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Celebrating 20 Years of Linux

Unknown Lamer posted more than 3 years ago | from the dirty-gnu-hippies dept.

Linux 193

dmbkiwi writes "2011 is the 20th anniversary of the first release of the Linux kernel by Linus Torvalds. Since that time, the Linux kernel, together with the GNU tools and a whole host of software has been developed by enthusiasts and professional programmers into an operating system that runs on tiny embedded systems right up to the world's fastest supercomputers." The Linux Foundation is hosting a celebratory gala at this year's LinuxCon.

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193 comments

Happy Birthday (5, Funny)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749070)

What do you get for the kernel that has everything?

Re:Happy Birthday (3, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749102)

What do you get for the kernel that has everything?

A larger desktop market share and acceptance by the general population?

Re:Happy Birthday (2)

_0rm_ (1638559) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749126)

Sounds like Canonical has that covered.

Re:Happy Birthday (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749284)

Let me handle this before some other fucktard does:

Naw naw naw me use abuntuou while yonder and muh sound dint work it was in the one them roundhogs that pushed up a button on the screen it was no sawnd meant i cud not play my soungs on the fancy machine i do say serr it clearly ul neva werk

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750232)

Ubuntu is not a real Linux; it's too mainstream now so it sucks.

FTFY :P

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750590)

Oh for real! The sound on ubuntu/mint is crap! I get one little hiccup over the network streaming in something and pow sound is out. Just liek that and have to restart the application so the sound engine will register the freakin thing. Soon will be leaving for another flavor and leave Ubuntu/Mint to its own poop pile to play in.

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749934)

hahaha that's a good one!

Re:Happy Birthday (3, Funny)

node 3 (115640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750448)

Sounds like Canonical has that covered.

That gift must have got lost in the mail...

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749256)

Maybe a working link in the Slashdot article? The #1 link is not an HREF.

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

similar_name (1164087) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749368)

A larger desktop market share and acceptance by the general population?

Larger desktop share would be nice, but technically I would say Linux (especially the kernel) is accepted by the general population even if they don't know it's Linux running their phone, gps, web page, etc.

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

judeancodersfront (1760122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749938)

How about something more realistic like world peace?

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749114)

a popper, of course. :-o

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749116)

What do you get for the kernel that has everything?

42...

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

lennier1 (264730) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749446)

If that's the question those mice should really demand their money back.

Re:Happy Birthday (3, Funny)

manpeach (1493673) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749120)

Give Him a twenty dollar gift certificate at Pizza Jo's!

Re:Happy Birthday (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749148)

Obligatory XKCDs:

http://xkcd.com/456/

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749894)

Ubuntu? Debian? A jedi knows not these things. A jedi only knows slackware!

Re:Happy Birthday (2)

npsimons (32752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749150)

What do you get for the kernel that has everything?

You joke, but I was just looking at a comparison of open source OSes, and Linux really DOES seem to have everything. [wikipedia.org] I keep getting reminded of The "Last" OS comment [slashdot.org] . Truly insightful.

Re:Happy Birthday (2, Insightful)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749222)

Stable API?

Calm down. I'm joking. It has gotten better. Just the occasional, changing of the name of constants.

Re:Happy Birthday (2, Insightful)

npsimons (32752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749396)

Stable API?

Oh please don't tell me you're another one of those going on about stable kernel API nonsense. [kroah.com]

Calm down. I'm joking. It has gotten better. Just the occasional, changing of the name of constants.

Oh good. Well, you could just always go the route of getting your driver into the mainline kernel. Or hell, if that's too much trouble, ask them to write it for you [kroah.com] . What's that you say? You want a binary interface so you can write closed source drivers? Well in that case, fuck off. It's called "open source" for a reason.

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

judeancodersfront (1760122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749984)

You're like the PETA fanatic that shows up at a bbq knowing there would be meat and still chooses to annoy everyone.

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

Yunzil (181064) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750612)

Oh please don't tell me you're another one of those going on about stable kernel API nonsense. [kroah.com]

Good lord. All the reasons cited on that page are presented as good things rather than as problems that need to be solved, as most of them are.

