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KGB Wants Control of Email and VOIP

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the proactive-protest-stomping dept.

Encryption 129

blair1q writes "The FSB (really just a rebadged KGB) is worried about the abilities that internet communications services such as Hotmail, Gmail, and Skype give to people they consider black-hats. In particular, they don't like the fact that these services allow encryption. They say they aren't going to seize or block them, yet, but are just 'studying' the situation, with an eye possibly toward implementing controls like those in China. Their increased interest in the tools may be related to a DDoS attack on Russian President Dmitri Medvedev's own LiveJournal account, which he termed 'revolting and illegal.'"

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Join the club, comrade (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762572)

The U.S. government wants the exact same thing [nytimes.com] . I'm pretty sure that almost every government at this point wants *at least* a way to bypass encryption, a "kill switch" for the internet in their country, and some form of email monitoring (all these without any pesky warrants, of course). If your country is an exception, count yourself lucky.

Re:Join the club, comrade (4, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762636)

If your country is an exception, count yourself lucky.

Count yourself delusional, more like... But if they think they can actually pull this off, the KGB is delusional. Encryption is out of the bag. The software for VOIP and e-mail is wide open. (FOSS) All it will do is drive people from Skype to Jitsi. (Or similar)

Re:Join the club, comrade (5, Insightful)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762682)

Ah but if it drives them to Jitsi or any alternatives, then that is a quick easy way to know who to flag as a terrorist. After all 90% of people won't be educated enough to know the difference if encryption is lost, so the 10% that switch, are the ones with something to hide.

Re:Join the club, comrade (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762986)

The notion that people with nothing to hide shouldn't seek to preserve their privacy is one of many completely absurd beliefs anywhere, right up there with scientology. We give up too many rights because of ignorant points of view like this. The fact is, with no privacy at all, it would be a trivial matter to find something to put everyone away for. Go ahead, say you've never broken the law and gotten away with it. Make yourself a liar.

Re:Join the club, comrade (3, Funny)

hannson (1369413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763610)

absurd beliefs anywhere, right up there with scientology

You are so sued!

Re:Join the club, comrade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763078)

Everyone is already considered such out of the box, this is why they want to bypass encryption, being flagged that way is seamingly become more and more irrelevant.

Re:Join the club, comrade (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763354)

The "funny" bit is that those who'd need the most surveillance will certainly be exempt.

Re:Join the club, comrade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35764820)

It might suggest the possibility of the person needing to hide something. They could be using it because others use it (Less likely probably). They could be using it because of political preferences (think FSF, ACLU, human rights, etc likely). They could be using it because of highly confidential business information (less likely). They could be using it because of criminal enterprises or activities (drugs, drug distribution, etc). They could be using it because of sexual preferences. They could be using it for a thousand different reasons. Terrorism is almost certainly in the minority when it comes to why someone would use encryption when few people in the mainstream use it.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 3 years ago | (#35765370)

They could be using it because the IT guy is a paranoid privacy advocate, and chose it for the entire company. Like at my company. :)

KGB??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35764888)

The KGB has not existed in about 20 years. Call an organization by some antiquated/hip-sounding name so that you can get a moron like Soulskill to post it on the front page. Is this really what Slashdot has stooped down to?
 
--morgan greywolf

Re:KGB??? (1)

cheekyboy (598084) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764972)

The same murdering MOFOs still work for them, that have no concepts of freedom or 'hatred' for government controls. They think they are 'above' the elected government.

Oh and im sure their mothers beat them silly when young and didnt give them their potatoes.

Re:Join the club, comrade (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762790)

All it will do is drive people from Skype to Jitsi. (Or similar)

No one has ever heard of Jitsi or similar.

Re:Join the club, comrade (3, Informative)

nadaou (535365) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762998)

> No one has ever heard of Jitsi or similar.

Now they, have, thanks!
http://jitsi.org/ [jitsi.org]

Skype doesn't work with my webcam, even though the OS supports it with other programs. My family (don't know about yours) won't mind installing Jitsi, ... win!

