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RIM BlackBerry PlayBook: Unfinished, Unusable

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the don't-keep-that-all-bottled-up dept.

Blackberry 260

snydeq points out this InfoWorld review of the BlackBerry PlayBook, "an 'unfinished, unusable' tablet from RIM. 'At the core of it all, the design of the PlayBook as a BlackBerry-dependent device was simply a boneheaded decision by executives who hoped a hit product might entice more BlackBerry sales,' Gruman writes. 'Why RIM chose to ship the PlayBook in such a state is unfathomable. The iPad 2 and Xoom have been out for weeks, so there's no heading them off at the pass. Instead, the PlayBook debuted with all eyes on it — but instead of a world-class performer, we got the homeless guy who plays air guitar in front of the mall.'"

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phones also suck (-1, Troll)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905284)

I'd like to point out that blackberry phones also suck. The UI is horrendous.

Re:phones also suck (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905406)

As long as you stick exclusively within the email interface, things aren't so bad. It's just if you happen to venture out that life gets a bit dire.

Part of the Blackberry experience has been being honed since before blackberries were phones at all. The other part is a me-to tack-on. It isn't too hard to tell which is which...

Re:phones also suck (1)

conspirator57 (1123519) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905862)

i'm pretty sure that since the Storm (and possibly before) all blackberry products have suffered the same sorts of flaws caused by terrible management decisions.

also, getting rid of the clicky wheel was a terrible decision. and even then they should have put its replacement (mini-trackball/touch plate) in the same location (side of the phone)

Re:phones also suck (1)

pacificleo (850029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905448)

they got best email integration for phone . BBM is pretty good . Yes they still got soe work to do in App space and it takes awefully long time to re boot the device but hey its not that bad if you ask me . they have got a Legeacy to support too .

Re:phones also suck (0)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905628)

they got best email integration for phone . BBM is pretty good . Yes they still got soe work to do in App space and it takes awefully long time to re boot the device but hey its not that bad if you ask me . they have got a Legeacy to support too .

Best email integration for a phone?

Maybe if you're willing to pay for an Enterprise Server... I've never worked any place that ran one of those. Might be absolutely wonderful if you run your own BES. But if you're trying to do without a BES? Painful.

Both my Droid and the iPhones I've had to support work far better than any BlackBerry I've ever touched. Email setup is painless. Email synchronization is flawless. Navigating your messages works great. Sending, receiving... All superior to the BlackBerry.

Re:phones also suck (1)

PeterKraus (1244558) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905694)

Really.

I've got my Curve 8520. Emails are absolutely flawless - talking to my gmail.com account while sending emails using my business domain (which is actually using google). Talks to my google calendar well too. And it's a decent MP3 player. Oh, and it's suitable for using it to read /. on the train (using the Bolt browser). About 3 days of battery life.

I actually like the UI (BB OS 5), and I like the phone too. I guess YMMW...

Re:phones also suck (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905726)

So your argument for RIM is that google made a blackberry app that works well? WTF?

Re:phones also suck (1)

PeterKraus (1244558) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905746)

Hey, don't be so offensive. I was just surprised that you don't like the BB way of emails, as I quite like them.

Re:phones also suck (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905820)

Offensive? I didn't even include a goatse link!
My point is just that you can't point to a google app as proof that BB is good. Their app didn't even use the BB UI, it used it's own! Even with that though, it was still annoying because you couldn't scroll as easily because you had to use that stupid little ball. My $0.02, opinions may vary.

Re:phones also suck (1)

PeterKraus (1244558) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905866)

I'm using the BB email app. The Google email app sucks, you can't even add attachments... Now I see where the confusion came from ;)

(Though to sync the calendar i'm using google sync, which is a google plugin. Also google maps are way better than BB maps.)

Re:phones also suck (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906052)

Newer blackberries use an optical track pad which is, imo, the best mouse-substitute out there

Re:phones also suck (1)

trapnest (1608791) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905874)

Google didn't though, I'm quite sure he's talking about the built in email functionality, which I agree is superior to most phones out there.

Re:phones also suck (2)

Ephemeriis (315124) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905950)

Really.

I've got my Curve 8520. Emails are absolutely flawless - talking to my gmail.com account while sending emails using my business domain (which is actually using google). Talks to my google calendar well too.

Over the years, I've had to support a number of folks using various BBs to talk to various email servers.

Setup was always kind of a pain. Varied a little bit from one version of the software to another... From one carrier to another... But their wizard was always a little cumbersome. And if you didn't do it right you'd get spammed with synchronization messages. And sometimes you'd wind up with a second email address somehow.

These days I'm just supporting co-workers on an Exchange server. Getting them to talk to the Exchange server securely, using SSL, is a bit of a trick. You have to run through their wizard and intentionally set it up wrong. When it doesn't connect right it gives you the option of specifying your settings manually. Then you can tell it exactly how you want to connect.

Once you are connected and talking to the Exchange server, even looking at an email message in Outlook will cause the BB to think it's new. So you wind up re-downloading old messages all the time. This has been an issue for a couple years now, and the only consistent solution I've seen is "buy a BES."

As far as calendar sync goes... Well, it doesn't. Unless you've got a BES (or things changed very dramatically in the last year or so) you'll need to plug your phone in to your computer in order to sync your calendar. This is a huge pain for us, because it means we have to install the BB client software on random computers around the hospital... And configure it... And then folks need to keep track of their USB cables and remember to plug in periodically.

On my Droid, I just set up a "corporate sync" account. You have to enter the settings manually, because the wizard doesn't work right (why do these wizards never work right?)... And the manual settings button isn't immediately obvious... But at least you don't have to intentionally do it wrong to make it show up. Once the account is set up it'll pull down my email, calendar, and contacts all wirelessly. No need to plug in at all.

