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Microsoft Counts Down To XP Death

CmdrTaco posted about 3 years ago | from the along-with-everyone-else dept.

Microsoft 766

mikejuk writes "Microsoft have just released an end-of-support countdown gadget that ticks off the days until XP is no longer supported — but it only runs under Vista or Windows 7! It focuses the mind on the fact that XP is being forcibly retired. It is a wake-up call to think hard about the unpleasant situation and consider the alternatives.So as you watch the count down to XP's death tick by think about the problems created by using software that actually belongs to someone else..."

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766 comments

oblig (5, Funny)

tulcod (1056476) | about 3 years ago | (#35893976)

does it work under wine?

Re:oblig (1)

Lose (1901896) | about 3 years ago | (#35894202)

Seeing how gadgets are just zip files with a few HTML files and javascript inside, it sure does.

Re:oblig (1)

Lennie (16154) | about 3 years ago | (#35894352)

Then why would it not run under Windows XP ?

Active Desktop anyone ? As it was called in Windows 95, 98 and so on. Not sure how Microsoft calls this on Windows XP.

On Windows XP: Display Properties -> Desktop-tab -> Custimize Desktop -> Web-tab -> New

Uh, unless you're a programmer... (2, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | about 3 years ago | (#35893980)

Doesn't *ALL* software "belong to someone else"? Even with FOSS software you depend on others to maintain it. If they stop, then you don't get updates. Now sure, you could theoretically go down to the local college and get a programming degree and learn to do it yourself--but how often does that REALLY happen? At least with MS, I know the software is going to be supported for several years, and not become adandonware because Jeremy got a new job and doesn't have time to update it anymore.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894038)

+1. The summary really could have done without the self serving circle jerk bullshit.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894042)

So then buy from Redhat, or Ubuntu or whoever. Lots of folks will provide support for FOSS software. This is an old piece of FUD you are spewing here.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894106)

Support on that level would cost more than updating your OS every decade from a stable company. You know it's true. You're the one spreading the FUD.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894164)

So then run centos/fedora/ubuntu and get patches for free. If you only want patches you don't have to pay at all.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (4, Insightful)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#35894226)

Total cost of ownerships figures are debatable, what is not is that with closed source sofware you do not decide your own IT strategy.
You just "do as told"..
If you like that, be their guest...

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894136)

But if you can't do it yourself, being dependent on RedHat or Ubuntu really isn't any better than being dependent on Microsoft other than philosophical differences which really don't enter into a business decision.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894186)

Sure it is, because if either one screws you there are lots of others who will provide support. Since anyone can do it there can be actual competition in the market.

At worst case you can be sure your app will run on RHEL after Novell kills SuSe, or whatever hypothetical you want to get into.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (5, Insightful)

Bert64 (520050) | about 3 years ago | (#35894362)

It's very different, because there are multiple organisations that provide linux support and nothing to prevent new organisations springing up, while only one organisation provides windows support.
You wouldn't want to grow dependent on anything without there being a second source supplier who can step in if the first one fails. And similarly, multiple competing suppliers will result in better and cheaper service.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894176)

Yeah, good thing RedHat is still supporting all their releases... Oh ... wait ... no they're not. RedHat 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 - all gone. RedHat Enterprise Linux 1, 2, 3 & 4 - all gone. Gee, maybe retiring old versions of software is just ... universal?

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 3 years ago | (#35894182)

So then buy from Redhat, or Ubuntu or whoever.

And they provide 11 years of support for their product? Even Ubuntu's LTS is what? 2 years? And Red Hat? So basically I have to annually pay more to get support than what I paid for the XP license to begin with? You're joking, right?

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894232)

Ubuntu charges nothing for patches, RHEL is for production boxes not desktops if you just want patches you can run Centos.

Also when upgrades cost nothing it is not fair to compare them to an OS that costs to replace. These updates can even be done in place. My laptop right now has gone from 9.04 to 10.10 and will be 11.04 in a few weeks.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894280)

Lamer.

Linux by any company doesn't make it any better, it's still shitware intended for those stuck in the 90's.

You only have to look at the vast number of security holes in the linux kernel to realise that even with it's 1% desktop popularity, it's a security and maintenance nightmare.

Now compare that with the superior support and security you get with Microsoft's latest offerings.

Research and numbers speak for themselves.

FOSS companies compete for you to depend on them (1)

tepples (727027) | about 3 years ago | (#35894096)

Even with FOSS software you depend on others to maintain it.

