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Wind Power Firm Sees No Evidence of Hack

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the why-can't-we-all-get-along dept.

Security 99

alphadogg writes "One day after a hacker posted screen shots and data to a hacking mailing list, saying he had broken into a New Mexico wind turbine facility, the company that runs the turbines says it has seen no evidence of a computer intrusion. The hacker, who calls himself Bigr R, made the claims Saturday, posting screenshots of the facility's management interface, screenshots of an FTP server and project management system, as well as Web server info and configuration data from a Cisco router."

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DUPE! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854546)

The very definition of dupe! - seriously two articles down!!

LOW! (0)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854670)

Congrats, you've set the bar super low -- not only did you not bother to RTFA OR TFS, you actually failed at parsing TFH(eadline). Go, moron!

This is obviously a clever fake. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854554)

I'm quite sure he gathered all this information while he was still employed, and is just now releasing it.

Language (3, Interesting)

bezking (1274298) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854558)

If you look at the screenshots he posted (example [imageshack.us] ) you'll see that some of the screens were in the German language or a derivative thereof. Why would a New Mexican power plant have its systems in German!?

Re:Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854590)

Cuz it's über pwnage duh.

Re:Language (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854608)

Quoting The Previous F Article

"If this is a hoax, it's really well done".

Is *Faking* break-ins the new L33T?

Re:Language (1)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854840)

I think the recent escapades of "Anonymous" has fired up the imaginations of a lot of wannabes. So yes, faking it is the new 1337 -- for some people.

Re:Language (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854972)

Code kiddies and wannabees always have been and always will be.

Re:Language (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855276)

Among the script kiddies? yes, yes it is.

Re:Language (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855304)

Is *Faking* break-ins the new L33T?

Oh it always has been. From the kids who copy+pastes stuff from their windows system file into msn messanger so his/her friends think they are being "hacked", to people using hostnames to determine where someone lives on IRC and try to scare them with the information...

Re:Language (4, Interesting)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854690)

Germans Make Good Stuff.

Seriously, if you start getting into high level automation of PLC and other industrial systems, there are only a few key players in the game. Siemens [siemens.com] is one of those companies. Sure enough, if you search for SINAMICS S120, the Siemens page is the first hit.

How often do you dump your error codes into 5-10 languages? If you go to Europe and use a piece of GE technology you'll probably get errors in English.

Re:Language (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855294)

Allen Bradley is out there quite heavy. in fact I saw far more of it than siemens stuff.

Re:Language (1)

mooboy (191903) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855356)

Allen Bradley is out there quite heavy. in fact I saw far more of it than siemens stuff.

AB is big in the US only. Siemens is by far the largest controls systems provider internationally.

Re:Language (1)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 3 years ago | (#35860010)

Doesn't really matter, SINAMICS S120 is clearly Siemens gear.

Re:Language (1)

frozentier (1542099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855592)

Germans Make Good Stuff.

No shit, look at the ShamWow! Vince wasn't kidding.

Re:Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35859364)

"Now let's smack some hos and watch how the shamwow cleans up that bitches blood!" ~Vince

Re:Language (2)

Themer (994454) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855842)

All of the Siemens PLC error codes come out in English for English interfaces. I have used them extensively.

Re:Language (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35856106)

Wait, I seem to recall something in the news recently about some security problems with Siemens controllers in some industrial equipment. Something about a virus or worm getting into software on the computers that ran the facility, and from there into the controller software itself, where it proceeded to mess up the industrial gear. I'm having a little trouble remembering the details, though. Hmmm... it was all in the news a while ago. I think maybe the problems were in Iran?

Re:Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854758)

Reminds of a story a few years back when US agents were caught breaking into German wind power plants to conduct industrial espionage. China isn't the only one stealing technology, you know.

Re:Language (2)

shish (588640) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854868)

Looking at that example, a more confusing thing comes to mind: why would their systems be built with MS-Paint o_O?

Re:Language (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855572)

Hahahahah.. I didn't consider the screenshots worth looking at until you said that.. that's some extremely unprofessional interface design.. geez.

Re:Language (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855840)

that's some extremely unprofessional interface design

Actually that's highly professional. Industrial/professional UIs are never pretty because it's not a requirement. Why waste time and money on making things pretty? These aren't consumer products where the buyer first and foremost looks at how it looks instead of what it does.

