Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Celebrating Yuri Gagarin's 1961 Flight Into Space

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the to-go-boldly dept.

ISS 124

DeviceGuru writes "The 50th anniversary of the first-ever manned space flight, by Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin, is being celebrated on April 12 with a two-day early activation of the ARISSat-1 ham radio satellite aboard the International Space Station. If you can get your hands on a scanner or ham handy-talkie you can join in the celebration by listening to prerecorded messages from the satellite as it orbits the globe tonight and tomorrow."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Happy Cosmonautics Day (1)

dimethylxanthine (946092) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790128)

Good to see other people other countries joining what I though to be a purely Soviet holiday up till now. A person well worth celebrating, mind you!

But I suppose the internet helps...

Enjoy, and don't get too drunk today ;)

Ura! Yuri Alekseevich!

Re:Happy Cosmonautics Day (0)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790270)

In America, Cosmonautics Day celebrates YOU!

Cheers!

Re:Happy Cosmonautics Day (1)

Vectormatic (1759674) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791452)

If i actually had wodka in the house, i'd drink one tonight on Yuri, sadly though, he will have to settle for a glass of ice-thea (it will have a slice of lemon though)

50 years of manned spaceflight! Here's to another 50, even if we achieve only half of the last 50 years, it will be worth watching

But he wasn't the first guy in space. (-1, Offtopic)

vivek7006 (585218) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790134)

It was this guy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Ilyushin [wikipedia.org]

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790208)

It was this guy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Ilyushin [wikipedia.org]

Have you actually read the article you are citing?

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (1, Funny)

vivek7006 (585218) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790258)

Have you actually read the article you are citing?

Nope, because this is SLASHDOT (in 300 style!)

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (1)

Jello B. (950817) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790884)

hello, 2006.

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35794320)

2006? Is that you? I must warn you about an earthquake in haiti and another one in Japan!!!! Google for it!

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (1, Offtopic)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790698)

It was this guy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Ilyushin [wikipedia.org]

Have you actually read the article you are citing?

There are times when I think slashdot should have a football (ok, soccer) yellow/red card system for particularly stupid and/or misleading posts. But then that wouldn't exactly encourage the advertisers as on any one day about half the readership would be banned.

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (3, Informative)

dimethylxanthine (946092) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790216)

FTFWPA: "The entire early history of the Soviet manned space program has been declassified and we have piles of memoirs of cosmonauts, engineers, etc., who participated. We know who was in the original cosmonaut team, who never flew, was dismissed, or was killed in ground tests. Ilyushin is not one of them."

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (1)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790256)

Too bad I don't have mod points....

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790284)

Sorry, but Joseph Kittinger was there almost a year before Gagarin, and he didn't need a spaceship to do it. On August 16, 1960, Colonel Kittinger jumped out of a hot air balloon at over 100,000 ft with nothing but his gargantuan balls of steel attracting the earth towards their center of mass at half the speed of sound. You will never meet anyone as badass as Colonel Kittinger.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcT8lKKpeXs

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (4, Informative)

mikael_j (106439) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790310)

Yes, he jumped from a balloon at 31,200 m up, this is nowhere near the Kármán line at 100,000 m which is commonly defined as the edge of space.

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (3, Funny)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790874)

On August 16, 1960, Colonel Kittinger jumped out of a hot air balloon at over 100,000 ft

Yes, he jumped from a balloon at 31,200 m up, this is nowhere near the KÃrmÃn line at 100,000 m which is commonly defined as the edge of space.

You must excuse him, he works for NASA...

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (3, Interesting)

bkmoore (1910118) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790738)

His balloon was not a hot air balloon. It was filled with a lifting gas, either helium or hydrogen. Operating a hot air balloon at that altitude would require bringing along oxygen for the burner, which would increase overall weight and decrease altitude. Also, Gagarin orbited the planet in space. Kitinger explored the upper atmosphere in a high-altitude balloon. Both achievements were equally dangerous and impressive, but they are not the same.

Re:But he wasn't the first guy in space. (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790398)

The problem is that he died in 2010 ... a man in space that survived would the a hero of the Soviet Union ...

Yuri got there first

Actually it was Wan Hu... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790524)

Wan Hu was the first man in space: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wan_Hu [wikipedia.org] :)

Re:Actually it was Wan Hu... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35792094)

Wan Hu was the first man in space: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wan_Hu [wikipedia.org] :)

So... Hu was on first?

great (1)

Globalintimate (1955638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790266)

I think the inventory of satellite changed our life a lot, it is worthy of celebrating.