GNOME's empathy is another: http://packages.debian.org/sid/empathy [debian.org]

Pidgin too.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763132)

http://jitsi.org/ [jitsi.org]

First of all, if you are using e.g. MSN protocol with Jitsi all the data goes through Microsoft servers and are again in the exact same situation as before and liable for listening. Thus you have gained nothing. Secondly, if you instead use one of the decentralized protocols you have to deal with all the hassles it entails, like for example setting up the server settings and such. Considering that I will want to be able to chat with my friends and family, and they will want to chat with their friends and families, and their friends will want to chat with their friends and so on everyone would have to deal with that hassle. It's a lot easier to just use one of the centralized ones. Ie. atleast none of my non-geek fellows will want to start using non-centralized stuff and there's no point in telling them to change client just to use the same stuff they are already using.

Re:Join the club, comrade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35764420)

You only increase the number of parties trying to eavesdrop by one.

Instead of: You-[Your ISP]-[Recievers ISP]-Reciever
You now have: You-{CRYPTO}=[Your ISP]=[MSN]=[Recievers ISP]={DE-CRYPTO}-Reciever

The latter is a clear improvement, because even though the number of potential eavesdroppers has increased by 50% the chance for any potential eavesdropper to gain information from an intercepted message is reduced drastically.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764936)

"It's a lot easier to just" let the KGB or whatever alphabet soup guys listen to all my chat.

FTFY

Re:ever heard (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763528)

"That's right, don't use Jitsi. I repeat, don't use J I T S I. Or Debian Empathy. Emmmmmpathy."

Why are all the governments of 2011 acting like it's 1994 and the internet is this hot new thing to control after they sorta let it slide for 17 years? Separating forest from trees, all these gov desires are pretty low IQ. "MMMMM. Email. Gimme!" They couldn't have thought of that back when AOL was still the rage? Why now?

Theory: Fishbowl Effect. After we have finally had our fun with memes and made a fer .com dollars, the endless years of hyperconnectedness are going to drag on with not even a religious apocalypse to distract us, so those in power have nothing better to do than start salivating over hypertracking. Back in 1994 the web was still fun.

Re:ever heard (3, Interesting)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763792)

Why are they doing this now? One word: Egypt. The fact that with Internet organizing one of their old boys club could be run out on a rail? I'm sure that scares the shit out of them.

As for TFA? I'm sure we'll be seeing more of this in the coming months. Anything that can threaten power the way it did in Egypt will have to be monitored (for the children/terrists/etc) and sadly most folks won't know nor care that everything is being monitored as long as it isn't THEIR door that gets kicked in. If you're doing nothing wrong, right?

Re:ever heard (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763990)

Better get used to ... *sunglasses on* Democracy. YEEEEEEEEAHHHHHHHHH

Horatio Moment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35765168)

There are more things in heaven and /.
*shades*
than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
YYYYEEEAAAAHHHHHH!

girls, dont date spies or govt stooges (1)

cheekyboy (598084) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764998)

One simple solution, and if every girl ignores or doesnt date or marry any and all govt stooges / spies / LEOs. Then you will quickly see very few applicants to these agencies if it casts you as a 'virgin' outcast.

Or if you are already with one, leave em.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

ArcadeNut (85398) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763278)

No one has ever heard of Jitsi or similar.

I have! But only one post ago...

Re:Join the club, comrade (1, Interesting)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762832)

I disagree. Convenience dictates the vast majority of people will migrate to one of a few centralized solutions, which can be pressured (or legislated) to honor wiretap orders. And the few who go out of their way for extra privacy are practically volunteering themselves for extra scrutiny by doing so.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763706)

If Google etc allows ssl, and everyone uses it, and the emails themselves are encrypted, then the governments have a bit of a problem. They can outlaw it, require access etc. But then people can add proper encryption on top of that, but this won't stand out trivially because all the other emails will be encrypted anyway, so they'll have to get google to give them access to everyone's email, which will be hard to keep secret. This is probably what they're worrying about.

Re:Join the club, comrade (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763906)

Uh, wait, are you seriously suggesting that if the US government says to Google "hey, can I have Threni@gmail.com's e-mail history", Google doesn't just give it to them?

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762838)

If your country is an exception, count yourself lucky.

Count yourself delusional, more like... But if they think they can actually pull this off, the KGB is delusional. ...

Um. Notice how all these anti government protests are not in the following countries ... USA, Russia, China.

Moo.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762754)

The government does, but businesses don't; and in the USA, businesses always win

Re:Join the club, comrade (2)

hey! (33014) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762968)

I might entertain the government having this power to invade my privacy, provided they don't get to do it in privacy themselves.

