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ALS Sufferer Used Legs To Contribute Last Patch

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the a-moment-of-silence dept.

GNOME 222

krkhan writes "This is a little old, but seeing as it didn't make it onto Slashdot at the time, I think it deserves a headline now. Adrian Hands was suffering from ALS and had lost motor skills when he used his legs to type in Morse code and fix a 9-year-old bug in Gnome. The patch was submitted three days before he passed away."

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Dedication (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773912)

You know what's important to someone when they continue to do it from their deathbed.

Re:Dedication (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774040)

Shame, that feature was removed from the next version.

Re:Dedication (1, Informative)

shentino (1139071) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774156)

Unfortunately it was in a version of gnome that is now EOL.

Re:Dedication (3, Insightful)

Dr.Syshalt (702491) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774282)

Absolutely ANY code you produce will be EOL'ed at some point.
Just as your children will (surprise) die one day.
Does it make the life worthless?

Re:Dedication (1)

bunratty (545641) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774334)

Not if they reproduce, etc. The code being EOL'ed at some point is one thing, but just months after it was accepted is quite another! It's similar to an infant's death.

Re:Dedication (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774376)

Not if they reproduce, etc. The code being EOL'ed at some point is one thing, but just months after it was accepted is quite another! It's similar to an infant's death.

if you think that's anything like an infant's death be glad that you are such a fucking nerd you have no idea what it is to lose a baby. the heartache and loss is more than you would possibly know how to handle. a piece of code is nothing. it can be replaced.

most ridiculous thing i have ever heard. if you were trying to insult those who suffered through the real thing you did well.

Re:Dedication (0)

bunratty (545641) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774442)

I wasn't the one who came up with the original comparison between code being EOL'd and someone dying. I was working within the analogy. Idiot!!!

Re:Dedication (1)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774372)

Yep, it does.

Re:Dedication (1)

F.Ultra (1673484) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774714)

That was just the initial bug entry, the patch will probably find it's way into the current version. Otherwise it would probably not been accepted.

foot paddles? (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773926)

that picture of him in his chair working on the computer, I was hoping to see how he was managing to use his feet, but the picture didn't extend to his feet. any more descriptive pictures of the setup?

Re:foot paddles? (2)

rfuilrez (1213562) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773936)

Its actually a paddle to the right of his right knee. You can see it attached to a piece of PVC tubing under his desk

Re:foot paddles? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773972)

Thats a catheter bag.

I don't know what to think (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773934)

On one hand, I find it awesome that even in that state he managed to do something that productive and leave one (more) lasting trace of himself. On the other hand... I would hope that everyone would find something even more important to do during their last weeks than fix gnome bugs.

Re:I don't know what to think (4, Insightful)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774000)

"I would hope that everyone would find something even more important to do during their last weeks than fix gnome bugs."

So you have a kind of objective standard about what's important and what it isn't that you want to share with us?

Re:I don't know what to think (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774050)

There is no "objective standard," only what most of us can agree on. Most of us can agree that everyone should find something even more important to do during their last weeks than fix gnome bugs.

Re:I don't know what to think (4, Insightful)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774246)

I don't think anyone can be qualified to judge that sort of thing for another person. Quality of life has everything to do with state of mind, and we can only know our own state of mind.

Re:I don't know what to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774314)

Who gave you the authority to speak for "most of us"? Actually, most of us think you're full of crap.

Re:I don't know what to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774370)

Who gave you the authority to speak for "most of us"? You ARE full of crap.

Re:I don't know what to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774608)

I see the irony in the above post was far beyond your comprehension. Not very surprising.

Even if I'm full of crap, that doesn't change the fact that most of us, in a thorough and scientific poll, have decided your crap level is beyond acceptable limits.

Re:I don't know what to think (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774166)

Considering the version number though it gives a whole new meaning to the term EOL.

Important (5, Insightful)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774174)

Important is a relative term. It's different for everybody. If you're doing something you honestly love, that's not a bad way to spend your last few days.

Re:Important (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774730)

Or in a crueler interpretation, it might be a way to get your mind off things. At least one person I heard about became something of a workaholic during his divorce, coming home to his big old empty house was a big downer. A girl in her early 20s who learned she had six months to live quit her studies - what was the point? - and spent most of that drunk. If I had an imminent death hanging over me, I'd go crazy. Filling up your day with "normal" activity is a way to stay sane.