Re:great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790356)

(Assuming you meant "invention", not "inventory"; otherwise your post is even MORE worthless - if that's possible)

You do realize we're talking about manned spaceflight here, don't you?

Re:great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790498)

Hard to see the point in being an asshole. The poster sounds like s/he isn't a native Anglophone.

Re:great (1)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790706)

Hard to see the point in being an asshole. The poster sounds like s/he isn't a native Anglophone.

YMBNH

Free comic book (1)

Amiralul (1164423) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790364)

Here's a free comic book related to this event: CBZ [goo.gl] or PDF [goo.gl]

Re:Free comic book (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791142)

Are you twitting now? No. So why the hell do you shorten your links? Is it cooler? No, it pisses people off!

Re:Free comic book (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791942)

It's called being a TwitterTwat.

I hope he's enjoying the afterlife (0)

ikarys (865465) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790372)

Bending spoons in heaven.

Re:I hope he's enjoying the afterlife (1)

dimethylxanthine (946092) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790494)

How many pilots fell victim to SU-15
Rest in peace young Yuri, there's a heaven for a G
Be a lie if I told you that your profession was safe,
My comrade, you deserve respect!

(adapted from Life Goes On, by 2Pac)

Re:I hope he's enjoying the afterlife (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791326)

I'm glad I'm not the only one thinking this. :P [wikipedia.org]

Re:I hope he's enjoying the afterlife (1)

Issarlk (1429361) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792254)

AFAIK he was a communist. They don't believe in heaven.

Re:I hope he's enjoying the afterlife (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792492)

Yeah, everyone is an "atheist" when they know that saying otherwise will get them thrown in a gulag.

Not true (2)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797808)

Not true. Orthodox Church existed just fine during the USSR. It even had official state support, even during Stalin's reign.

Re:I hope he's enjoying the afterlife (1)

Ironchew (1069966) | more than 3 years ago | (#35794198)

AFAIK he was a communist. They don't believe in heaven.

You deserve a prize for the most logical fallacies packed into ten words.

To many more manned spaceflights. (2)

kvvbassboy (2010962) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790410)

I think this is the primary scientific/engineering landmark of the 20th century, followed distantly by the Internet.

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (0)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790598)

I would say the Wright Brothers' first powered flight outranks this from an engineering landmark point of view. Aeroplanes have had a much bigger impact on the world throughout the 20th century, while space flight's importance is great but more specialized.

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790856)

The Wright brothers just copied something birds had been doing for millions of years, but manned spaceflight was something entirely new.

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (1)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791016)

Powered flight was the next step in flight. People have been flying for decades with unpowered aircraft. This is 2 years after the first man made device was put into orbit.
In the first years of the 20th century everyone and their grandmother were making powered aircraft. This was proper science.

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (4, Insightful)

Sique (173459) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791062)

I beg to differ. I am using space flight services far more often than airplane services. I am using weather forecasts, satellite TV and GPS on a daily basis, while I don't fly that often or get airmail or are buying stuff transported by airplanes.

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791248)

Hm, none of these are MANNED, you jackass, and none of these would be possible without electronics and computers, and ALL of these could be possible without space.

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (1)

stealth_finger (1809752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35794682)

Hm, none of these are MANNED, you jackass, .

Because those satellites just 'appear' in space, right?

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (1)

igny (716218) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791274)

But do you get sick with viruses transported by airplanes from all over the world?

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792536)

From an engineering standpoint, once the internal combustion engine came along, powered flight wasn't that great of a technical challenge. Powered space flight was a much more challenging technical achievement (as evidenced by how many engineers it took working from the V-2 to Sputnik).

Re:To many more manned spaceflights. (1)

GWRedDragon (1340961) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791024)

As opposed to the development of the computer?

at least that flight has truly occurred (1)

biancmb (888501) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790416)

not as the much celebrated moon missions by the US

I hope he's enjoying the afterlife... (1)

ikarys (865465) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790418)

... bending spoons in zero G heaven.

Re:I hope he's enjoying the afterlife... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791454)

You're confusing Yuri Gagarin with Uri Geller.

