×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

New Chili Is World's Hottest

samzenpus posted about 3 years ago | from the it-tastes-like-burning dept.

Australia 201

bazzalunatic writes "The Trinidad Scorpion Butch T chili is grown and harvested by an Australian company, and not by the inmates of an Australian insane asylum as rumored. The chili is claimed to be the world's hottest (1,463,700 SU), surpassing the current Naga Viper chili at 1,382,118 SU. From the article: '"They're just severe, absolutely severe," says Marcel de Wit, The Chili Factory co-owner. "No wonder they start making crowd-control grenades now with chilies. It's just wicked." The chili is so scorching that Marcel and his team have to wear protective gear when handling the new variety. "If you don't wear gloves your hands will be pumping heat for two days later," he says.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

201 comments

COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (4, Funny)

Spritzer (950539) | about 3 years ago | (#35794712)

Someone better find a better ice cream to start chasing these chilies with.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794818)

So what's the point? To show off how much pain you can take with dinner?

When it is that hot, you singe your taste buds anyway. There is no enjoyment in eating food I can't taste.

Crowd control is about the only use for these things.

I reiterate - what's the point?

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

blai (1380673) | about 3 years ago | (#35794912)

College, everyone's drunk, you add some of this to their chasers, ???, profit

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794962)

It's kind of like sex. Hard to explain, if you haven't done it. Hmmm... maybe /. isn't the best place for that analogy...

In any case, rather than saying they "singe your taste buds", I'd say that chilis like these /expose/ them. And capsicum is quite good for you.

I'll try 'em when I can get 'em. Ghost peppers were awesome.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795470)

Oh, BS. Your taste buds don't need to be "exposed." That's just nonsense.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35796196)

No, but his rectum does.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (5, Informative)

grub (11606) | about 3 years ago | (#35794970)


I don't mind the pain of eating spicy foods.

What I don't like is the anal searing I feel as the lava is being extruded from my quivering sphincter.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (2)

rogueippacket (1977626) | about 3 years ago | (#35795188)

I don't think it's a question of "what's the point", but "how high can you go". Considering that a run-of-the-mill Chili pepper runs at about 40 000 SU and can make food unbearable for most of the population, growing a pepper which is almost 40x hotter really only has one use - crowd control. Even if you are a seasoned spice hound and eat Habanero peppers for breakfast (at 200 000 SU), this thing would burn a hole in your stomach lining if you ate it whole.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795684)

Capsaisin doesn't "burn a hole in your stomach" (I assume you mean a peptic ulcer). It stimulates your nerves into thinking that something is burning; it doesn't actually burn anything. The pain is an illusion.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

fotoflojoe (982885) | about 3 years ago | (#35795224)

Eating chilis releases endorphins. People get hooked on that release.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (2)

marsu_k (701360) | about 3 years ago | (#35795564)

True, but also the taste. Once you get used to the heat (yes, your tolerance grows quite quickly) you learn to appreciate the flavours, they do exist even in the hottest varieties. I personally prefer Naga Jolokia over Habaneros - not only you have to use less, the taste is much sweeter and fruity. Habaneros are quite bitter.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (2)

Anrego (830717) | about 3 years ago | (#35795718)

Agreed.

This is why I like scotch bonnets over habaneros. They both have the same heat, but I find scotch bonnets impart a nicer flavour.

I'd also note that tolorance drops quite quickly too! I had to stop eating excessively spicy food for a few months (for reasons unrelated to the food) .. and I couldn't even make it through the supermarket "spicy" chili that I used to jokingly scoff at for a while afterwards.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | about 3 years ago | (#35796290)

Scotch bonnets give me hiccups. I like the color and taste and can take the 'heat' but I can't bear the hiccups!

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

Anrego (830717) | about 3 years ago | (#35795558)

Eating spicy food just shy of the "it tastes like pain" line is quite enjoyable. Just enough pain to release those endorphins, which have a mellow, relaxing effect.

Eating excessively spicy foods to the point where you can barely choke it down and keep a straight face... yeah.. that's for the macho types. Have to admit, I'm curious what this thing would be like. I've tried the Naga peppers.. grown locally so probably not the full deal.. but definitely wasn't especially pleasurable (not as bad as I envisioned though).

