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Google Teaches Computers "Regret"

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the I-do-not-think-it-means-what-you-think-it-means. dept.

AI 145

mikejuk writes "Google is funding an AI project that will introduce the technical concept of regret into programs — but there's a big difference between regret and being sorry. In fact regret is just the difference between maximum possible reward and the actual reward received and the project is about optimization. There are two things to learn from this situation. The first is that just because some numerical measure is called 'regret' it doesn't mean it has anything to do with the common use of the term. Secondly if you are going to invent an AI technique then picking emotive words for your jargon is a good way to ensure publicity."

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Past transgressions (5, Funny)

supertrinko (1396985) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850912)

Will they now regret that they've allowed us to live so long?

Re:Past transgressions (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35850982)

Will you ever regret your retarded shitposts?

There's a ghost in me (1)

lennier (44736) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851010)

Wants to say I'm sorry
Doesn't mean I'm sorry

Re:Past transgressions (-1, Flamebait)

WonderingAround (2007742) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851232)

If they realize they're a mac will they regret being alive and commit suicide?

Re:Past transgressions (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851492)

Will they now regret that they've allowed us to live so long?

Asimov would roll his eyes.

Re:Past transgressions (1)

BlueBlade (123303) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851752)

What can change the nature of a computer?

Are you still there? (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853132)

I don't hate you.

Regret is a standard term in economics (5, Informative)

doshell (757915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850922)

Regret is a standard term in economics (esp. game theory). If anyone is to take the blame over a poor choice of noun, it certainly isn't Google.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851048)

it's also something that has been used in AI/machine learning situations (specifically, reinforcement learning) for some time.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851552)

That is exactly the same context. It is used in learning in game theory.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (-1, Flamebait)

McTickles (1812316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851066)

As if economics were ever relevant to real life...
Time to grow up economics/AI autistic wizards, that's not quite how it actually works.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (5, Interesting)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851144)

here i am feeding the troll, but the best AI for backgammon is trained by regret-based reinforcement learning (it's needed since the dice rolls blow up the search space for standard perfect-information strategies): http://www.research.ibm.com/massive/tdl.html [ibm.com] . in this case the regret-function is unknown and is stochastically approximated ("learned") by repeated play.

it's notable that unlike chess AI which is considered effective but unnatural, this backgammon AI is considered to play mostly "like a human" and its play has actually inspired new strategies for human backgammon players.

regret-based methods are typically heuristic, and i'd call them much less "autistic" than, say, infinitely-rational nash agents or game tree pruners.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (0)

Luke Wilson (1626541) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851310)

Right, economics lives in a world of games with artificial rules. Great for finding a strategy for a game with two colors of counters moving from column to column. Applying it to anything resembling real life is negligent at best.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (2)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851324)

what's your point? any rational model is going to be based on some restrictive assumptions. would you rather that economists just do what feels right to them, or that economics stops existing, or what? would this somehow be less negligent? or let me guess, if only economists agreed with your personal view of the world, everything would be better, right?

if you don't like artificial rules, you should appreciate that regret-based learning is a more flexible setting than standard game theory; for example, it allows a natural formulation of imperfect information and adaptation.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (2)

Walt Dismal (534799) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851864)

Regret can be cast as the reaction to making a decision that produced consequences of less value than another decision that could have been made, or which produce punishment rather than positive outcome. As such, it's fairly easy to implement. In AI systems, I use regret and other failure emotions such as fear, anger, or sadness as metrics of success or failure of goals. They provide feedback into learning and planning functionality, controlling strategies. And yes, one can make an AI that 'feels' sadness upon loss, analogous to how humans experience a reaction to loss.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (2)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852380)

yup. all of this is MUCH less "autistic" than economics has ever been before.

unfortunately i've not had the opportunity to implement a regret-driven system although they seem interesting for longitudinal data. the major problem in the TD-gammon program seems to have been tweaking the attribution function, i.e. learning exactly what to assign as the cause of my regret. fun stuff.

i wouldn't go as far as to claim that an ai feels anything yet. i wonder if feeling or cognition will emerge first in an "artificial" system (or rather which one we will recognize first...).

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

Eskarel (565631) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852634)

Personally I'd rather economists just acknowledge that all the little numbers on their graphs are living, breathing, feeling people and all that that implies. For one it might mean they'd stop expecting them to act rationally and for another it might mean that they're definition of the "best possible result" was a little different.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (2)

xouumalperxe (815707) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851394)

Right, economics lives in a world of games with artificial rules.

Because nobody else does that. [xkcd.com]

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851166)

So tell me troll, just how does it work? have you found any pearls of wisdom whilst scraping the bottom?

