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What Happens If You Get Sucked Out of a Plane?

Roblimo posted more than 3 years ago | from the do-not-try-this-at-home dept.

Transportation 327

astroengine writes "We've all wondered about it. When flying at 30,000ft, you look around the cramped economy class cabin thinking 'I wonder if I'd survive being sucked out of this plane if a hole, say, just opened above my head?' That's probably around the time that you should fasten your seat belt. According to medical experts interviewed by Discovery News in the wake of the Southwest Airlines gaping hole incident, the rapid depressurization, low oxygen levels and freezing cold would render you unconscious very quickly. Assuming you don't get chopped in half as you exit through the hole and hit the tail, you'd be long dead before you hit the ground. Nice."

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Easy answer (1)

djfuq (1151563) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772740)

You come outside the plane!

Why were experts called on this? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772750)

I thought this was obvious, even from a non scientific point of view?

Not really (3, Informative)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772844)

30,000 feet is about as high as Everest. People have walked up Everest and survived... ...in fact I'm not sure I believe their conclusions. You'd be down to almost 'normal' conditions in about a minute.

People have survived half an hour at altitudes higher than that, eg. Ewa Wisnierska [timesonline.co.uk] .

Re:Not really (4, Informative)

cpghost (719344) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772920)

Those who walked up the Everest had time to depressurize very slowly. Every diver will tell you what happens if you depressurize too fast.

Re:Not really (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772976)

We're talking about like half of one atmosphere, here. I don't think you're going to get the bends.

Re:Not really (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772924)

Yeah, and the wind velocity wont hurt either or knock the wind out of you. Oh you forgot about that?

Uhg... oh and if you wanna believe it so much, test it.

Re:Not really (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772964)

That was compared to winning the lottery ten times in a row though. I'd say there are probably a few maneuvers you could pull to maximise your chances of survival though - curl up into a ball for the first while (Heat Escape Lessening Posture), then go limp for the last bit of the fall. Are there things you can do to help mitigate sudden pressure changes, like breathe out all the air in your lungs?

Maybe some people would rather go unconscious given the minimal chances of surviving the impact, but sod that, I want every last second baby. :D

Re:Not really (2)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772986)

Erhm.... I think the sensible thing to do is to ponder how to avoid it altogether. By the time you get sucked out of that plane, you are a goner. You don't get bonus points for "but he survived to feel the impact" on your autopsy report.

There is no effing achievement for that!

Re:Not really (4, Insightful)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773004)

You don't get bonus points for "but he survived to feel the impact" on your autopsy report.

There is no effing achievement for that!

Meh, I'd rather not be put down in my sleep like an ailing pet, thanks. More seriously though, the will to survive is probably the single most important factor in any survival situation, closely followed by knowledge of what to do in your environment. Its shocking how many people just give up, lie down and die, sometimes when help was close at hand. Keeping your spirits up is vital, even if you've just been sucked out of a plane! :D

Re:Not really (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773034)

Yeah you might latch onto a passing pterodactyl and escape to safety... oh wait.

Re:Not really (5, Funny)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773046)

I'd rather be thinking "Hey I can see my house from here, wheeeeeeeee" than spending my last few minutes in blind animal terror. Sure, the last thing going through my mind would probably be my feet, but that's no reason to quit!

Re:Not really (1)

LordNacho (1909280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773166)

You don't get bonus points for "but he survived to feel the impact" on your autopsy report.

There is no effing achievement for that!

Meh, I'd rather not be put down in my sleep like an ailing pet, thanks. More seriously though, the will to survive is probably the single most important factor in any survival situation, closely followed by knowledge of what to do in your environment. Its shocking how many people just give up, lie down and die, sometimes when help was close at hand. Keeping your spirits up is vital, even if you've just been sucked out of a plane! :D

WTF? Who's gonna not have the will to survive? Isn't screaming in fear an indication of this desire?

Re:Not really (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773182)

WTF? Who's gonna not have the will to survive? Isn't screaming in fear an indication of this desire?

There's a difference between the will to live and the will to survive. Survival means you live by reasoning, determination, training, and actions. Living simply means you continue to breathe until you are found. The will to survive is the mental conditioning of your mind to survive no matter what man, nature, or luck throws at you. Never underestimate the power of the mind.

