consequences. Web users in the nation of 3.2 million people were left twiddling their thumbs for up to five hours. Large parts of Georgia and some areas of Azerbaijan were also affected. Dubbed 'the spade-hacker' by local media, the woman is being investigated on suspicion of damaging property. She faces up to three years in prison if charged and convicted."

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All I see is (4, Insightful)

ciderbrew (1860166) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742514)

Company laid vital fibre-optic cable 10cm from the surface. The company that put that fibre down should be investigate for endangering the public.

Re:All I see is (4, Informative)

xaxa (988988) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742572)

"The cable is owned by the Georgian railway network. It is heavily protected, but landslides or heavy rain may have exposed it to scavengers."

Re:All I see is (5, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742636)

Why do they call them "scavengers" instead of what they really are - thieves.

Re:All I see is (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742726)

You mean "prospectors".

Anyway, TFA states that this practice usually involves collecting unused copper wires. I don't really see how that's stealing. Is a bum that picks up used cans from the street also a thief in your book?

I'm not saying that it's an honest and good way to make a living, but sometimes there is no choice. We all need to live. Apparently this woman's need for money is greater than the proper owner's need to dig up the unused copper. No real harm done.

Re:All I see is (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742850)

From this point of view she should be happy: for 3 years she will have no problem to find food/bed/warm place in winter...

Re:All I see is (3, Insightful)

TehBlahhh (947819) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743006)

There's an assumption there that Georgian prisons have either of those things. I'm not holding my breath.

Re:All I see is (4, Informative)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742892)

Apparently you are unaware of the current trend of stealing live telephone wires from telephone poles. I assume that this "scavenger" was engaged in the same business, only with underground cables.

Re:All I see is (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742958)

TFA is wrong. "Unused copper wires" belong to people who laid them. Digging them out of the ground is theft.

Re:All I see is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35743022)

No choice? Ethics, you don't has them.

Clearly from your point of view she should next use her spade to murder the neighbors, take their stuff and sell it on ebay because she needs to make a living.

Re:All I see is (1, Insightful)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743262)

Spades.. Cruise missiles.. what's the difference? Hey, we just need to 'make a living'.. what's the deal?

Re:All I see is (1)

slackbheep (1420367) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743076)

This isn't uncommon in many poor regions of the world. As a child growing up in Newfoundland, Canada I was aware of a couple of townspeople who did the same thing, alongside collecting bottles and so forth.

Re:All I see is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742794)

Stealing to survive is not thievery.

Re:All I see is (4, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742930)

Yes it is. It's also understandable, justifiable, and a very poor reflection on the surrounding society, but it's still theft.

Re:All I see is (5, Funny)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743142)

Yes it is. It's also understandable, justifiable, and a very poor reflection on the surrounding society, but it's still theft.

Actually it's not fheft it's copyright infrin....wait a second!

Re:All I see is (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742974)

Stealing to survive is not thievery.

Only if you steal food and eat it. Or if you steal a coat to use during winter.

If you steal anything and sell it, then it *is* thievery, no matter how much you needed the money.

Re:All I see is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35743010)

Stealing to survive is not thievery.

Only if you steal food and eat it. Or if you steal a coat to use during winter.

If you steal anything and sell it, then it *is* thievery, no matter how much you needed the money.

If you can't steal the food itself, and stealing other things and exchanging them for food is your only option... People don't leave food lying around the way they do other things.

Re:All I see is (2)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743046)

Playing devil's advocate, she was out digging up cables. If she's capable of digging she's capable of finding food, they have huge, largely unguarded fields full of food called "farms" where you can engage in this behaviour.

Re:All I see is (4, Insightful)

emj (15659) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743124)

Ah yes those all season meatballs fields of Georgia, but elsewhere it's practically impossible to live by stealing food from a farm.

Re:All I see is (3, Funny)

alendit (1454311) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743028)

Why do they call them "scavengers" instead of what they really are - thieves.

On behalf of all elderly people who have to make living with scavenging copper let me say: "Fuck you!"