Re:Language (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856182)

There's a difference between "not pretty" and "shitty". Right angled lines would have been better than freehand in MS paint. It would have taken all of 3 seconds more, and look infinitely better.

Re:Language (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856272)

that's some extremely unprofessional interface design

Actually that's highly professional. Industrial/professional UIs are never pretty because it's not a requirement. Why waste time and money on making things pretty? These aren't consumer products where the buyer first and foremost looks at how it looks instead of what it does.

I've grown to think that the more expensive and/or specialized the program, the worse the UI is. And it's not about making the UI "pretty" but more "usable".

Sure the program is designed by an engineer who cares little about UI design and slaps every button on the main screen, or puts UI controls where they're easiest for their QA testing, but that doesn't mean it's usable or even conducive to a sensible workflow. (Imagine your daily job is to use those things and it involves clicking in 100 different places to get two pieces of information that really ought to be shown together, etc).

Bad UI design has also contributed to many an accident, as well. And who know what sort of software engineering practices went into its production? Having seen one package be a horrendous mix of C, Visual Basic (of varying versions), Lisp and probably a half dozen other languages...

Of course, the professionals in the field tolerate such crap because well, it's probably the only software package out there. And new versions bring about old and new bugs again, so everyone ends up using some ancient version because it works and they know the workarounds for its bugs and its UI quirks.

And yes, those workarounds may involve all sorts of other crap thrown together - including taking the results of the program, feeding it into some Excel spreadsheet, taking the results of that and feeding it back into the program because it somehow doesn't (or won't easily) calculate something.

There's probably some chewing gum and duct tape in the whole process as well. It can be ... scary.

Re:Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855082)

Most of these systems are developed by Siemens, which is a german company. And, no, they don't really care too much about getting localization down pat.

Re:Language (1)

Jaktar (975138) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855260)

Sinamic is a Siemens product. Siemens is one of the larger producers of controls for industry. I use a number of their products at my job. It's not uncommon for these types of controls to offer multi-language support. I wonder if that wasn't part of this guys hack.
I don't know much about the Siemens "front end" though, as the plant I work for uses a different control interface.

Re:Language (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855580)

If you look at the screenshots he posted (example [imageshack.us] ) you'll see that some of the screens were in the German language or a derivative thereof.

English?

Re:Language (1)

Bobfrankly1 (1043848) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855766)

If you look at the screenshots he posted (example [imageshack.us] ) you'll see that some of the screens were in the German language or a derivative thereof.

English?

Yes.

ABB is Swiss (1)

tacokill (531275) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855784)

ABB also makes DCS systems and they are a swiss company (ie: speak German).

Another poster already pointed out Siemens as well.

Re:Language (1)

Bobfrankly1 (1043848) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855908)

If you look at the screenshots he posted (example [imageshack.us] ) you'll see that some of the screens were in the German language or a derivative thereof. Why would a New Mexican power plant have its systems in German!?

Because if the hacker got into anything, it was the honeypot that he/she was meant to get into.

Re:Language (1)

superdave80 (1226592) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856348)

Not unheard of. Here in California, I actually have a injection molding press at my factory that has its control screens set for English, but it still spits out some German words from time to time.

Re:Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35856496)

If you look at the screenshots he posted (example [imageshack.us] ) you'll see that some of the screens were in the German language or a derivative thereof. Why would a New Mexican power plant have its systems in German!?

Yeah; I might have believed it if the screens were in Mexican

Re:Language (1)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 3 years ago | (#35860652)

That looks more like a page from a manual rather than a screenshot, though. Wold have expected the screenshot to look more like this [siemens.com] .

Re:Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35862732)

If it is a "hoax" he still created buzz and forced the company to expend resources to deal with his actions which in itself is a "hack" although a low tech one.

Re:Language (1)

Internetuser1248 (1787630) | more than 3 years ago | (#35865360)

Germany manufacture a lot of mechanical parts and also have a strong industrial relationship with mexico. It is not unlikely that the hacker was employed in some part of the process of building the plant.

It should also be noted how major the difference is between a hack at a wind farm and a hack at a nuclear power facility, even a fake hack. Whats the worst you could do if you hacked a wind turbine? Well you could probably break it given the right wind conditions.

None of this means it didn't happen (5, Insightful)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854576)

It's possible that the IT staff who failed to secure the networks and websites also lack the expertise to detect an intruder. It's certainly not easy, and if they were able to cleanly socially engineer (or perhaps guess) passwords to get it done, there may be no way to detect it at all.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854630)

One day seems a bit quick to do an investigation.

