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New Spin On Graphene Makes It Magnetic

timothy posted about 3 years ago | from the nanotech-vs-credit-cards dept.

Science 58

intellitech writes "A team led by Professor Andre Geim, a recipient of the 2010 Nobel Prize for graphene, has shown that electric current can magnetize graphene. The researchers found a new way to interconnect spin and charge by applying a relatively weak magnetic field to graphene and found that this causes a flow of spins in the direction perpendicular to electric current, making a graphene sheet magnetised."

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58 comments

Magnets (4, Funny)

xMrFishx (1956084) | about 3 years ago | (#35844058)

This, is how they work!

Re:Magnets (1)

redneckHippe (744945) | about 3 years ago | (#35844162)

Fucking Clowns.

Re:Magnets (1)

orangesquid (79734) | about 3 years ago | (#35844290)

Finally, my sig is relevant!

But, seriously, graphene (and some lab-precision equipment... well, *reliable* lab-precision equipment---a 20-year-old tube electrometer thrown out by a university lab for being flukey doesn't count) would be terribly fun to experiment with (at least for me). Measuring material properties is one of my interests.
In terms of semiconductor experimentation at home, there's always copper oxides, but, meh... it's been over-done.

Re:Magnets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844458)

A five digit ID on slashdot and so many caps. Meh.

Re:Magnets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35845230)

I think you'd have to know the reference... it's a lyric from an ICP song that became a short-lived meme: "FUCKIN MAGNETS, HOW DO THEY WORK?" - it's misinterpretation + careless-use-of-thesaurus humor.

Re:Magnets (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | about 3 years ago | (#35846118)

Perhaps that song was a reference to line 2 of Pink Floyd's "High Hopes":
"In a world of magnets and miracles"
But they're probably just dumb clowns.

Re:Magnets (1)

KingBenny (1301797) | about 3 years ago | (#35857416)

so, its just another case of evolution saying : you're obsolete, redesign yourself with what you have ? if they can use it to enhance my memory fifty years from now i am their biggest fan

Pulsed Magnetism (2)

tmosley (996283) | about 3 years ago | (#35844072)

I wonder if it would be possible to pulse magnetism through a long ribbon, creating a no moving parts lift mechanism for a space elevator?

Re:Pulsed Magnetism (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844692)

Hm, are you retarded? Here's what your post sounded like: I wonder if we can weave them into a superconductor grid when we build a Ringworld?

Re:Pulsed Magnetism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35845430)

Quick, patent scrith.

Re:Pulsed Magnetism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35848050)

So it would be like a rail gun/maglev running along a Graphene Ribbon, Nice.

You know they have this contest, you might want to give it a try.

http://www.spaceelevatorgames.org/

Nobel Prize for graphene (3, Funny)

gmhowell (26755) | about 3 years ago | (#35844120)

Hey, that's great that they have a Nobel Prize for graphene, but isn't that... I don't know... a little specific?

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (2)

maswan (106561) | about 3 years ago | (#35844154)

If you are nitpicking, how about the fact that the team is not headed by Geim at all, but by Physics Professor Michael S. Fuhrer of the UMD Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials. The only mention of Geim is as one of the two recipients of the Nobel Prize in physics for their graphene work.

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844364)

If you are nitpicking, how about the fact that the team is not headed by Geim at all, but by Physics Professor Michael S. Fuhrer of the UMD Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials. The only mention of Geim is as one of the two recipients of the Nobel Prize in physics for their graphene work.

He wasn't mentioned because they didn't want to Godwin the article.

(Sorry, that was terrible.)

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844518)

Especially since "Führer" is written with a "ü". Which is nearly exactly as different from "Fuhrer", as saying "Fohrer".

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (0)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 3 years ago | (#35845066)

Who cares! when are these damned scientists gonna give us what they've been promising for years, huh? I want my flying car, I want my huge multiTB holographic disc for my flying car, so I can burn every single tune that has ever been worth a crap for blasting through the sky, and I want my Alyson Hannigan Sexbot to sit beside me and tell how fricking awesome I am dammit!

So quit wasting our time with this mamby pamby nano bullshit and give us stuff worthy of you wearing the white lab coat you damned geeky scientists! Hell you haven't even given us a six million dollar man yet, and that show was in the 70s! You suck!

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (1)

Calydor (739835) | about 3 years ago | (#35846054)

I want my huge multiTB holographic disc for my flying car, so I can burn every single tune that has ever been worth a crap

I think we need to agree to disagree on the space requirements for this unless you include live recordings in full HD surround sound and 3D of a lot of classical compositions.

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35846482)

I want my Alyson Hannigan Sexbot to sit beside me and tell how fricking awesome I am dammit!

I know this is /. and all, but the intended use of a sexbot is much more fun than what you just described.

Re:Nobel Prize for graphene (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35905168)

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Carbon... (2)

Haedrian (1676506) | about 3 years ago | (#35844138)

...is there anything it can't do?

Re:Carbon... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35849220)

"Carbon... ...is there anything it can't do?" ... says the Carbon Based Lifeform. :)

Wow.. Is there anything this substance CAN'T DO? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844152)

Graphene is the best substance in the universe. I put it on my breakfast cereal in the morning, I use it for fuel in my hovercraft, it blocks the damaging UV rays from giving me spin cancer, my cat litter box is filled with it, and the sheets that tuck me in at night are woven from Graphene... I LOVE this stuff

Re:Wow.. Is there anything this substance CAN'T DO (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844204)

Can you #@{& it?

Re:Wow.. Is there anything this substance CAN'T DO (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844254)

I suppose one could construct a blow-up doll from thin sheets of graphene, but I don't see the practicality.