Re:I don't know what to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774798)

more important to do during their last weeks than fix gnome bugs.

You use KDE, don't you? :P

The human spirit (5, Insightful)

rjh (40933) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773942)

All of us like to think that the latest ten-core Xeon or whatever is the neatest thing since sliced bread, but stories like this remind us of what we often forget: the human spirit is the greatest hack of all time.

The family is in grief right now, and my sympathies are with them: but I hope they also understand the beyond-epic level of respect we have for Adrian Hands, and how he demonstrated right until the very end what the hacker ethos is all about. May we all live up to that standard.

Re:The human spirit (5, Interesting)

EdwinFreed (1084059) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774800)

It's quite remarkable what people in this condition can accomplish.

Some years back I used to carpool with my father, a doctor. This meant each day I would go to the hospital after work and wait for him to finish making his rounds. But sometimes he would take me on his rounds if there was something he wanted me to see or someone he wanted me to meet.

One of the people I met this way was a man suffering from ALS. The only things he could move were his eyes and one toe. A sensor was fitted to that toe and hooked up to a microcomputer (a SWITZ system, I think - this was in the early 80s). Despite the crudeness of this setup, he was able to write scholarly papers and even a textbook in his field (geology).

Whenever I'm personally inconvenienced by some health issue or other, I often recall that meeting. And then I stop complaining abount my own lot in life.

What is ALS!? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773946)

Sheesh, would it have been too hard to spell out the acronym once?

Typical for you nerds. :(

Re:What is ALS!? (4, Informative)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774098)

ALS or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's Disease.

Quoting from Wikipedia

"[ALS] is a form of motor neuron disease caused by the degeneration of neurons located in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and the cortical neurons that provide their afferent input. The condition is often called Lou Gehrig's disease in North America, after the famous New York Yankees baseball player who was diagnosed with the disease in 1939. The disorder is characterized by rapidly progressive weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations, spasticity, dysarthria, dysphagia, and respiratory compromise. Sensory function generally is spared, as is autonomic, and oculomotor activity. ALS is a progressive,[1] fatal, neurodegenerative disease with most affected patients dying of respiratory compromise and pneumonia after 2 to 3 years; although occasional individuals have a more indolent course and survive for many years."

It isn't a computer techie nerd term, it is a medical term. ALS is in the news about as much as MS so I think most folk would reasonably conclude that anyone who crawls out of their personal rut now and then would have heard about it. Also, if you don't know what ALS is then the expansion probably would not help. At one time "Lou Gehrig's" would have been more common than ALS but I think it may be the other way around now.

Google is just a mouse click away.

Re:What is ALS!? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774580)

That's not as funny as Ass Burger's Syndrome and hug machines for window-lickers.

Actually you'd be surprised how many people havent (1)

NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774602)

I mean based on my experience a large portion of the population here (Massachusetts) has no idea what you mean if you use those 3 letters. Usually my spiel about my mom went like this

She has ALS

What's that?

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

What's that?

Have you ever heard of Lou Gherig's disease?

Most people say oh that's horrible at this point. Actually in one case someone wasn't familiar with Lou Gherig's disease. (Admittedly that was understandable since the fellow was an immigrant. He was familiar with Stephen Hawking though so I mentioned it was the disease he had although I'm not sure if that's technically correct.)

Re:Actually you'd be surprised how many people hav (0)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774640)

I stand corrected.

One should never blame conspiracy for what stupidity readily explains and never be surprised at the extent of ignorance in the general population.

Cheers

Re:Actually you'd be surprised how many people hav (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774690)

It's Gehrig, not Gherig.

Also, it's Gandhi, not Ghandi.

Re:What is ALS!? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774636)

Google is just a mouse click away.

Yes, but Google is also just a click or a shortcut away for the submitter/editor.

There are many acronyms with different meanings. Anyway, as this here clearly refers to Medicine [wikipedia.org] :

  • Advanced life support, a level of medical training
  • Anterolateral system, part of the nervous system
  • Antibodies from Lymphocyte Secretions, an immunological assay

... well, you get the picture.