I think they should get a warrant specifying what they're looking for, and if they don't find what they're looking for they should be required to give you official notification that they've been reading your stuff.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

mlts (1038732) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763000)

Similar, but not the same. It is highly doubtful that a Great Firewall of China will be coming up soon for the US, nor posts saying "$POLITICAL_OFFICIAL sux" would be rewritten in flight to praise $POLITICAL_OFFICIAL as they do in some other countries.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

Asmodae (1155077) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763280)

I read FSB as FBI when I first saw this article and was not surprised.

Hehe... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763390)

If your country is an exception, count yourself lucky.

Belgium HAS no government at the moment... Wooh! Safe.

Re:Hehe... (1)

jandoedel (1149947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763794)

Dude, you still have plenty of governments left. European, Flemish, Walloon, French community, Brussels Region, German speaking. You still have, like, 85% of your governments left + an-old-but-still-kinda-in-charge government. And a king. And 2 queens.

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763514)

I downloaded and deleted from the servers all the mail I'm legally allowed to immediately after I first read about that. My new policy is to delete all mail from the servers, keeping only an encrypted copy on my local main box (and its associated backups). Everyone should do the same, if they are able. Use fetchmail, offlineimap, whatever but do it quick. Remember, if you had nothing to hide they wouldn't be trying to examine your email, citizen! **shudder**

Re:Join the club, comrade (1)

mldi (1598123) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763774)

Oh, the FBI won't have the time of day to look at your decrypted email. They'll be too busy tracking down identity thieves. I hope they like paperwork.

Back in the USA (4, Insightful)

plawsy (174981) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762596)

And this is different from NSA, et al ... how?

Re:Back in the USA (5, Funny)

kvvbassboy (2010962) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762650)

It's Russia, so it must be more sinister and evil.

Re:Back in the USA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762678)

It's Russia, so it must be more sinister and evil.

This is Slashdot. If it's not from the USA, it must be LESS sinister and evil.

Re:Back in the USA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762714)

Indeed, it's not like they're sneaking into other countries and irradiating people to death or anything... oh wait.

Re:Back in the USA (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762858)

You should see what the CIA is doing.

Re:Back in the USA (1)

ThunderBird89 (1293256) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763140)

By extension, you should see what every secret service is doing. Ask Georgij Markov, Fidel Castro, or Mahmoud al-Mabhouh. Oh wait, you can't: some people were doing their job properly (and with ruthless efficiency).

Re:Back in the USA (1)

ThunderBird89 (1293256) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763166)

Oh wait, you can ask Castro, provided you can reach him. Those ones fizzled...

Re:Back in the USA (1)

jdgeorge (18767) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762808)

Sounds as if these guys are doing exactly what they should do; evaluating the Internet-related problems they face given their mission to protect their government's interests. I'd be shocked if every major national government doesn't have folks looking at the same problems.

Re:Back in the USA (2)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763370)

What bothers me is that the interests of the government and the interests of the people those governments allegedly represent clash almost head-on.

Re:Back in the USSR (3, Insightful)

cobrausn (1915176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762964)

I love how anytime someone points out how any other government than the US government might be doing evil things, it's immediately assumed to be some attempt by Americans to make themselves look better, and compared to some similar American program. It's as if it is somehow more important that an insult be hurled at the US than attention be diverted to some other country's less-than-honorable behavior for a few moments.

Trust me, we are all well aware of the failings and bad behavior of the US government. I see about ten articles a day about it. But don't ignore the serial killer next door because a loud, obnoxious, schizophrenic drunk is making noise down the street.

Re:Back in the USA (1)

ozbird (127571) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764002)

"We're the good guys, Marty."

Re:Back in the USA (1)

O(+inf) (2033618) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764842)

NSA probably does have access to GMail etc storage (even if Google doesn't know that), but they aren't proposing to ban, say, gmx.de, on the grounds that they have no means of accessing the storage there, nor intercept user communication over HTTPS. Nor will they complain if you host your own mail server and use secure protocols to communicate. Neither TFS nor TFA explain it, but what really made the whole thing so shocking is that FSB blokes have called for banning GMail, Skype etc in Russia unless some means of access are provided. In other words, they want government-mandated backends to all forms of communication, and to ban anything that can't be wiretapped. It should also be noted that the use of strong crypto by organizations (rather than private individuals) is heavily regulated in Russia, with most activity requiring special certification. Using foreign-hosted systems is seen as a workaround for the law.