My current pain/pleasure line falls at scotch bonnets... and that tends to be chopped up and cooked into something. Beyond that... I'm not enjoying it.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (2)

Hatta (162192) | about 3 years ago | (#35796046)

When it is that hot, you singe your taste buds anyway.

You realize the "heat" is just a ligand receptor interaction. There's no actual heat there. Spicy food does decrease your perception of other flavors, but this is not a cytotoxic effect. It's not quite clear how it happens, but since capsaicin application under the tongue can depress taste perception on the tongue it's probably some sort of cross talk between the pain fibers and taste fibers before they reach the brain.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

lonelytrail (1741524) | about 3 years ago | (#35796104)

Have you ever considered people other than you may have a different lifestyle and thus different likes and dislikes than you? Just because you don't see the point, does that make it completely useless for everyone in the world? Hmmmm.

Let's just be completely racist here and say that there might be some people from India who have been delivered VERY spicy food since they were in utero and probably have a tolerance (and also desire) for heat that you couldn't come close to comprehending. Does that make them macho show-offs? I don't think so.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795014)

and ruin all the fun... no

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 3 years ago | (#35795782)

If you're just going to kill the heat with ice cream, why bother? I eat spicy food because I like the heat. If I didn't want the heat, I wouldn't do it. There is such a thing as too hot, but in those cases I just don't eat it, rather than cutting the heat with dairy. If it's so hot that you need something to kill the pain, it's too hot to be reasonably enjoyed.

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (4, Interesting)

gstoddart (321705) | about 3 years ago | (#35796042)

If it's so hot that you need something to kill the pain, it's too hot to be reasonably enjoyed.

Which is why as I've gotten older I've more or less decided that anything beyond a banana pepper or a jalapeno is pointless.

I just don't enjoy it anymore, and my first encounter with habaneros pretty much showed me that things like a mouth that stays on fire for hours and burning hoop just aren't fun. I've just never been able to enjoy super spicy foods as much anymore -- at least not at the endurance end of the spectrum.

The dairy is nice because it's kind of an off-switch -- and, really, all the cultures that have the spicy food use dairy to quench the heat, so why is it cheating? It's not like it's some manly endurance test to take the full heat without any relief ... well, I guess to some it might be.

I'm sure some people really do enjoy these things, but I've more or less given up. I know someone who has used so much spices over the years, and smoked for long enough that she has no taste buds left ... if it's not spicy as hell, and/or salty as hell, she can barely taste it.

Mostly, however, this article makes me think of Guatamalan Insanity Peppers from the Simpsons. :-P

Re:COME ON ICE CREAM!!! (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 3 years ago | (#35796206)

I mostly agree. I use habaneros very sparingly. One habanero in a 9x13 casserole is plenty. When used in small amounts the heat isn't overpowering and you can still taste the sweet fruitiness of the pepper.

And sure, dairy is fine if you just use it to titrate the heat. My point is that eating something way too hot just because you can dull the pain with dairy is silly. If it hurts, don't do it, there's nothing really to be gained. Better to use one pepper to season a pot of chili for several dozen people than to eat that pepper and vomit lava out your nose and try to figure out how to get ice cream up there.

I've got to order some of these! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794796)

Now I see this after I planted my garden with ghost chilis!

Re:I've got to order some of these! (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795424)

Now I see this after I planted my garden with ghost chilis!

As a rule, chilies grow hottest where they get the most sun and the weather is hot. High humidity keeps the air warm overnight, which helps in the production of Capsaicin. For northern hemisphere there's still plenty of time to plant these before their best months of production (July-August).

How Much Is That in Quetzlzacatenango Peppers? (1)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | about 3 years ago | (#35794804)

the world's hottest chilli (1,463,700 SU), surpassing the current Naga Viper chilli, at 1,382,118 SU

But how much is that in Quetzlzacatenango peppers?

Re:How Much Is That in Quetzlzacatenango Peppers? (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 3 years ago | (#35794932)

Sorry, that is not an accepted slashdot unit of measure. Please restate the question in the form of Libraries of Congress.