Re:Not really (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772992)

Curling up into a ball for the majority of the fall would increase velocity by a fair amount... not exactly beneficial to survival.

useful information! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772752)

I will keep this in mind the next time I get sucked out of a plane :-D

News (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772756)

So... if a a hole forms in the plane you're in and you get sucked out through it then you'd probably be dead pretty quickly (unless picked up by a passing spaceship, and the odds against that are astronomical). Is that the entire point of this 'story'? Is there anything there anyone didn't know?

Re:News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772826)

Would you be dead, or are people just assuming? The air pressure is about 1/3 of that at sea level. If you orientated yourself downwards as you fell, couldn't you ram the diffuse air into your lungs with your momentum by opening your mouth and pointing downward?

Re:News (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772854)

I think there's an awful lot of assuming going on. Real people have survived worse than that.

Re:News (3, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772910)

yah, but Real people was finally cancelled in 1984 because of low ratings.

Re:News (2)

zbaron (649094) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772852)

(unless picked up by a passing spaceship, and the odds against that are astronomical)

No, just infinitely improbable.

Re:News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772872)

astronomical odds have a higher chance than infinitely improbable (1 in unknown high number vs 1 in infinite)

Re:News (1)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773144)

"unless picked up by a passing spaceship, and the odds against that are astronomical"

All you need is an infinite impossibility engine, then.

This has sadly happened... (4, Informative)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772762)

A flight attendant was killed when she was blown out of Aloha Airlines flight 243 [wikipedia.org] back in 1988.

The plane landed with a huge section of fuselage missing, but the other passengers survived. Not a trip I'd like to be on, and makes the Southwest incident look minor in comparison.

Re:This has sadly happened... (1)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772780)

Ok ok, it was referenced in the article, but the link's useful. Curses Sunday morning skimreading!

Re:This has sadly happened... (1)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772818)

That wasn't due to depressurization, did you all miss that Mythbusters episode when they shot a hole in the pressurized cabin and nothing scary happened? Aloha airlines was a special incident, the flight attendent was killed when 10 feet of walls and ceiling suddenly peeled off the plane, and the ensuing explosion probably threw her out of the fuselage from where she was standing in the aisle.

Re:This has sadly happened... (4, Interesting)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772856)

I was commenting on the survivability of it, not the cause. In the case of the Aloha incident, it's interesting to note the high number of injuries to survivors who were in the plane, no doubt some were caused by environmental rather than physical trauma.

In any case, planes are design with blow out panels, there's some speculation as to the exact cause of 243, but nevertheless it had a huge impact on aircraft design and safety.

Re:This has sadly happened... (1, Flamebait)

Lazareth (1756336) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773024)

I'm sorry, but Mythbusters != Science. Mythbusters == staged entertainment.

Re:This has sadly happened... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773128)

It's more Science than the BS that some "Scientists" work with.

http://xkcd.com/397/ [xkcd.com]

Re:This has sadly happened... (1)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773138)

That's true. I would much rather trust the random, uninformed ramblings of someone posting on a website to someone who actually goes out and tries something for themselves (and who also have a team of researchers to help out).

In this case, what myth that Mythbusters tested was not the same as what happened on Aloha 243 so there really isn't much point arguing about it now.

Re:This has sadly happened... (5, Informative)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772932)

Also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Airways_Flight_5390 [wikipedia.org] the left windscreen failed at 17300 feet and the captain was sucked 1/2 out.

Re:This has sadly happened... (4, Informative)

damburger (981828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773114)

He survived, but only just. Until the paramedics got there the crew were convinced he was long dead.

Re:This has sadly happened... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773158)

Instead of having windows on planes, they should just have a series of displays and external cameras.

Re:This has sadly happened... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773094)

Well done for using the correct term blown. /. editors take note.

In 1972 a flight attendant survived fall from 10km (2)

methamorph (950510) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773112)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vesna_Vulovi%C4%87 [wikipedia.org] [wikipedia.org] In 1972 a serbian flight attendant survived a fall from 10,160 meters after the plain exploded mid air. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAT_Flight_367 [wikipedia.org] [wikipedia.org] She holds the world record, according to the Guinness Book of Records, for surviving the highest fall without a parachute.

It's pretty well known... (4, Funny)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772770)

....you spend six confusing years on an island with a bunch of strangers and a polar bear.

Hopefully you adapt quickly and learn to hate flashbacks and flashforwards.