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851182)

The University of Chicago/Friendman bullshit is only one (ugly) perspective on economics. For stuff that actually makes sense, Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations still holds up pretty well after all the years and his writing is really clear and natural to read (if a bit rambling). I think David Ricardo has a similar take on things and is less prone to tangents if you're in the mood for something shorter.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851254)

I find people use the word in much the same way. "I regret selling my car" usually means the expected pros and cons didn't match the actual outcome. It's not remorse for doing it, just disappointment over the results. I would say it's more expressing a factual hindsight than an emotional state. Also I've found that most regrets people have is because you can always assume everything will go your way on the path not taken or you know now that the huge gamble would have worked out. You never know that this girl would have become your psycho ex, the startup work you to death and still flounder, your sports career cut short by injury. You always fantasize that it'd be better than your real life, which being real and all tends to have its smaller and larger setbacks. Most likely you did make the right choice, you just like to beat yourself up about it.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (3, Interesting)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851868)

Furthermore, the emotion we identify as "regret" seems to me to line up neatly with the economic definition. I defy anyone to prove that when we feel regret, our brains are doing anything other than comparing the reward we received for a particular action with the maximum reward we think we could have received for a different action. TFA is more or less playing the Chinese Room game: "I assert that computers can't do X, because computers can't do X, because I assert that computers can't do X."

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851986)

Which the Chinese Room "game" does not assert. Rather, it calls into question the notion that merely translating symbols from one system to another system amounts to anything like understanding those symbols. English speakers and Chinese speakers understand their respective languages, because they have embodied minds whose symbols are grounded in the real world via their nervous systems in combination with having a body. We know what a "rock" is, because we can pick it up, throw it, bang our heads against it, taste it if we like, etc. Thus if we're taught the Chinese equivalent, then we know that a Chinese speaker is referring to the same kind of thing. Where as a symbol translating system (computer or human blindly following a bunch of rules in a room) has no such understanding.

Moreover, human languages cannot be entirely translated by just symbol manipulation. Context plays an important role in ironing out all the ambiguities inherent in our languages. So does knowing how to take a colloquialism in one language and express that meaning in another. Or stating that there is no real equivalent.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852086)

Moreover, human languages cannot be entirely translated by just symbol manipulation. Context plays an important role in ironing out all the ambiguities inherent in our languages. So does knowing how to take a colloquialism in one language and express that meaning in another. Or stating that there is no real equivalent.

And if you create a piece of software which can do all those things, what basis do you have for saying that it doesn't understand the language? The answer, of course, comes back to the assertion "computers cannot understand," or equivalently, "understanding is a quality computers cannot assess." Pretty much every defense of the Chinese Room, and more-or-less equivalent arguments like TFA, consist of this kind of raw assertion followed by endless circular elaboration.

What people who do this are really saying is "computers do not have souls, for only man is made in the image of God," but they lack the courage to state it in such plain terms.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852098)

Grrr. That should be "... cannot possess" rather than "cannot assess" above, of course. Perhaps judicious use of typos is the key to passing the Turing Test.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35852520)

What people who do this are really saying is "computers do not have souls, for only man is made in the image of God," but they lack the courage to state it in such plain terms.

No, I'm not saying that. I adhere to a naturalistic view of the universe and non-dualistic view of the mind-body (the mind being a word we use for certain aspects of brain activity).

And if you create a piece of software which can do all those things, what basis do you have for saying that it doesn't understand the language?

None, of course. But you miss what I was saying. That you're not going to get that from software (or a human for that matter) merely following rules that translate one set of symbols to another. Something must ground the symbols and provide the software with understanding. So, how about embed it in a robot's body? Is it realistic to expect a piece of software with no body to really pass the Turing test?

The answer, of course, comes back to the assertion "computers cannot understand," or equivalently, "understanding is a quality computers cannot assess."

I think that entirely depends on our ability to mimic biological intelligence, which evolved to understand the world it had to adapt to in order to survive and reproduce. The GOFAI can only get you so far. Thus neural nets, bottom-up design where the machines figure out how to navigate on their own instead of building up complex maps of their surroundings, research into alternate architectures where the machines would not be so brittle in the face of error, etc.

On a side note, I'm not entirely sure why we want to make our tools human (or animal-like). It's not like we have a shorter of biological intelligences in nature to make use of. And they are our tools. We consume computers just like any other machine. So why create them in our own image? But no doubt if we can do it, it will be done. Whether this will ultimately be a good thing or not (or some of both), remains to be seen. The Friendly AI crowd certainly thinks AGI is a serious existential threat.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853150)

I defy anyone to prove that any negative feeling is caused by anything else than our brain comparing an outcome to an hypothesized outcome.