Re:How Much Is That in Quetzlzacatenango Peppers? (1)

jd (1658) | about 3 years ago | (#35795078)

Assuming the Library of Congress to be at STP, how many LoCs is this new chilli?

Re:How Much Is That in Quetzlzacatenango Peppers? (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 3 years ago | (#35796036)

15 scovilles is approximately 1 ppm capsaicin. A library of congress is approximately 0.001 ppm of the data universe. This pepper should be about 1000 LoCs. Admittedly, there are significant roundoff errors in that calculation, but it should be good enough for the layman.

Re:How Much Is That in Quetzlzacatenango Peppers? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 years ago | (#35794996)

To measure it properly, basically it's going to be 7 tequilas to get over a Trinidad Scorpion Butch T chili. Quetzlzacatenangos are only 5.

I'll pass. (1)

grub (11606) | about 3 years ago | (#35794810)


I eat habaneros and get a serious case of the Ring of Fire.

Re:I'll pass. (0)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 3 years ago | (#35795850)

I pooped out a burning ring of fire
I went down, down, down, and the flames went higher
and it burns, burns, burns, the ring of fire
the ring of fire

What's the point? (2)

Literaphile (927079) | about 3 years ago | (#35794828)

I don't get it - what's the point? With a chili that hot, even if it's diluted in a sauce you're not going to get anything resembling a nice flavour or taste, just fire in your mouth. I'd much rather eat something that packed a moderate punch along with decent flavour.

Re:What's the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794876)

The point is to point and laugh at the fool that goes to the toilet immediately after preparing the hot sauce.

Re:What's the point? (1)

osgeek (239988) | about 3 years ago | (#35794916)

The point is Youtube.

Go to Youtube and search for "ghost pepper". You'll come up with an assortment of fools proving their machismo on camera.

Some of the videos are hilarious.

I welcome these new all-powerful chili pepper overlords and the Internet hilarity they bring with them.

Always remember (1)

beamdriver (554241) | about 3 years ago | (#35794992)

"It doesn’t matter who you are, or what you’ve done, or think you can do. There’s a confrontation with destiny awaiting you. Somewhere, there is a chilli you cannot eat."

-- Daniel Pinkwater, A Hot Time in Nairobi

Re:What's the point? (1)

NekSnappa (803141) | about 3 years ago | (#35796294)

My favorite video of that sort is where a guy gets his (soon to be ex) girlfriend to eat a tablespoon of chili powder by telling her it's cinnamon. Hilarity, and a really pissed off chick, ensues.

Drugs (2)

PhreakOfTime (588141) | about 3 years ago | (#35794938)

I don't get it - what's the point?

It releases quite pleasurable natural drugs in your brain.

Endorphins

It's a legal drug, for now.

Re:Drugs (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795284)

Can we ever have a discussion about anything without the pro-drug hippie losers telling everyone to get high?

God I am so sick if you people. Pregnant mom with morning sickness? Smoke weed! Want to stop children from trying drugs when they are 12? Give them weed when they are 6! Enjoy food? It's because you are GETTING HIGH!

I wish some kind of super-drug that was fatal was developed so the Earth could be purged of all the idiots like yourself, and you could even die doing what you think you love too. Then I wouldn't have to hear about how red your eyes are, or how high you got last Friday, or how high you plan to get next Friday, because I don't give a FUCK.

>>herp a derp legal drugs

I hope you commit suicide someday.

Re:Drugs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795444)

Angry Troll much?

I didn't see the GP say anything about encouraging drug use, much less about smoking weed. I saw an answer to a question someone asked as to why anyone would enjoy eating these peppers.

Re:Drugs (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795468)

I don't get it - what's the point?

It releases quite pleasurable natural drugs in your brain.

Endorphins

It's a legal drug, for now.

Want to try something fun? Half a bunch of hot peppers - habaneros, scotch bonnets or hotter and place on one of those fan driven dehydrators inside your house. Hours of fun as your eyes, sinuses and lungs encounter airborne capsaicin. It's almost like swimming in caffeine.

Took hours to air out the house...