True, but with free software, you choose on whom to depend.

If they stop, then you don't get updates.

With free software, companies compete for you to depend on them. If they stop, you can switch to another company offering support for the product. True, an unpopular free software product is in the same boat as proprietary software with respect to end of life concerns, but the more popular ones have a wider choice of support options.

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (1)

vistapwns (1103935) | about 3 years ago | (#35894158)

"True, but with free software, you choose on whom to depend."

Just like you can choose to depend on MS. BTW, which linux distro releases patches for 10 year old releases, I'm curious..

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 3 years ago | (#35894212)

Not even Red Hat most likely. And even if they did you'd be paying way more than the cost of what your Windows license was and you only get a single year of support! Whereas for the 100 dollars I paid for XP I got 5 years of free mainstream support and an additional 6 years of security fixes.

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894282)

For the 0 dollars I paid for Ubuntu I am now running the latest and greatest version, and will upgrade again in two weeks. With no reinstalls. Did MS mail you a free Win 7 disk?

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (1)

Cris CodeCruncher (2048180) | about 3 years ago | (#35894400)

lol. what a fool. linux is 20 years old and has been updated from the start. all for free too. and who the hell cares anyways, go buy your windows machines, have them work like shit, get virus's and then deal with it. have fun!

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (2)

Synn (6288) | about 3 years ago | (#35894328)

"which linux distro releases patches for 10 year old releases, I'm curious.."

If you installed a 10 year old release of Debian you could likely update it to the current release version with no problems.

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894422)

Here come the linux fags with the pitchforks again! Hide!

Cost of upgrading (1)

tepples (727027) | about 3 years ago | (#35894408)

Just like you can choose to depend on MS.

Depending on Microsoft is a Hobson's choice: take it or leave it. Depending on a Linux distributor means there will probably be more than one distributor with an acceptable offer.

BTW, which linux distro releases patches for 10 year old releases

Whether or not that question is worth answering depends on the following questions: First, do Linux distributors charge as much to upgrade from one release to the next as Microsoft charges to upgrade from one release of Windows to the next? Second, do Linux distributors increase the hardware requirements as much from one release to the next as Microsoft changed them between Windows XP and Windows Vista? The CPU, video, memory, and disk requirements increased, and the driver model for peripherals changed fundamentally.

Re:FOSS companies compete for you to depend on the (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 3 years ago | (#35894354)

Both your statements are equally true of commercial software.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894118)

With software like XP that 'calls home to Momma' every so often, it is possible, but not likely, that they could decide to turn off XP completely. They would be within their rights to do so. They've never done that before, but no guarantees (I had a customer on Win 3.1 until a couple of years ago). FOSS software may be unsupported or abandoned for a while, but it can't be turned off once you have it on the system.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894236)

Nah, it'd be a PR disaster. On the other hand, with access to the source code, they could release a really nasty virus on the QT...

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (4, Insightful)

Asic Eng (193332) | about 3 years ago | (#35894160)

Well Open Source does give you the option to hire someone to pick up the source code and make improvements/bugfixes. Not particularly interesting for a private user, but relevant in a commercial context.

We've seen people taking advantage of that option (for somewhat different reasons) just recently with OpenOffice, and for KDE3 there is the Trinity "fork".

Regarding "Ownership" though - I completely agree, just because MS stops support doesn't mean you can not use the software anymore. Similarly Ubuntu or Redhat will also eliminate support for older versions at some point.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#35894184)

This is very near to trolling, if you use a FOSS solution and the creator of the solutions decides to stop developping it you can find other people that might be interested, and because you have the source they can, and in practice they do.
Oracle is not so much interested in OpenOffice, so "big deal" there are enough other people who care/need to go on supporting it.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894190)

There is, and for several years will be, a lot of individuals and institutions that are both willing to, and capable of, supporting and developing further any reasonably popular piece of software. Be it $LINUX_DISTRO or $MS_WINDOWS_VERSION.

Now the trouble with the proprietary software is, both civil and criminal liability would arise if somebody tried to openly support it and develop it further.

The end of support of Windows XP is decided upon by Microsoft for business reasons (that's fair), but enforced by the police and courts (that's a blatant shaft). Paid for by your taxes.

In short, you pay those gov't agencies to get prevented from getting support for proprietary software.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (3, Insightful)

Synn (6288) | about 3 years ago | (#35894242)

With FOSS software when the programmers stop updating, new programmers fork the code and continue to update it.