Re:It's pretty well known... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772842)

Man it must suck having watched that.

Re:It's pretty well known... (2)

swb (14022) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773090)

I thought you learned to eat raw fish and make friends with a ball.

Why, oh why? (0)

naota-kun (705771) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772772)

Why couldn't it be "What happens if you get sucked on a plane?"

Re:Why, oh why? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772828)

Either google images is lying to me or pornographers are losing the art of creative naming.

Inspired by the headline, I searched for 'gaping hole incident' intending to report on the panoply of eye-gouging horror, yet lo and behold the first page is not only boring, it's SFW. Taking a tip from a result pertaining to a sinkhole, 'absurdly large gaping hole' was similarly disappointing. It was necessary to revert to such pedestrian language as "big gaping hole" to elicit the predicted flood of distended anus pictures; The legendary master and lord of all such things never appeared on any of the first three pages.

The Internet seems to be losing its edge...

Re:Why, oh why? (2)

Briareos (21163) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773036)

You've clearly got the wrong search term there - try 'gaping hole indecent'...

np: Meat Meat Manifesto - Luminol (Answers Come In Dreams)

Re:Why, oh why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772840)

Why couldn't it be "What happens if you get sucked on a plane?"

'Cause this is Slashdot. We only talk about things that are likely to happen in real life.

Re:Why, oh why? (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772866)

You get arrested.

Shark Week 2.0 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772774)

Otherwise known as "Stuff that's COOL but not exactly useful. BUT HEY RATINGS!"

Blown out. Not sucked out. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772776)

Wouldn't you actually be blown out rather than "sucked" out as it is stated in the post?

You aren't sucked out. You're blown out. n/t (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772778)

n/t

Please. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772784)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vesna_Vulovi%C4%87

They must have overlooked this (5, Informative)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772786)

Re:They must have overlooked this (2)

echucker (570962) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773000)

Perhaps not. Wiki article says that aircraft was at 17000' and still climbing. It was not at cruising altitude of 30000'+.

Re:They must have overlooked this (2)

nettdata (88196) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773088)

It's got more to do with the speed of the aircraft than it does the altitude.

The airspeed across the open/busted window creates a huge pressure differential, basically sucking the contents out of the space (in that instance, the cockpit).

If you've ever seen the small size of the window in question, and realize that the pilot was sucked halfway out of it, you might understand the level of force we're talking about here.

Re:They must have overlooked this (3, Interesting)

nettdata (88196) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773096)

Just to add to this, and to see the theory at work, you can do this simple exercise (like we did at flight school).

Open a can of some liquid. Coke, Pepsi, whatever.
Get a straw, and cut it so that the bottom end can be submerged a bit in the liquid, and the top end is about an inch over the opening in the can.
Blow across the top of the straw.
Liquid will come out, even though you're at the same altitude.

Same concept here, but with 400+ knot windspeed.

Re:They must have overlooked this (1)

sharkman67 (548107) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773148)

Perhaps you need to read a little more carefully. The wiki article says approx 10,000 meters which is approx 30,000 feet.

U NO !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772788)

That's why I tell me girlfriend. She's a catholic so turns me down.

MHC (2)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772796)

I'm pretty sure it doesn't count as joining the Mile High Club.

Re:MHC (1)

bhunachchicken (834243) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772812)

TFA says "out", not "off"

No (2)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772804)

No No No, you're not sucked out of a plane. Sheesh, is Discovery trying to blatantly go for the lurid headline when their own links on the page to the Mythbusters test show nothing happens?

All those hollywood movies are peddling falsehood, and it looks like Discovery is doing the same for profit and pageviews. Sheesh.

Re:No (1)

mr_lizard13 (882373) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772820)

So BA Flight 5980 and Aloha Airlines 243 were made up then?

Re:No (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772834)

I think the answer is that small holes don't do anything (i.e. don't start sucking loose papers etc towards them), but huge gaping holes in planes might...

MythBusters tested for bullet-sized holes.

Re:No (4, Interesting)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772928)

As I said in an earlier post, Aloha Airlines had 20 feet of walls and ceiling suddenly tear off the fuselage. The only death was a flight attendant who was in the aisle at the time, I'm sure the 700 mile an hour wind and immediate turbulence is what made her fall out, not some sudden pressure change of only 8.5psi. Mythbusters tested [kwc.org] it, even detonating explosives on the window in the pressurized plane didn't knock Buster out of his seat.