Or hell, if that's too much trouble, ask them to write it for you [kroah.com].

Yeah, because that's worked so well so far. Plus the next time someone changes the kernel API you get to redo all the drivers again. Awesome!

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749810)

The Last OS? Isn't that what they said about Multics?

Re:Happy Birthday (2)

npsimons (32752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749956)

The Last OS? Isn't that what they said about Multics?

Unfortunately, that was before my time. I have heard of Multics though; I think I may still have a scan of my first vi reference card that had MULTICS(or was that ULTRIX?) printed on it. But wasn't Multics written in PL/1? Perhaps that was the cause of it's downfall, whereas I don't see C going anywhere (especially for OS implementation) anytime soon.

The key to Linux survivability, I think is that lots of people are working on it and using it; in other words, invested. To see the number of changes and technologies that have been integrated into Linux over the years is truly astounding; to imagine something that could replace it (something that would have all the benefits of Linux, and either improve upon its failings, or add something Linux could not), is not something easy to imagine.

Re:Happy Birthday (2)

0racle (667029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749394)

Multiscreen 3d acceleration?

Re:Happy Birthday (3, Insightful)

Jeek Elemental (976426) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749464)

decent competition?

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749536)

drivers
documentation
ease of use

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750058)

Drivers ya I can see that, although there really isn't that much that is missing any more. Documentation though? Common there is so much documentation and so many forums on basically every error code in existence that documentation is just stupid to bring up. Finally "ease of use" most of the time when I hear this it is just about installing drivers but aside from all of that most distros similar to Ubuntu are pretty much just like windows. See icon -> double click, see another icon -> double click. Most of the time FOSS software tries to mimic the popular stuff anyway like OpenOffice vs MS Office. As it develops it gets better but the only real issue would likely be drivers.

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750244)

I await - after 15 years - my MIPS R4000 support with framebuffer devices for the SGI Indigo Elan and the unique TTY on this architecture.

"A better Iriix than Irix".

Re:Happy Birthday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749600)

A fully working audio-stack which replaces the current mess of various layers?

Re:Happy Birthday (2)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749700)

There's a lot of networking protocols (especially dealing with real-time TCP, networking over slow connections - eg DTP, QoS functions) that are missing and why the hell aren't things like Web100 and KTAU integrated with mainstream yet?!

Documentation (eg: LARTC) is horribly out-of-date and usually sucks.

The VAX port is missing.

A number of newer filesystems (eg: btrfs, nilfs) still need work and there's a few good filesystems (eg: Polyserve's fs) that we don't have clean-room implementations of.

More of the hooks that will be needed to provide a standard baseline for computer clustering (eg: MOSIX, Kerrighd, bproc) still need to be written out and implemented.

QA. Variants of the kernel are FAA-approved, other variants are Carrier-Grade. It's doubtful the mainstream kernel can be either - at least for very long - but narrowing the gap will increase the number of people interested in high-end usage.

More drivers. Not just for home stuff, but also for special-purpose stuff. I don't recall seeing any specific SCADA support, for example. There's way more crypto boards out there than there's drivers, and don't give me that nonsense that crypto should be in userspace - you can't drive a hardware accelerator at decent speed if you're context switching all the time. As for what a userspace driver does to security... *shudder* No, some things HAVE to be in the kernel even if it's not some people's preferences on policy grounds.

Re:Happy Birthday (1)

mordred99 (895063) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749816)

popcorn .. for something to aspire to when it grows up.

An iPad (1)

judeancodersfront (1760122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749992)

They seem to be a popular gift.

damnit guys (-1, Flamebait)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749094)

It's GNU/LINUX

Re:damnit guys (2)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749142)

I didn't know Stallman had a Slashdot account...

Re:damnit guys (1)

ACS Solver (1068112) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749268)

Though judging by your nickname, you might be Eric Raymond ;)

Re:damnit guys (2)

Panaflex (13191) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749840)

No, that's ESR(3702).... He used to post here a while back...