That said, I do think this was probably a hoax.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (2)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854790)

Not really, with a good IDS system you should have no trouble. We log everything that happens on our server and DMZ vlan's to a Network General box and could easily pull up all conversations between the firewall and any server box, or any workstation and any DMZ box. I would hope critical infrastructure such as a SCADA system is at least as well monitored.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855056)

I am sorry to disappoint you, having worked at a company developing SCADA systems... these systems are developed a bit like this:

  Assumption 1: SCADA systems... should be on a completely separate infrastructure.
  Assumption 2: If the system is on a separate, secure infrastructure... we have no need for additional security measures.

  Reality-check 1: 'I want to see what they h*ck is going on at the site when I'm at home!!!'
  Reality-check 2: Nobody listens to the security-conscious-guy when they want to have fancy graphics./

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855354)

AND:

Don't worry.. if it's behind citrix, it's not actually _connected_ to the internet!

Seriously... not connected to the internet means NO CONNECTION TO THE INTERNET! Like.. if I was to draw a line through a network map.. I would not be able to make it to the internet. No matter how many gateways and points of indirection ... if someone from the internet can make it to the system, you can't say it's not connected!

*foams at mouth and starts growling*

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855316)

No it's not. Most do not have any IDS let alone any decent networking. Most SCADA systems are lowest bidder and competent IT and networking staff are not in the equation at those price levels.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855510)

Sweet, well then when they get hacked and cause widespread outages I hope they get fined megabucks for every minute of downtime and are sued by their critical contract customers for gross negligence. Someone needs to force these guys to do things in a competent manner and apparently a decade of being warned about cybercrime hasn't been sufficient so I guess the only way they will listen is if it hits their bottom line.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (1)

Anrego (830717) | more than 3 years ago | (#35861624)

so I guess the only way they will listen is if it hits their bottom line

Even then, probably not. The cost of even a major incident is going to be less than doing it properly in the first place.. and the government is gonna be bailing them out, not fining them!

It's a shitty system and it's all gonna fail one day ... but no point deluding ourselves to the reality of the current situation.

Did you not see die hard 4!

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854740)

I would argue that the burden of proof is on the hacker, and not on the power company.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855048)

The problem is that most oversights in security will be continue to be missed when the site is reviewed. The same people who didn't think using postit notes on monitors to keep track of passwords wouldn't think that was a problem even after 90% of their workforce are carrying in cellphones with cameras built in every day.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (2)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855308)

They checked the windows 98 gateway machine and their virus scanner did not find anything. There is no way he got in, the AV software said so!

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (1)

starfishsystems (834319) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856998)

It's possible the guy got in. The evidence he presents is far from conclusive. It's possible he didn't. The operator says there's no evidence for it. Without conclusive evidence, all we can do is idly speculate, which makes this topic perfect for Slashdot.

The way in, apparently, was through a Cisco border router. It only takes a moment to check the router logs. Both successful and failed logins are recorded. Resetting the log leaves evidence. If the site is competently managed, the log events are also sent to a separate syslog host. If I were the site operator and I saw no evidence of incompetent configuration, and nothing amiss in these logs or elsewhere, then I would be comfortable saying, "we have not found evidence of a breach". That, in fact, is what the operator says.

Re:None of this means it didn't happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35861098)

It's just way odd...

http://img228.imageshack.us/i/85258364.png/ [imageshack.us]

It lists Florida Power and Light.. which if you look at the next picture lists NextEra Energies.. which has NO locations/operations/etc in Florida...

Plus the 'anonymous' login works on the ftp server in the picture.. so again.. I think he, at most, just grabbed some example pictures or something provided with the application

Nothing to see here. (1)

jshackney (99735) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854600)

This whole thing smelled funny from the beginning.

Re:Nothing to see here. (1)

catmistake (814204) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854870)

I'm not so sure. Couldn't this be Iranian retaliation for Stuxnet?

Re:Nothing to see here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854974)

I think it is more likely that this is retaliation from Israel [blogspot.com] :

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/136924 [israelnationalnews.com]

        The United States has begun denying visas to Israel's nuclear scientists, according to the Hebrew-language daily Maariv. Workers at the reactor in Dimona told the paper that they had been treated poorly by US representatives, and had been told they could not travel to the States.

Israel is telling the US that in can get into itz nukular plantz any timez it wantz, lol!11!!1

Such lovely, loyal allies the US has in the ME.