Re:phones also suck (4, Informative)

Doug Neal (195160) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906202)

BES Express is a free product. From an administrator's point of view it's somewhat limited in functionality compared to BES, but from the user's perspective the all the synchronisation and directory integration works as expected.

Re:phones also suck (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906190)

Both for email and music, it sucks rocks compared to the iPhone.

I'm not an Apple apologist, but the iPhone is much better for music and everyone but RIM devotees can see that

Re:phones also suck (1)

FlipperPA (456193) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906328)

Apparently you missed this memo... Blackberry Enterprise Server Express is now free, but yes, still only supports Exchange and Domino. Not my cup of tea, but yeah, it is free now:

http://us.blackberry.com/apps-software/business/server/express/ [blackberry.com]

Re:phones also suck (1)

FlipperPA (456193) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906292)

With UIs, beauty always ends up being in the eye - and fingers / thumbs - of the beholder. I love my Blackberry phone, and yes, I've tried iPhone (but not an Android yet).

That said, I won't touch the PlayBook with a 10000ms ping.

I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905312)

I read the first few paragraphs, and he says he would rather use no tablet at all than this thing -- and it still gets 5.4 from him. Score inflation much?

Re:I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (1)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905488)

He's probably afraid of all the hate mail he's gonna get. "You're an Apple fanboy!"

Re:I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905578)

Yeah but it reads like a review of a dead prostitute, actually just half the body, (where the iPad is the luxury escort service).

It's like: I can't describe the disgust that washed over me as the severed pelvis fell out of the bloody shipping container, then a detached half a face, and one breast. Maggots had already eaten most of the vulva and the stench of a decaying rodent, along with a sappy green bile oozed from the vagina like some hideous sore.

I'd give it a 5.4.

Re:I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905718)

Goddamn, man! How the fuck am I supposed to eat my lunch after that visual? Next time: DISCLAIMER!!!

Re:I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905868)

Sorry!!!

Re:I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (1)

brokeninside (34168) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905580)

Presuming that is a 10 point scale, that equates to getting a 54% on a test which is a failing grade in most courses.

Also, note that it equates to the "poor" category.

Re:I love how he still gives it a "5.4" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905658)

If it's anything like video game review scores, big publishers get a free 50% bonus. If you're big enough, scores start at 5 out of 10. A 5,4 is actually a 0,4.

Not Dead on Arrival (4, Interesting)

pacificleo (850029) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905324)

Classic case of hubris and " love to hate " syndrome . It has got a good CPU , Support Flash , QNX run on Dalvik VM so there is always a plan B of supporting . Android Apps . I think for version 1 this is a decent device and i have used the pre released unit . Multitasking is good enough and by any count it is better than Xoom . in a world filled with Android and Apple Fan boys its hard to measure anything on a standalone basis .

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (4, Informative)

the unbeliever (201915) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905390)

It's DOA because you can't use email, calendars or contacts unless you attach it to your Blackberry phone, which AT&T has already blocked via AppWorld.

That was a boneheaded move by RIM, and unless they correct that feature then I can't see the Playbook doing very well.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (2)

bberens (965711) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905572)

Sounds to me like they tried to "pull an Apple" on the tight coupling but screwed it up.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906212)

I think you missed a </troll> tag on the end of your comment.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (1)

Carewolf (581105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906058)

which AT&T has already blocked via AppWorld.
That was a boneheaded move by RIM,

What?

Interfacing with your blackberry might be a good or a bad thing depending on whether you are aiming at Blackberry users only or not, but why on Earth are you and the reviewer, not only excusing AT&T, but excusing your own poor choice of carrier?

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906210)

It's DOA because you can't use email, calendars or contacts unless you attach it to your Blackberry phone, which AT&T has already blocked via AppWorld.

That was a boneheaded move by RIM, and unless they correct that feature then I can't see the Playbook doing very well.

Seriously, what kind of VP of product development wakes up in the morning and thinks something like this is a good idea?

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905420)

Android and Apple Fan boys? You mean in a world filled with far superior tablets, it is tough to compete with a crippled, unstable, and unusable product.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (3, Insightful)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905444)

The review is a bit harsh and from what I read, it does have good hardware and the software has potential. I would agree that RIM seems to have launched it unfinished and incomplete. As expected with a launch of any new product you expect there to some things missing especially since this is the first time RIM has used QNX on a product. I would commend RIM on that aspect of it. I could understand that there are be quirks or bugs with the system. I understand that there are not many apps at the moment. What I don't understand is why RIM would launch a tablet or any mobile device without a calendar, contacts, or an email client. Sure you can use your Blackberry phone to tether to it and RIM says that functionality will be added later but why not just wait? With all the negative reviews so far telling people to wait until RIM fixes these things, potential customers are going to wait anyways. All RIM has done is to give a negative first impression of their product.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905520)

Classic case of hubris and " love to hate " syndrome. It has got a good CPU , Support Flash , QNX run on Dalvik VM so there is always a plan B of supporting Android Apps. I think for version 1 this is a decent device and i have used the pre released unit. Multitasking is good enough and by any count it is better than Xoom. In a world filled with Android and Apple Fan boys its hard to measure anything on a standalone basis.

No, it's a classic case of an Apple competitor rushing out a half-finished tablet in a desperate bid to get into the game. Nobody would be giving Apple this much slack if the iPad had the same deficiencies. And why should we judge the RIM PlayBook on a standalone basis when there is a tablet out there that has set the standard against which to measure? It only makes sense to claim the PlayBook shouldn't be compared to another tablet when you know it would it won't fare very well.