Hollywood put this idea in everyone's minds that everyone gets sucked out into space, like Goldfinger, if you shoot out a window on a plane. Just doesn't happen that way.

Re:No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773174)

How about United flight 811 [wikipedia.org] , where they lost a cargo door, and the subsequent decompression collapsed the floor and pulled out a dozen seats and passengers?

Re:No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773204)

you're 700mph figure has me suspicious of your whole post.
let's do some math:
        max 737 speed is mach 0.785 * mach 1@30000ft 1091 km/hr / 1.6 km/mile = 535 miles/hr

anyway, what does the 500mph wind do but suck by the
bernoulli effect?

Re:No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772824)

One could be blown out (front and back holes) but not sucked out.

But have we considered if there were snakes involved... that does change the factors.

Re:No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772918)

But have we considered if there were snakes involved... that does change the factors.

Wahts the difference? The air moves from higher pressure area to lower pressure area. From one perspective that's 'sucked' and from another it's 'blown'.

Re:No (1)

cpghost (719344) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772912)

No No No, you're not sucked out of a plane.

Yep! People could be blown out of a plane if they're exposed to a strong wind that pushes them out. The sudden depressurization alone is unlikely generate enough force to accelerate a grown up human body out of the plane.

I've actually thought about this (2)

Hultis (1969080) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772814)

...and if we assume you don't hit the tail or wings, and have enough clothes not to become unconscious before getting to the ground, you should probably aim for a steep slope (preferably with soft snow!) or tree with quite weak branches, such as a spruce. Anything that makes the deceleration phase last longer works (not water though!). If you manage to hit a steep slope in a good way you actually have a decent chance of surviving.

Re:I've actually thought about this (5, Funny)

r.stallman (2030484) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772886)

Correct, in fact this same thing happened to me once. I whipped out my Win7 Mobile device and thanks to it's superior 3G coverage was able to quickly refer to VirtualEarth on the way down. I then used the great new SQL/Server spatial extensions to work out the best trajectory and walked away with only a few scratches. After my smooth landing MapPoint guided me to the nearest pub so really it turned a potential disaster into a great day out, thanks again Microsoft!

Re:I've actually thought about this (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773006)

I whipped out my Win7 Mobile device

I'm begining to suspect that you're not the real r.stallman.

Re:I've actually thought about this (4, Interesting)

St.Creed (853824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772936)

I remember a story of WW2 where a crewmember from a flying fortress (tailgunner I believe) couldn't reach his chute due to fire raging on the plane. So he decided to jump rather than burn. During the fall he got unconscious and fell into a pine forest covered with heavy snow. He survived with minor injuries.

Another case was a parachute jumper who got tangled in the cords, chute produced some drag but impact was still way above 100 Km/hr. Fortunately it was a former swamp and the ground tended to give way a bit. Everything fracturable was fractured on the impact points (she even managed to get those points correct as per training) but the woman remained conscious and survived.

I think though that when you drop out at 30.000 feet you will lose your consciousness quite soon and don't have much say in what happens. Which will usually be for the best.

Re:I've actually thought about this (1)

Hultis (1969080) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773106)

People have climbed Mount Everest without oxygen so I don't see why you would lose consciousness due to lack of oxygen if you fall from just a little bit higher? Is it because it's hard to breath at that speed? Wouldn't it be possible to stop the air enough with your body and clothes to breath it?

Anyway, falling without a parachute from a plane is one of those disasters I almost want to happen to me (as in I would like to see if I could make it. Same thing applies to being stranded on some island.), so it would be a shame to lose consciousness and ruin the possible fun.

ObCarlin (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772862)

In the unlikely event of a sudden change in cabin pressure--ROOF FLIES OFF! --an oxygen mask will drop down in front of you. Place the mask over your face and breathe normally.

What about long fall survivors ? (4, Interesting)

Pastis (145655) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772864)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Magee
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Chisov

a bit different (and controversal) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vesna_Vulović

Ah the joys of being sucked out on a plane... (1)

ZeroNullVoid (886675) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772900)

Ah the joys of being sucked out while 30,000ft.

I just love waiting for that rapid depressurization, it is such an  euphoric feeling, it also means your on your way to the mile high club.

Oh Wait... they were not talking about oral sex...  that sucks.

A Dan Brown Novel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772930)

I think you get featured as a hero in a Dan Brown novel.

