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Grammy Awards Finally Giving Games Some Respect

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the retroactive-award-for-morrowind-please dept.

Music 70

donniebaseball23 writes "Video game composers have been fighting for equal recognition at the Grammy Awards, and they've just taken another step in the right direction, as The Recording Academy has added video games to the descriptors of four awards, giving them equal billing with film and television. 'I think this could be viewed as a first step in the direction of video games getting their own category,' said the Recording Academy's Bill Freimuth."

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Still waiting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35789914)

Still waiting for the album of the year award to be anywhere close to relevant - or any of them. The Oscars are merely bad, the Grammys are closer to zero value.

Re:Still waiting (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 3 years ago | (#35789928)

I wonder if there's a People's Choice Award equivalent for the Grammy Awards.

Re:Still waiting (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793130)

Exactly. This is the crowd that gave Jethro Tull "Best Metal Album" and made Christopher Cross (yeah, I know, who?) their darling for one year. Who gives a flying frak at a rolling donut if they recognize gaming or not? But, hey, don't worry, be happy.

It's like animation fans who complained the Oscars had "ghettoized" them by creating a separate category for animated films. I kept asking them why they even cared what that circle jerk of pampered, Moon-sized egos did.

Re:Still waiting (1)

anyGould (1295481) | more than 3 years ago | (#35794754)

It's like animation fans who complained the Oscars had "ghettoized" them by creating a separate category for animated films. I kept asking them why they even cared what that circle jerk of pampered, Moon-sized egos did.

Like it or not, winning an Oscar turns into huge money for a film. Having a separate category for animated films has guaranteed that they'll never win Best Picture. Which goes a long way towards the idiot argument of "animated films aren't Real Cinema - when's the last time one won an Oscar?"

As little as I care, I'm glad they are included in an existing award, rather than put down at the kiddy table. Not expected one to *win* anytime soon, but at least they're included.

Re:Still waiting (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797810)

OK, but these are just animation fans I know. They have no financial stake in the films. Well, one owns some Pixar stock, I think, but Pixar hardly seems to be suffering from the situation.

first (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35789916)

first

not even close.... (2)

metalmaster (1005171) | more than 3 years ago | (#35789940)

Cinematics, story and voice acting in your average videogame cannot come close to the equivalent in feature films. Games are event-driven, so they're choppy by nature. There are games like Metal Gear Solid that have great cut scenes, but many gamers have complained that it seems more like a movie than a game. That seems like it's always going to be an argument, because if people wanted to watch a movie they would do so. They wouldnt be playing games

Re:not even close.... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35789974)

You are aware that the grammy awards are about music?

Stops playing one BGM and starts another (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791752)

Unless you're playing Lumines, Rez, DDR, Guitar Hero, or some other game whose gameplay revolves around music, the music in your game is going to be "choppy" to the extent that it stops playing one background music track and starts another. Smooth transitions won't be possible for several more years, at least until US Patent 5315057 [uspto.gov] expires at the end of 2014.

Re:Stops playing one BGM and starts another (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791878)

Bullshit. Just look up any old LucasArts iMUSE game like Monkey Island 2 for seamless transitions. More recently, take a look at The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape From Butcher Bay.

That *is* iMUSE (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791960)

Smooth transitions won't be possible for several more years, at least until US Patent 5315057 [Assignee: LucasArts] expires at the end of 2014.

Bullshit. Just look up any old LucasArts iMUSE game

The patent I linked to is in fact the patent on iMUSE, owned by LucasArts. Please allow me to rephrase: Smooth transitions won't be possible for several more years in games not published by LucasArts until the end of 2014.

Re:That *is* iMUSE (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35792454)

Then what about Escape From Butcher Bay?

Re:That *is* iMUSE (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 3 years ago | (#35795936)

"Smooth transitions won't be possible for several more years in games not published by LucasArts "

Bullshit. Borderlands, the original Unreal, both have quite smooth transitioning into music tracks.

Re:Stops playing one BGM and starts another (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35794610)

I wonder if Valve licensed this from LucasArts for the Director technology used in the Left 4 Dead games and HL2: Episode Two.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left_4_Dead#AI_Director

Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (3, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792708)

The Grammy's are the most notoriously meaningless awards in any field. They're owned by the studios, who use them as little more than PR tools. Every year they're won by the same predictable chart-toppers (indies need not apply), they reward popularity over talent (two words: "Milli Vanilli"), and no one takes them seriously. In fact, the Best New Artist Grammy has been jokingly called the "Kiss of Death" award, considering how most "artists" who win it end up becoming one hit wonders. The only reason anyone even watches that joke of an awards show is for the performances. And even those are pretty forgettable.