Re:Regret is a standard term in economics (1, Funny)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852232)

Oh.

I was going to say, if Google wanted to teach their computers regret, they should just let it date my ex-wife.

"regret" is the standard term from economics (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35850936)

for the concept described (in economics, it's usually measured in dollars). See: Regret (decision theory) [wikipedia.org] from WP.

Really? (1)

by (1706743) (1706744) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850956)

The first is that just because some numerical measure is called 'regret' it doesn't mean it has anything to do with the common use of the term.

And here I thought that my defective RAM stick actually caused a baby to die [wikimedia.org] .

Standard economics term (1)

Captain Segfault (686912) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850960)

This is a standard definition of "regret" in an economics context.

I regret reading the summary (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850976)

...and I'm sure as hell not going to read the article. I regret slashdot has become the trashiest of trashy geek news sites. I can almost feel the regret coursing through my veins as I hit preview and submit.

i-programmer.info again? (4, Insightful)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850978)

i guess this is the new roland piquepaille: superficial and uninformed blurb-commentary on technical news. wonderful.

Re:i-programmer.info again? (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851462)

I started getting nostalgic for Roland's postings of yore, but I think this has quashed that quite regretfully.

Regret? (1)

orkysoft (93727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850994)

Just hit ^Z to undo your mistake :-)

Re:Regret? (1, Offtopic)

TheInternetGuy (2006682) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851186)

Sorry, I can't let you do that Dave.

Different words with different meanings (3, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#35850998)

> ...there's a big difference between regret and being sorry.

Yes. "Regret" is not a synonym for "remorse".

Re:Different words with different meanings (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851476)

For those who didn't see the whoosh....
Remorse [thesaurus.com] Remorse [merriam-webster.com] Remorse [princeton.edu]

I beg to differ.

Re:Different words with different meanings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35852996)

Unless you are a hopelessly subtle troll, this is a quality case of "did you even bother to read the links you are posting?"

First link, thesaurus.com: Notes: regret carries no explicit admission that one is responsible for an incident, while remorse implies a sense of guilty responsibility and a greater feeling of personal pain and anguish.

Second link, merriam-webster: yes, remorse is a synonym and the definition is equal.

Third link, princeton.edu: they define remorse [princeton.edu] as: (a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed))

Two out of three of those (your!) links actually say that remorse implies regret, but not vice-versa.

I'm sorry, you said something about "whoosh..."?

Re:Different words with different meanings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851504)

"It doesn't feel pain, or pity, or remorse (but it does feel regret). And it absolutely will not stop, ever! Until you are dead!"

An increasing percentage of /. stories evoke Terminator thoughts. I guess that means the singularity is near. Nice knowing you.

I'm sorry Dave... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851008)

Search Google for: "torrent"
Google: I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.

Well (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851014)

It won't work in the future when the Silencer takes over the computer. The way he uses them is with no remorse, no regret and no mercy.

ahh i see (2)

ajdub (520241) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851022)

fprintf("Regret: %f\n",test_error);

Re:ahh i see (2)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851128)

fprintf("Regret: %f\n",test_error);

fprintf(stdout, "Regret: %d\n", test_error);

FTFY

Re:ahh i see (1)

cranil (1983560) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851452)

maybe he writes code in Matlab...

It was the beer (1, Offtopic)

theurge14 (820596) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851026)

That Cylon chick isn't anywhere as cute as she was last night.

Re:It was the beer (1)

tigersha (151319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852958)

Don't worry Gaius, soon you will meet and be part of the church of nymphos. An none of them are Cylon

Regret vs. sorry (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851032)

Regretting something is much more strongly tied to the past than being sorry is. While both will well revolve around a past event, and realizing that one did something which was wrong, any regret that lasts longer than the time it takes to realize that you regret it is living in the past, while being sorry for something enables a person to move beyond it if they can be forgiven for it.

Re:Regret vs. sorry (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851106)

I regret not having put some money into an index fund in March 2008 but I feel no remorse about it. On the other hand I feel remorse for not having spent more time with my father in his last years. Do you see the difference? "Regret", in its narrowest meaning, is not to far from Google's definition. Their usage also comes directly from decision theory: they did not invent it.

This didn't make the stock go up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851046)

I love that google is doing all of these crazy ideas and some not so crazy (self driving cars) but at the end of the day it is an internet search and advertising company. I've very glad that i'm not an investor that has to watch my money being spend on things like this.