For /. as a news aggregator site (albeit for nerds), it would be nice to explain acronyms which are not common for every nerd. That's one single step for a single submitter/editor—and saves lots of Google leaps by readers.

Re:What is ALS!? (0)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774680)

Oh please, don't make excuses for lazy readers. The submission was succinct but clear : "suffering from ALS and had lost motor skills". If the reader can't figure out that ALS is a disease from that then their web license should be taken away. Spelling out ALS is not going to help and from that point you'd have to draw a picture for them.

Submission description was good; complainer was lazy and/or ignorant. Plenty of replies in the text with full descriptions of ALS which the lazy reader could find enlightenment from.

There are other poor submissions more worthy of your comment.

Re:What is ALS!? (2)

laurelraven (1539557) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774768)

There are many acronyms with different meanings. Anyway, as this here clearly refers to Medicine [wikipedia.org] :

I just did a quick Google search and found that alternate uses of ALS don't show up until the 8th link; the top 7 are all about Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Acronym overload is only a valid excuse when there isn't an overwhelming preference for one particular usage, or that this usage is not the overwhelming use case for that acronym. Since it is the most common use of the acronym, spelling it out is a bit redundant; submitters and editors here alike should be able to reasonably assume that the vast majority of readers here understand what Google is and how to use it. If readers don't use the tools right in front of them, that is their own fault.

Re:What is ALS!? (2)

wwphx (225607) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774804)

ALS truly sucks. A friend of mine who's less than a year older than me, we grew up on the same street and have known each other for 50 years now, is dying of it. He was a very vital person, frequently went hunting, avid firearms enthusiast, excellent computer and networking tech, and now he's in a powered chair and almost unable to cough. It's heart wrenching to go to see him, but he appreciates the visit and my wife plays harp for him which he and his wife really enjoy. As we live 500 miles away, we can only visit every 2-3 months.

I've seen a lot of death over the years and lost friends and family to: cancer, strokes, Alzheimers, murder, suicide, vehicular accidents, and now this gets added to the list and it rates pretty high on how I do not wish to go. Your brain is totally unimpaired, but your body is shutting down around you. I thought my life sucked with not having much of an immune system and having to stick four needles in my abdomen for 90 minutes twice a week to get reasonable immunity support, but there's always someone with something worse and it's quite humbling to see it.

Stephen Hawking is perhaps the best known ALS patient (or has something related to ALS), it's amazing that he's lived as long as he has but he's definitely been the statistical outlier. They're now questioning whether or not Lou Gehrig actually had the disease that was named after him.

Deeply touching (0)

goatsetroll (2038074) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773948)

I just can't post a goatse link in this post.... Don't have words to describe it.

Re:Deeply touching (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774072)

I just can't post a goatse link in this post.... Don't have words to describe it.

What goatse or this story?

Re:Deeply touching (1)

goatsetroll (2038074) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774094)

This story of course. See, trolls aren't that bad after all

Re:Deeply touching (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774160)

But if you yourself call yourself "not that bad", then in the eyes of everyone else it only makes you a pretentious troll. You see, we don't give a damn about you, and only notice you thanks to your desperate gaping attempts at grabbing attention.

Re:Deeply touching (1, Funny)

StudCapsFTW (2037156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774106)

I just can't post a goatse link in this post.... Don't have words to describe it.

It is touching that this man was able to carry on with things that were important to him despite the crippling effects of ALS. It seems that even near the end of his fight, he took joy from maintaining some normalcy in his life. He really wanted the world to treat him just the same as if he never had the disease - as a man with something positive to add (and the open source model helped make this possible). If it hadn't been for his son, we never would have known of his condition. I don't think Adrian Hands wanted special treatment or consideration from others. Your concerns are admirable, but I think if Mr. Hands were still alive, he wouldn't want to be coddled with kid gloves just because of what he was going through. So go ahead and post your goatse link, just like you would on any other thread. In a perverse way, he would have wanted you to.

Re:Deeply touching (1)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774388)

This isn't touching at all. People do this all the time. Just cause it was gnome it's more important? Who cares.

Re:Deeply touching (1)

Edzilla2000 (1261030) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774460)

People use their feet to code in Morse while being a few days away from death all the time? In what world?