The Simpsons said it best. In an episode where Homer wins a Grammy, he takes one look at it, sees it's a Grammy and throws it out the window. Then, out the window, we hear a voice yelling "Hey, don't throw your trash out here!"

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (1)

Plastic Pencil (1258364) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792808)

Amen. Testify! Also, internet, weren't you supposed to save music by slaying the big labels? They may be slowly crumbling, but I can't remember a decade prior to last where mainstream music was so vapid, pointless, empty and engineered, with practically no redeeming qualities.

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35792924)

Pretty sure Arcade Fire is glad they didn't take your "don't bother to apply" advice.

Yeah, they are atypical for an indy band, but still...

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#35794780)

Arcade Fire

Warner Music Group has been distributing all Merge Records releases since 1993. Of course, you'll never learn that unless you dig into it, since they don't want to lose their indie cred by publicly being associated with a big studio. Read up on the Alternative Distribution Alliance [wikipedia.org] to see how Warner is secretly behind quite a few "indie" labels.

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35797452)

Not indie and they suck ass, besides.

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (1)

Schmyz (1265182) | more than 3 years ago | (#35795674)

I couldnt agree more...I am waiting for something profound to become an awards show...say...the awards show for the best folded laundry.

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (1)

s1d3track3D (1504503) | more than 3 years ago | (#35795940)

Every year they're won by the same predictable chart-toppers (indies need not apply)

Yeah, the timing of this move is extra suspicious, last year many indie artists were represented and nominated, including the huge surprise of Esperanza Spalding beating Justin Beiber for Best New Artist! (even if you hate him, everybody's heard of him, how many people have heard of her? not many is my guess).

Even if the Grammy's are diluted, they can help launch careers, just by exposing people to artists they might not be exposed to otherwise, another case in point, Nora Jones, a few years ago.

Whether or not you like these artists, I think it's clear that they represent 'musicians' and not just 'entertainers' and to me, more exemplify what a music award should be about. This comment [nytimes.com] makes a good point.

Re:Are you aware the Grammy's are a joke? (1)

Drakkenmensch (1255800) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797104)

The Simpsons said it best. In an episode where Homer wins a Grammy, he takes one look at it, sees it's a Grammy and throws it out the window. Then, out the window, we hear a voice yelling "Hey, don't throw your trash out here!"

Actually, he takes it back to his hotel room where he tries to pawn it off as a tip substitute to his hotel attendant. The guy replies "Oh boy, an award statue! Oh, it's only a Grammy." and tosses it down the balcony. The rest of the quote is accurate.

Re:not even close.... (2)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790060)

Wow, you are deluded. Considering most major games these days use techniques that are used in film for cinematic sequences, stories that have much more depth than the hollywood reeltrash, and actors that are also big names in hollywood, well, maybe they are more deserving than films these days.

Aside from this, it's not the Grammys that need to respect games... it would be gamers needing to respect the grammys - which I doubt will happen.

I'm not sure what games you play that make them "choppy by nature", but they aren't the games that I am playing.

Re:not even close.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790140)

A more apt comparison would be to rate video games to very early film.

Video Games, as an art, are relatively young. Film has over a hundred years behind it, while games have merely forty, assuming you include the arcade era. Thus, they are far less developed as an art form for the purposes of storytelling and narrative.

One can hardly expect an adolescent to have the same capacities as a fully grown adult. Likewise, video games may not measure up to current film because the film industry has had decades longer to perfect the art of telling a story. That does not mean, however, that they cannot be an art form, nor be recognized for their ability to convey a narrative experience.

Imagine if early silent films were compared to the art of theatre. Film would seem pathetic in comparison, but it has developed into a nuanced medium all its own. Your statement is essentially the same. The fact that the current form is less refined than a different art that has had far more time to mature is shortsighted.

Re:not even close.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791148)

Bah! There is more "art" in games than there is to be found in movies or tv from Hollywood. Hollywood is great at the craft, but there are too many comities involved in the production of a typical main stream US movie or tv show and they manage to strangle any art out of the equation. There are of course some exceptions, like probably a few big name directors that can film their vision without too much meddling.

Games have had the chance to be more original, but as gaming becomes more prevalent, more of artsy edges are polished away in the same manner to unify the product for the dumb mainstream consumer.