Re:Nothing to see here. (1)

necro81 (917438) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855084)

Probably the Iranians have bigger targets than the SCADA network for a privately-owned wind farm in New Mexico. Stuxnet was targeted at a key facility of the Iranian nuclear infrastructure: a non-overt attack on the Iranian military and government. I would expect if the Iranians were pissed at us over that they would attempt to retaliate in kind.

Re:Nothing to see here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35859666)

Maybe they thought they were... maybe... they thought that this wind farm.... was America's Windscale!

Not Really (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854622)

They're trying to goad an emotionally immature hacker into providing even more evidence.

Making the criminals do the investigative legwork .. now that's smart policing.

Next story on slashdot in an hour... (2)

pasv (755179) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854628)

Wind Turbine Firm hack confirmed: "Oh wait, never mind. We found his rootkit on port 31337 going out from our webserver! D'oh!"

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (2, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854682)

I'm more concerned that Slashdot itself has been hacked, and some unscrupulous bad guys is posting the news as it happens, instead of weeks, months, or years later.

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (3, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854754)

and some unscrupulous bad guys is posting the news as it happens

... and the same bad guys is inserting bad grammar in my posts.

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855320)

and some unscrupulous bad guys is posting the news as it happens

... and the same bad guys is inserting bad grammar in my posts.

Actually, I've just been drugging your coffee. The net effect is the same though.

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35856116)

if they're is good grammer in the posts that wood be proof of slashdot gettin haked.

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35856828)

Am they?

Oh shit, now its effected me to!!

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#35861874)

Or maybe we're just loosing our minds!

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854698)

Yeah, because the 1337 h4x0r can't be making this all up.

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854722)

Maybe next they'll just start using /. as a personal messaging system:

Top story: Wind Turbine Company to Hacker: U SUCK.
Next story: Hacker: no u r. oh and mom if ur reading i'll be late home k

Re:Next story on slashdot in an hour... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854930)

s'ok son. Having sex with Power Co Exec. You should see HIS root kit.

Simple Message (1, Insightful)

scubamage (727538) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854650)

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

Re:Simple Message (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854676)

You could be a lawyer for the RIAA!

Re:Simple Message (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854678)

I know you are, but what am i?

Re:Simple Message (3, Informative)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854708)

And if youll note, it doesnt say "there was no hack", but that "they see no evidence".

Re:Simple Message (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854920)

God did it!
Take that, bitches!

Re:Simple Message (1)

mooboy (191903) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855440)

Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

Perhaps, but crappy evidence is evidence of crap, IMHO. Take a look at the dude's screen shots. Any power company using such poorly put together screens, with no interesting status info, no proper overview screen with worthwhile data, isn't really a power company, but some kiddies dream.

time conceals, then reveals non-physical wounds (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854672)

the way things look now, history is on a tear to be not fake anymore. only the truth begins the healing part. fancy that. so our rulers will begin to distribute the unfake truth immediately, before, during & after disarming, so we can all get on with the long overdue healing. then we can finally stop typing stuff we have no idea/don't really care, about, but are learning to anyway, so that's good too. don't forget to read the seapeeleaks unproven uncharged guilty verdicts. thanks again.

Re:time conceals, then reveals non-physical wounds (1)

plover (150551) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855008)

Dammit, Timecube, you've crossposted back into the sane world again. Stop that!

phishing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854700)

Or maybe the hacker, or others, are simply waiting to see how much info they can squeeze out of any disclosure where the company attempts to show there hasn't been a break-in.

maybe a stupid question, but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854720)

Why would their "management interface" be accessible via the internet? It seems to me that control of such facilities should always be air-gapped as part of security-101.

Re:maybe a stupid question, but.. (2)

jasen666 (88727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854808)

Any SCADA/HMI system should be physically isolated from the business LAN regardless of whether it's internet accessible or not. Sounds like a few inherently bad choices were made here if this is true.

They better be right (1)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854746)

Otherwise I imagine the hacker will try to put up a demonstration.

i wonder what can be done with access to that system.

Re:They better be right (1)

kubernet3s (1954672) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855236)

-send turbines spinning under power -starting changing earth's rotational axis -Neptunian winters -God help us

Re:They better be right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855504)

-send turbines spinning under power
-starting changing earth's rotational axis
-Neptunian winters
-God help us

I think Morbo might want to have a few choice words with you.