Re:Wow.. Is there anything this substance CAN'T DO (1)

by (1706743) (1706744) | about 3 years ago | (#35844292)

Well, most people "#@{&" carbon-based life, so...sorta.

Not contained in the most abundant molecule in the body, but still. Though continuing on that line of thought just made me very uneasy about grabbing a glass of water...

Re:Wow.. Is there anything this substance CAN'T DO (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35847004)

Though continuing on that line of thought just made me very uneasy about grabbing a glass of water...

...Because grabbing that glass of water is the closest thing we'll ever know, to "#@{&" a silicon-based life form.

bad summary, interesting article (5, Informative)

artor3 (1344997) | about 3 years ago | (#35844206)

  • The team was lead by Michael Fuhrer, not Andrew Geim. The only relationship Geim has to this article is that he received a Nobel for discovering a process to create the material that these researched used (i.e. graphene)
  • It's not electric current that magnetizing the graphene, it's small impurities - specifically, gaps in the lattice. The magnetism is controllable by tuning the number and location of the impurities, which is what makes this potentially useful
  • This doesn't have anything to do with spin, except insofar as all electromagnetism topics do. Spintronics is only mentioned at the very end of the article as something this "could also have interesting applications in".

It's almost like the summary is describing a different article.

Re:bad summary, interesting article (1, Troll)

ijakings (982830) | about 3 years ago | (#35844240)

Well the story was brought to you by timothy, editor of such other fuckups as the 1999 article on IQ scores [slashdot.org] which was posted this week, and many many more

Re:bad summary, interesting article (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844270)

lol @ timmy the fag

Re:bad summary, interesting article (3, Insightful)

oldhack (1037484) | about 3 years ago | (#35844284)

You know how people here love to dump on science journos, but the stuff that people submit here seem even worse.

Re:bad summary, interesting article (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35846534)

More than that, it looks like all they really did was coat the ends of some pyrolytic graphite with [unnecessary] gold plates as electrodes and show that it produces a magnetic field with you put electricity through it. I did this without the gold plating about 6 months ago when I was playing with pyrolytic graphite, can I have a nobel prize too?

damn slashdot sucks now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844266)

Can't drag the "Score" slider, so can't read any comments unless I want to click on each one. Doh. Web 2.0 sucks.

new spin on euro bashing; david frost? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844322)

referred to as 'a project', dave's guest assured that the currency had expired, & at best the continent would be plummeting into chaos immediately. the next guest insisted we must resolve to protect iraq militarily forever more. so the media 'war' is bringing down the hose (of cards) overseas, as on their channels, the euro is the new money, & god & uncle sam are being thrown out of their desert almost faster than we can blow everything up. dave should consider changing his accent again as with the current script he sounds faker than ever.

wrapping it up, frost around the world (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35844642)

"any alternative to nuclear power is far worse". liars, touts & shills oh my. "we have to be rooted in science". "why chase unicorns"? indisputable 'science'? hysterical recorded history? what?

But can it... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35845662)

Get perpendicular?

Making it magnetized? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35846692)

How about just "making it magnetic?"

Magnetized (or magnetised) is a verb, that means, well, you look it up if you don't know what it means.

If "sleepified" was a verb meaning "putting someone to sleep" you wouldn't write "making him sleepified."

Semantics, they work (2)

Kazymyr (190114) | about 3 years ago | (#35846696)

I assume the article author means _permanent_ magnets (and reading TFA confirms they talk about ferromagnetism), because otherwise any old piece of wire you pass an electric current through becomes a "magnet"

Re:Semantics, they work (1)

ErikZ (55491) | about 3 years ago | (#35847210)

Will water become magnetic when you run current through it?

Re:Semantics, they work (1)

Kazymyr (190114) | about 3 years ago | (#35848564)

What do you think?

No, wait, I don't want to know what you think. Do the experiment. Take a tube, fill it with water (if you use distilled water add a bit of salt to it, because distilled water is an insulator) and run a current through it. Measure the magnetic field around the tube, and you'll have the answer. But please keep the answer to yourself, because everyone else already knows it.

Pure water not at any sane level (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | about 3 years ago | (#35848884)

if you put enough voltage across your water to overcome the insulating properties of the water and crack it into oxygen and hydrogen then yes the resulting ions will conduct.

but unless you have access to Gigavolts or so you just don't use absolutely pure water.

but your answer is yes any time (use the righthand rule to keep directions straight) you have current +motion you will have a magnetic field.

Interesting article (1)

Evil Pete (73279) | about 3 years ago | (#35850902)

Please people RTFA before you comment.

I'm no expert on this stuff but my interpretation of what is being discussed is that the use of vacancies in graphene allows interesting conduction properties and the control of the magnetic properties of the graphene in a manner that does not exist in metals.

From the article:

"The result would be a ferromagnet, like iron, but instead made only of carbon. Magnetism in graphene could lead to new types of nanoscale sensors of magnetic fields. And, when coupled with graphene's tremendous electrical properties, magnetism in graphene could also have interesting applications in the area of spintronics, which uses the magnetic moment of the electron, instead of its electric charge, to represent the information in a computer.

"This opens the possibility of 'defect engineering' in graphene -- plucking out atoms in the right places to design the magnetic properties you want," said Fuhrer.

I don't know about you but that does seem interesting to me.

Element Zero? (1)

Vastad (1299101) | about 3 years ago | (#35852750)

What next? If you run electricity "backwards" through it, you get negative gravity? Repulsor lifts and anti-grav sleds become real?

We insert it into nervous systems and grant telekinesis?

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