Re:What's the point? (2)

dragonhunter21 (1815102) | about 3 years ago | (#35794942)

Riot control. Imagine if even a diluted version of that pepper were to get sprayed at you. You'd be face-down in the dirt, crawling at your eyes in seconds.

Re:What's the point? (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 3 years ago | (#35795196)

And they are not controlled (yet) so perhaps we can start growing and harvesting them to use against the government oppress^H^H^H^H^H^H^H law officers.

Re:What's the point? (1)

mr1911 (1942298) | about 3 years ago | (#35794948)

You don't even have to read TFA - the summary mentions "crowd control grenades".

I work with some guys that eat crazy hot stuff just to say they ate crazy hot stuff. I don't think they can even taste anything anymore.

Re:What's the point? (1)

kjdames (588423) | about 3 years ago | (#35794976)

Many people believe eating spicy food releases endorphins in your body because your body is tricked into believing that it is in pain and releases the pain-relieving endorphins.

Scovilles, they'll be the dead of you! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795780)

...tricked into believing it is in pain...

You'd better believe it is raw, actual, undiluted pain! Not some imaginary "if you don't think about it, it will go away" kind of pain, no sir!

I was once convinced I was quite tolerant to spicy food. I ate Mdm Jeanette and Habaneros as a snack. Then someone got me a few Bhut Jolokia peppers. And, yes, I was stupid enough to accept the dare. Pain and suffering commenced. It is hard to describe the feeling you have about something that you really, really want to stop but which you know is only just starting to build up. Wave after wave of pain.

You know those things that are not fun when you're doing it, but you can kind of laugh about it later? Well, this is not such a thing. It's been well over a year and I still don't think I should've done that. But hey, you're curious, right? Try it for yourself! It'll hurt only for a couple of hours, you'll live to tell the tale. Probably, anyway.

Re:What's the point? (2)

Duradin (1261418) | about 3 years ago | (#35795050)

It's the same point as putting linux on your [toaster|vacuum|console]. Bad experience, limited use, but you do it anyways.

I don't know about this new one but Bhut Jolokias are difficult to grow, much more finicky than most peppers, so it's a challenge and if successful a chemical weapons plant.

Re:What's the point? (3, Funny)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about 3 years ago | (#35795954)

I have never had a problem growing Bhut Jolokias up here in Minnesota in the summer. We have some nice hot humid days and it still can get cool in the night. I do have to start them inside each year since it is still possible to get some hard freezes even now. I love these peppers since these are what I consider a hot pepper, I grow also grow jalapeños, bell, cayenne, habanero and can eat all of them fresh off the plant like candy. Fresh ones are always better and hotter than the ones from the store

Interesting story. One time I was making chili and forgot to wash my hands after cutting up all the peppers (about 2 bells, 12 jalapeños, 12 cayenne, 6 habanero, and 6 Bhut Jolokias) and went to pee. I ended up curled up on the floor in the fetal position for about half an hour I have never felt that much pain ever. I was numb for several hours afterwards. I never notice it on my hands as they are rough and calloused, but it is a different story on sensitive skin.

Re:What's the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795764)

There are numerous uses for peppers [wikimedia.org] including food, relatively safe weapons (personal defense & crowd control), and as pesticides in farming. Furthermore, medical uses are abundant for capsaicin [wikimedia.org], including the treatment of wounds, skin disorders, digestive problems, and neuropathy.

So they bred a really hot pepper. Tag as idle and move on, right fellas? I mean it's not about iphones, linux, or obscure physics, so it must not be important.

In fact, this is the very heart of science, and a type of science (plant breeding) that is older, and more important to the long-term survival of the human race, than virtually all others.

Plant breeding is hard, thankless work that most people never even think about (except for the occasional GMO/Non-GMO debate). In some plants, such as trees that take many years to grow and bear fruit, selective breeding programs can take decades just to find one desirable trait for disease resistance. Shawn Mehlenbacher [oregonstate.edu] at Oregon State University has spent decades breeding hazelnuts that are resistant to Eastern Filbert Blight so that we don't lose the species of tasty hazelnut that you all enjoy.