Re:All I see is (1, Insightful)

Xest (935314) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743156)

Yes, because your set of moral standards are accepted globally to be the One True Set of Moral Standards (tm).

Sorry no, I suppose you think the poor Nigerians scavenging in the massive rubbish tips sailed over to their country by the West simply to find what they need to survive at thieves too?

Fringe cases like this which are theft in your country, are accepted, legal and essential to survival for some people in other countries. Don't try and apply your moral view of the world in your no doubt cushy western lifestyle to the rest of the world, it makes you sound ignorant. Some countries have such a problem with poverty that they recognise that letting the poor scavenge abandoned stuff to reuse for their survival is actually essential to help these people survive.

It may be that you're right, and the wrong light has been shone on this woman and she really is a theif stealing that which has not been abandoned, but your comment makes it sound very much like you're suggesting scavenging is always theft. It's not.

Sympathy... (-1, Troll)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743194)

They're called "scavengers" because the reporter sympathizes with them. Typically because there's a whole liberal narrative about the noble poor who would NEVER, EVER steal anything for pleasure... just for bare minimum subsistence. Much like how we know that when a poor man robs a middle class family of their electronics, it's axiomatic that he's only stealing them so he can pawn them for food and medicine money for his starving children...

Re:All I see is (1, Interesting)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743246)

Why do they call it 'war' instead of what it really is - murder.

Politics baby...

Re:All I see is (0)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742576)

they managed to bring internet to armenia though.
that's not endangering. thing is, sometimes doing things proper just isn't proper way to do things. especially in.. well, ex soviet slave states.
good money available there if you manage to get internet connection there though, but why isn't risk money spent on it then? well it's fucking risky. had the cable been copper it would've been stolen.

(the lady probably might not be able to pay a fine, so even that would probably land her in jail, as it would fit to scene in those states that fines get converted to jail time.

Re:All I see is (0)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742640)

Some of the ex Soviet states have better internet than North America, so I wouldn't laugh quite so hard.

Armenia is a little more backwater than european ex-SU, though. I'm not familiar with the rates or service in the Caucasus, but most everything else was somewhat less available there than in Moscow, afaik...

Re:All I see is (1)

durrr (1316311) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742674)

They just want a reason for using a tool as fancily named as a Fusion Splicer at ever opportunity.

Re:All I see is (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742858)

"Scavenging for copper" = "Steal copper wires from the ground".

That's a little harsh... (1)

linuxrocks123 (905424) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742520)

I mean, it was an accident. 3 years in prison for a poor woman scavenging for metal doesn't seem too fair, at least assuming her goal wasn't to steal copper wire. Hopefully they won't charge her, or will give her a slap on the wrist.

---linuxrocks123

Re:That's a little harsh... (5, Insightful)

EdZ (755139) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742540)

assuming her goal wasn't to steal copper wire

"Scavenging for copper" is a euphemism for exactly this. The only copper you find 'just lying around' is copper being used for power or data transmission.

Re:That's a little harsh... (2)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742568)

ANd as you see "Scavenging for copper" can cause a lot of damage [dutchnews.nl]

Re:That's a little harsh... (-1, Offtopic)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743340)

So can bombing civilians with high tech weaponry. Who's being prosecuted for that? Funny how we place our priorities. I would hope we could lay off the little old ladies and go after bigger fish. Unless they're stealing to stuff to make homemade bombs... Are people here actually defending the authorities in this case? Weird...

Re:That's a little harsh... (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742582)

Not really. In those old soviet states there's plenty of old stuff that's no longer in use. Like that old nuclear testing site TFA mentions.

Re:That's a little harsh... (1)

definate (876684) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742720)

Yeah. That's why I like it when "scavengers" go and "scavenge" copper and electrical equipment from abandoned houses. Maybe the house is old, maybe the financing ran out, maybe it's just delayed building. Either way, they're "no longer in use", so feel free to take it.