Re:Back in the USA (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764926)

NSA, FSB, KGB. Entirely different combinations of three letters.

PPH is the only one you should trust.

In soviet russia... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762610)

...internet controls YOU!

Re:In soviet russia... (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763382)

As if you'd need "soviet" for that anymore. Face it, the Soviet Union protected our liberty. As long as they existed, the "western democracies" had to play nice to be seen as the good guy.

As opposed to how the US is handling it? (3, Insightful)

bazmail (764941) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762620)

Clean up your own back yard before you go knocking on your neighbors door.
The NSA has hardware in Google HQ and most likely other US data centers too.

Re:As opposed to how the US is handling it? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762770)

Clean up your own back yard before you go knocking on your neighbors door.

The NSA has hardware in Google HQ and most likely other US data centers too.

The speed which which they tracked down the Craigslist Killer shows it's really happening, it's really stored, it's all there for them to pull up when they need it. Including this post and you reading it.

Re:As opposed to how the US is handling it? (1)

ginbot462 (626023) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763024)

Hey guys! /waves at camera

Oh, I see ... you've been furloughed too.

Re:As opposed to how the US is handling it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762844)

Citation needed.

Really. You are required to successfully infiltrate Google Headquarters and collect evidence. Shouldn't be too hard.

Re:As opposed to how the US is handling it? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763094)

Citation needed.

Really. You are required to successfully infiltrate Google Headquarters and collect evidence. Shouldn't be too hard.

There's a geocache hidden there. Shhh!

Ahh ok (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762946)

So you want Slashdot to report on nothing that is negative outside of the US, so long as they US does it as well?

Why? Just general US-hate?

Seems to me this is news no matter where it happens. I've seen Slashdot report on the US government doing plenty of stupid shit, including all the AT&T stuff, so why can't they also report on Russia?

freenet (2)

crowlogic (940856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762680)

This is why everyone should be running freenet, stick your virtual fingers in the mans eyes. http://freenetproject.org/ [freenetproject.org]

Re:freenet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762908)

If everyone using Freenet was jailed tomorrow and accused of trafficking kiddie porn, the media wouldn't even notice.

Re:freenet (1)

crowlogic (940856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763086)

ya think?

Re:freenet (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762994)

This is why everyone should be running freenet, stick your virtual fingers in the mans eyes. http://freenetproject.org/ [freenetproject.org]

Since all the good stuff is outside of Freenet network, what good would using it do?

Re:freenet (1)

crowlogic (940856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763076)

just to piss off the man and devout resources to tracking useless shit

Re:freenet (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763178)

So basically, you're saying the point to using freenet is to feed your own delusions and conspiracy theories? No thanks, there's much better uses for it than just to create needless traffic.

Re:freenet (1)

crowlogic (940856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763438)

No, that's not the point, I just felt like writing something snarky to demonstrate the useless of almost all forms of communication

Re:freenet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763082)

Put all the good stuff inside of it!
Thatâ(TM)s what it would do.

KGB is a station is San Diego (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762684)

Why would KGB a classic rock radio station out in San Diego want to control email ? Ratings ain't good enuff.. eh?

There is nothing a Government Spook hates more (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762722)

than competition.

So the argument is made that the interwebs need control, a la Great Firewall of China.

In Post-Soviet Russia Freedom means more control over YOU.

Don't ALL email services allow 3rd-pty encryption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762734)

If you use a client like Thunderbird, it's automatic (e.g., Enigmail), but even with webmail you can simply cut and paste.

Open PGP (1)

bkmoore (1910118) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762738)

If the FSB / KGB, NSA, etc. come down too hard on Gmail, etc. then people who need or desire security will probably start using Open PGP or some other, stronger form of encryption. The smart spook should work on cracking the lowest-common form of encryption and try to get people to use it and think it's secure.

Re:Open PGP (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762796)

If the FSB / KGB, NSA, etc. come down too hard on Gmail, etc. then people who need or desire security will probably start using Open PGP or some other, stronger form of encryption. The smart spook should work on cracking the lowest-common form of encryption and try to get people to use it and think it's secure.

It's already at work ... and that is the stupidest password for a slashdot account I've seen this week.

In Soviet Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762842)

VOIP control YOU!