UTC times (2)

commlinx (1068272) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790540)

The page http://www.arissat1.org/v3/ [arissat1.org] includes the transmission time in UTC and information on some of the other telemtry channels. They begin Monday 11 April 2011 at 14:30 UTC and continue until 10:30 UTC on 13 April 2011. I just tried the 145.950 MHz FM downlink as it passed over Australia without luck, but was using a fairly crappy wideband scanner antenna indoors. I might give it a try tomorrow with a 150MHz antenna which is closest narrowband antenna I've got.

Strange thing to celebrate... (-1, Flamebait)

molotov303 (182638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790542)

Doesn't it seem strange to celebrate what was, after all, a major loss for our civilization? The fact that we lost both opening chapters of the space race (Sputnik 1 and Vostok 1) is a national shame, which should be burned into our memory to be sure, but celebrated? Hardly.

Celebrating the victories of our enemies is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (2)

supertrinko (1396985) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790582)

They're no longer your enemy. And Yuri did an amazing thing, the soviets performed an amazing feat. Yes, that should be celebrated, and the thousands who died in the cold war wouldn't think otherwise (I am equally able to spout unfounded statements about what soldiers would or would not do).

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790604)

Yuri did an amazing thing

Not to be pedantic, but Yuri didn't actually do anything. Vostok 1 was fully automatic from lift-off to bail out.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (0)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790622)

Not to be pedantic, but Yuri didn't actually do anything. Vostok 1 was fully automatic from lift-off to bail out.

Well, he didn't shit his space suit(probably, I don't know if the Soviets released any records on that one). So that's gotta be worth SOMETHING.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (3, Interesting)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790736)

Yuri did an amazing thing

Not to be pedantic, but Yuri didn't actually do anything. Vostok 1 was fully automatic from lift-off to bail out.

Yeah, and Neil Armstrong was just a glorified pilot. I've been on holidays several times on planes, what's so special about the Moon?
Talk about sour grapes.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35792318)

Yeah, and Neil Armstrong was just a glorified pilot. I've been on holidays several times on planes, what's so special about the Moon?

Looks like an explanation is in order. Among certain groups, there is a tradition of grumbling about the attention given to the "meat in the seat", when the *real* accomplishment is designing, building, launching, and guiding the spacecraft housing said passenger.

In other words, you rise to the top of the engineering game, launch a rocket to the frickin' moon, and some jock still comes along and grabs the spotlight.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793228)

He got in. That's amazing enough.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35796266)

Yuri did an amazing thing

Not to be pedantic, but Yuri didn't actually do anything. Vostok 1 was fully automatic from lift-off to bail out.

He risked his life to prove it would work. That scores a fair bit higher than a computer-desk-critic.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (4, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790606)

Some people don't have their head so far up their ass that they can't celebrate a great achievement of mankind unless they did it. The Soviets one-upped you. You one-upped them with Apollo. The world moved forward. Not everything has to be about you.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

dave420 (699308) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791532)

"You"? I don't think the guy you're replying to had anything to do with the space programs.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790620)

No.

That's why - http://img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/4513/strebkov1976.2/0_5c0f3_6f23fd15_XL

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (4, Insightful)

Nimatek (1836530) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790626)

'Our civilization'? I was under the impression that everyone on this planet belongs to 'our civilization' and thus all our great accomplishments are worthy of celebration. Space race? Enemies? What time are you living in exactly? Would you prefer for scientific and engineering achievements not to happen, unless they belong to your country, serving your 'nation'? I better stop, this is getting too close to Godwin territory.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790682)

What time are you living in exactly?

Well, for the purposes of this discussion, 1961 seems like a reasonable context. At the time, no one in the US was celebrating.

Would you prefer for scientific and engineering achievements not to happen, unless they belong to your country, serving your 'nation'?

The Manhattan Project was an incredible scientific and engineering achievement by any measure, but whether it's something to to celebrated depends a lot on which side of the war you happened to be on.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791572)

The Manhattan Project was an incredible scientific and engineering achievement by any measure, but whether it's something to to celebrated depends a lot on which side of the war you happened to be on.

Or nuclear energy.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (2)

Deus.1.01 (946808) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790756)

Indeed, everything we have today have been touched by achivements from all corners of the earth, be it ancient greek, medival muslim/christian societies, indian and chineese.

We wouldnt have any renaissance or even better the enlightment age if the munks didn't have anything to work on.