Re:That's a little harsh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35743004)

And who the hell would dig for copper wires that are currently USED TO TRANSPORT ELECTRICITY? Someone who doesn't know what survival of the fittest means. Was she even near a city or something?

Re:That's a little harsh... (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743178)

And who the hell would dig for copper wires that are currently USED TO TRANSPORT ELECTRICITY? Someone who doesn't know what survival of the fittest means. Was she even near a city or something?

It's not as dumb as collecting petrol from broken pipelines which happens frequently in Africa with entirely predictable results. Don't care how poor you are, doing that is tantamount to Darwinising yourself.

Collecting scrap in Uzbekistan is mandatory (1)

sjwest (948274) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743044)

Uzbekistan citizens are required by there 'leader' to collect scrap metals for the rulling family to dispose off naturally at a profit to them alone. You may not have heard of it but it exists. The world has some interesting leaders.

Uzbekistan citizens have complained that metal buckets for recycling are not as easy to find as they once where.

Re:That's a little harsh... (5, Informative)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743118)

"The only copper you find 'just lying around' is copper being used for power or data transmission.

Clearly you've never been in an office building or an industrial site. There's literally hundreds of km of unused and abandoned copper wires in buildings around the US. The basic practice of leasing a building with no network services, installing network services, and then when the lease is up reaching into the wall and cutting cables short so the next company can't benefit from your expense has caused all of this. In many places decommissioning is another way of saying get rid of the equipment and just cut the cable at both ends and leave it buried. We serviced an antenna mast a few weeks ago and pulled some 9 40m lengths of LMR-900 off the tower, all cables were traced from dead antennas to either loose connectors in the buildings or had been cut off in the building or on the tower. After the decommissioning we took the cable with us and someone sent it down to the recyclers. The metal in it was worth a fortune and no one could even tell us why it was there.

Re:That's a little harsh... (2)

tabrisnet (722816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743386)

Saying that they cut the copper to prevent others from using it... is somewhat unfair.

Last time I was involved in renting a building, when we moved out we were REQUIRED to cut the cable, by zoning regulations and our lease agreement. This was in Santa Clara, CA.

Re:That's a little harsh... (1)

the_raptor (652941) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742660)

There is no such thing as an "accident" when human agency is involved*. An accident is when a meteor crashes through your roof and kills you. Cutting the Internet to an entire country isn't an "accident" it is stupidity.

The reason developing countries rely so heavily on mobile phones isn't because it is a good solution but because copper gets ripped up by thieves almost as soon as it is laid. Though I do enjoy reading about potential Darwin award winners who try and "scavenge" power cables.

* As the saying goes in the firearms world "Negligent discharges are either due to operator incompetence, failure to maintain the weapon in working condition, or defect of manufacture".

Punishment to fit the consequences (5, Funny)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743016)

I mean, it was an accident

So said Exxon after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. [wikipedia.org]

If you cause harm due to ignoring the possible consequences of your action you should be punished according to the consequences of your act, not according to your intent. That's what the law defines as "criminal negligence".

after disarming, we can open air all those bunkers (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742544)

so those sneaky murderers will be less apt to believe they can hide from their handywork, or, should they find a way to re-arm themselves? they are sneaky, in plain sight too.

Impressive! (2, Funny)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742556)

In other words, some old granny succeeded where even 4chan would fail?

Re:Impressive! (3, Funny)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742644)

TFA didn't mention if she was wearing a Guy Fawkes mask or not....

Re:Impressive! (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742824)

It's Armenia. They're just starting to discover LOLCat jokes.

Re:Impressive! (2)

pecosdave (536896) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742928)

Fail!

It's Georgia! They have Confederate flags on their Yugos.

Re:Impressive! (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743192)

Nah! It's the *other* Georgia: the small country that invaded South Ossetia in 2008, and then complained when the Russians bitchslapped them back out...

Re:Impressive! (2)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743138)

Uhm, ever heard of Radio Yerevan [wikipedia.org] jokes? They were vastly more popular over all the Soviet Union and the rest of the soviet bloc than LOLCat memes have ever been.