Re:Deeply touching (1)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774628)

It's an example. Not more important... just an example. If you'd like to contribute some other stories like this... feel free. Or, you could get that stick that's wedged in your butt removed. :)

Re:Deeply touching (1)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774108)

Thanks for small mercies.

That is commitment (2)

billyea (2029384) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773952)

Committed members like this, that sacrifice their time and effort, are what keep the open source movement alive and churning out functional code. So in the end, he left the world with a legacy of improving software for everyone else, doing what he loved, and cleaning up loose ends. Can't blame him at all.

A gift to the world (4, Insightful)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773966)

There are so many who benefit from the community, and so relatively few who give back. So many people claim some excuse to not contribute anything to anybody without getting paid.

Then there's this guy.

I am honored to have shared a planet with him.

ALS (4, Informative)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773974)

ALS is Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amyotrophic_lateral_sclerosis [wikipedia.org] It's a form of motor neurone disease, not a nice way to go.

Re:ALS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774136)

>not a nice way to go.

Is there such a thing :-| ?

Re:ALS (1)

Millennium (2451) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774214)

There probably isn't such a thing as a truly good way to go, but there are degrees of suck. I can think of worse ways to go than ALS, but not many.

Re:ALS (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774218)

>not a nice way to go.

Is there such a thing :-| ?

Painlessly while sleeping, for example. Many would argue that it's one of the nicest ways of going.

Re:ALS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774316)

There are plenty of nicer ways to go than ALS. Many accidents kill people almost instantly, for example.

Re:ALS (1)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774366)

Unlike screaming and buggering 9 year olds like the others on his bus.

Re:ALS (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774304)

Yes, there are. Lightning is good, if it's instantly fatal. A Mack truck can do a pretty quick job of it. If you happen to like skydiving, you could hope that you enjoy a nice long freefall, to be splatted instantly on your last jump. Then, there is drowning - it's really not bad at all - a brief struggle for air, then falling into lethargy, then sleep. Probably the easiest and best of all is to check out in the middle of a good night's sleep.

Personally, I hope to die at age 99, shot by a jealous husband. And, I'm hoping he's a damn good shot!

Re:ALS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774336)

ask Felix Faure

Is this the same? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773976)

Is this the same retardation that Stephen Hawkings has?

Re:Is this the same? (1)

TheCycoONE (913189) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774064)

They both had ALS yes; but 'retardation' in the medical community refers to a psychological problem (http://www.assessmentpsychology.com/iqclassifications.htm), and ALS evidently does not impede mental functioning.

Re:Is this the same? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774340)

ALS evidently does not impede mental functioning.

Clearly, as this was a Gnome patch, not an EMACS patch.

What a joke. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35773988)

I'm not sure what's more amazing, how he wrote the patch or the fact that the ticket was open for 9 years and the only person who managed to do it was someone who could barely move to even press the keys required to type up the patch.

Indeed (1)

goatsetroll (2038074) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774020)

Thats because of nature of open source.
You really have to do it yourself, and not count on others.
Sometimes as a unexpected surprise some might help you, but don't count on that.

not surprising (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774104)

... the ticket was open for 9 years and the only person who managed to do it was someone who could barely move to even press the keys required to type up the patch.

That's why it took so long.

As much as I'd like... (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#35773998)

As much as I'd like to say something teary-eyed, all I can think of is:
"And this is just how day-to-day GNOME development looks like."

Mr. Hands (5, Funny)

charlievarrick (573720) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774014)

Irony.

Re:Mr. Hands (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774550)

Mr. Hands died with his coding boots on.

fulfilling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774018)

I can only hope that my last moments are as fulfilling. Still doing the things you love when the odds are greatly against you.

Re:fulfilling (1)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774148)

Having been beside a couple of folk as they declined and passed away, I would think that using the mind for something rewarding is not so bad. I hope his final moments were with someone who could comfort him so he was not alone.

Re:fulfilling (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774330)

I hear your sentiment - but some of us would rather be alone. And, yes, like yourself, I've sat and held hands with a few who have died. The first was my Grandpa, and there have been a couple of complete strangers on the roadside after auto accidents. Mehhh. I'd rather just die alone, than to have some butt ugly dude like myself sitting there holding my hand while I die.