And today, the notion of several civilizations is completely irrelevant, we are tied as one on a global scale in more ways then just political and economical factors...good and bad.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (4, Insightful)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791214)

Just a thought: does anyone outside of your civilization regard the entire planet as "our civilization"? Western ideas aren't as universal as you might have been mislead into thinking.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

Nimatek (1836530) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791370)

Science is quite separate from cultural values and ideologies. Breakthroughs can be of benefit to all factions of our human civilization. Also, 'western ideas' is a very broad term. I don't find it particularly meaningful, seeing as even among the 'western countries' there are numerous disagreements on basic issues, such as the structuring of society and economy. It is difficult to take such nationalistic squabbling in the name of ideology seriously, as the ideological makeup and the entire culture of a country can shift and transform over the course of only two generations, while such achievements persist as foundation for everyone to build on, when the original enmities are long dead.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (2)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791482)

Science is quite separate from cultural values and ideologies.
Another Western idea. Seriously, you don't even think to question the foundations of your thinking...such as if members of other cultures think the same way as you and share your Western values.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (4, Insightful)

tehcyder (746570) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790726)

Doesn't it seem strange to celebrate what was, after all, a major loss for our civilization? The fact that we lost both opening chapters of the space race (Sputnik 1 and Vostok 1) is a national shame, which should be burned into our memory to be sure, but celebrated? Hardly.

Celebrating the victories of our enemies is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

I suppose you're still pissed off that the Chinese invented gunpowder three thousand years ago?

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

LanMan04 (790429) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793512)

Doesn't it seem strange to celebrate what was, after all, a major loss for our civilization? The fact that we lost both opening chapters of the space race (Sputnik 1 and Vostok 1) is a national shame, which should be burned into our memory to be sure, but celebrated? Hardly.

Celebrating the victories of our enemies is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

I suppose you're still pissed off that the Chinese invented gunpowder three thousand years ago?

The funniest thing is the guy's handle is "molotov303", so he named his online persona after a protege of Stalin. Nice going, comrade!

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

arose (644256) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797488)

To be fair, the handle could come from the Finnish drink named after same protege.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (2)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790744)

The fact that we lost both opening chapters of the space race

The fact that you had a space race is a national shame on both sides.

Imagine if engineers and scientists on each side had been allowed to say to the other, "Dude, let's work together on this one."

And before you respond with the obvious, how many of these engineers and scientists were doing it for the love and glory of mother Russia / America, rather than because they wanted to explore space?

Celebrating the victories of our enemies is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

Deliberately misinterpreting the notions of both "enemy" and "cold war" is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

Trololo, molotov 303.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (3, Interesting)

GooberToo (74388) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793124)

Imagine if engineers and scientists on each side had been allowed to say to the other, "Dude, let's work together on this one."

They wouldn't have received any funding. Let's recap. Goddard basically created modern rocketry. No one would fund him. He created the then definitive works on the subject. WWII started and his work was basically ignored by the allies despite his efforts. Germany took his efforts and created the stepping stones for modern missiles, rockets, and manned flight. It was funded by war. Post WWII, Germans taken in by both the US and Russia created the manned flight programs, which in turn were funded by war or the fear of war. Remember, manned flight was an excuse to justify massive spending to create ICMBs.

So basically, "working together" almost never receives funding unless there is yet another underlying cause allowing the first to be used as a public excuse.

Hell, the US-German program was so successful and the US program was so unsuccessful, the US-German program was literally mothballed and prevented from launching so as to allow the pure-US effort a chance as well as to allow the Russian's time to actually launch Sputnik to as to create an internal overflight precedence. Once Sputnik was launched, which created much ire and fear of the US public, much to the surprise of the US Cabinet, and after repeated US failures, the German program was removed from mothballs. The US-German program was taken directly from mothballs to the launch pad, and successfully launched. The US-German program was mothballed roughly a year before Sputnik was launched into space.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791338)

Scientific and free-thinking communities generally don't adhere to the same bullshit "THERE IS OUR ENEMY!" rhetoric as politicians and the ignorant masses they lead.

Re:Strange thing to celebrate... (1)

TapeCutter (624760) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791730)

Celebrating the victories of our enemies is like spitting on the graves of the hundreds of thousands who died in the cold war.

Says the guy who picked Stalin's forgien minister for a nickname.

Still counting in earth-years? (3, Funny)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790650)

Happy 50th space anniversary... (although I think that it's a little hypocritical to celebrate 50 revolutions of the earth around the sun, when the whole point of it is to be less earth-bound).