That and other Armenian humor gave them a reputation of a nation of jokers.

Suck my oversized fat nigger cock! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742574)

YEAH! SUCK IT!!!!

How many Americans are thinking... (3, Insightful)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742578)

How many Americans are thinking "I didn't know that Armenia was anywhere near the South-Eastern States"

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742598)

most of them are thinking "what is armenia?"
or "if that old lady tries that here we will hang her for terrorism."

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (1, Offtopic)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742634)

Clearly its a mispelling of "America"

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743070)

Weirdly I actually read is as America in the post title and was trying to figure out how the hell an old woman in Georgia could take out US internet (not being from the US I made the connection with Georgia as former USSR rather than the US Georgia).

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (-1, Offtopic)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742620)

You know, I was going to flame you, but I just don't care anymore.

Grow up.
--
BMO

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742646)

This is slashdot. We don't know about Kardashians, and if we did, they would fight the bajorans.

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742864)

All of them.

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (0)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743068)

[citation needed] How many Americans actually thought that? Please provide examples.

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (1, Offtopic)

TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743164)

Since when do you need citations to ask a question? Come to think of it, how would you possibly provide a citation for a question?

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (0)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743380)

Since when do you need citations to ask a question? Come to think of it, how would you possibly provide a citation for a question?

I hope you have a citation for that question.

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35743276)

Why does he need a citation for a question? How can you even provide a citation for a question?

Re:How many Americans are thinking... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35743394)

I thought it was near Dollywood!

Redundancy man. (4, Interesting)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742584)

If one shallow cable knocks a country out, someone failed pretty hard in the first place.

I don't know an awful lot about backbone type setups, not being in the industry, but I was under the impression that a self healing ring was a fairly common way of dealing with important fiber. That way as long as you don't cut two cables at once, you're golden, and can take your sweet ass time fixing a broken link without a whole bloody country losing internet access.

But of course, redundancy costs money. Hopefully not as much as downtime...

Re:Redundancy man. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742662)

The only people that "scavenge" for metal scraps are the ones that are taking down working infrastructure. It's practised all over the world. As for "accidentally" cutting an optic-fibre cable, they only accidental thing would have been it's importance to the infrastructure.

Re:Redundancy man. (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742698)

No, of course this wasn't an accident exactly, but it does happen.

I'm sure there has been more than one case of a construction crew or farmer screwing up and chopping through some cable...

Re:Redundancy man. (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742758)

Doesn't need to be any developing nation. Just a few weeks ago the guys at the construction site for the new section of our building managed to accidentally damage one of the two main communication lines for our company, forcing the system to switch to the fallback connection.

Re:Redundancy man. (5, Funny)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742664)

I was under the impression that a self healing ring was a fairly common way of dealing with important fiber

Sorry, but you're making it too easy to even try..

Re:Redundancy man. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742964)

Who would throw a ring around that fiber for the state of Georgia .... now now , if only it was Nigeria

Re:Redundancy man. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742696)

Maybe the network was centralised for political reasons. Maybe the government wanted a single point of failure.

Re:Redundancy man. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742832)

I don't see why the government would want a single point of failure. A single administrative control point (e.g only a single government-controlled provider having outside connections) could be politically desirable, but that has absolutely nothing to do with how many physical bits of glass they put in the ground.

Re:Redundancy man. (2)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742860)

There are also practical reasons for this. Armenia is a land-locked country whose neighbors, for the most part, don't like it too much. They don't really have a lot of practical ways to connect to the internet save through Georgia, and it's really Georgia, not Armenia, who can really dictate which cables get placed where.

Re:Redundancy man. (2)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743080)

Bah. Clearly you never dealt with Baby Bells back in the day. Telco's idea of a "redundant circuit" was two wires in the same conduit.