This happened with X11, Open Office, etc etc. As a user of FOSS you can pretty much rest assured that the software you use will be supported so long as it fills a need or isn't replaced by something superior. It won't be abandoned even if you don't code, simply because other programmers can pick up the ball and keep going with the product.

Corporate software is much much more likely to become abandonware. Companies go out of business, their corporate goals change, a product may not be generating enough income, or they simply want to sell something new and shiny. Compare that to a product like Emacs. It was first released in the mid 70's and just had a new release last month. Odds are it'll still be around 30 years from now.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (2)

lrnj (1986582) | about 3 years ago | (#35894262)

...or someone who is friends with a programmer, or someone who can hire programmers, or someone who can pay someone to hire programmers...

It's one thing for one maintainer to be able to drop a product, and a very different thing for no other maintainer to be able to pick it up.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

Bert64 (520050) | about 3 years ago | (#35894302)

Sure, most software technically belongs to someone else...
But the difference is between a single entity having total control over a piece of software.

If XP were open source, then considering how widely it's still used just because the original authors decide to stop supporting it, you can guarantee there would be several third parties stepping up to continue maintaining it. The more widely used a piece of code, the greater the chances that *someone* will be willing/able to maintain it, you don't have to do it yourself although that option is always available to you, and if you can't justify the cost yourself you could always pool your resources with other people who still use the same software.

Basically you have choices, you are not beholden to the whim of a single entity.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

Cris CodeCruncher (2048180) | about 3 years ago | (#35894310)

bullshit. bullshit. who cares about whether or not it gets updates? it doesn't matter in the least when it comes to who owns the software. Linux belongs to the people!

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

Foofoobar (318279) | about 3 years ago | (#35894340)

You are confusing ownership and maintenance. Just because the car manufacturer is the one who maintains your car, does that mean you do't own your car? Just because an electrician comes in to fix your wiring, does that mean they own your home? Open source code is the same; it was released into the wild and is owned by no one. You can do with it what you want. You can fork Linux and have 'Billy Bob's Super Awesome Funky Linux' Distro... and many have!

Do not confuse ownership and maintenance else I'm going to come over to your house and fix your sink and kick you out.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894384)

But no other programmer can come in and fix XP, he would get his ass sued off. The electrician that installed the wiring in your home will not be suing any future electricians for working on your wires.

Re:Uh, unless you're a programmer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894398)

At least with MS, I know the software is going to be supported for several years, and not become adandonware because Jeremy got a new job and doesn't have time to update it anymore.

Uh, did you read the article? XP is going to be abandonware, and what happens to Jeremy is irrelevant. And no, all software does not belong to someone else.

Forth (1)

MasterOfGoingFaster (922862) | about 3 years ago | (#35894008)

Damn glad I stuck with Forth.

OS? I don't need no stinking OS...

Re:Forth (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#35894272)

Tsss, you should have used emacs, then you would have the office suite, OS and programming environment in one package ..
And you do not need to mutate your brain to think in stacks, just grow a sixt finger :-)

(I would have moded funny :-))

Re:Forth (1)

An ominous Cow art (320322) | about 3 years ago | (#35894404)

Using emacs as your single all-in-one OS/UI/programming environment would also mean programming solely in Lisp, so he'd have to mutate his brain to think in parentheses :-).

derp derp (1, Insightful)

not already in use (972294) | about 3 years ago | (#35894010)

So as you watch the count down to XP's death tick by think about the problems created by using software that actually belongs to someone else..."

Yes, you're better off with opensource. It's much nicer knowing software you depend on may be abandoned without notice.

Re:derp derp (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894082)

So then buy from redhat or another FOSS vendor.

Re:derp derp (2)

Desler (1608317) | about 3 years ago | (#35894324)

And which FOSS vendor gives 11 years of free support like 100s of millions have gotten from Microsoft on XP? To get the "self-support" option for a single desktop user from Red Hat you pay $49 a year.

Re:derp derp (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894094)

May be abandoned is better than will be abandoned. derp derp indeed.

Re:derp derp (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 3 years ago | (#35894116)

That's not really how it works though, is it? There IS notice. You watch the mailing list if there is any doubt, and when it tapers off, you know you're about to be abandoned.

Compare this to only finding out a product is being abandoned if the vendor chooses to tell you for their own purposes, and it's clear which approach has more to offer the user.

--

Gee, it's been one whole minute since I last posted a comment. I guess if I were as dumb as a taco, I would still be trying to formulate my next thought.