Re:fulfilling (1)

dogsbreath (730413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774424)

I suppose... you certainly don't need someone crying. Having someone telling you "it's all right" and making comforting comments is probably better for most of us. Then again, in Canada we put our elderly on ice floes and release them to the sea to die.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talking_to_Americans [wikipedia.org]

search for "ice floes"

Re:fulfilling (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774164)

This story actually made me stop and think about what I would do as I neared my last moments and I frankly can't think of a single thing I am quite that passionate about. Just crazy. And kind of awesome.

Re:fulfilling (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774354)

Hey - it doesn't have to be some great big fame and/or fortune thing. My mother in law only wanted to hold her great grandchildren, and to be able to change their diapers in her last days. All her life long, the woman all but worshipped babies, and the more closely they were related to her, the better. Whatever makes you happy works.

Re:fulfilling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774746)

I'm passionate about flying aircraft... I hope I don't go out doing what I love.

Stephen Hawking Ruined it for Everybody (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774042)

That is very impressive but frankly speaking Stephen Hawking ruined it for every one who suffers from ALS. As an ALS patient no matter what you do, your achievement would almost always be dwarfed by his. He has set the bar too high for ALS sufferers.

Re:Stephen Hawking Ruined it for Everybody (4, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774638)

What bar? This ain't a contest, there's always going to be someone who's better than you.

Personally, I think the only person you are in competition with is you yourself. Are you better than you were a year ago? Then you win.

Stuff like this makes me angry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774060)

If we had a serious, concerted effort at life extension, similar to the "not because they are easy, but because they are hard" speech by Kennedy, curing diseases like this would be easier. We really don't understand our biology and as such have to content ourselves with the empricial, slow and piece-meal approach that is modern medicine.

Re:Stuff like this makes me angry (2)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774150)

Yeah, but the real money is in giving old men more hair and boners and reducing teenage acne.

this is what gnome is (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774088)

Gnome is trying to bring open source to the disabled. there is the cool window managers for the able bodied users but gnome does try really hard accessabilty wise. Several other gnome developers have died of their disabillties over the years.

Re:this is what gnome is (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774392)

Of course, It's designed to be run exclusively by retards, for instance.

Re:this is what gnome is (0)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774426)

Yep, one day you might even be able to run it.

A/S/L (0)

mtmra70 (964928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774162)

16/M/Orlando

Re:A/S/L (1, Insightful)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774290)

Mr. Hands had a serious disability, what's yours? ..oh, sorry, I didn't notice the big 'M' letter. Carry on.

Strange Disease (4, Interesting)

bigattichouse (527527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774172)

My family and I took care of my father-in-law as he declined and eventually succumbed to ALS in 2004. Every tiny act was monumental, even going out and getting a haircut, or a shaving him, or eating.

I can tell you that motor is the ONLY thing that goes. Pain stays, mental function stays, it is a pretty hellish existance for the sufferer. And something they could do just fine today - gone tomorrow... no predictability to it. And then there are painful muscle spasms as things go wrong. until they finally aren't able to breathe any more and die. I'm glad the mentioned coder was able to find a way to keep going, and put their mark on things.

The main medication at the time (@ $900 a pill), only worked for 18 months at which point your symptoms would be identical to as if you didn't take it - so it slowed things down enough to buy you time to get your affairs in order, and then all the progression caught back up. I don't know about current meds.

What's bothered me is that there is VERY little understanding of the disease, and how you get it - there are risk factors (being in a war is one, so is eating bats in guam). The VA had a HUGE list of questions that sounded like they were just grasping at statistical straws.

Re:Strange Disease (4, Interesting)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774240)

I can confirm this. My wife suffers from ALS, and every day is a struggle. Some days are better than others, but she's got the painful spasms every day.

I'm in awe that Adrian could do this in the final phases.

Re:Strange Disease (5)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774362)

I can confirm this. My wife suffers from ALS, and every day is a struggle

I know it doesn't really matter that some completely random person on the internets says this, but I feel really sorry for both of you : I can only imagine how hard it is, both for your wife and for you to watch the disease eating her away :

Re:Strange Disease (3)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774394)

I want to say something but everything I can think of just seems hollow compared to what you both must be going through. Be strong.

Re:Strange Disease (1)

bigattichouse (527527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774642)

It's rough, I feel for you.