John Gruber nailed it with this Daring Fireball (http://daringfireball.net/) post from yesterday--

"I don’t understand why so many reviewers bend over backwards to grade these things on a curve. If the iPad 2 had the problems and deficiencies the Xoom and PlayBook have, these same reviewers would (rightly) trash it, and declare (again, rightly) that Apple had finally lost its Midas touch. These aren’t “beta” tablets. They’re bad tablets. It’s that simple. It’s true that their hardware seems closer to iPad-caliber than their software, but improving software is the hardest part of making products like these. By the time RIM releases “a serious software update or three” the entire market will have changed. The truth is, Motorola, Samsung, and now RIM have released would-be iPad competitors that pale compared to the iPad. Just say it.

The mass market doesn’t buy, and doesn’t want to buy, products based on what they might become months from now if these companies somehow dramatically improve the software. They buy products for what they are today, out of the box. Motorola and RIM and Samsung are Apple’s industry peers. These are the big leagues, this is The Show. They’re charging customers real money to buy these things. They should be judged by the same standards."

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (4, Insightful)

dskzero (960168) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905634)

"I don’t understand why so many reviewers bend over backwards to grade these things on a curve. If the iPad 2 had the problems and deficiencies the Xoom and PlayBook have, these same reviewers would (rightly) trash it, and declare (again, rightly) that Apple had finally lost its Midas touch. These aren’t “beta” tablets. (...)"

This is a lie. People were all over the first iPad despite all the deficiencies, claiming they were not needed (Some of those being implemented in the second iPad). I haven't touched this RIM tablet (and I won't, I think tablets are pointless for me), but the reviewers' bias for Apple is obvious no matter the state of the market.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (2)

blackchiney (556583) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905738)

Besides the camera and lock switch boondoggle can you list what theses deficiences are in the original iPad. I do remember it being able to check email, read calendar, contacts, appstore, and a browser. That covers about 95% of what people want in a tablet.

In RIMs case I can understand the calendar ommision but email? Really?

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (4, Insightful)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905814)

This is a lie. People were all over the first iPad despite all the deficiencies, claiming they were not needed (Some of those being implemented in the second iPad). I haven't touched this RIM tablet (and I won't, I think tablets are pointless for me), but the reviewers' bias for Apple is obvious no matter the state of the market.

Perhaps it did enough. It had apps, a calendar, email, contacts, a great web browser, great battery life, a great screen, weighed half of the lightest notebooks, and felt pretty darn fast even without a dual core processor. Built in apps did multitask, third party ones didn't, and push notifications filled party of the gap. But probably the most important thing in all of that is that it had a calendar. And email. And contacts. And you didn't need a tethered iPhone to pull that off. Yes, clearly a year ago, you could ship a product without multitasking and a camera. But today you cannot ship a product without email.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905890)

It's not a lie. Plenty of reviewers dinged the iPad for its failings--no camera, no multitasking, no USB, requires connection to a computer to activate, could only transfer files using iTunes (blech)...all of those got press coverage and plenty of /. scorn. But people were all over iPad 1 because, despite those flaws, it was still a very complete product that built off two other very popular products (iPhone, iPod Touch) with a massive app ecosystem on day 1; and iPad 2 has rectified (mostly) those first two failings, pushing the bar that much higher for new tablets.

So, against that, shipping a tablet without basic things like calendar and email apps or that will require multiple software upgrades and, in Xoom's case, a send-it-to-the-manufacturer hardware upgrade to deliver on the promised features is just totally unacceptable.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (2)

samkass (174571) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905904)

"I don’t understand why so many reviewers bend over backwards to grade these things on a curve. If the iPad 2 had the problems and deficiencies the Xoom and PlayBook have, these same reviewers would (rightly) trash it, and declare (again, rightly) that Apple had finally lost its Midas touch. These aren’t “beta” tablets. (...)"

This is a lie. People were all over the first iPad despite all the deficiencies, claiming they were not needed (Some of those being implemented in the second iPad). I haven't touched this RIM tablet (and I won't, I think tablets are pointless for me), but the reviewers' bias for Apple is obvious no matter the state of the market.

He said iPad 2, not iPad. This is 2011. People aren't comparing the PlayBook against a product they'd have to own a time machine to buy... compared to the competition today, the PlayBook appears to be a bad device. It's arguable about whether one would want to buy an iPad 1 (if they still made them) or a PlayBook due to the PlayBook's incomplete software, but that's not relevant to the market today.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (1)

RobinH (124750) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906344)

A time machine to buy? The iPad 1's are still on sale around here.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (1)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905536)

Why would anyone buy this for the apps when nobody can write apps for it without being filthy rich and signing away their firstborn? If your phone's only good for Android apps you might as well run them natively.

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (2)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905786)

Classic case of hubris and " love to hate " syndrome . It has got a good CPU , Support Flash , QNX run on Dalvik VM so there is always a plan B of supporting . Android Apps . I think for version 1 this is a decent device and i have used the pre released unit . Multitasking is good enough and by any count it is better than Xoom .

So it has a good CPU, reasonable support of Flash in the browser... and a future plan to support some Android apps that are pre-screened by RIM, if the developer recompiles them and submits them. And I can't imagine that will be pleasant [jamiemurai.com] . The hardware sounds good, the development process sounds atrocious, and there is a decided lack of support for email, calendars and contacts. I'm not claiming my iPad is the best device that will ever exist OMG Apple rules... I'm just saying I want my contacts, calendars and email on my tablet, the same way they are on my phone and the same way they are on my laptop. Expecting people to have that... but only if they have a Blackberry turned on and tethered not only cuts them off from a huge percentage of the market (you know, those guys who don't have Blackberry's), it also probably isn't exactly what some Blackberry phone users wanted. And webmail is nice, but I use my tablet in places where I don't always have Internet access. Plus, already stored contacts come up quicker than logging into a web page and waiting for the screen to refresh.

in a world filled with Android and Apple Fan boys its hard to measure anything on a standalone basis .