Re:Redundancy man. (4, Insightful)

gravis777 (123605) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743250)

Maybe you missed the part of the article that stated what countries were actually cut off. Armenia is a country with an entire population of just 3.2 million people. Shoot, many countries have cities that have a larger population than this. Granted, this does make it a fairly densly populated area as far as former Soviet states are concerned, but its still a small, poor coutry (the GDP is just around $2,600 per person, compared to the US at $46,000 per person). Azerbaijan, who also lost some internet, is a country of about 10 million and a GDP of just $10k. In other words, the fiber laid was very likely not from a business standpoint of providing broadband to these countries. It sounds like a business laid the line between distant offices, and decided to sell off some bandwidth to help subsidize the cost (or a humanitarian effort, depending on how you look at it). In either case, there would be almost no redundancy in the line. It is probably, from a business standpoint, cheaper to send a crew out every few years to do a splice than to pay all the money up-front for redundancy. And if it was a business trying to connect outlying offices, they are probably just going to connect to the closest High-speed hub and who has it for the cheapest - probably Russia or one of the other former Soviet States. Granted, it would make sense for Armenia to get their Internet from Turkey, but, once again, this probably wasn't a government-sponsered broadband roleout or a telecom roleout, but rather just hooking into a business that already had their own fiber line laid.

Point is, in Armenia, their capital city is in the western part of the state, and probably does get broadband from Turkey, but the rest of the coutnry probably gets theirs through this line. Azerbaijan probably has redundancy, but wouldn't be surprised if this came from an Arabic country - such as Iran.

Just because many countries have redundancy doesn't mean that everyone does, and I am sure many places have fiber lines laid out by the cheapest means necessary.

Re:Redundancy man. (0)

Sique (173459) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743382)

Iran is not an arabian country. Just because the population is mainly muslim, it doesn't make it arabian at all. It's mainly persians, turks (azerbaijanis), mazandaranis and kurds living there. Only 3% of Iran's population are arabs.

Redundancy required (2)

no known priors (1948918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742604)

Sooo, an adequate demonstration of the need for redundancy when it comes to telecommunication networks. Honestly, the only reason this is news is because it cut of 3.2 million people, and it was caused by an old lady. But telecommunication cables are cut all the time, both by people and accidents.

Yet, if I cut the phone line near my parents place, they'll still have Internet access (satellite). Indeed, I suspect they would still have phone access, because the cable would need to be cut on either side of their house to completely kill it.

I wonder what the Armenian response to this is going to be? Maybe make sure to get another outside link? (Perhaps via a country to the south, such as Iran or Turkey.)

Anyway, the article has very little to add to the summary, so I wouldn't bother reading it. (Or, so I was told by a neighbour who I get to read the articles so I don't have to.)

Re:Redundancy required (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742690)

Anyway, the article has very little to add to the summary, so I wouldn't bother reading it. (Or, so I was told by a neighbour who I get to read the articles so I don't have to.)

intuitive redundancy. :)

Re:Redundancy required (1)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742888)

Well, just look at the countries surrounding it:

Azerbaijan, Iran, Turkey en Georgie.

2 of thos countries Azerbaijan and Turkey they have a very bad relation, running your inthernet through that country is not really an improvement. The relation with Iran is better but censoring and filtering makes it a bad cantidate for internet,

Left over:Georgie.

Re:Redundancy required (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742948)

Unless my knowledge of geography is really bad, and the border between Armenia and Georgia is only about 2mm wide, having a single country that you can run Internet connections from is still no excuse for having only one uplink. At the very least, there should be two, a few miles apart, connected to the country's network at different points.

Re:Redundancy required (1)

Kartu (1490911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743396)

It's Georgia not "Georgie".
Turkey is to the west of Armenia, Iran is to the South, Azerbaizhan to the East, Georgia to the North.

Re:Redundancy required (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743072)

"Yet, if I cut the phone line near my parents place, they'll still have Internet access (satellite). Indeed, I suspect they would still have phone access, because the cable would need to be cut on either side of their house to completely kill it."

you suspect wrong. The phone company does not run redundant lines to your home. They abandon stuff in place, but never EVER run redundant lines unless you paid for that added feature at a severely jacked up price.