-- In Soviet Russia...Rockets launch you!

Re:Still counting in earth-years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791688)

Hypocritical?

Re:Still counting in earth-years? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792570)

when the whole point of it is to be less earth-bound)

Who said that was the point? Frankly, satellites have provided me with WAY more benefit than any moon landing ever did. AFAIC, *that* was the point.

Re:Still counting in earth-years? (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792712)

You're an animal. A human to be specific. You've evolved and internalized via biological functions all manner of earth-bound cycles. You are not an interstellar space spore. The idea that we can just get rid of the year as a metric because of a guy orbiting the earth is a bit silly and certainly is not "the point."

Maybe in some transhuman future where everyone lives off-planet and we control our genes and biology. But right now? Naww. Monkeyman needs a calendar.

Re:Still counting in earth-years? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793412)

His fight doesn't count by FIA rules. For a flight to be official the pilot must land with his craft.
Yes shameless nitpicking that no including myself should give any weight too but someone was going to say it so I might as well get it out of the way.

The only downside is that Gargarin is not with us today. He is exploring beyond the rim.

conversation record... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790724)

Some translation of conversation just before flight between Korolev an Gagarin:

Korolev: Yuri, then I want you just to recall that after a moment's willingness to take place six minutes and will start before the flight so that you do not worry. Reception.
Gagarin: I understand, I am perfectly calm!
Queens: There's a packing tube - lunch, dinner and breakfast.
Gagarin: Clear
Korolev: Sausage, Bean there, and jam for tea. 63 pieces, you will be thick.
Gagarin: heh heh
Korolev: After arrival, eat everything at once - instructs Korolev.
->>Gagarin retains a sense of humor:
Gagarin: Main thing there is sausages to vodka drink with.
Everyone laughs
Korolev: Damn, and he writes all, the bastard! - Jokingly resents Korolev, knowing that the tape of Gagarin captures every word.
Everyone laughs

Original you can find in http://www.x-libri.ru/elib/innet170/00000001.htm
sorry for bad translation ;))

Food For the Moon Landing Skeptics (1, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790956)

... listening to prerecorded messages from the satellite as it orbits ...

It was all a fake! Well, at least we have Buzz Aldrin, ready to turn any impertinent folk's face into a Picasso, if the journalist claims that the Moon Landing was a fake. If I had traveled to the Moon and back, I would also be so onery, in case someone asked me if it was a fake. Oh, you could check it yourselves . . . one of the Moon missions left a mirror on the surface of the Moon. All you need to do, is to shine a laser on it.

Oh, and one more thing. The US Space Program was really tits up . . . even Werner von Braun had to turn to Walt Disney for support. When Sputnik and Gagarin went up, JFK got his ass in gear.

Something to the state of the times in the world way back when, from Ice Station Zebra:

David Jones: The Russians put our camera made by *our* German scientists and your film made by *your* German scientists into their satellite made by *their* German scientists.

Re:Food For the Moon Landing Skeptics (2)

GWRedDragon (1340961) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791042)

Oh, you could check it yourselves . . . one of the Moon missions left a mirror on the surface of the Moon. All you need to do, is to shine a laser on it.

Hardly evidence, given that even the biggest conspiracy theorists probably believe that there were successful unmanned moon landings. Not that I don't think men landed on the moon, but it's difficult to conclusively prove if you have zero trust in official sources and somehow discount all the photographs and video.

Re:Food For the Moon Landing Skeptics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35792878)

In 1969 the Americans first landed men on the moon. Now some people have made names for themselves by saying that this and subsequent landings never happened. Their position is that NASA faked them in order to save face and fool the public. To prove their point they rely on explanations of the reported events using dubious science and lay explanations that any first year science major would and does, laugh at.

However, they always miss or purposely avoid the the one piece of irrefutable proof that it did in fact happen. That is that the Soviet government never refuted the American claims and they were in a unique position to do so. For even after the Americans landed on the moon the Soviets still continued to send orbiters, landers and rovers to the moon.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/spacecraft_planetary_lunar.html

Now if they wanted to get the goods on the Americans all they had to do was to land, photograph or explore with a rover the American landing sights. Just imagine the embarrassment not to mention the the damage to American credibility, at the height of the cold war no less, that such information would generate. Records even show that they never landed or even explored that areas that that American landings happened. So they did not even go and look to make sure because they knew it really happened.