Re:not even close.... (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 3 years ago | (#35797724)

Video Games, as an art, are relatively young. Film has over a hundred years behind it, while games have merely forty [..] One can hardly expect an adolescent to have the same capacities as a fully grown adult.

Funny that you should compare video games to an adolescent. I've long thought that the industry's current obsession with seeing its own "maturity" and development in terms of comparing itself to the film industry as a sign of its underlying *immaturity*.

Right now the focus seems to be on pretentious, self-congratulatory attempts at cinema-mimicking narrative and emotional depth through self-consciously (*relatively*) big budget, cheesily-written sequences played out via horrid, unconvincing and mannequin-like CGI characters and patting themselves on the back at how "close" they are to cinematic quality (they aren't). It's more reminiscent of a teenager that wants to see themselves as mature, to be associated with those who get more respect... whose wannabe maturity really indicates the lack of just that.

When the video game industry has developed its own conventions, like cinema did when it moved out of the shadow of the theatre, when it realises that video games aren't- or shouldn't be- the same as films and start doing things on their own terms.... then *that* will be when it has grown up.

Re:not even close.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790206)

LOL and BLAH... Duuuude!... Games haven been 3D and Digital since at least 20 years now... Cinema has only recently catched up to video games in that regard...

get your facts updated man... and Metal Gear Solid is from 1998... so much fail...

Bwana Devil (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791792)

Games haven been 3D and Digital since at least 20 years now... Cinema has only recently catched up to video games in that regard

Cinema has been 3D since day one and stereoscopic since Bwana Devil in 1952.

Re:not even close.... (2)

metalmaster (1005171) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790370)

grammys == music....ok, cultural fail there

Wow, you are deluded. Considering most major games these days use techniques that are used in film for cinematic sequences, stories that have much more depth than the hollywood reeltrash, and actors that are also big names in hollywood, well, maybe they are more deserving than films these days. Aside from this, it's not the Grammys that need to respect games... it would be gamers needing to respect the grammys - which I doubt will happen. I'm not sure what games you play that make them "choppy by nature", but they aren't the games that I am playing.

Movies follow a linear progression of near constant dialogue. Game cinematics are broken up by uh....gameplay? I have seen a few games that move between cutscene and gameplay fluidly, but in many games this is a fault. One example being a boss battle. You kill your enemy with weapon A and the cutscene shows you doing so with weapon B OR you "kill" your enemy but in a cutscene they merely appear exhausted. This is choppy cinematics.

LOL and BLAH... Duuuude!... Games haven been 3D and Digital since at least 20 years now... Cinema has only recently catched up to video games in that regard... get your facts updated man... and Metal Gear Solid is from 1998... so much fail...

and finally, i know I shouldnt feed the cowards, but Im sure you're aware that the 4th installment of Metal Gear was released 3 orso years ago is among the most highly regarded games as far as its cinematics and story are concerned. However, many gamers have expressed their dislike for the game because of its long(7-10mins?) cutscenes. At that point you lose the focus of a game and it has become a series of movie clips

Re:not even close.... (1)

BanditCat (762235) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790558)

Shadow of the Colossus on PS2 is a stunning example of how wrong you are and have been for years; it plays like a movie end to end.

Re:not even close.... (1)

smelch (1988698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792548)

Heavy fuckin' Rain. Great movie that plays like a game.

Re:not even close.... (1)

Raenex (947668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793938)

Heavy fuckin' Rain. Great movie that plays like a game.

I played the demo and it was just awful. The first problem was the horrible controls: no free-look, awkward swiping motions, and just terrible walking animations. I felt like I was awkwardly controlling a zombie. They really should have just licensed an engine that didn't suck, something like GTA IV.

The second, and even more fundamental problem, was having to separate your attention between control prompts on the screen and following the "movie". Trying to do both at the same time takes the enjoyment out of each.

I really wanted to like Heavy Rain. I thought the atmosphere and story idea was cool, right down to the title. Unfortunately, as a game it sucked.

Re:not even close.... (1)

smelch (1988698) | more than 3 years ago | (#35794186)

Well I'm glad you played the demo and didn't like it from a brief encounter with a prostitute. The controls seem a little difficult at first but I got used to it pretty quickly. I also loved Indigo Prophecy. At one point in Heavy Rain I had my gun pointed at some guy who was losing his shit, saying in my head over and over "don't shoot him, don't shoot him, don't shoot him", the guy moved a little quickly and I accidentally shot him in panic. Its so immersive, its hard to fight back natural reactions. At one point I got so tense over some piece of context that I searched my entire house carefully, expecting something around every corner only to find out everything was ok. On a replay, this didn't even begin to happen as things triggered in a different order which made it much less tense (and the creepy music wasn't playing, and it was daylight). I've never been pulled in to a game quite like that. It actually duplicated the feeling of being creeped out alone in your house at night. Moments like this are scattered all over the place and two players will have completely different experiences. It may not be a great "game" as the mechanics are simple, but its a hell of a way to tell a story.