This same story is true for virtually all of the food you eat - there is some scientist at some boring agricultural college, at a seed bank [wikimedia.org], or at a germplasm repository [portlandmonthlymag.com], working his or her life away to make sure that your favorite foods are still available for future generations, and if they have some spare time, breeding them to be bigger, better, and tastier than ever.

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794840)

Is it the new hotness, or hot newness?

Ghost pepper old news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794878)

Last I heard the ghost pepper was the hottest. This sounds like it's taking it to a whole new level.

Does not fempute? (4, Insightful)

uberjack (1311219) | about 3 years ago | (#35794924)

You have to wear protective gear, yet in TFA photo, they aren't?

Re:Does not fempute? (1)

BassMan449 (1356143) | about 3 years ago | (#35795102)

I doubt you would need protective gear until you cut them up and got the juice on your skin. That's when you would have issues.

Re:Does not fempute? (3)

jd (1658) | about 3 years ago | (#35795116)

They were experimenting to see if it causes mutations.

Re:Does not fempute? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795728)

They were experimenting to see if it causes mutations.

Pretty much all capsicums (peppers) are cultivars or mutations of the original plants from Central America. What is interesting is to seek out the original plants.

Re:Does not fempute? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795314)

You have to wear protective gear, yet in TFA photo, they aren't?

Skin of the pepper isn't the hot part. When you halve a pepper look for the white fleshy bit around where the seeds are located. That's the hottest part of the pepper. If you are looking for the most intense experience, trim that bit from your peppers and toss the rest.

Re:Does not fempute? (1)

outsider007 (115534) | about 3 years ago | (#35795544)

TFA says *you* have to wear protective gear. These guys obviously have testicular fortitude above and beyond the average mortal, and also tolerance probably comes into play at some point.

Re:Does not fempute? (1)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | about 3 years ago | (#35795704)

You have to wear protective gear, yet in TFA photo, they aren't?

They only wear the gear while cooking them. From TFA:

"We went to Melbourne to cook our first batch of the sauce, the Scorpion Strike, we all had to wear full chemical masks and suit-up with full protection suits and gloves to cook these up." Marcel says. "Imagine, when you start cooking with it - those fumes that come out of the pot."

I've never commented before but, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35794972)

This is an article on slashdot because....?

Re:I've never commented before but, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795272)

this is /., no longer "news for nerds, stuff that matters", but "whatever random articles get submitted, the moderators don't give a shit anymore"

Re:I've never commented before but, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795340)

SCIENCE!

Um...yum? (1)

wandazulu (265281) | about 3 years ago | (#35794978)

Given the protective gear necessary to handle these peppers, I'm assuming they aren't going to be available to the home consumer at the local co-op. Even if the home consumer got ahold of one of these, it seems like its mere presence in the kitchen would render chili and salsa essentially inedible; what would I do with one of these, really?

Re:Um...yum? (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | about 3 years ago | (#35795878)

I can see this finding its way into some restaurant's food challenge. The Phaal challenge of Man vs. Food comes to mind:

http://www.eatmedaily.com/2009/01/the-phaal-challenge-at-brick-lane-curry-house-on-man-v-food-video/

Any time a gas mask is required for cooking, you can tell the food will be spicy!

If the goal is just a chemical burn at this point (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 3 years ago | (#35795022)

Why not just make chili with 12 Molar Hydrochloric Acid? Let's see you top THAT with some lousy chili pepper!

Re:If the goal is just a chemical burn at this poi (1)

DCFusor (1763438) | about 3 years ago | (#35795134)

Because HCL tastes too much like lemonade and would clash with the other flavors in the chili?

In fact, the effect on skin (and tongue) is much less with the HCL. Now, if you were talking sulfuric or nitric.... But you wouldn't want to become flammable yourself - that's how you make guncotton.

Re:If the goal is just a chemical burn at this poi (1)

Loadmaster (720754) | about 3 years ago | (#35795244)

New from Coke Lime Flavored HCL that blends perfectly with your hot wings!

Like Hotdog eating contest (4, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795028)

I like hot food, very hot food, but I don't see any of these hottest chilies making it to my pantry any time soon.