I wonder... (1)

cobrausn (1915176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762864)

If this will just force people who care about privacy to start using encryption. Considering how few people care about privacy, that means they will likely have reduced the set of people they 'should' be looking at by quite a bit (i.e., now just terrorists, subversives, and geeks instead of everybody). If the occasional security-concious geek gets caught up in the net and looked at a bit too closely, so be it, might still be a win so far as they are concerned.

Under these kinds of circumstances, hiding 'in plain sight' without using encrypted traffic (just use coded phrases and the like) would probably garner less attention. Maybe send your terrorist communications using unencrypted leet speak.

Not really KGB (0)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762896)

FBS and SVR split the duties of the old KGB, so its a fragment of KGB, but it's very inaccurate of a /. headline to label it KGB, KGB was disolved nearly 20 years ago (3 December 1991).

Sounds like a job for... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35762922)

...steganography.

Re:Sounds like a job for... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763026)

...steganography.

I am reminded of a puzzle, where an ape is placed in a cage, with two possible ways of escape, as identified by those who placed the ape there to observe.

The ape found a third way.

Perhaps the best way to defeat someone nosing in on your conversation is to devise a simple way to communicate in code, which appears normal or actually creates such a massive barrier to decrypting your meaning that no software alone could handle it.

If I wanted to keep the Cage Bee out of my affairs I might actually resort to writing letters and dropping them in the mail in places where they can't easily intercept them.

Re:Sounds like a job for... (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763040)

...steganography.

Now your porn collection can also double as personal data storage, what an awesome excuse for ever increasing collection!

Re:Sounds like a job for... (2)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763442)

It also doubles as a good excuse. "No, I do NOT have two terabytes of porn, the pics are just so large because they hide my plans to become ruler of the world."

Re:Sounds like a job for... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763538)

> Now your porn collection can also double as personal data storage, what an awesome excuse for ever increasing collection!

I wonder if my wife would buy that explanation.

LiveJournal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35762980)

the fact that he has a LiveJournal account is both revolting and illegal in my mind

KGB? (1, Flamebait)

yeltski (1438587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763034)

>>The FSB (really just a rebadged KGB) What is this bigoted and nationalistic editorializing nonsense? What if I said "Federal Republic of Germany" is just a rebadged "Nazi Germany"?

Re:KGB? (0)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763114)

It isn't bigoted to point out that the former Soviet Union dissolved and that Russia still has a similar set of masters with zero hope for meaningful change.

Nazi Germany was defeated in battle. The Soviets merely "right-sized" after their economy shat the bed.

Re:KGB? (1)

yeltski (1438587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763316)

No, it is bigoted to claim that a totally different government entity that is stuffed by totally different people, is the same thing after 20 years of vehement anti-soviet liberal reform. You are one of the people who will keep saying 'KGB' until there is no country left at all, because that is your true bigoted goal. That would be the meaningful change in your eyes. Also, Soviet Union was defeated in battle just as much as Nazi Germany, thats why US called it the Cold War. The Soviets were driven out of the party 30 years ago, by liberal capitalists, ie Gorbochev and Yeltsin. You can come out of the closet now.

Re:KGB? (1)

O(+inf) (2033618) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764794)

It isn't bigoted to point out that the former Soviet Union dissolved and that Russia still has a similar set of masters with zero hope for meaningful change.

It's not particularly similar, aside from that both now and then ruling elites cling to power at all costs. However, the social and economical structure they impose on society is vastly different.

Re:KGB? (1)

O(+inf) (2033618) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764784)

It's even technically incorrect. For example, KGB was also responsible for foreign intelligence, which FSB does not do.

KG was (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763038)

Calling the FSB a rebadged KGB is a bit disingenuous, isn't it? I mean, one doesn't have to live in Russia to discern that these are two different organisations with different structures and, most importantly, goals.

Re:KG was (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763134)

Calling the FSB a rebadged KGB is a bit disingenuous, isn't it? I mean, one doesn't have to live in Russia to discern that these are two different organisations with different structures and, most importantly, goals.

Anything which reports to Vladimir Putin is still a Cagey Bee in my book.

in russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763058)

...livejournal account attacks you!

Moooooooommmmmmyyyy! (1)

HiggsBison (678319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763190)

We're the officially appointed sneaky cheaters! They're cheating and ignoring us! Mother Russia, tell them to quit it! Unfair, unfair, unfair!