Perhaps you meant to say "in a world filled with iPads and Android tablets, it's hard to measure a tablet without considering what's already available, in some cases for less money:"

Sorry, but multitasking and dual core processors aren't enough anymore. The iPad 2 has extremely polished software, a HUGE marketplace of third party apps, more built in functionality for managing your PIM, and while it doesn't come with an office suite, $30 fixes that pretty quickly. But it doesn't play Flash. So if that was your only motivation (accessible Flash), then you can buy a PlayBook.... or a Xoom with seemingly more functionality out of the box.

You're right... it's going to be hard for Playbook to compete in an established market. That's what happens when you ship later than your competition and don't visibly offer more functionality or a drastically reduced price. It can be done (B&N NookColor, Motorola Xoom), but you can't just ship a tablet and expect ten million in sales (countless Chinese tablets with Android 1.6 and a cheap price tag).

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906038)

"OMG Apple rules" - I concur

Re:Not Dead on Arrival (2)

COMON$ (806135) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906178)

WTF would someone buy this unless they had a BB hard-on? I was one of the people eagerly anticipating a debut from BB that would allow efficient document sharing in a business via a private WAN. Instead we saw the death rattle of an industry who lost all sense of innovation and connection to the customer...

When you are late to a tech game you need to offer something extra, something the market share holders dont have already...this tablet..wow, BB missed a golden opportunity. All they needed to do was create a BB document center server/module for BES and a slate to pair with it just like BBs do. Voila you just won your market back, and securely placed sales for the next 5 years as the only provider of secure electronic documentations to a slate.

And they botched the launch, too. (4, Interesting)

twidarkling (1537077) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905330)

Not enough product shipped to stores (we got 3 64GB models, just enough to satisfy preorders on launch day), they didn't hype the fact that we'd be opening an hour early on launch day for those who wanted to pick up one, they didn't get a demo model out so people could play with it to entice more preorders, didn't get a demo out to stores so staff could learn a bit and show people fun stuff about it, or useful stuff about it, and accessories didn't reach the store for the most part until the day after launch or later. Three mediocre cases, that's all there was available for people to chose from. Seriously one of the worst product launches I've seen pretty much ever.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (0)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905508)

The product launch means nothing, the product quality means everything. Okay so the launch might not of gone well but over all the playbook is a better product then any tablet on the market. The launch is a small part of the product life cycle, What matters with how the device operates and stat for stat the playbook smokes the ipad hands down:

Operating system BlackBerry Tablet OS (QNX)
Power 5300 mAh
CPU 1 GHz Cortex-A9 dual-core processor
Storage capacity 16, 32 or 64 GB Flash
Memory 1 GB RAM
Display 7" LCD display 16:9 aspect ratio
Resolution: 1024 x 600 px (WSVGA) (1080p HDMI output)
Graphics PowerVR SGX540
Input Capacitive, Multi-touch, Touch Screen, GPS, Orientation Sensor (Accelerometer), 6-Axis Motion Sensor (Gyroscope), Digital Compass (Magnetometer)
Camera Dual 1080p HD cameras (3 MP front facing, 5 MP rear facing)
Connectivity Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g/n), Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR
Online services 7digital & BlackBerry App World
Dimensions 5.1" x 7.6" x 0.4" (130mm x 194mm x 10mm)
Weight 0.9lbs (425g)

And the ipad

Operating system iOS 4.3.2 Released April 14, 2011; 8 days ago (2011-04-14)
Power Built-in rechargeable Li-ion battery 25 Wh (90 kJ)
CPU 1st Generation 1 GHz Apple A4
2nd Generation 1 GHz Apple A5
Storage capacity 16, 32, or 64 GB flash memory
Memory 1st Generation 256 MB DDR RAM
2nd generation 512 MB DDR2 RAM
Display 1024 × 768 px 132 PPI 4:3 aspect ratio 9.7 in (25 cm) diagonal XGA, LED-backlit IPS LCD
Graphics 1st generation PowerVR SGX 535 GPU
2nd generation PowerVR SGX543MP (cores: 2–4)
Input Multi-touch touch screen, headset controls, proximity and ambient light sensors, 3-axis accelerometer, digital compass 2nd Generation adds: 3-axis gyro
Camera 1st Generation: None
2nd Generation: Front-facing and 720p rear-facing
Connectivity Wi-Fi (802.11 a/b/g/n) Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR GSM models also include: UMTS / HSDPA (850, 1900, 2100 MHz) GSM / EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz) CDMA model also includes: CDMA/EV-DO Rev. A (800, 1900 MHz) Online services iTunes Store, App Store, MobileMe, iBookstore Dimensions

1st generation
9.56 in (243 mm) (h)
7.47 in (190 mm) (w)
.5 in (13 mm) (d)
2nd generation
9.5 in (240 mm) (h)
7.31 in (186 mm) (w)
.34 in (8.6 mm) (d)
Weight Wi-Fi model: 1.5 lb (680 g)
Wi-Fi + 3G model: 1.6 lb (730 g)
2nd Generation: 1.33 lb (600 g)

Okay so the launch went bad, but point out where the iPad in anyway even contends with the playbook, the playbook will sell itself from being a much better product. The stats are there.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905556)

The specs mean NOTHING to the user if the user experience is horrible.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905920)

I am also curious why he even bothers comparing the first generation iPad. My 2011 device is better specced than your previous 2009 model!?

While hardware may matter, i feel it is the user experience that matters more. If I get a better user experience out of black box A, than block box B then I don't care what is inside.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (2)

dogmatixpsych (786818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905582)

Mod the parent 'Funny'. We all know that specs mean everything. Besides, those specs don't "smoke" the iPad. It looks pretty similar other than a smaller screen and better cameras. More RAM doesn't mean much because apps are designed to use much less RAM than what is in the tablet.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (2)

bberens (965711) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905592)

Apple generally doesn't win by having the best hardware stats.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (1)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905636)

Okay so the launch went bad, but point out where the iPad in anyway even contends with the playbook, the playbook will sell itself from being a much better product.