Re:damnit guys (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749382)

I didn't know Stallman had a Slashdot account...

There is no where on earth infidels can hide from the powerful musky hand of Stallmen.

Re:damnit guys (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749408)

He just borrows one when he needs it.

Re:damnit guys (2)

Jonner (189691) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749548)

Even if RMS [stallman.org] has a Slashdot account, I doubt he'd find any fault with this story, which correctly describes the role both Linux and GNU have played.

Re:damnit guys (4, Informative)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749160)

GNU dates from 1983. This is just the Linux kernel's anniversary.

Re:damnit guys (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749426)

Sad. It means that GNU will not live to see its 30 anniversary. #2012feelings.

(whops! this is not twittter!)

Re:damnit guys (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749176)

But it's hardly GNU - it's 20 years old

Re:damnit guys (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749178)

Correct or not, it's accepted convention, and more publicly recognizable if people just hear Linux. Yes, most of us know its origins ... this is Gnews for Gnerds.

Re:damnit guys (0)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749214)

Correct or not, it's accepted convention, and more publicly recognizable if people just hear Linux. Yes, most of us know its origins ... this is Gnews for Gnerds.

Slashdot is a place for overly critical aspies to get together and complain about things that don't really mater. Don't belittle my people damnit.

Re:damnit guys (3, Informative)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749376)

The Free Software Foundation didn't create Linux. Linus Torvalds created Linux and decided to license his code with the GPL. This little fact is the main reason that I call Linux by "Linux" and not "GNU/Linux".

The OS kernel that should be tagged with "GNU" is Hurd since it is actually being created by the FSF therefore it should be called "GNU Hurd".

Before the flaming commences, I'd like to defend myself by saying that I promote GNU software in the workplace and support their hard work. I do have some minor ideological differences with RMS, but that doesn't stop me from using GNU software or supporting the FSF.

Re:damnit guys (1)

ZankerH (1401751) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749930)

No one insists on calling the Linux kernel "GNU/Linux". That's the name of a POSIX-compliant OS that uses a combination of Linux kernel and GNU userland utilities.

Re:damnit guys (1)

jmac_the_man (1612215) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750038)

GP just insisted on that. It's the 20th Anniversary of the Kernel, not of its combination with the GNU userspace tools. Hatta is normally obnoxious about everything other than Slashdot being unusable if you leave Javascript enabled, but he's absolutely right about this.

Re:damnit guys (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750060)

The Free Software Foundation didn't create Linux. Linus Torvalds created Linux and decided to license his code with the GPL. This little fact is the main reason that I call Linux by "Linux" and not "GNU/Linux".

The OS kernel that should be tagged with "GNU" is Hurd since it is actually being created by the FSF therefore it should be called "GNU Hurd".

Before the flaming commences, I'd like to defend myself by saying that I promote GNU software in the workplace and support their hard work. I do have some minor ideological differences with RMS, but that doesn't stop me from using GNU software or supporting the FSF.

Google didn't create Linux either, but everybody uses the name Android. Your anti Free Software Foundation sentiment is dated. I use GNU+Linux+X+Gnome+Firefox daily The reality is I can swap out any of those components with very little change to my daily life. GNU/Linux is a more accurate poorer name for what I use on the desktop, but in reality The HURDS of developers include thousands of individuals, all of which will never get created with there name as Part of an OS. Seriously though I have some major ideological differences with Linus, but that doesn't stop me using the Linux Kernel, because what he and others have achieved is incredible.

Re:damnit guys (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750694)

Google didn't create Linux either, but everybody uses the name Android.

That's a horse of a different color. The Linux kernel is being used mostly as a bootstrap and a hardware layer for Dalvik. For all intents and purposes Android is an OS provided by Dalvik, I haven't seen any push for Gnu/Android.

Your anti Free Software Foundation sentiment is dated.

What anti-FSF sentiment?

Re:damnit guys (5, Informative)

PhilHibbs (4537) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749230)

Linux is a kernel, and it's called Linux, and it's not part of the GNU project. A distribution that includes the GNU tool set and the Linux kernel is a GNU/Linux distribution. This is not a story about a GNU/Linux distribution, it's a story about the kernel. If you're going to be pedantic, get it right.