Re:derp derp (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 3 years ago | (#35894394)

You watch the mailing list

Ha! Yeah. Everyone I know who uses open-source anything always subscribes to the mailing lists and reads all of the messages. In fact, right now I'm monitoring the mailing lists for PHP, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Apache, Ted, WHM/cPanel, GIMP, PEAR, Suhosin, Perl, gcc, ClamAV, exim, ftpd, named, imap, spamd, etc. You know, just in case.

Re:derp derp (1)

Locutus (9039) | about 3 years ago | (#35894122)

it's WAY better using proprietary software because companies abandoning proprietary software MIGHT notify you? That makes lots of sense. NOT! With open source, you at the very least have the opportunity to fix the bugs you find while using the software and have a chance of getting it to work on your systems for years and years later. With proprietary software, you are SOL once the owner stops support.

LoB

Re:derp derp (0)

not already in use (972294) | about 3 years ago | (#35894292)

Spare me. FOSS depends on these idealistic principles that anyone can and will be able to maintain source code simply because it's available, which is complete and utter bullshit for reasons so obvious that I won't waste my time enumerating them. There's a reason FOSS fails to find mainstream success except in cases where code is being maintained by corporate entities.

Re:derp derp (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894248)

It's much nicer knowing software you depend on may be abandoned without notice.

How is this 'without notice' ? Microsoft has been warning us for some time that support for Windows XP will be ending soon, and there is nearly three years on the countdown timer, which is longer than the entire lifetime of some open source projects. Windows XP is 10 years old now, and will be 12 (nearly 13) when it is retired.

What percentage of open source projects that were released (not started) in 2001 are still actively supported now in 2011?

This is hardly 'without notice'.

Re:derp derp (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#35894318)

Actually you do not look at the death tick because if you can, you are not running XP any way, and with Open Source you see if the support are slowing down or not, it is not an "on/off" marketing descision...

"Ownership" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894014)

So, when 'software not owned by someone else' ceases to be maintained, there will still be security and feature updates, correct?

Start a consortium (1)

tepples (727027) | about 3 years ago | (#35894130)

If free software on which your company and other companies depend ceases to be maintained, your companies can jointly start a consortium or foundation to maintain the software.

Re:Start a consortium (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894220)

So, one should only use 'software not owned by someone else' if one controls a business with enough resources to hire programmers and start consortiums? So, no small businesses or home users, gotcha.

Re:Start a consortium (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894338)

Those only need patches, not real support. They should run software that does free in place upgrades to the latest version.

Re:Start a consortium (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894344)

Which will cost a lot more than buying a newer version of Windows. (And won't get you something better than before for your money.)

Re:"Ownership" (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#35894370)

If there are enough users, yes, and at least it is possible, whereas closed source is dead when the owner says so ...
and absolutely nothing you can do about it...

Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894050)

XP is more than decent for most offices and there is no reason you could not run any program in it so only reason to kill XP is to get more money and has nothing to do with what clients wants. How much longer people are going to tolerate this kind of abuse of power ?

Re:Hmm (0)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#35894128)

"and there is no reason you could not run any program in it "
It only supports 4GB of ram, lots of things want more than that.

Re:Hmm (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 3 years ago | (#35894402)

It only supports 4GB of ram, lots of things want more than that.

Only 64-bit Windows apps can access more than 4GB of RAM, and I've only seen two 64-bit Windows apps in the wild so far, one of wihch is Internet Explorer (Windows 7 may come with some other native 64-bit apps, but IE is the only one that I know is 64-bit... I'm guessing that no-one has really been waiting for 64-bit notepad or minesweeper).

Re:Hmm (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894180)

What abuse of power? You can continue using XP for as long as you want; they don't magically make it stop working.
They are just saying they are not going to spend further time and money updating it. After almost 10 years this should have been expected seeing that most software isn't maintained nearly as long.

Re:Hmm (3, Informative)

Mascot (120795) | about 3 years ago | (#35894332)

How the hell is a company choosing, after _13 years_, to no longer support a piece of software "abuse of power"?

Nobody's forcing you to uninstall XP. You'll just have to come to terms with the reality that at some point it will no longer be supported.

Still not upgrading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894062)

With a good firewall, a secure browser and good antivirus, I'm not worried.

I can easily get 3 more years out of xp, if not longer.

Why isn't there an iPhone app for this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894064)

I wish Microsoft would create an iPhone app for this so I can taunt my cow-orkers

Re:Why isn't there an iPhone app for this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894374)

And then they can laugh at you as Apple logs your location all day.