They did not use it to pressure the Americans to stop bombing North Vietnam and Cambodia where Soviet military advisers were being killed as a result. They did not use it to pressure the United States to stop sending military advisers and Stinger missiles to the Afghan fighters during the Soviet occupation. They did not use it to stop the Star Wars program of the Regan administration.

In fact they did not even use it to turn the West's attention away from the Soviet Union during the Soviet Coup of 1991 when members of the Soviet government briefly deposed Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev and attempted to take control of the country.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_coup_attempt_of_1991

Which every body knew was the last death throws of the Soviet empire. If they did not use the information then to turn the attention of the American, and world public, inward to their own governments lies and thus corruption and force it to ignore the events in the Soviet Union in order to deal with a damaging domestic and international issue. Then the proof of faked moon landings did not and never existed.

One final thought. After the fall of the Soviet Union the Russian economy tanked. People were selling all kinds of stuff owed by the crumbling state, ships, weapons, artworks and knowledge but nobody ever approached any Western news agency or tabloid to sell them this information. And to say that one would buy it but not publish is foolish. The seller could just keep peddling it until some on did and then it would be old news and worthless until then it would still be worth something.

Re:Food For the Moon Landing Skeptics (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793608)

The US space program wasn't in bad shape at all by then. Sputnik had kicked it into gear back in 1957. You have to look at the military side to understand. By 1961 the US was actually far ahead im ICBMs, SLBM and Bombers. The R-7 was a massive impractical ICBM that took a week to prep for a launch but it was the only thing the USSR had that had a chance of threatening the US with. In 1957 the US was working on making practical ICBMs and smaller warheads. It had no military need for anything like the R-7. By 1964 the US had jumped into the lead with Gemini and by 1969 the US landed on the moon.

Oh and just for historical perspective the US didn't any German help with cameras or film for spysats. We had Dr. Land. The same man that developed the Polaroid helped develop the first cameras for the U2, SR-71, and the first US spy sats. But it was a good movie.

Yuri's Night (1)

oneiros27 (46144) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791458)

Or, if you don't want to sit at home listening to the radio, you can see if there is a Yuri's Night [yurisnight.net] party near you. Most were over the weekend, but there are still a few the night of.

Also, it's the anniversary of the first US space shuttle launch.

And a shout-out to Sergei Korolev too (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792294)

I would also like to recognize Sergei Korolev [slashdot.org] , a name that's sadly unknown in the United States, Without him, there might never have been a space race, or satellites, or a man on the moon, etc. He's the guy who achieved the miracle of talking Kruschev into a space program. He also taught himself rocketry, worked his way through school as a common laborer, served time in Stalin's gulags, and headed the team that recreated the V-2 rocket in the Soviet Union after the War.

ooops, bad link (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792316)

Sergei Korolev [wikipedia.org]

Re:And a shout-out to Sergei Korolev too (1)

k6mfw (1182893) | more than 3 years ago | (#35796664)

Sergei was offered the Nobel prize for Sputnik and Gagarin's flight. Nobel committee only knew of him as "Chief Designer" but USSR says these accomplishments are of "all people." They don't give the Nobel prize posthumously. What is amazing is he managed to stay alive from the gulags! An excellent book, "Korolev: How One Man Masterminded the Soviet Drive to Beat America to the Moon" by James Harford, http://www.amazon.com/Korolev-Masterminded-Soviet-Drive-America/dp/0471327212/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top [amazon.com]

Book has many interviews with several of Sergei's colleagues. One of them mentioned when Kennedy said America is going to race USSR to the moon. Russians could either compete in the race or not. They did neither (kind of like what America is doing now).

What if Korolev had died in the gulags? What if there were other "greats" who perished under Stalin's rule, and which certain things that could have been did not happen?

And 50 years later... (2)

tekrat (242117) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792480)

It's pretty much only the Russians still launching men/women into space. The US Space program is essentially, over.

NASA's plans are up in the air, muddled and without focus, liable to change on political whim, and even when they go forward, it will be hopelessly underfunded and probably a disaster.

Meanwhile, the Russians are using pretty much the exact same technology they were 50 years ago, and continuing to launch. NASA has to buy seats on the next few years of flights if we want to get anybody into or out of the ISS.