Re:damnit guys (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749314)

Linux is a kernel, and it's called Linux, and it's not part of the GNU project. A distribution that includes the GNU tool set and the Linux kernel is a GNU/Linux distribution. This is not a story about a GNU/Linux distribution, it's a story about the kernel. If you're going to be pedantic, get it right.

This proves my point... thank you kindly.

Re:damnit guys (4, Informative)

Jonner (189691) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749326)

I realize this is probably an attempt at humor, but it's not funny and a lot people still seem to be confused about the issue. Linux [kernel.org] is 20 years old, but GNU [gnu.org] is 27 years old. There are complete operating systems based on GNU (and not Linux) as well as those based on Linux with very little or no GNU components. The term GNU/Linux only makes sense when one is talking about an operating system based on both of them, which is by far the most common way to use either one of them.

This would be quite interesting... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749132)

If slashdot stops being broken so that I can click the link. Can't right click->open in tab in ff4, or left click either.... Great.

Re:This would be quite interesting... (2)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749350)

It's not Slashdot. It's a bogus link in the text, once again the editors fail.

dmbkiwi writes <i>"2011 is the <a>20th anniversary of the first release of the Linux kernel</a> by Linus Torvalds.

Note the lack of an HREF on the <a> tag.

Re:This would be quite interesting... (2)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750110)

The parent post is right. In FF4, links don't activate properly here on Slashdot. I don't know enough to figure it out, but it is only FF4 and Slashdot that I've seen this problem.

Re:This would be quite interesting... (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750176)

I know this is the standard response to a bug report, but...

"Works for me in FF4".

The link is broken. (2)

scharkalvin (72228) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749152)

Click on the underlined "20th anniversary of the first release of the Linux kernel " and you go nowhere.

Re:The link is broken. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749252)

WELCOME TO SLASHDOT

Grrrrr (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749328)

Grrrrr! burn the GNU Linux flag [flagburningworld.com]

Re:The link is broken. (1)

Jonner (189691) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749556)

Yep, it's an a element with no href attribute, something I've never seen before.

Holy crap ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749158)

Holy crap, 20 years? I'm pretty sure I first installed it in '92 or '93, that really makes me feel old now.

I know it was a Slackware install with a 0.99a Kernel or something like that. I know there were an immense amount of floppy disks involved.

Wow, 20 years goes by fast.

Re:Holy crap ... (2)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749286)

I installed one of the first Slackware distros around 1993 or so on my old 486SX-25 with a whopping 70mb hard drive and 8mb of RAM, to run my BBS. I showed off running X and having folks dial in on one of my two phone lines, really flew once I had proper UART serial ports.

Now I'm running Linux servers every bloody where; custom routers, SAMBA servers, LAMP servers, Postfix mail gateway.

Re:Holy crap ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749386)

I installed one of the first Slackware distros around 1993 or so on my old 486SX-25 with a whopping 70mb hard drive and 8mb of RAM

I put it on my brand new 486DX-33, with a 325MB HD, and 8MB of RAM, with a video card with 1MB so I could do 1024x768. Two years or so later I upgraded to have a total of 20MB of RAM (and a princely sum that cost in the fall of 1994, $600 if I recall).

At the time, my Linux machine was bigger than some of the Sun machines at my school.

Ahh ... good times.

Re:Holy crap ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749412)

Same here...I recall ftp'ing it down off of sunsite.unc.edu and making tons of floppy disks to install with! A1,A2,A3,B1,B2,etc,etc...

Re:Holy crap ... (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750352)

I had an SLS version first. I think there may have been a Slackware version at the time. I wanted to limit the headaches of installing it, so I chose a distribution with a relatively small number of floppy disks, and optional floppy sets. The BSD I looked at required too many floppies for a "base" system. I was downloading at work and taking them home (no ISP access until this millenia :-). I certainly had no access to an expensive CD writer. Later it turned out I used Linux more at work than home, but I still wanted distributions that didn't cause the IT staff to wonder why the network was being tied up several hours.