Re:This didn't make the stock go up? (1)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851174)

They know if they stick to their current revenue streams without doing anything to diversify or at least lock people in they'll lose market share, so they're desperately reaching out in every direction using their insane amounts of cash trying to get more fingers in more pies.

Re:This didn't make the stock go up? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851682)

It is called a dividend. These excursions are just wasting money that could go back to investors.

Regret (1)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851064)

Father?
Yes son?
What does regret mean?
Well son, a funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than something you haven't done.

And by the way, if you see your mother this weekend be and sure and tell her SATAN! SATAN! SATAN!

Re:Regret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851212)

nice! 1997 Orbital

Re:Regret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851226)

I'd mod you up, but you got the first line wrong

Better luck next time.

Makes sense (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851070)

They taught people regret years ago when they started trampling on folks privacy. Why not spread the love to computers?

Regret (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851084)

Daddy what does regret mean?
Well son a funny thing is its better to regret something you have done than something you haven't done and when you see your mother this weekend be sure and tell her..." Satan!, Satan!, Satan!"

Re:Regret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851478)

Damn....I was just getting ready to post that......

Sigh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851116)

What the fuck are you talking about? Regret is a standard term in decision theory. Has been for decades.

Secondly if you are going to invent an AI (0)

oliverthered (187439) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851118)

Think of the children.

What i'd like to see... (1)

lopaka1998 (1352441) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851124)

"Google is funding an AI project that will introduce the technical concept of regret"

Um... yes... and I'm sure the AI regrets Google teaching it such. Now if we could only affix a robotic arm with a shotgun attached to it's "hand"... and see what happens...

I'd be interested to know if the AI shoots itself, shoots the Google programmers teaching it regret, or both. What a conundrum.

Aperture Science (1)

karnal (22275) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851190)

And here I thought Aperture pioneered this first.

I WAS the computer (1)

Gim Tom (716904) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851216)

Back in the early 1960's I learned what was called the Minimax Regret algorithm in a class on linear programming. Unfortunately at that time I WAS the computer that had to execute the algorithm. Google did not invent Regret.

Other way to get publicity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851256)

"Secondly if you are going to invent an AI technique then picking emotive words for your jargon is a good way to ensure publicity."

Or you could work for a company named Google or Apple.

Tense Trouble (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851278)

Google Funds Research to Teach Computers "Regret"

fixed that for you

Publicity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851342)

"picking emotive words for your jargon is a good way to ensure publicity."

Hey look, it worked!

Skynet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851352)

At least when google transforms into Skynet we know we will be missed.

HAL 9000 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851358)

"Regret" as in "I am sorry Dave, but..."? :)

So... (1)

MrP- (45616) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851360)

So... they installed Windows on it?

Re:So... (1)

ArundelCastle (1581543) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851376)

What the hell does that even mean?

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851388)

What the hell does that even mean?

Windows computers hate themselves so much they regret being booted and quickly work to correct the situation.

Hence the BSOD.

Re:So... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851506)

What the hell does that even mean?

Windows computers hate themselves so much they regret being booted and quickly work to correct the situation.

Hence the BSOD.

You'll have to explain what BSOD means to all the youngins who never used a pre-2001 flavor of Windows.

Re:So... (1)

pookemon (909195) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851510)

Well - in place of having anything intelligent to say about something, post a "Haha Windows" type of "joke".

I keep telling you all, but you refuse to believe. (1)

pro151 (2021702) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851386)

Google is Skynet. I know, I am a Droid Borg. ;o)

Re:I keep telling you all, but you refuse to belie (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851508)

Google is Skynet. I know, I am a Droid Borg. ;o)

Google won't become Skynet until we use it to kill our enemies. Watch the movies again, Skynet wasn't evil.

Re:I keep telling you all, but you refuse to belie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851544)

It's likely Skynet regretted sending back a T-800 instead of a nano-factory-assembler bot in the first go. They could have had the army of machines to get the job done in the first place, instead of making a whole bunch of convoluted efforts and unnecessarily wasting a whole lot of energy for time travel.

Good lord, editors (1)

subreality (157447) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851390)

... if you are going to invent an AI technique then picking emotive words for your jargon is a good way to ensure publicity.

Having recognized this, why did you still post it to the front page?

I thought it was Douglas Adams (1)

redpop350 (516863) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851428)

Just listen to any one of Marvin's laments; there's plenty of regret there to go around.

It's really easy to do, trust me (1)

Lord_of_the_nerf (895604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851454)

Old: The requested URL was not found on this server.