Not surprised (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854786)

It seemed from the beginning that the "hacker" was the person the hacker claimed to be getting revenge for, the guy who was fired from Florida Power and Light the firm who the wind farm was a subsidiary of.

I would not doubt the photos had been taken when the guy still worked for the plant. Even I have photos of critical systems I work on at work, doesnt mean I could get into them once I was terminated, our security team times to the minute the person is "let go" when we destroy accounts and change passwords.

The obvious rejoinder.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854802)

"...Sterndale: How do you know that?
Holmes: I followed you.
Sterndale: I saw no one .
Holmes: That is what you may expect to see when I follow you. . ."

The Adventure of The Devil's Foot - A Conan Doyle.

Re:The obvious rejoinder.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35858042)

Oddly enough - I'm reading that very story right now.

Here is a question. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854822)

Why is something critical like a wind farm even hooked up to the internet? Does it need an internet connection? If you do need to put data onto the Internet, why can't it be from a secure one way firewall box that doesn't even accept connections into it, it only sends data out to an insecure server on the web and the web monitors can be watched from there.

Re:Here is a question. (1)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854932)

Almost everything is hooked to the internet. Most of the critical stuff is behind a good vpn and a good firewall that most engineers do not imagine to be hacked.

And who says it was hacked from the internet?

So what I am reading (1)

RigrmRtis (2044716) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854844)

Is that the most likely scenario is that this guy is for real. And isn't that, as a former employee, he has old configs stored somewhere that he still has access to (like a personal laptop). As well as screen shots related to training material. Nah this guy that was just fired and has offered up no real-time evidence is probably telling the truth. Just because that would make it more interesting.

No evidence of hack (1)

wezelboy (521844) | more than 3 years ago | (#35854922)

Cause Norton Anti-Virus sez so!

Slow news day ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35854946)

zzzzzzzzzzz.........

Passwords (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855094)

Anyone else find it funny that the vty and con passwords were cisco.

ow no!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855376)

hackED:)

Baby shower food [baby-showe...ideas.info]

It Didn't Not Happen (1)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855636)

It's a non-denial denial!

staaage right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35855684)

these arent the turbines your looking for

Cr4ck3r (1)

SlashV (1069110) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855726)

It's "cracker [catb.org] ", not "hacker". Come on /. You should know better.

Re:Cr4ck3r (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35859950)

You're obsessed with white guys from the southeastern US...

He was just that good (2)

JTsyo (1338447) | more than 3 years ago | (#35855728)

You can't backtrace him.

Re:He was just that good (1)

mpoulton (689851) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856236)

You can't backtrace him.

Maybe they can't, but just wait until they get the CyberPolice on his trail! They can backtrace anyone.

Re:He was just that good (1)

fl_litig8r (904972) | more than 3 years ago | (#35857294)

Maybe they can't, but just wait until they get the CyberPolice on his trail! They can backtrace anyone.

True enough, and the consequences will never be the same. He done goofed.

some info is too detailed (1)

funnyguy (28876) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856090)

I'm not sure if NextEra is saying it didn't happen, they can't tell, or they are refuting that the screenshots were taken due to a 'hack'. Either way, some of the information looks too credible. For example, NextEra provides output data from wind farms and this data goes into various OASIS systems. One screenshot shows what are presumably OASIS files from as recent as last week. All NextEra would need to do is double check those files, make sure that timestamps and sizes match what exists and that is proof. That should then lead back to the FTP session that gathered that directory listing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Access_Same-Time_Information_System

The only thing I know is saying we "found no evidence" one day after the release of information is a stupid PR move. It makes you look incompetent or incapable of detecting / protecting your information, exactly what the 'hacker' was attempting to do. NextEra just reinforced that notion.

Stupid... (2)

WaffleMonster (969671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35856746)

If BigR is really a former disgruntled employee he might as well have just posted his full name and address along with the dumps.

The response by Benji on the seclist mailing list sums it up: "so how long do you give yourself before you're in prison?"

big deal (1)

shadowrat (1069614) | more than 3 years ago | (#35857934)

I hacked slashdot. As evidence, i found this in the slashdot servers:

0x38a7fe1a

Ex-employH4x0r (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35858446)

Probably an ex-employee for the IT group that knows how to use TOR to post something. Oooooooo what a big hacker he is. Good password management and data cleanup (DLP) cost money most wind farm firms don't have a lot of that substance... yet.

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