What Happens If You Get Sucked Out plane? YOU DIE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772948)

YOU DIE!

Sign, discovery showing its high standards again (3, Informative)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772958)

Okay, couple of things going on here. First: The myth busters episode "proofing" you can't be sucked out of aircraft. This was the movie myth that a small hole wouldn't not cause everything inside to be sucked out. HOWEVER, we are not talking about that here, we are talking about a major hole. In the hawaii incident, there was a gigantic hole, the flight attendant was not sucked out movie style but (probably) swept up by the massive wind force that occurs partly simply because aircraft move so fucking fast. Nobody knows how she met her dead. It might be comforting to think she died instantly and without pain... if that helps you sleep at night.

Another incident involved a pilot being SUCKED out through the window in front of him (showing just how wrong the DISCOVERY mythbuster program is in its logic and research). He was SUCKED out and exposed to the cold and lack of oxygen for a long time AND survived.

Another incident involves an aircraft breaking up in mid air, all died but the family got record damages because experts had shown that they most likely survived the break up and were alive and aware the entire way down. Families were from one of the south american countries, maybe chili if you want to google it (to lazy myself).

The simple fact is that Myth Busters is a great example of bad science where they ignore recorded evidence and then twist the experiment until it doesn't resemble to claim at all. The clearest example was the "myth" of Jaws being able to hit a boat. So they tested the myth of a super sized shark hitting a boat, by using a smaller shark because Jaws was an unrealistic size... well? That is the myth, the myth is NOT real shark doing something real shark don't do.

Same with the being sucked out. There is more then one way, and pressure difference isn't the only one. Air rushing past a hole tends to create a sucking force itself (see how your engine sucks fuel up into the air) and a massive hole would create all kind of secondary forces. According to mythbusters, large buildings don't cause winds to rise to such level that they blow people of their feet because the pressure difference ain't big enough. Well, shucks.

So basically, discovery claims things contradicted by their own programs. Guess that answers who takes discovery serious, ABSOLUTELY NOBODY.

Re:Sign, discovery showing its high standards agai (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773076)

>Families were from one of the south american countries, maybe chili if you want to google it (to lazy myself).

I think this was the Andes soccer team crash that took place in the early 1970s.
I heard the ate Chili con carne to stay "alive"

Re:Sign, discovery showing its high standards agai (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773134)

but but but but it was on MythBusters so it MUST be right!!

Re:Sign, discovery showing its high standards agai (1)

nadaou (535365) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773206)

> He was SUCKED out and exposed to the cold and lack of
> oxygen for a long time AND survived.

um, no. they held on to his legs for the rest of the flight, but it turned out he died a horrible death long before they landed. -40 degree wind blasting at 500 knots for most of an hour will do that to you. wee bit of a wind chill factor on that ride, never mind the fluid dynamics of trying to breath in those conditions.

Unplanned freefall (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772962)

The folks at Free Fall Research have a more optimistic view [greenharbor.com]

It ain't necessarily so (4, Interesting)

Simon Brooke (45012) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772966)

According to several of the police officers and volunteer helpers at the Lockerbie incident (Pan Am flight 103) whom I have personally spoken to, a substantial number of the passengers were not dead when initially found, although none survived. The cockpit came down in a field 150 metres from the house of a friend of mine. In the opinion of those witnesses what killed the passengers was injuries sustained in their impact with the ground, not the fall itself.

Re:It ain't necessarily so (4, Informative)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773074)

I can vouch for this as I was there that night and several days after as one of the search parties tasked with finding and marking the positions of the occupants... not fun at all... very messy.

Re:It ain't necessarily so (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773092)

I hate Muslims, don't you?

It depends... (1)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 3 years ago | (#35772968)

Well, I suppose it depends on what the SNAKES were doing at the time.

Slow Geek News Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772970)

?

Valid 10 years unless revoked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772974)

First amendment rights: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievance

newclear kode time compression feature initialized (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773048)

kind of a 'fire all of our guns at once, ...', event. get it (chosen ones holycost) over with for now. hold on to your sadham & gonorrhea manuals. every time we're about to find out everything about ourselves.... 'god' kills most/all of us, proceeded by inhuman behaviors perpetrated upon us? it's in the book.