Re:not even close.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35793708)

Some games blend storytelling and gameplay without the need for cinematics. Take a look at Bioshock. Granted, it still follows the gameplay --> story section --> gameplay pattern, but some of the voicework done just for effect was pretty good (the part with a bunch of crazy splicers or whatever banging on the walls and screaming trying to break in was pretty creepy).

Re:not even close.... (1)

Malenfrant (781088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790728)

Dreamfall, by Funcom, is very like a film. It is an adventure game that that progresses through puzzles and cutscenes and dialogue. It is also one of my favourite games. The story is a lot better than most films because most films these days are very generic. I played through Dreamfall 10 times because I enjoyed the story so much, even though I knew how to complete it.

Re:not even close.... (1)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790730)

Have you ever watched your friend play Uncharted 2, Crysis or Call of Duty? The realism is so great that it's like you're watching a movie.

Re:not even close.... (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791694)

or even play Mega Man Legends 1 or 2...it's like a playable cartoon.

Call of Duty games realistic? (1)

dstyle5 (702493) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793814)

Call of Duty games realistic? The first few were pretty good and somewhat realistic, but since CoD 4 its been one big game that traded story and realism for Michael Bay style of storytelling. Its the antithesis of realism, eschewing it for over-the-top explosions and characters doing ridiculous things. I slogged through the "story" mode of MW2 since I bought it to play online with friends and found myself rolling my eyes many times throughout. The CoD games now are just a bunch of big action scenes with little story tying them together.

Re:not even close.... (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791292)

Cinematics, story and voice acting in your average videogame cannot come close to the equivalent in feature films. Games are event-driven, so they're choppy by nature. There are games like Metal Gear Solid that have great cut scenes, but many gamers have complained that it seems more like a movie than a game. That seems like it's always going to be an argument, because if people wanted to watch a movie they would do so. They wouldnt be playing games

On the other hand, check out this list:

1) No one makes any money but the distributors due to crooked accounting, and the distributors are being destroyed by "the internet".

2) Mass distributed content is formulaic and repetitive remakes of the same tired old ideas and frankly hasn't had anything new or fresh in many years.

3) 1% of the population is fanatic about it, the other 99% simply do not care.

4) Everyone in the biz thinks the world revolves around them, everyone outside the biz doesn't care at all about them (huge cultural impedance mismatch)

5) It takes a huge investment of time to understand the inside jokes, none of which are funny.

Sounds like a pretty good match!

Re:not even close.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35792902)

Good thing Grammy is about music then, fucktard.

Re:not even close.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35795508)

Well they do have a lot in common the categories - should be

1, Yet another sequel hash
2. Best script plot hole of the year
3. worst console port to pc award
4. Profit loss due to piracy and not crap product

Games shouldn't be treated as movies. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790000)

And I don't mean because games cannot be artistic. That's idiotic.

I mean because games are made better than Hollywood movies are.

I didn't believe this until recently. I thought even the most garbage movies shamed PC games. Then I played Mass Effect 2. I loved the game. But the Hollywood movie influence is everywhere.

Notably, the 'epic' (but unreal) shots. A character spray-firing a machine gun with no aim because it "looks cool." A character leaping off a falling building and it crashing down around him, just feet from crushing him. Said character shrugs and makes a smartass comment, unfazed. Setting a bomb timer to 10 seconds (WTF) and escaping with inches to spare. Or scenes like this one [youtube.com] (which is hilarious, but c'mon...). There are endless examples.

PC games have the potential to become even greater than movies, so long as they are not dragged down by Hollywood's stupid theatrics.

In short. Fuck the Grammy Awards. You suck.

Re:Games shouldn't be treated as movies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790036)

I should have previewed more. I typed 'PC games' twice when I really just meant games as a whole. Force of habit I guess. I'm sorry.

Re:Games shouldn't be treated as movies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790168)

Before someone says I'm an idiot for confusing Grammy Awards with Academy Awards, I'll beat you to it. I'm an idiot. Disregard OP.