SOFTWARE.

As an aside though, I'll compare hardware too.
The Apple A5 *is* a Dual Core 1Ghz Cortex A9 CPU, so equal there.
The iPad 2's GPU is *two* PowerVR SGX 543s, so more than double the performance there.
The iPad's screen is higher resolution.
The two have roughly equal battery life.

So basically, the iPad beats or equals the Playbook on every spec except for RAM.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905940)

Funnily enough it even beats the Xbox 360 in specs. This really shows that software can make a whole world of difference.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (2)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905996)

I'm not sure where you're getting that a dual core 1Ghz ARM beats a 3 core 3.2Ghz PPC, or that even the iPad 2's PVR SGX 543s beat the Xenos GPU. But certainly both of them have as much RAM as the XBox 360.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (2)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905844)

The hardware is OK. The issue is the software. I don't have a BlackBerry phone, and don't plan to get one, so I need a full experience without linkage to a phone. It seems there are a lot a missing/unimplemented features, and a lot of badly done ones.

This is the case for all tablets, including the iPad, but Apple seems to have both fewer features missing, and to be better at doing the really important ones, and doing them right. Too bad they do their best to neuter the connectivity/interoperability features (no SD Slot ? No USB ? Come on !)

I really really REALLY don't want to get myself locked into iTunes for apps and content, and it seems there's no real way to use an iPad without doing so, but I haven't yet seen another tablet I think I'd enjoy using. On the software side, Android will probably get mostly there within a year. On the hardware side.. I just spent some time messing around with a Xoom. It feels much bulkier then an iPad2. And the eeePad, which seems better than the Xoom an all counts (including price), is bulkier still....

I hope non-iOS tablet software, whether Android, BlackBerry, or WebOS, will be feature-complete by next year, and the competition will be on who supplies the best extras, be it hardware or software. We've just got to wait a bit.

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906060)

Not enough product shipped to stores (we got 3 64GB models, just enough to satisfy preorders on launch day), they didn't hype the fact that we'd be opening an hour early on launch day for those who wanted to pick up one, they didn't get a demo model out so people could play with it to entice more preorders, didn't get a demo out to stores so staff could learn a bit and show people fun stuff about it, or useful stuff about it, and accessories didn't reach the store for the most part until the day after launch or later. Three mediocre cases, that's all there was available for people to chose from. Seriously one of the worst product launches I've seen pretty much ever.

The food here is terrible...and in such small portions!

Re:And they botched the launch, too. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906184)

There was no demo because it wasn't ready to demo. If you demo this on launch day you'd realize it's not done let alone worth buying. With the countless updates RIM released prior to (and during launch), you can imagine how buggy it was a few weeks ago when they really needed to start demoing the product. It also comes to the simple fact, there's no demand, so no supply. Every Best Buy in the Boston area had them for sale on launch at 4pm. No lines, no hype, no bother...

it's usable for me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905332)

The Infoworld article seems biased to me - I own one and it works brilliantly with my Blackberry phone, does what I need it to and will only get better over time. The phones DO suck but the tablet is based on a new OS that is leaps and bounds better than the phones. Word is the phones are supposed to start rolling out based on the new OS in the future.

Re:it's usable for me (1)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905836)

The Infoworld article seems biased to me - I own one and it works brilliantly with my Blackberry phone, does what I need it to and will only get better over time. The phones DO suck but the tablet is based on a new OS that is leaps and bounds better than the phones. Word is the phones are supposed to start rolling out based on the new OS in the future.

That's kind of the best summary of the problem I've seen, even though you intended to compliment the device. So it would work better for me if I got a blackberry so I could tether and get the contacts, calendars, emails displayed (unless the phone battery went, in which case the content would disappear based on the reviews I've read, only to come back later). So I can have that today... but I have to swap out for a phone that "sucks".

they sure do (2)

us7892 (655683) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905368)

I see far fewer blackberry devices where I work - where they once dominated. This tablet sounds bad. I guess I won't see one of these any time soon.

Re:they sure do (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905514)

Same here. Though we've got lots more iPhones, iPads, and Android phones in their place. Hmm... (And I haven't seen a single Windows Phone 7 device yet.)

Re:they sure do (1)

Mistah Blue (519779) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905906)

Yes. I have a 9700 which I plan to replace with an iPhone at my next upgrade. This is my second 9700, as the first one ate batteries and had to be replaced. This current one's 30 day warranty is out, so if it fails I will replace with an iPhone immediately. I hope it lasts until the iPhone 5 comes out though.

Well iPhones won't get a chance where I work (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906054)

See, the iPhone has this curious problem, if it has the wrong password for mail or the likes it doesn't ask for the correct one, it spams the server till it locks out the account. Throw in no support for ActiveSync and well that leaves Blackberry and Android

Re:Well iPhones won't get a chance where I work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906140)

I assume you mean your work doesnt support microsoft activesync......... Because the Iphone has supported activesync for years.

Re:Well iPhones won't get a chance where I work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906254)

See, the iPhone has this curious problem, if it has the wrong password for mail or the likes it doesn't ask for the correct one, it spams the server till it locks out the account. Throw in no support for ActiveSync and well that leaves Blackberry and Android

We have about a dozen iPhones where I work and I have not witnessed this behavior -- users get prompted again for their password almost immediately if they enter the wrong one. Oh, and the iPhone does indeed support ActiveSync and its related policies. Not sure where you're getting your information from, but I'm pretty sure you're wrong on all accounts. Works great with both Exchange 2007 and 2010.