Chips and Dips (1)

hercubus (755805) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763360)

Nice story "Chips & Dips"
Slashdot (really just a rebranded "Chips & Dips") can't resist pulling an acronym out of the mists of time
Seriously, not that hard to say "Russia's Federal Security Service (aka FSB) wants..."
The 1980's called and said they wanted their Cold War propaganda back

Slashbloid, brought to you by FOX (1)

xororand (860319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763690)

Did you not notice that the "News for Nerds" slogan has been gone for a while?
Slashbloid's main purpose is to generate advert impressions now. It doesn't matter how cheap and wrong the summaries are. FOX News would be proud.

Re:Chips and Dips (1)

Opyros (1153335) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764428)

For that matter, the KGB was really just a rebranded CHEKA.

The trouble with astronomy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763388)

"Recently" observed but how many million years ago did it actually happen?

We have to learn from China! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763456)

I mean, look at them! They have an economic growth in times of a recession, so their model of society has to be right.

Let's face it, folks. Communism was the right idea.

(may contain traces of nuts or sarcasm)

FSB!=KGB (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763542)

"The FSB (really just a rebadged KGB) is worried about the abilities that internet communications services.."

For completeness sake this should be written as:
"The FSB (really just a rebadged KGB (really just a rebadged MGB (really just a rebadged NKVD (really just a rebadged OGPU (really just a rebadged Cheka (...) ) ) ) ) ) is worried about the abilities that internet communications services.."

Am I the only one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35763580)

That read the title as "KGB Wants Control of Email and YOU"?

In other news... (1)

alendit (1454311) | more than 3 years ago | (#35763840)

...German Verfassungsschutz (really just rebaged SS) wants to be allowed to hack into your PC (http://www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/Wirtschaft-stuetzt-Schaeubles-Plan-fuer-heimlichen-PC-Zugriff-Update-168367.html , German).

You may not agree with FSB's methods (i do not either), but lets not point fingers and pretend that other secret services are ANY different. And the thing with "KGB" is either bashing or just ignorance.

I agree... (3, Funny)

pyrbrand (939860) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764350)

Russian President Dmitri Medvedev's own LiveJournal account, which he termed 'revolting and illegal.'

I agree. LiveJournal accounts can often be revolting and illegal.

The KGB no longer exists (1)

Frangible (881728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764548)

There is no KGB. Putting it in the title is pretty dumb and factually incorrect.

Yeah, the FSB is the success to the KGB in the Russian Federation, but if you tell a Russian there's no difference between it and the Soviet Union, half of them will probably punch you in the face.

This kind of stuff just makes Slashdot read like an amateur blog that can't be trusted for news or fact checking.

Re:The KGB no longer exists (1)

O(+inf) (2033618) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764798)

There is no KGB.

There is [wikipedia.org] , actually, just not in Russia.

Re:The KGB no longer exists (1)

sik0fewl (561285) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764896)

KGB Wants Control of Email and VOIP
The FSB (really just a rebadged KGB) is worried about the abilities...

FSB Wants Control of Email and VOIP
The FSB (successor to the KGB) is worried about the abilities...

See what I did there? All of the facts, none of the bias!

Medvedev's part in the story (3, Insightful)

O(+inf) (2033618) | more than 3 years ago | (#35764904)

Their increased interest in the tools may be related to a DDoS attack on Russian President Dmitri Medvedev's own LiveJournal account, which he termed 'revolting and illegal.'"

This is very much oversimplifying the part of Medvedev in this story (as well as the story in general).

This whole mess started when an FSB official (head of their department of information and telecommunication security), in the course of an official meeting, brought up GMail, Hotmail and Skype as an example of a "security problem" due to impossibility of wiretaps (as servers are outside the country, and HTTPS ensures secure connection to them from within), and suggested a ban (neither TFS nor TFA mention this!).

Shortly after, an official from president Medvedev's administration stated that the ban - and, more broadly, the whole idea that foreign-hosted services are a "security issue" - is a personal opinion of that particular FSB person, and does not represent the official position of that organization nor government as a whole.

Shortly after that, prime minister Putin's press secretary stated that this is incorrect, and the position is the official position of FSB, that it is well-argued and reasonable, and that Putin takes it with all due consideration.

So basically it's more of the same thing [nytimes.com] that we've seen before. Whether it's a genuine power struggle between president and prime minister (the elections are less than a year away), or whether they're playing out a scripted "good cop / bad cop" in preparation for the same, is yet to be seen.

Front Side Bus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35765204)

What else could FSB possibly stand for?

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