// stupid /. post delay.

Re:Games shouldn't be treated as movies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790990)

Sorry, that was my alternate personality speaking.

Re:Games shouldn't be treated as movies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35791260)

Hahaha disregard that, I suck cocks!

For example: music in games! (1)

Kensai7 (1005287) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790116)

Finally!! This is great news because, seriously, music production in the latest blockbuster games is truly spectacular. Hear the latest Shogun 2: Total War soundtrack [totalwar.com] and it's frankly Hollywood on Windows!

Re:For example: music in games! (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792206)

Why in just the latest blockbuster games? The best game music is from the 8-bit era, when composers were so limited that it really took a genius to make anything sound good.

Who gives a fuck about the Grammy awards? (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790120)

Just a bunch of RIAA insiders stroking themselves, and insisting the rest of us must care about it (since it dominates the newscast that night).

The reason it took so long (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790130)

...was that for the past 18 or so years, the grammy for game music (heck even awesome drowning sounds -- remember Quake Classic?) would have always gone to Trent Reznor hands down.

Civ 4 (3, Interesting)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790316)

The title song from Civilization 4 won a Grammy this year, becoming the first song from a video game to do so. I wonder if that had anything to do with their decision? As is often the case, you need really top-notch, undeniable talent to break down the barrier. Once it's broken, things get easier.

Re:Civ 4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35794864)

If I'm not mistaken, though, it won not because it was video game music, but because it was released on an actual album and was actually good.

No one listens to video game music. OK, not no one, but no one with taste. People will listen to music that happens to be in video games, like the case of Baba Yetu (the Civ 4 theme in question), but no one listens to music that's explicitly designed to be a video game song.

For good reason - no one listens to the actual movie music scores either. If you look at a movie soundtrack, you'll notice that the songs you can buy on the soundtrack album generally aren't the versions used in the movie. Instead they use the same themes, but are re-written to actually be interesting to listen to: no one is going to listen to music that was written explicitly to be heard in the background behind a bunch of sound effects and dialog. Regardless of whether it was for a video game or movie.

Re:Civ 4 (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 3 years ago | (#35800404)

If I'm not mistaken, though, it won not because it was video game music, but because it was released on an actual album and was actually good.

IMHO "actually good" is the understatement of the year. I looked up that music on youtube after the grammy award and it FLOORED me. And not just one version but:
  - The official music/video version (of just the baba yatu song)
  - The PBS special on the first live performance (including the "coronation" intro, TWO videos, and a duet). This is the version that won the Grammy.
  - At least one of the user-generated alternate videos worked out with even better sync-to-the-music, and
  - The Dubai Fountain display based on / inspired by it was also phenomenal (with several different youtube videos from different angles).

It's not just me that was impressed, too. Think about it: How good does a piece of work whose lyrics are a Swahili translation of the Lord's Prayer have to be to inspire a composition for the Dubai Fountain? (Even if you DO know that Islam claims Allah == Jehova, explicitly recognizes the bible as a form of "the book" and Christians as "people of the book", treats Jesus as their second most important prophet and predicts his second coming.)

Who cares? (5, Insightful)

hairyfish (1653411) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790374)

Why do gamers care about the Grammys? As a gamer, I couldn't care less about *any* award show. The whole concept is some outdated idea from the 20th century when media companies had a monopoly on distribution, and used these shows to peddle their wares. The rise of the Internet has made them obsolete.

Re:Who cares? (1)

martinX (672498) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790458)

Where's my mod points when I need them. Gone are the days when the industry can say "look at me" and we all collectively do.

Re:Who cares? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790732)

I don't have a problem with game awards shows that award all aspects of gaming and development. If it wouldn't appeal to a huge general audience, then broadcast it online to a niche audience (a well done one would still be huge) and treat it with respect and dignity. I'd pay a few bucks to watch that live online every year. Awards are part of acknowledging and rewarding bold new attempts, even if they're not commercially successful. They're important in every industry, frankly. Granted, some are more relevant than others (I can't think of many things less relevant than the Grammy's -- except maybe the Oscar's and the one for kids). Instead of piggy backing on something that already exists, I'd love to see something crafted lovingly for gamers and game makers. And by lovingly, I don't mean the fucking shit that Spike TV does every year that makes you feel kind of sick and embarrassed to be a gamer.

About the Grammies? Naw, but the IGF? I for one. (1)

HeckRuler (1369601) | more than 3 years ago | (#35792734)

As a gamer, I couldn't care less about *any* award show.