Outside of the curiosity of how much Capsaicin we can get a capsicum to produce, these don't appear terribly useful in dietary circles. Though I suppose someone could host a contest of gastonomic masochists to see who can eat the most.

For painkiller they might be useful. I grew Habanero peppers and a woman at work asked if she could have some for her grandfather. A day after I gave her bag of a dozen she said he really appreciated them - could he get some more. I was awestruck - "He ate all of them already?" No, he mashed them up and applied them to his arthritic hands to take the pain away. Aha. Well done, him. I had more than I needed and gave them as many as they could take - the plants really went to town from mid July to late August in Michigan heat and humidity.

Re:Like Hotdog eating contest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795786)

Best use for habaneros... Inner Beauty Hot Sauce

This recipe is from http://www.hotsauceblog.com/hotsaucearchives/home-style-inner-beauty-hot-sauce-recipe/ and is very close to the one we use (not sure where we got our recipe - it's written down on a tattered, mustard-stained piece of paper). We put up a couple quarts of this every fall.

Home Style Inner Beauty Hot Sauce Recipe

Ingredients
12 fresh habanero chiles — roughly chopped
1 ripe mango — peel, pit, mash
1 cup cheap yellow prepared mustard
1/4 cup brown sugar — packed
1/4 cup white vinegar
1 tablespoon prepared curry powder
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon chili powder
salt and freshly cracked black pepper — to taste

This style of hot sauce, widely used in the West Indies, is basically habanero peppers (also known as Scotch Bonnets), fruit, and yellow mustard, with a few other ingredients thrown in. Use this recipe as a guideline. Habaneros are at the top of the chile pepper heat scale, so feel free to substitute other peppers of your choice. Funnel the sauce into an old pint liquor bottle.
Mix all the ingredients together and stand back. This will keep, covered and refrigerated, until the year 2018. Be careful, though: If it spills, it will eat a hole in your refrigerator. If you ever want to dispose of it, call the local toxic waste specialists.
WARNING: Hottest sauce in North America. Use this to enhance dull and boring food. Keep away from pets, open flames, unsupervised children, and bad advice. This is not a toy. This is serious. Stand up straight, sit right, and stop mumbling. Be careful not to rub your nose, eyes, or mouth while working with habaneros. You may actually want to wear rubber gloves while chopping and mixing — these babies are powerful.

Re:Like Hotdog eating contest (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795880)

I make habanero garlick dill pickles and habanero sweet and sour pickled carrots. They are always in big demand. I've been tempted to go into business.. maybe when I retire.

Re:Like Hotdog eating contest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35796002)

I use a hotsauce for cooking that's made with Naga Jolokias because it imparts a good amount of capsaicin to a dish without otherwise altering its flavour (there's a slightly detectable flavour outside the capsaicin, but it's far less noticeable than if I'd used just about any other sort of hot sauce). This little bottle is going to last ages at this rate; I suppose you could argue an eco benefit there.

Re:Like Hotdog eating contest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35796320)

So you can't see a use for hotter chili? How about needing less in dishes to give X amount of heat and flavor? It's called efficiency. Instead of 1 Tbs people can use 1/2tsb for the same effect.

Words Hottest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795254)

Sorry for the Autonomous comment - long time reader, haven't posted before.

I had the opportunity to eat this pepper at the chili festival, and I had three of them. These peppers are remarkable in their flavor and bite. The heat doesn't build up, it bites all at one like wassabi, but the flavor - its fantastic.

I am eagerly waiting for these peppers to be widely available.

So this is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795320)

...really a weaponized form of food?

And you're going to put that thing in your mouth? (1)

OglinTatas (710589) | about 3 years ago | (#35795382)

The chili is so scorching that Marcel and his team have to wear protective gear when handling the new variety.

Seriously, what is up with the ever hotter chilis? The hottest ones are long past the point of being edible. Even the first generation habanero extracts from way back in my college days would burn all the taste buds off one's tongue AND scorch one's rectum leaving a toilet full of blood.

Escalating the heat in one's food is an addictive thing, but when one gets to the point I describe above, one would generally--I did anyway--realize that it is not good for one and one is not really enjoying it anymore.