She's 75 and prison life is, uh, tough. (1, Insightful)

crovira (10242) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742672)

But then again she is Georgian, has lived through one world war, countless skirmishes, the Stalinist purges and survived 'til now.

I say pay her room and board, and free internet, until she dies.

Re:She's 75 and prison life is, uh, tough. (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742782)

Not only that. At that age a 3 year sentence could easily be a life sentence.

Re:She's 75 and prison life is, uh, tough. (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742812)

I say pay her room and board, and free internet, until she dies.

Oh you mean send her to an Australian prison?

Re:She's 75 and prison life is, uh, tough. (2)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743082)

I say pay her room and board, and free internet, until she dies.

At her age, she probably gets a pension from the government.

However, if you consider that the Armenian per-capita GDP is about one tenth of that of the USA, that must be a pretty small pension.

Redundant redundancy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742684)

Obviously this is a serious case of redudancy issues of redundancy.
Not only for Armenia and Georgia, but also for slashdot (though not forgetting Armenia, Georgia and /.).

In a time like this, the redudancy mod should obviously give +5 instantly. well + 1 initially, but later for safety reasons it should give +1 again for safety reasons.

Thank you for your time, your time is important to me, thank you.
- The redundancy minister of redundancy in the minestry of redundancy

I know the feeling (2)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742694)

Around last year an anchor cut the only undersea connecting cable which connected where I live to the rest of the world.

The country spent half a week without internet. Sometimes you can't really afford redundancy.

Georgia gives new meaning to the word "back ho" (1)

George_Ou (849225) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742710)

Georgia gives new meaning to the word "back ho"

Communication Disruption (1)

MaroonMotor (967664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742724)

can only mean one thing - the Georgians are coming and they are loaded for bear.

Does it mean she accidentally... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742836)

...the whole internet?

In other news... (1)

Thad Zurich (1376269) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742856)

... Turkish government issues a statement denying the event ever happened ...

She was stealing, not scavenging (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742902)

Why the euphemism? The woman was stealing the copper, not scavenging it.

Re:She was stealing, not scavenging (1)

Issarlk (1429361) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743106)

Because it's an old granny. They might hurt her feelings!

She's quite the 'hacker' (1)

jfbilodeau (931293) | more than 3 years ago | (#35742924)

She must be quite the 'hacker' to bring down the Internet for a whole country.

Slashdot = Engadget + 1 day (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35742972)

Slashdot = Engadget + 1 day

Re:Slashdot = Engadget + 1 day (0)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743038)

Not really. Sometimes they need 2-3 days for the whole copy&paste overhead.

woman's unwitting sabotage had catastrophic.... (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743060)

Ok, could we sensationalize this one up more? Catastrophic? really? So how many people died? how many places exploded or burned to the ground?

Oh and Sabotage... really

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabotage [wikipedia.org] for a definition... so "Unwitting sabotage" makes Merriam Webster cry.

I'm not a grammar Nazi, but good god, I've seen better and more level headed reporting on Fox News.

Maybe next time the submitter could make more crap up so that he can put in more inflammatory words to get us all worked up into a proper outrage?

Elderly Georgian (2)

Yuioup (452151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743114)

She can't be alive if she's that old.

Not Victorian, too young to be late Edwardian but definitely not Georgian.

If she were Georgian she would be displayed in a glass case somewhere.

Re:Elderly Georgian (2)

Zandamesh (1689334) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743322)

Why not?

Georgia has a pretty high life expectancy:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_expectancy [wikipedia.org]

Re:Elderly Georgian (1)

ocularsinister (774024) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743364)

*Wooosh!*

it's true!... (1)

Gravis Zero (934156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35743158)

internet. serious business.

Response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35743182)

The amazing part is how damn fast the response was.

Cable goes out. Is noticed a short time later in Western Europe. A "crack team" of sorts arrives soon after to arrest her.

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