Really? (3, Insightful)

joe_cot (1011355) | about 3 years ago | (#35894086)

Windows XP is almost 10 years old. Find me a Linux distro that supports 10 year old versions, on the desktop.

No one cried foul when Windows 98 was EOLed, after only 8 years. That was because they liked XP. Microsoft has pushed back the EOL on Windows XP multiple times due to complaints, but it's time to move on.

If you dislike Vista and 7, use something a different operating system. Don't pretend Microsoft should support 10 year old software.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894170)

But with a free OS, you just keep getting updates. Nobody says you have to abandon your operating system and start over.
I have one box that's just automatically upgraded through every Kubuntu release from Edgy to Maverick. Yes, I know that's a lot less time than probably many of you, and much less than the decade referred to, but it's only proprietary software that makes you change OSs (and probably hardware) in order to keep getting bug fixes, security patches, etc.

Re:Really? (1)

joe_cot (1011355) | about 3 years ago | (#35894284)

But Edgy is not the same as Maverick. There is likely very few to no packages that haven't been changed in the process. Ubuntu is saying that your version is EOL, and you need to upgrade, same as Microsoft. The only real difference is that Ubuntu is free and Windows is not. But no one cries foul because Ubuntu no longer supports Edgy.

Re:Really? (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | about 3 years ago | (#35894194)

I've compiled > 10 year old GNU software on what was a modern OS at the time. Worked great.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894286)

Not the same thing.

Re:Really? (1)

joe_cot (1011355) | about 3 years ago | (#35894322)

You can still run programs from Windows 1 in Windows 7. In both cases, that doesn't mean that said software doesn't have security issues, and it doesn't meant that anyone is supporting it.

Re:Really? (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | about 3 years ago | (#35894392)

And how many KB of source code was that? Care to venture a guess how that compares to the Windows XP code base, and the associated cost of maintenance?

Re:Really? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 3 years ago | (#35894238)

my company has around 60 or so XP boxes, and I can tell you now they care much more about money than updates to windows

all I can say about that mentality is its very common place and be prepared for spam like you have never seen it before

Re:Really? (1)

jimicus (737525) | about 3 years ago | (#35894426)

Indeed, but if they're looking at the whole picture (and they'd be foolish not to), cost of licensing is only part of the cost.

I can't believe I'm saying that, I sound like a Microsoft shill. Eurgh. I'll have to get in the shower after I've posted this.

Anyway, how much does it cost to migrate to Linux if your company depends on a application(s) that are Windows only? That, I would argue, is one of the big things keeping people on Windows.

Re:Really? (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#35894410)

You are absolutely right, there is no reason for Microsoft to support XP any longer, actually we would like them to stop all support of all versions :-)

There is freedom, good dictator and bad dictator..

Freedom is usually messy and complicated, good dictator is better than bad dictator...

But all in all, freedom is more sustainable...

Re:Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894418)

"support" just means "fix bugs". Normally after 10 years all the bugs in a product have been squashed and the product survives indefinitely. Microsoft is making a big deal out of XP because they're still not done fixing all the bugs and they want to get out of that.

kaaaching (1)

realsilly (186931) | about 3 years ago | (#35894088)

Microsoft is trying to ensure the life of their company. XP is not bringing in the revenue for them any longer, so from their perspective it's time to move on. This is really bad for the consumers. People are happy with the product. Companies are saving $$$ by not replacing software and licenses.

This is potentially good for the economy, because corporations across America will soon be forced to update the operating systems and IT departments may need to hire new techs for installations. Conversely, companies may increase their IT budget but folks will not get raises or additional staff to help with ever demanding workloads.

Pull Your Head Out (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 3 years ago | (#35894250)

XP is not bringing in the revenue for them any longer...

Dude, XP is over 10 years old. Please inform me which popular Linux desktop distro has backwards support for 10 year old packages? There are LOTS of reasons to have issues with MS, but not supporting outdated 10 year old software forever is not one of them.

Re:Pull Your Head Out (5, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | about 3 years ago | (#35894356)

Dude, XP is over 10 years old. Please inform me which popular Linux desktop distro has backwards support for 10 year old packages?

XP was still on sale last year when I bought my netbook (now wiped and running Ubuntu). The date it was first released is meaningless.

Re:kaaaching (5, Insightful)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | about 3 years ago | (#35894260)

his is potentially good for the economy, because corporations across America will soon be forced to update the operating systems and IT departments may need to hire new techs for installations.