I remember Linux earlier than this, but I had no compatible computer for it at home so I mentally glossed over it.

Re:Holy crap ... (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750470)

Yep I remember installing it on a 486DX-50 with 6 mb of RAM, and it still was able to run multiple desktops with animated backgrounds. Too bad that the linux kernel and the general desktop distributions have become so bloated, used to be a small, fast OS.

Re:Holy crap ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750710)

I'd argue with you and say blah blah Puppy blah blah embedded Linux blah blah... but I agree regardless. The system requirements even for something like Puppy are quite extreme compared to the computer I was running even in 2000/2001 (AMD K6/2, with 512meg RAM I think). I'm hardly a kernel programmer but sometimes from what little I understand I can't help thinking that Linux might have been a bit more flexible going for a microkernel.

Re:Holy crap ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749498)

I remember that when Linux came out, I decided it was time to get my own computer. I started working on getting linux installed, Made the file system , and Low and BeHold, Slackware came out! I didn't have to compile everything from scratch! I think the first slackware was something like a .32 kernel. I remember the first kernel I compiled was a .32. I didn't have the system completely working at the time, but with slackware out, I dropped all that and just installed the distro. It beat compiling everything myself.

Re:Holy crap ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750006)

I first used Linux on the 'sfi.survivor.org' BBS in St. Louis, in 1993. I first installed Linux in 1995, from a Slackware CD-ROM included with the Linux Unleashed book; it was Kernel 1.2.13, so ... Slackware 3.0? (I remember when Patrick bumped it to Slackware 7, to remove the impression that it was lagging behind RedHat etc. I gave him grief for that at the Linux Business Expo in Las Vegas that year.)

I think the smallest machine I ever installed Linux on was a 2MB 386sx-25 with a 40MB hard drive. I also have an old Compaq 486/25 with an 80MB drive and an ISA 10Base2 NIC that I got it running on. Memories.

Dead link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749172)

How come the first link doesn't do anything?

Yay for SLS (0, Flamebait)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749236)

What a totally awesome system that was... Multi tasking and multi user. Window *still* can't get it right 20 years later.
 

Ahhh, the memories. Also DO NOT THROW AWAY... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750254)

...any of your old Linux distro CDROMs from the 1990's. They might come in handy as evidence of any prior art.

Anyway, back to the topic of SLS... my very first distro ever was SLS downloaded as floppy images from a BBS dialup connection, way back in 1993. Never could get it to install and run, but shortly afterwards, the first InfoMagic CDs came out and of the distros on the disk, I got Slackware installed and running on my i386 machine!

Link (1)

similar_name (1164087) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749320)

If I had to guess, it should have probably linked to this [like-a-boss.org] .

Linux is obsolete (1)

atari2600a (1892574) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749322)

It's all about the MINIX microkernel & Prince of Persia!

Corrected link (2)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749380)

Since the one in TFS is bogus -- I got this from the firehose:

Corrected Link [like-a-boss.org]

Happy Birthday (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749392)

It's already been 20 years?!?

Damn we're getting old.

Slashdot *is* broken! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749458)

Click on "Log in" :

Error 503 Service Unavailable

Service Unavailable
Guru Meditation:

XID: 736098075
Varnish cache server

Re:Slashdot *is* broken! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749544)

"Me too" post

These things happen all too frequently (4, Informative)

e9th (652576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749482)

And in just 6 months, we'll all be celebrating the 15th anniversary of the first official release of OpenBSD. [monkey.org]

20 years of Linux on the desktop. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749518)

And still at 0.76% market share. [statcounter.com] . I was sucked in to the linux trap in 2001, and am glad to have got out of it. Gnome 3 was the final nail in the coffin, and Unity is the kick to the horse corpse.

Re:20 years of Linux on the desktop. (1)

3vi1 (544505) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749822)

5.1% according to w3schools. http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_os.asp [w3schools.com]

Statcounter's statistics are skewed because they include virus information and AV update sites, which the average Windows user has to access about four times a day.