I read the title differently... (3, Funny)

Yuioup (452151) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905374)

A better title would be:

RIP BlackBerry PlayBook: Unfinished, Unusable

Maybe (2)

brokeninside (34168) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905644)

We may do well to remember that the iPhone was the second iTunes branded phone. Apple's first phone was the Motorola ROKR [wikipedia.org] .

That the ROKR was pants doesn't seem to have hurt Apple's later success with the iPhone. That the first edition of the Playbook is pants doesn't necessarily mean that the product line is dead in the water.

Now, one can certainly make the argument that given Blackberry's reputation, further generations are unlikely to be significantly better. But that's really a different argument.

Re:Maybe (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905898)

The ROKR was a Motorola phone, with access to iTunes. Not an Apple Phone.

The Playbook is a full-on RIM tablet. Releasing it with unfinished software is a very risky move. They might not survive the negative reviews, may not be able to fix it fast enough... I understand RIM (and Motorola) wanting to get their feet wet and damn the torpedoes, but with a much better finished (and, arguably, designed) eeePad, and HP's WebOS thingy, and others, just around the corner, RIM and Moto may end up looking like premature ejaculators trying to compete with experienced lovers.

Re:Maybe (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906024)

You make a fair point. This will hopefully be a lesson learnt for RIM and hopefully they think about what the next generation needs to be about and release something worthy of contention.

They have to realize they are now in a market where consumer preference is almost a bigger factor than enterprise preference, so they need to appeal to the former while still ensuring the right checkboxes are filled for the latter.

I wonder how much trying to tie their consumer offerings to their enterprise services us hurting them and their ability to properly innovate?

AT&T seems to be the problem? (1)

kevinmenzel (1403457) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905388)

The article seems to be mostly aimed at AT&T's lack of bridge support - which by the way, can be bypassed by the way, quite easily - as you can just grab a link for bridge off the net, as opposed to AppWorld. So if you aren't on AT&T - which quite frankly, describes most of the Blackberry using world - this thing is still a great companion to the Blackberry. Plus this review reeks of confirmation bias. Essentially this "review" boils down to "I was expecting it to be bad, and I think it's bad, and AT&T makes it worse, and I can't even be bothered to do a quick look through Blackberry community sites to see if my main gripe with AT&T can be rectified, because I don't want to be wrong."

Re:AT&T seems to be the problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905430)

He did bypass AT&T's block to Install Bridge, but the Table still sound like junk.

But the fact that it can't do simple exchange E-mail without a Blackberry within close proximity, open running, and bridged(which takes about a minute) is insane.

Lame...You can get 2 netbooks or an iPad for the same price and have something useful.

Re:AT&T seems to be the problem? (2)

Carewolf (581105) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906112)

He did bypass the AT&T problem, so he is better than what you describe. Try going to page 2.

But yeah: There is an insane amount of confirmation bias added on top of several geniune concerns.

I am starting to think of hardware reviews are like pick-ups, without a good opener, the product is destined to crash'n'burn in reviews, and nobody does openers better than Apple.

Re:AT&T seems to be the problem? (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906164)

Even without the AT&T block, the fact that this tablet needs the bridge is ridiculous.

There are Tegra 2 tablets with fully functional WiFi for far less (ViewSonic 10" G-Tablet is $300)

stick to others (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905424)

i personally dont like blackberry, i will stick to anroid or iphone or windows phone
--------------.
fitness first janitor [fitnessfirstjanitor.info]

IT IS A TABLET !! WHO CARES IF IT IS USELESS !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905428)

These are HOT !! HOT !! HOT !! (like that ex-Dolls, Poindexter guy says) so who cares if it works like wife when aunt flo visits ?? And who is this guy, anyway ?? I can find anyone to say anything if I look anywhere !! And as John Dvorak has made a career, the more you can rile the believers, the more HITS YOU GET !!

Does POP/IMAP work or not? (1)

guanxi (216397) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905506)

Which is it? On the first page the author writes,

You can't connect to POP, IMAP, or Exchange servers directly from the tablet, as you can from an iOS or Android device -- you must have a BlackBerry tethered via Bluetooth using the BlackBerry Bridge application

But then on page 3 he writes,

But if you don't use BlackBerry tethering, then you have no security, as you must use standard IMAP and POP connections to your email.

Which is it? And why can't you use standard security for your your standard IMAP and POP connections (i.e., SSL)?

Re:Does POP/IMAP work or not? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905594)

I'm not sure. I think he means to say in it's present state, the device does not seem have an option for encrypting those connections if you are using them directly. If you are using a Blackberry tether, the Blackberry is doing all the encryption as the bridge. Maybe there was a setting he missed or RIM hasn't put it in yet.

Also appears to contain typical RIM.. (2, Interesting)

Junta (36770) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905526)

I admit I haven't tracked Blackberry much, but I remember many of us at worked had smartphones that implemented general standards (e.g. becoming a usb mass storage for getting files on and off via usb cable). Meanwhile, the blackberry users were still forced to use weird, proprietary programs to get at the device because RIM wouldn't implement standards. Once upon a time, this was typical, just like Palm's Hotsync, but those days should be long behind us except that RIM props it up.

Then I read in a review that the playbook does the same BS, requiring proprietary, RIM-only software that only works with Windows and OSX. Most of the world has this figured out, don't see why RIM is still going this route.

Then I see they decided to tie email/calendaring etc to a blackberry handset with *no* option to do it without it. Further complicating things, it looks like AT&T forbade it on their stuff.

Even with new shiny UI elements, they are in many ways stuck in their annoying ways. Of course, it's probably no coincidence they are annoying as hell *and* are so popular in the 'enterprise' space.