I dunno, I'm a pretty big fan of the independent game festival [igf.com] , and seeing who won what. Usually nukes a week or two of productivity for me.

Re:Who cares? (1)

fermion (181285) | more than 3 years ago | (#35793214)

Which is why they are doing this. By including games, they increase they increase the chance that a person who never watched the Grammy awards might watch. The Grammy awards are irrelevent to the gamer generation. This is just a way to make it a little less irrelevant.

JRPGs - credit where it's due (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790838)

For me the JRPGs would dominate any top 10 list of game soundtracks (spending a fortune licensing commercial music a la GTA doesn't count).
Presumably, Western composers get paid peanuts to write in-game music, and the results are laughable - music nobody would ever choose to listen to outside the context of the game.

There's no reason for the Grammys to recognise Japanese artists such as Koichi Sugiyama and Nobuo Uematsu who are truly brilliant modern-day composers - I think computer game composers command a lot more respect in Asia than they do over here. Writing film scores is about the only way to popularise modern classical music, and that won't change so long as the gaming industry carries on underpaying their employees.

What was the last decent original soundtrack for a PC game? Transport Tycoon?

Re:JRPGs - credit where it's due (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35790992)

Transport Tycoon?

Out of the top of my head Portal and VVVVV have amazing music, also for me stuff like Wipeout or Ghost in the Shell (1997) was much more innovative than JRPGs one. Don't get me wrong, I still have FFVI soundtrack in my hard drive, but aside experiments like the opera house performance i find it to be too focused on doing its job (move your emotions) somewhat neglecting searching what new stuff you can do in the genre, much like a Toy Story movie they deliver flawlessly, but can't shake the plastic flavor out of my mouth.

Braid and most other Valve games also have amazing pieces. And if moving themes a la JRPG are what get's you try Elder Scrolls pieces or maybe Deus Ex soundtrack.

As for background music? Few things are better than the original SC soundtrack.

Re:JRPGs - credit where it's due (1)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 3 years ago | (#35794620)

Shattered Horizon's title song is amazing; I honestly don't know if they have any other songs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJfIbfOLvpI [youtube.com]

And the life time achievement (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#35790898)

And the life time achievement goes to [opens the envelope] chess

Chris Hülsbeck (1)

Jimpqfly (790794) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791018)

I hope Chris Hülsbeck (http://www.huelsbeck.com/ [huelsbeck.com] ) will have some reward for his career, one day ...

Some of the music he has composed :
- R-Type
- Giana Sisters
- Turrican 1, 2 and 3
- Apidya
- Tunnel B1
- Extreme Assault
....

Re:Chris Hülsbeck (1)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791900)

I know almost nothing about the Giana Sisters except that i got a cool remix of its music via OCRemix [ocremix.org] . I guess it was some kind of Super Mario Bros knock-off that most people have never heard of? It kind of surprises me to see any kind of reference to the game show up, but it totally makes sense that if so it would be a discussion about game music :)

Lifetime Achievement Award (3)

gravis777 (123605) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791610)

Now if only they will go back and give Nobuo Uematsu a lifetime achievement award! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Fantasy#Music [wikipedia.org]

Re:Lifetime Achievement Award (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35793952)

Now if only they will go back and give Nobuo Uematsu a lifetime achievement award! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Fantasy#Music [wikipedia.org]

Along with Jeremy Soule [wikipedia.org] .

Let me just say that... (2)

Dr. Stavros (808432) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791634)

This is a triumph.

Re:Let me just say that... (2)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791718)

I'm making a note here, huge success.
It's hard to overstate my satisfaction.

Re:Let me just say that... (1)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 3 years ago | (#35791920)

I agree, this is a huge success. I should make a note of it to remind myself of this accomplishment later.

Fahrenheit (Indigo Prophecy) (1)

fervus (1841214) | more than 3 years ago | (#35817200)

Fahrenheit (Indigo Prophecy) - Now this is the kind of game/movie that I would love to see more of. The idea was simple: a game that plays like a movie but in which you still continuously(almost) PLAY the game. It had great story, great feeling to the scenes, sound was appropriate and cinematics blended in so naturally. It all worked out. In my opinion I would give that game an Oscar. I think the story is the most important aspect of a game - as in any movie. Match it with good acting and keep the user playing (not as a spectator) and you will get a lot of success with it. In time, if enough of these are created, games will get their own Oscar award. P.S. I know Grammy's are just for sound.. but we're talking about entertainment in general here.
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