Maybe SpaceX will change things for the better, but what I find so sad is that the USA went to the moon, and now our country is just a shadow of it's former self, bloated, dull, and stupid. We're the Roman Empire waiting to fall. Nero is fiddling.

Here's to Yuri and Valentina though. I remember pointing out on Slashdot years ago, when Star Trek Enterprise premeired, how the title sequence avoided the Russians, even though it was trying to show the advancement of human space flight.

I suggest someone change that title sequence, because all the advancement in that area is coming from someplace else, Russia, China, India -- but likely NOT the USA.

Re:And 50 years later... (1)

quenda (644621) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793240)

The US Space program is essentially, over.

Manned program. Which is a bit sad, but the science goes on. And more so the military & intelligence side. Just without the PR program.

Re:And 50 years later... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35796844)

Wow way to turn a blind eye to the complete collapse of the Russian space industry, nevermind the long bread lines and hundreds of cancelled programs.

Lol Slashdot you guys are hilarious how much you hate the U.S. but love to suck the tits of it.

Please point to me the private space programs that are taking off in Russia/China/India....
Ohh you can't and the Shuttle has been taking up Russians/Indian's already, so much for that theory.

U.S. haters go home or move to China/Russia/India, "ooohh whats that?, you have become so complacent and living it up you choose to turn a blind eye to the misery of living in Russia/China/India.

Watch when NASA program does finally take off with the Aries there will still be people mumbling around here about how terrible the U.S. is, there is a whole generation of Apollo people who got spoiled and it was all over who had bigger military between Russia. It wasn't over Science/Exploring that we got to build all these programs in the 20th century.

first to orbit, but first up? (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792744)

Not to take away from Gagarin and the rest of the Soviet space program's accomplishment of putting a man in space, orbiting the earth, and returning safely, but it's important to remember he may not have been the first man in space.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Cosmonauts [wikipedia.org]

Considering the memory hole that the Soviet Union was, it's impossible to say if any of those are real or not (some are obviously hoaxes); but it's equally impossible to disprove at least some of them.

Re:first to orbit, but first up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35793032)

Eh. If that were true we would have found out about it after '91, when Yeltsin was showing us the "answers in the back of the book" from a bunch of other Cold War coverups.

Re:first to orbit, but first up? (1)

braindrainbahrain (874202) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797168)

Kewl story on the Lost Cosmonauts, thanks for posting.. See also this recent news blurb [npr.org] (and book [amazon.com] ) about the cosmonaut Vladimir Kamarov, allegedly the cosmonaut that Robert Heinlein heard about during his visit to the USSRin 1960.

What about the first African in space? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35796136)

When is that going to happen?

(Obviously without the aid of NON-AFRICANS)...

Yuri's Night is giving away a free eBook (1)

DrewMartin (2039756) | more than 3 years ago | (#35796174)

Yuri's Night folks are giving up copies of Martian Summer for a limited time. They're trying to create a space review mob to get space topics trending. Here is the link if you are interested: http://yurisnight.net/2011/04/yuri%E2%80%99s-night-and-martian-summer-the-millions-and-millions-give-away/ [yurisnight.net]

Programmed in to my Yaesu FT-530 (1)

wwphx (225607) | more than 3 years ago | (#35796820)

Eagerly hoping to hear something!

73, KB7UJR

Celebrating Russian space accomplishment at NASA (2)

k6mfw (1182893) | more than 3 years ago | (#35796836)

If there is one thing that is amazing is there are (were) celebrations of a Russian (or precisely Soviet) space accomplishment at a NASA facility. This was last year at NASA Ames Research Center, this year budget issues prevented this year's Yuri's Night but they had Yuri's Education Day (http://ynba.org/2011/).

Last year's event had all kinds of people you typically don't see at a NASA facility. Plus the music was really loud with all the flashing lights, etc. in same building that housed research aircraft (XV15, ER-2, QSRA which are all now long gone). And sometimes the smoke you smell coming from certain groups that is not cigarette or stage smoke. I asked some 20-somethings of what they think of it all, generally they see Gagarin's flight not as a competition between two countries but his flight was the evolutionary step of all mankind.

So here we are 50 years since Yuri's flight, and the big announcement is what museums will contain the Space Shuttles! It seems we all succumbed to being flatlanders. Only looking straight ahead (for profits) or looking down (for oil) instead of looking up, out, and beyond.

Re:Celebrating Russian space accomplishment at NAS (1)

slooglasnik (2039582) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797682)

True
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?