Re:Also appears to contain typical RIM.. (1)

DaftDev (1864598) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905674)

Of course, it's probably no coincidence they are annoying as hell *and* are so popular in the 'enterprise' space.

That pretty much sums up my feelings on Cisco as well. Companies like this think that they can charge a markup on their products because it is "enterprise proven", but it's only a matter of time until a company like Apple/Google or Juniper/Sonicwall comes along and offers a compelling reason to switch.

Re:Also appears to contain typical RIM.. (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906116)

For the iPhone take a look at 'Good' from 'Good Technologies'. The company I work for uses it, though while not perfect it does allow you to keep your contacts and calendars separate from the company ones.

I should mention the company I work for is a large multinational - the sort of company RIM should be worried about defecting.

Re:Also appears to contain typical RIM.. (2)

Joe Jay Bee (1151309) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905688)

I admit I haven't tracked Blackberry much, but I remember many of us at worked had smartphones that implemented general standards (e.g. becoming a usb mass storage for getting files on and off via usb cable)

Derp. My Curve and Bold both used mass storage just fine.

Re:Also appears to contain typical RIM.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905756)

I admit I haven't tracked Blackberry much, but I remember many of us at worked had smartphones that implemented general standards (e.g. becoming a usb mass storage for getting files on and off via usb cable). Meanwhile, the blackberry users were still forced to use weird, proprietary programs to get at the device because RIM wouldn't implement standards. Once upon a time, this was typical, just like Palm's Hotsync, but those days should be long behind us except that RIM props it up.

When was this? Their devices have acted as USB mass storage for several years now.

Re:Also appears to contain typical RIM.. (1)

DiSKiLLeR (17651) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906046)

When was this? Their devices have acted as USB mass storage for several years now.

Indeed. And yet apple products STILL won't show up as USB mass storage devices...

As John Gruber said (2)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905542)

As John Gruber, of Daring Fireball, said [daringfireball.net] :

I don’t understand why so many reviewers bend over backwards to grade these things on a curve. If the iPad 2 had the problems and deficiencies the Xoom and PlayBook have, these same reviewers would (rightly) trash it, and declare (again, rightly) that Apple had finally lost its Midas touch.

These aren’t “beta” tablets. They’re bad tablets. It’s that simple. It’s true that their hardware seems closer to iPad-caliber than their software, but improving software is the hardest part of making products like these. By the time RIM releases “a serious software update or three” the entire market will have changed. The truth is, Motorola, Samsung, and now RIM have released would-be iPad competitors that pale compared to the iPad. Just say it.

The mass market doesn’t buy, and doesn’t want to buy, products based on what they might become months from now if these companies somehow dramatically improve the software. They buy products for what they are today, out of the box. Motorola and RIM and Samsung are Apple’s industry peers. These are the big leagues, this is The Show. They’re charging customers real money to buy these things. They should be judged by the same standards. Judging these things on a curve is the flip side of my criticism of Walt Mossberg’s iPad 2 review:

Stating the plain truth, that the iPad 2 has no serious competition as a mainstream consumer device, doesn’t make you biased. It makes you accurate.

Re:As John Gruber said (1)

pleasegetreal (744605) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905782)

My Xoom is faster and has better integration with my work applications than the iPad2. Why would I want to dumb down the way I work to buy an iPad2? This is after all "The Big Leagues" and facts matter as opposed to believing advertising hype. From my perspective, for people that actually use their tablets for work related tasks, only someone who likes to work more slowly and inefficiently would purchase an iPad2.

Re:As John Gruber said (2)

Antimatter3009 (886953) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905858)

I don't know about this. He's not wrong, per se, but he's missing a key point: these devices do things an iPad can not and will not ever do. And (probably) vice versa. So yeah, my Xoom market crashes on occasion and I have to reopen it, but I also have a bunch of widgets all over my home screen. And while my instability will eventually be fixed, the iPad will never have widgets. Point being, if you assume the iPad and the Xoom (or Playbook) are the same except that one has some problems then his point is valid, but if you see them as different products with their own ups and downs then he doesn't make so much sense. For every downside to the non-iPad there's an upside to counter it. In that context, it doesn't make sense to "trash" these other tablets. They're just better in some ways and worse in others, and the value you place on each of these features/bugs will direct the scores you hand out.

Note: if you don't see the upsides of the non-iPads of the world as upsides then this can't apply, but then these products were never meant for you anyway. If you don't like widgets and customizability, you probably weren't in the market for a Xoom to begin with, and the same goes for the Playbook and its Blackberry Bridge.

Re:As John Gruber said (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906098)

these devices do things an iPad can not and will not ever do.

Like having a non-functioning SD card slot in the cause of the Xoom?

Re:As John Gruber said (1)

itsdapead (734413) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906172)

So yeah, my Xoom market crashes on occasion and I have to reopen it, but I also have a bunch of widgets all over my home screen. And while my instability will eventually be fixed, the iPad will never have widgets.

Woah! that's two big assumptions! You have no guarantee that your Xoom will be fixed (still waiting for SVG support and, more importantly, internet proxy support for my Android phone), nor can you know that iOS will never have widgets - if there is enough demand Apple may well add them (as they did with multitasking).

Hell, I wouldn't even bet against Apple relenting on Flash if it started losing them sales - but it doesn't sound as if people are bowled over by Flash on the few Android systems that now support it.

Re:As John Gruber said (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906302)

So yeah, my Xoom market crashes on occasion and I have to reopen it, but I also have a bunch of widgets all over my home screen. And while my instability will eventually be fixed, the iPad will never have widgets.

Right, because writing userspace toys is WAAAAAAAY harder than fixing OS-level instability, amirite? It's like saying, "sure, my Windows 98 box may crash a lot, but Linux doesn't have MINESWEEPER!"