Make sure you take breaks away every now and then, that was always the hard part.

Do you have someone who can help? I'd be happy to help research nonprofits in your area that might offer day services to let you go out and recharge.

He knew more Morse than most... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774224)

I for one didn't even know you could enter non alphanumeric characters in Morse code. I wouldn't even begin to know how to even do a CR/LF in Morse, for that matter.

if genuine native americans had not been genocided (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774228)

then our enemies would not be offering peace pipe bombs everywhere, as the genuine natives were non-smokers, & did not have any natural enemies, nor pollution, taxes, hunger, hymens, real sex religious training, or any of our other 'advances'? the natives still have no words to describe what happened after we 'discovered' them.

also, the boogeymen, thought to be fictional fairytail creatures to us (more religious training), were a band of tribesmen who repelled the queen's fatal advances for decades, until she went away & came back with a bigger biblical style extermination event. unrepentant again? now a major motion picture about the early canada native genocides, buggerings, & surgical alterations, supplied by the queen's clergy, & 'scientists'..

it's all in the almost never read teepeeleaks etchings.

queer cavemen falling out of sunken nazi planes (hitler's confession aboard)? mysterious unproven origins of hymenism. almost everything blowing up constantly? it's all in the chosen ones holycostal book.

Awesome story (1)

Clsid (564627) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774232)

One of the best stories I have read on this site so far. As one of the previous posters said, it's all about the human spirit. May he rest in peace.

No Hands (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774252)

Look ma, no Hands

In related news ... (-1, Troll)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774264)

... dementia patient submits final patch to Windows 7 service pack before being shipped off to the rubber room.

a great soul (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774378)

My father is suffering from the final stages of MS. Every day is a struggle, he's lost the use of both legs and one arm. He can barely use his one good arm but he loves searching google for information using an iPad I gave him, one finger tapping when he has the strength. He's completely bedridden, I've tried to comfort him as much as possible. He loves watching TV most days. He was in the Air Force and quickly became sick afterwards, it's been about 25 years with him watching him degenerating slowly.

I believe this man Adrian was doing what he loved. You have no idea how much of a great thing it is to be near a computer, and actually using a computer and the internet to a severely disabled person. When you are stuck inside all day and only have your immediate family around, it can be such a mental drain that the internet and a connection to others is a great way to keep in touch. What's really not surprising is that Adrian was writing patches to help people with disabilities.

That is something that's severely overlooked, imagine not being able to type, let alone move a mouse. I thank that man for helping people (even if it's a few who use gnome), he on his last days perhaps comforted someone else in the same shape he was in.

Thank you Ian and Adrian (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774380)

Adrian Hands and his family are a great example of why free software is a better way to celebrate and promote human achievement. Beyond the free access and the practical benefits, in the end, the most important thing is the development of community and freedom to participate and engage with making the world a better place. The freedom to pursue what you love, including solving small problems one at a time, to relentlessly make computers better for people with disabilities. The freedom to develop the skills and initiative to hack together devices that let people write software with their knees.

The most important qualities of free software and hacking ideologies are sometimes forgotten by their own communities and it always is hard to communicate them to others. This seems a good indication of just how sick and dehumanizing the "regular way" of doing things really is and how important it is to continue to reach out and demonstrate the beauty of hacking and free software, starting with just doing what you love.

I dont know whats more pathetic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774384)

a 9 year old bug or the fact a 9 year old bug was so easy to fix, someone with no motor control could fix it by taping their feet

come the fuck on gnome devs, "uh derp why aint this the year of the linux desktop?"

Re:I dont know whats more pathetic (1)

Beelzebud (1361137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774432)

It must be a miserable life you live.

What does this say about GNOME developers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35774398)

Nine years?

Won't last long (2, Funny)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774512)

The patch was reverted in Gnome 3 because someone found it useful.

That's amazing (1)

NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774570)

That he could do that. Of course ALS sucks. (Which I would be familiar with since I took care of my mom when she was dying of it.)

Add Copy Image and Copy Path to clipboard function (1)

hduff (570443) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774632)

Really? It took 9 years for someone to do this?

This is why people still believe in god (1)

NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) | more than 3 years ago | (#35774770)

Where else could be be but hacker heaven?
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