I'm not in it for super hot anymore, I'm in it for flavor, but because of my early experience with super hot, I generally let other people determine whether my recipes have reasonable heat values.

...it is difficult writing without the indefinite you construct.

Re:And you're going to put that thing in your mout (1)

Paul Jakma (2677) | about 3 years ago | (#35796322)

Chili tolerance doesn't last very long fwiw. Unless you just left, your college chili experiences won't make that much difference to your current tolerance level. ;)

Wash your hands before going to the bathroom (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 3 years ago | (#35795516)

Happened to a friend - didn't wash well after eating a bunch of (very) hot wings, then went to recycle that pitcher of beer. Couldn't sit still the rest of the evening.

Re:Wash your hands before going to the bathroom (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#35795800)

Happened to a friend - didn't wash well after eating a bunch of (very) hot wings, then went to recycle that pitcher of beer. Couldn't sit still the rest of the evening.

I've burned my face a few times. Takes practice to remember that capsaicin will soak into skin while cutting up habaneros with bare hands.

Don't rub eyes. Don't pick nose. Done stick finger in ear. If you have shaved your face that morning, don't rub fingers across face.

It goes away after a while, but can feel much worse than a severe sunburn.

Re:Wash your hands before going to the bathroom (0)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about 3 years ago | (#35795972)

Very true. One time I was making chili and forgot to wash my hands after cutting up all the peppers (about 2 bells, 12 jalapeños, 12 cayenne, 6 habanero, and 6 Bhut Jolokias) and went to pee. I ended up curled up on the floor in the fetal position for about half an hour I have never felt that much pain ever. I was numb for several hours afterwards. I never notice it on my hands as they are rough and calloused, but it is a different story on sensitive skin.

Re:Wash your hands before going to the bathroom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35796072)

Thats the oldest hot-wings bar story out there. Rubbing eyes/nose is second, but needing to 'shake the dew off the lilly' is the number one story when it comes to hot wings. "It burns!, It burns!" is how the story goes. Its a guy thing. I remember in college participating in a Jalapeno pepper eating contest (no hands). You are given a plate, with half a quart of Jalapenos dumped onto it. Winner gets 3 points, participants get one point. I only got through about 2/3 of my Jalapenos by the time someone else had eaten all of theirs. I was offered water, plus two (TWO!) glasses of beer to quench. It didn't do much, and my stomach was feeling kinda sore later on. Also, what goes up must come down, and what goes in .... well you get the idea. "Fire in the hole!" was the phrase for a day or so.

Re:Wash your hands before going to the bathroom (1)

corbettw (214229) | about 3 years ago | (#35796252)

That's probably the least-pleasurable way of getting a burning sensation in your privates from Hooters.

A strange game... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 years ago | (#35795598)

I can appreciate that, for the horticulturally interested, seeing how high a Capsaicin concentration you can get out of something that will actually grow might be an interesting hobby/challenge.

Beyond that, though, it seems sort of pointless. We know what the active ingredient is, we have techniques both for extraction and purification and for synthesis. It would be a modest effort in benchtop chemistry to produce Capsiacin at 90+% purity from even the comparatively mundane peppers, and 100% pure provides the clear upper limit on heat possible from that compound. Unless the interest is purely in the pepper growing, it seems like the Extreme Heat Sauce crowd could simply obtain the pure product, endure the pain, and go home happy.

practical applications (1)

DragonTHC (208439) | about 3 years ago | (#35795618)

we already know that Capsaicin has applications in modern medicine. This should be a great boost in the production yields for medical use. That is, if the company doesn't try to patent a plant.

1.5 Million SHU is for wusses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35795984)

Try 10,300,000 - 16,000,000 for Blair's 6 am.

maybe next year (1)

turtledawn (149719) | about 3 years ago | (#35796158)

I'm growing a naga jolokia this year - for some reason I cannot get most peppers to grow hot in my garden so I figure if I start off with something that overexpresses capsaicin like a mofo I might end up with an acceptable jalepeno-ish level of heat. I'm trying to cut sodium out of my diet as much as possible and hot sauce is a very nice way to provide an edge similar to salt to your food for those days you get tired of garlic or lemon..

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...