This is just another version of breaking windows (*sigh* just re-read this, the glass kind) being "good" for the economy because it caused people to buy windows and pay window repairmen. The "good" for the economy would be found instead in people switching to more efficient software, having less system downtime, and more security resulting in less spam/viruses wasting resources. But the simple forced switching causing companies to hire IT workers is not good for the economy.

Don't get me wrong, IT workers are important for a company, but you need to understand that all they do is lose a company money. Like HR, they usually don't produce product, they are on overhead. A good IT person can "save" a company huge sums of money by being efficient and lowering overhead and downtime company wide, but increasing IT budget is always a loss unless that increase is recouped by their ability to increase efficiencies elsewhere.

Re:kaaaching (3, Insightful)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | about 3 years ago | (#35894278)

Good for the economy? Would you please look up "broken window fallacy"?

But in a nutshell, it's not of economic benefit to replace something that serves its purpose INSTEAD OF getting something new which serves a new purpose. The resources used "fixing the broken window" cannot then be used to, say, glaze a new window in a new store.

--PM

Old news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894100)

How is this different from the last few times they tried this?

holycost includes being well chilled while serving (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894108)

we use more of the precious crusade generating carbonites that way (giving back), staying unfrozen, plus we smell/store better. are our rulers are overstocked with wizardry gifted onto them by the other fictional gods, or what. if there was discussion of disarmament, uncle sam would start blowing up even more stuff? senile? psycho? religion? what?

they still support it longer than canonical (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894112)

they still support it longer than canonical supèports their long term support releases.. wtg msft

WTF (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894166)

FTA
'Of course being a desktop gadget it will only work on Windows 7 or Vista so you can only view the countdown if you have actually solved the problem and moved on from Windows XP!'

so it doesn't run on XP? (1)

Locutus (9039) | about 3 years ago | (#35894204)

Talk about yet another way Microsoft has its head up its arse. They come out with this dumbass little program for you to remind you to wake up and move on but they require you have already moved on to one of their newer operating systems. Even one panned so completely they had to rush out yet another operating system release. Do they lock up those employees in the brain washing division for so long they no longer think straight? Sure seems like it and wouldn't doubt someone high up prays to some deity daily thanking her they still have a monopoly on the desktop. IMO

LoB

Damn (1)

mccalli (323026) | about 3 years ago | (#35894218)

Apparently I only have 1082 days left to figure out the modelines on my MAME box's original arcade monitor. Given that I have already prevaricated for around 700 days, this is not good news to me...

Cheers,
Ian

Let me get this straight... (5, Funny)

hrtserpent6 (806666) | about 3 years ago | (#35894228)

So in order to encourage you to upgrade Windows XP to a newer version, they create a countdown clock that only runs on systems you have already upgraded??? Is it called the "Schadenfreude Clock"?

"only runs under Vista or Windows 7" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894244)

Or not.
http://lifehacker.com/#!5089081/install-the-windows-vista-sidebar-in-xp

Unpleasant Situation? (2)

Kakihara (958777) | about 3 years ago | (#35894308)

It really is not an unpleasant situation.

First as someone who develops web applications used by for the financial sector, I'll be extremely grateful when the operating system with which Internet Explorer 6 is bundled becomes officially obsolete. Perhaps at last these firms will face up to the inevitable and upgrade, and we can stop spending a significant proportion of every development cycle dealing with this terrible browser.

Secondly, supporting XP requires resources. I would much rather MS used those resources (presumably these days derived from selling Windows 7) to innovate and support their modern products, rather than support a legacy operating system loved by very few, and loathed by many who have to work with it and its corollaries.

Even though I still much prefer my linux boxes, there's no denying that in Windows 7, Microsoft have finally built a decent operating system. Let's close the door on a bad memory.

Gadgets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894316)

"desktop Gadget, which doesn't run on XP".

And that's why I'll stick with XP as long as possible. I don't want to gaze at my navel, or have "gadgets" on my desktop. I just wanna get shit done.

Also (1)

ktappe (747125) | about 3 years ago | (#35894346)

It also demonstrates how desktop-specific MS is by having the countdown be an app instead of a web-based widget. I, for one, support Windows boxes from my Mac. Kind of hard for me to use the countdown timer on OS X.

On the other hand, if they had made the timer web-based, they'd probably have designed it to only work in IE anyway.

Set the Classic Theme in Windows 7... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#35894350)

..and watch how your beloved Windows 7 OS reveals itself as XP with fancy layouts, themes, and effects.

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