Re:As John Gruber said (1)

inAbsurdum (1028514) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906412)

And while my instability will eventually be fixed, the iPad will never have widgets.

I wouldn't be so sure about either of those statements. All OSes have some instability issues, it seems. Something gets patched, another thing gets botched... And Apple has flagged for significant changes in iOS 5, so widgets could very well make their way onto the iPad home/lock screen.

Re:As John Gruber said (1, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906312)

On the other hand, there are those who can't review a tablet without gushing over the iPad in every other paragraph. Now the iPad is obviously a very good device, but I suspect these reviewers as using it as a *benchmark*, as if the only viable path for other tablet developers is to clone the iPad as closely as possible.

The Playbook is obviously a different product concept from the iPad. That does not automatically make it a bad one, although I suspect the concept was motivated by the classic high tech business mistake of fearing to cannibalize sales of one's existing products. The PlayBook is a *companion* product for Blackberry phones. It's an *accessory*. Right from there most reviewers seem eager to write the device off because it has limited appeal to non-Blackberry users, but that's simply not reasonable. Just because a device is not useful to *you* doesn't mean it's not useful to *anyone*. Provided that such a companion product is executed and marketed well, it *could* meet the needs of *some* users and generate profits for RIM. That's a big proviso, though, because launching such a product in the wake of the iPad2 and the first of a wave of highly capable Android tablets could well be the marketing equivalent of spitting into the wind. The standards for successful marketing and execution in this scenario are very high. A good case can be made that RIM missed the mark, for example by failing to ensure the PlayBook could be tethered to Blackberry phones on all carriers that sell them. That's a major marketing (not technical) failure.

Still, I think reviewers should erect a firewall between their critique of the product concept from a business standpoint, and their critique of the execution. That would make their review more informative and credible. I think they should say, "I think RIM's attempt to avoid cannibalizing sales of the Blackberry by marketing a companion device is a bad idea. They should produce something more like an iPad clone with Blackberry functionality, even though that will encourage many users to buy a different phone and use the PlayBook for email. That said, if you are a Blackberry user looking for a companion device, here's what you need to know." It's fine if they go on to conclude the device is a piece of crap and would be too expensive even if it weren't, but they should show a little more critical rigor in reaching that conclusion.

Older email clients supported. (2)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905584)

It does however support Pegasus email client.

Click on our website: http://www.fullmalls.com (-1, Offtopic)

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Re:Click on our website: http://www.fullmalls.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906106)

I only buy clothes advertised by Chinese people with poor grammer who advertise on slooshdot

I must object... as a homeless guy... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905648)

As a homeless guy who plays Air Guitar in front of the mall, I am insulted... I am MUCH better than RIMs Playbook
(currently using my homeless iPad to post on Slashdot)

Design by management (1)

gweihir (88907) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905764)

Never a good idea. Only those completely incompetent do it.

The torch release was similar (1)

tagattack (412693) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905796)

The device was virtually unusuable due to the sheer volume of bugs in the touch-screen interface. I've had one, for almost a year, and it's now quite reasonable (a dozen firmware updates later) but at first, I had such problems as not being able to select an email or phone number if it was not on the first page-full of a list, because when I did, I would get the item that used to be at those coordinates when I was on the first page full.

Contrarian View (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905880)

Disclosure: I actually have a playbook and I love it. One of the features I love most is the fact that when my kids play with it, there is no chance they will access my work email, but when I'm on it my enterprise email is easily accessible.

There were a number of positive reviews, but the one that caught my attention was from thestreet (usually anti BlackBerry)
http://www.thestreet.com/story/11086427/1/rims-playbook-gets-contradictory-unfair-reviews.html
Some of the points:
- Secure connection to enterprise trusted infrastructure
- Only one phone bill to pay
- Flash works better than *any* other tablet (My kids have tried at least a dozen of their favorite games)
- It is light and easy to carry for a long time

Folks, It's Galen Gruman... (1)

dwm (151474) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905936)

It should be kept in mind that this review is from an author given to overstated [infoworld.com] screeds [pcworld.com] -- so take with a grain (or a saltshaker) of salt. This is an author who knows how to write things that will be reposted.

Re:Folks, It's Galen Gruman... (1)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906118)

So, which part is he wrong or lieing about? The article seemed to present facts, such as the PlayBook requires a BlackBerry to be tethered to it for basic email functionality.

Is he wrong? Is he lieing?

He said AT&T won't allow you to install the Bridge tethering software, so then if you're an AT&T customer, you can't get the tethering functionality without violating the terms of your contract.

Is he wrong? Is he lieing?

I get so tired of people making ad hominem attacks against article authors, instead of just answering the article itself. What criticism's that he made do you think are unfair or dishonest?

Re:Folks, It's Galen Gruman... (1)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906156)

I'll get this started by pointing out one seeming flaw or inconsistency in the article itself.

On page one, the author states,

Other than using a Webmail client, a PlayBook without a BlackBerry is unable to communicate. You can't connect to POP, IMAP, or Exchange servers directly from the tablet, as you can from an iOS or Android device -- you must have a BlackBerry tethered via Bluetooth using the BlackBerry Bridge application.

On page 3, in the security section, he then contradicts himself:

If you're tethered to a BlackBerry, you can rest assured that your communications are secured. But if you don't use BlackBerry tethering, then you have no security, as you must use standard IMAP and POP connections to your email.

Those two statements cannot both be true. I think what the author was trying to say probably, is that you can't use the normal BlackBerry "secure" email, contacts, and calendars, unless tethered (which is still a reasonable flaw to point out), which would be required for any business servers you want to connect to. But, that still makes his original statement poorly worded at best, deceptive at worst.

But it multitasks! (1)

FlipperPA (456193) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906272)

So you can not get your email, calendar, and contacts, ALL AT THE SAME TIME. Booya!

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