Re:20 years of Linux on the desktop. (1)

judeancodersfront (1760122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750074)

W3Schools is the one that is skewed.

W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to the browser that comes preinstalled with their computer, and do not seek out other browser aternatives.
http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp [w3schools.com]
Enough propaganda already, Linux is around 1% and has been for years. Admitting this isn't going to change anything.

Re:20 years of Linux on the desktop. (1)

Airline_Sickness_Bag (111686) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750200)

Popularity doesn't matter to me so much - as long as enough people use it so that there is software developed for it. I use Linux because it does what I want better than the alternatives.

August 26, 1991 (4, Informative)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749680)

That was the date of the birth announcement.

Re:August 26, 1991 (1)

zigmeister (1281432) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749900)

Aug 26 is my birthday... seriously, i did not know that little tidbit. I think you just made my day. (Posting from windows.... oops.)

Re:August 26, 1991 (1)

fotoguzzi (230256) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750660)

I think it's cool that Torvalds was born a few days before the UNIX epoch.

SOLARIS RULES! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749724)

Linux is a lame operating system and only losers and posers use it.

SOLARIS RULES!

1 year to download (1)

borcharc (56372) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749826)

20 years back linux came out, 19 years ago i started downloading it from bbs's, 18 years ago I installed it.... thanks to SLS and 2400 bps modems!

torvalds, stallman to help establish truth.gov (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35749852)

they seem like square guys? if members of the genuine public could get a look at the mess from the prospective of former unchosens, that could be very helpful to all of us, which these guys have already been a lot. thanks.

combined with the genuine native american elders rising bird of prey leadership initiative (teepeeleaks etchings), we've just about enough kode base to last out the never ending (until now) chosen ones eugenatical exterminitorial holycost.

Linux fangirl since 1997 (1)

spaceyhackerlady (462530) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749950)

I bought a used 486 computer in 1997, booted it, saw that it had Windows for Workgroups on it, marvelled that people actually paid money for it, bought a Linux book at the local technical bookstore, loaded Slackware 3.3, and was off and running.

I've always liked the way Slackware doesn't try to hide the fact that it's a Unix clone. I also like the way you can build any sort of system you like with it, desktop, server, whatever.

...laura

Re:Linux fangirl since 1997 (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750218)

You have a computer in the kitchen?

Re:Linux fangirl since 1997 (1)

justmike2000 (2023602) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750442)

What was wrong with Windows for Workgroups? I mean how did you know there was something better out there?

Re:Linux fangirl since 1997 (1)

spaceyhackerlady (462530) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750512)

What was wrong with Windows for Workgroups? I mean how did you know there was something better out there?

Being a Mac programmer might have had something to do with it... :-)

This was the time Apple was moving their product line from 68k to PowerPC. Our first PowerPC compiler didn't generate fat binaries, but I figured out how to make my own with ResEdit and the 68k compiler.

...laura

Re:Linux fangirl since 1997 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750488)

Bullshit. Where did you fit a 486 into your kitchen?

I 3 Linux. (1)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 3 years ago | (#35749990)

Linux has come along way, it's now stable mature reliable and available in a million flavours from some slick looking desktops through to supercomputers. It's a testament to the millions of people who've writen and re-writen it over and over and never run out of fun broken-by-design things to fix, through countless millions of labour hours over a couple of decades to produce an OS almost as good as what a proprietary outfit can do with merely a few orders of magnitude less labour in a few years.
(If Linux every worked properly I'd have nothing to do and would probably quit IT and take up mosaic tiling or producing hand-copied phone directories).
Now all it needs is some users.

Re:I 3 Linux. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750278)

Your signature should warrant your immediate execution.

Re:I 3 Linux. (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750288)

I'm trying to figure out if you're trolling or truly insightful.

Finally! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35750228)

It's the year of Linux (not on the desktop, tho).

does android count as linux on samrtphones? (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 3 years ago | (#35750410)

It is a superset of Linux 2.6. Its more open than most smartphone OSes, but not as open as Linux.
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