You dont get "sucked" out of a plane... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35772982)

The pressure inside the cabin of a boeing 737 is typically 7-8 psi difference from the outside air pressure, which allows the cabin altitude to be 8000' while the outside is 37000 feet.

With the air pressure inside the airplane being greater than the air pressure outside the airplane, you get blown out, not sucked out.

Re:You dont get "sucked" out of a plane... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773028)

Same thing.

Re:You dont get "sucked" out of a plane... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773104)

If you were sucked out the force outside the plane would be greater than the force inside the plane!

Low oxygen perhaps compensated by speed of descent (1)

FridayBob (619244) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773054)

Assuming that you found yourself sucked out of the cabin intact, perhaps low oxygen would not have to be a problem. It certainly would be if you were stationary at that altitude, but in this case you're falling. The question is, if you were falling face down in a free-fall position (belly to Earth), would the force of the air entering your mouth at terminal velocity (at least 195 km/h) increase the pressure of the air in your lungs enough to compensate for the altitude?

Remember, it's not the fraction of oxygen that decreases with increasing altitude -- that stays the same at 20%. It's the partial pressure of oxygen (PPO2) that decreases linearly with the ambient pressure. IIRC, we humans require a PPO2 of 0.12 bar to remain conscious, which is what you have at something like 12,000 feet (see this conversion table [sensorsone.co.uk] ). At 30,000 ft the ambient pressure is only about 0.3 bar, so the speed of your descent would have to at least double the pressure in your lungs to compensate, which seems possible to me.

Re:Low oxygen perhaps compensated by speed of desc (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773172)

You've the problem of your mouth and throat instantly icing over at -50c to deal with then. Better to conserve heat and hold your breath until you are a bit lower.

Halo Jumping (1)

android.dreamer (1948792) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773072)

If you were Halo Jumping out, you could survive. I doubt you would wear that gear casually on an airplane, but if you are really worried, it couldn't hurt. You could do 2 minutes of free fall from 30,000 feet and then parachute down with no injuries. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halo_jump [wikipedia.org]

Prior research? (1)

nman64 (912054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773078)

Part of TFA focuses on the decompression. Thorough science (and the MythBusters episode) have shown that this is not an extreme danger. With a large enough hole, wind and other forces present far greater risk of dislodging passengers.

As for the health risks, I wonder if they even looked at the research and equipment behind HALO jumps. Obviously, folks aboard a passenger aircraft aren't going to be prepared and aren't going to have 'chutes, but some of the health concerns and physical dangers have been closely examined to ensure the safety of high-altitude insertions.

Also, "my guess" and "or something" aren't the kinds of things I would expect someone that had really considered the matter to be saying.

Mohamed was a cock sucker (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773082)

Hey nigger skinnned mohamed (or one of the other 200 variants you shit eaters use), we want you to go back to the shit hole countries you are from.
You are bunch of lazy assed niggers who are parasites on the host country. Why don't you go back to your shit hole and make it better? Why the fuck
can't mohamed do that? I thought mohamed was all-powerful? Can't you cock sucking mother fuckers get it right in your own country? If Islam is so powerful,
why do you all live in a human sewer? Suck my dick, you faggots. Suck it good, Mohamed.

In 1972 a flight attendant survived fall from 10km (1)

methamorph (950510) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773100)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vesna_Vulovi%C4%87 [wikipedia.org] In 1972 a serbian flight attendant survived a fall from 10,160 meters after the plain exploded mid air. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JAT_Flight_367 [wikipedia.org] She holds the world record, according to the Guinness Book of Records, for surviving the highest fall without a parachute.

Don't Panic! (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773132)

If you watched the movies you'd know it's always the megalomaniac villain that gets sucked out of the airplane, not the hero.

Junk Science! (1)

xmorg (718633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773168)

This is all hogwash! Since you are traveling at the same velocity as the plane, you will not get "sucked out", or face deadly inertia. You may feel a slight breeze, and an urge to crawl outside of the hole and plane-surf.

Dont believe those stupid movie special effects where there's a hole and someone gets sucked out a tiny pinhole. You may feel a slight breeze due to the wind hitting you face but all in all its kind of like skydiving. Here is the math below

(velocity) * wind + inertia / (hole) - (your mass)2

Explosive Decompression (1)

daveashcroft (321122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773240)

Explosive decompression accidents are rare, but when they do happen, they are very very nasty.

I refer you to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byford_Dolphin [wikipedia.org]

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