New: The requested URL was not found on this server. We regret this. We aren't sorry however. That's different.

www.happyshopping100.com (-1, Offtopic)

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that explains a lot (1)

theshiznojudge (1809572) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851618)

computers don't already have a sense of regret? i guess that explains why mine didn't start working when i use my debugging hammer.

Tetris Grand Master 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35851880)

REGRET is a technical term from TGM2, which is the award given based on a multi-variate algorithm, prinicpally implying that you filled less than optimally for a set range of 100 levels.

Clarification (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35851948)

The first is that just because some numerical measure is called 'regret' it doesn't mean it has anything to do with the common use of the term.

So I think what they're saying is, "That was not meant to be a factual statement".

If it didn't have "anything to do with the common term" why didn't they just go all out and say "Google introduces "morality" to computers" or "Google introduces "the love that dare not speak its name" to computers".

Well, maybe not the latter. I think Apple has already locked up that market.

This how SkyNet starts (1)

Serindipidude (939235) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852134)

So we teach AI regret is just the difference between maximum possible reward and the actual reward received. The the AI realises the the reason for the discrepancy is due to the interference and inefficiency of the humans involved, and BAM, got to get rid of humans is the logical conclusion. Hello armegeddon.

http://www.fullmalls.com (-1, Offtopic)

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Another invention claim by Google (1)

Meditato (1613545) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852250)

Clever, Google! You renamed "error", making it the more anthropomorphic "regret". Ever heard of a Backpropagation-based Neural Network? This isn't anything new.

The difference (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35852262)

I'm sorry that I nuked you. I regret not nuking you sooner.

So, let me get this straight. (1)

Aldenissin (976329) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852290)

We used to think that we were not going to be safe from computers once they developed great enough artificial intelligence, because "they" don't feel regret. Now, we find that in fact, because they do feel "regret", or the opportunity cost, that is what actually will do us in because they will figure we are not efficient and are a waste.

Gotcha. "Seems sadly ironic that that tie has what's gotten you into this pickle, Mullet."

Originality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35852468)

In 1969, I worked with a brilliant engineer named Bob Kleinman, who coined the term "anticipatory regretter" for the flight control system that did what you wanted, not what you commanded.

Training dataset (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35852496)

They can train their AI on the amazing Regret Index.

http://www.qwantz.com/regret/ [qwantz.com]

They fed the algo wifi data (1)

thisisauniqueid (825395) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852660)

To teach their algorithm regret, they fed it a stream of sniffed wifi packets, and turned it over to the DoJ to be dealt with.

Or as they say in Chinese, "" -- if you don't hit your kids they won't be successful.

Re:They fed the algo wifi data (1)

thisisauniqueid (825395) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852664)

Funny -- slashdot doesn't allow non-Latin Unicode chars -- the Chinese is "bu da, bu cheng cai"...

I, for one, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35852872)

welcome our new regretful Overlords!

This is an anti-Microsoft plot (1)

tigersha (151319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35852950)

If they release this at Microsoft all of theirs machines will pull a Jim Jones and drink the cool-aid in a mass self-format

Clippy too? (1)

mr_lizard13 (882373) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853004)

It looks like you're writing a letter.

Regrettably I can't help you with that.

Just because something is called... (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853048)

Just because something is called "AI" does not mean that it has any relationship to anything that has to do with real intelligence.

Re:Just because something is called... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35853322)

Just because something is called "AI" does not mean that it has any relationship to anything that has to do with real intelligence.

I've read your comments long enough to know you can do better than that.

Just because something is called a "rock" does not meant that is has any relationship to anything that has to do with a real rock.

What's the above statement supposed to mean? Looking at it, it means nothing because "rock" is a term we apply to some object that fits our internal representation of what a rock is. Is a bunch of soil (err, little rocks?) that we throw into a furnace or lava flow or some other super hot place, which then becomes liquefied before popping out of the other end [of the process], cooling and solidifying to become hard a... "rock?" Does it have any relationship at all with a rock? Does it have anything to do with "real" rocks?

Posting as AC because I don't want to revert my moderations in this thread.

publicity (1)

nothings (597917) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853064)

"Secondly if you are going to invent an AI technique then picking emotive words for your jargon is a good way to ensure publicity."

Dear submitter: you are the one writing the submission summary which (a) goes on and on about the jargon term, and (b) gives them publicity. Wtf.

(Yes, I know that is what the article is about, so it is an accurate summary. It's still absurdly un-self-aware to then submit that to slashdot.)

Regret is a standard term in statistics (1)

mysterons (1472839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853092)

There is a vogue for such terms: an improper prior is one that does not sum to one; loss is when probability mass cannot be reached.

undo (1)

georgesdev (1987622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35853362)

"undo" feature is great too ;)
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