Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Microsoft and Nokia Finally Sign Definitive Agreement

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the do-not-go-gentle-into-obsolescence dept.

Microsoft 95

An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft and Nokia yesterday announced the signing of a definitive agreement regarding their global mobile ecosystem partnership. We already know that Microsoft and Nokia will work together to reach out to developers, but the two have agreed to make Windows Phone developer registration free for all Nokia developers. There are also plans to open a new Nokia-branded global application store that leverages the Windows Phone Marketplace infrastructure so that developers can publish and distribute applications through a single developer portal to consumers that use Windows Phone, Symbian, and Series 40 devices. Lastly, Nokia will contribute its expertise in operator billing to ensure participants in the Windows Phone ecosystem can take advantage of Nokia's billing agreements with 112 operators in 36 markets."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Looking forward to the shareholder lawsuit... (2)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905620)

w00t!

Who are they reaching out to? (5, Insightful)

spaceon (264645) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905656)

Who are they going to be reaching out to? The Windows developers that were already ignoring WP7, or the developers that got shafted by Nokia when they changed course?

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (4, Informative)

recoiledsnake (879048) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906056)

>Windows developers that were already ignoring WP7

Really? How did you come to know of that? By reading Slashdot?

The developer tools were downloaded over 1.5 million times and there are over 13,000 apps in the WP7 marketplace (faster growth rate than Android and iPhone at that stage).

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

keeboo (724305) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906144)

The developer tools were downloaded over 1.5 million times and there are over 13,000 apps in the WP7 marketplace (faster growth rate than Android and iPhone at that stage).

References, please.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (5, Informative)

FlipperPA (456193) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906238)

Hardly a Microsoft fan, but two seconds of Googling would have gotten you here (or any number of other sources):

http://www.windowsphoneapplist.com/stats/ [windowsphoneapplist.com]

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (2)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906282)

http://windowsteamblog.com/windows_phone/b/wpdev/archive/2011/03/30/a-year-later-the-windows-phone-7-numbers-that-matter.aspx [windowsteamblog.com]

I don't know how this compares to iPhone and Android, but 1.5 million SDK downloads, 36k developers, and 13k apps is impressive for a 6 month old platform that, by Slashdot's account, has 4 users.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906388)

4 users with access to a script running wget over and over again?

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Verdatum (1257828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906940)

Cygwin aside, Windows users don't have wget!

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

kvvbassboy (2010962) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907230)

wget for Windows [sourceforge.net] . Enjoy.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Verdatum (1257828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907998)

I love you, Internet.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906472)

I don't know about SDK downloads but according to wikipedia [wikipedia.org] , Apple had about the same number of apps in the same time period. Apple however does have app download information (500,000,000) whereas I can't find that for WP7.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (3, Insightful)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906646)

Microsoft has a huge developer base, they are Nokia desperately needs and what MS is bringing to the table in this deal. MS can evidently count on these developers to give their platform a shot, historically not a bad gamble. The foundation has been laid, now comes the critical part: converting these available apps into actual sales and a viable business financially. So far the only platform where users consistently spend a lot of money is iOS with Android a distant second.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

yorugua (697900) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909528)

Microsoft has a huge developer base, they are Nokia desperately needs and what MS is bringing to the table in this deal. MS can evidently count on these developers to give their platform a shot, historically not a bad gamble. The foundation has been laid, now comes the critical part: converting these available apps into actual sales and a viable business financially. So far the only platform where users consistently spend a lot of money is iOS with Android a distant second.

Nokia needs people buying their phones. My family has 6 Nokia phones (3 symbian). Our first buy after the announcement has already been a Droid. It's cool with Nokia, but MS? Thanks, but no thanks.

In the team I work in, there are some 5 E71. All are thinking about other brands after Nokia commited suicide (Again, I work with DBA's, Sysadmins, Network Admins. NO WAY they're buying MS *).

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (3, Interesting)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907194)

13k apps is nice, but phone and app sales aren't all that great now. I was interested in XNA, so I paid the $99. I released a small app first, and it's seen ~300 downloads in a month or two. With ads, I make ~$2-1 per day. I'm hoping my game (when released) will make more, but MS has decided to rank all indie games after Xbox Live games from what I understand.

I could be #1 in sales of all apps everywhere but unless I have the Xbox Live mark, I'm automatically ranked lower, making it hard to find my game. Plus, there's currently no indie game tab. This kind of thing makes me not want to work with the platform, at least for games.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35908006)

This is false. Check the market place on the phone and you'll easily see none xbox live games above xbox live games. Really makes me question if you even know what your talking about.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35908036)

As an independent game designer you are not locked out of getting your application certified to carry the "Xbox Live" flag. It just requires some compliance with MS rules. Look into it. Sorry for the AC post, but I'm at work.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35910008)

Try to port it to the Iphone or Andriod. I know it would be a huge rewrite due to language differences and opengl instead of directx, but you would have access to a much larger market and none of this xbox live bs.

I would rewrite with the Andriod because the SDK is free and multiplatform. See how it works?

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35911844)

Just give a promotion for the first 100 or so people to write a review. If you made a good game, and get good reviews, your initial ranking will not be a problem.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

yorugua (697900) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909494)

http://windowsteamblog.com/windows_phone/b/wpdev/archive/2011/03/30/a-year-later-the-windows-phone-7-numbers-that-matter.aspx [windowsteamblog.com]

I don't know how this compares to iPhone and Android, but 1.5 million SDK downloads, 36k developers, and 13k apps is impressive for a 6 month old platform that, by Slashdot's account, has 4 users.

That's great!. But considering symbian had about 10% market share last time I checked (and going down), MS some 2% maybe? then it's great someone is downloading all that!. Now, they need people to buy their phones, and that's were the hard part comes. Even old nokia users (such as myself) see nokia-wp as something to stay away from, and people already on other platforms don't feel as going back to WP (even more Samsung or HTC). So, the actual question is, what's the market they're after?

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (3, Informative)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906410)

It's not that much faster than iOS. WP7 has almost 15K apps right now. The marketplace was launched Oct 21, 2010. That's about 81/day. iTunes App store launched July 11, 2008 and had 15K by January 16, 2009. That is 78/day. There is lot of rounding error in there as the numbers are not exact. Android is a little harder to figure out as it's not all in one place.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906556)

You have to admit Microsoft has a problem here. There is very little buzz around their phones despite them spending over $100,000,000 in marketing before launch. I think they may have another Zune on their hands here. A good product that compares well to its rivals, but still doesn't sell.

I'm actually surprised that they partnered with Nokia rather than purchasing RIM.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906870)

It's classic catch up, something they have done over and over and I'm not sure what in the world their execs are thinking and why they haven't caught onto this. Instead of making something inspiring and unique, they try to duplicate other products and software. As much fun as it is to bash at MS, this is one of their "real" problems and I assume is due solely to archaic management and bureaucracy.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (3, Insightful)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907046)

I don't know if I agree with that. The tile metaphor is fairly unique and has been duplicated on Android. I think any innovation they come up with will be quickly cloned.

I would put their problems in three categories.

1. Their marketing sucks. They spent a fortune on a campaign to establish that WP7 is good for people who don't like using a smart phone.
2. They have the appeal and sexiness of Cisco or Oracle. They're that middle aged slightly pudgy guy driving a sports car. There doesn't seem to be anybody at Microsoft with any sense of design. At least nobody of any apparent authority.
3. Their best developers have moved on to Google, Apple, and Facebook and Microsoft isn't very attractive to the best of the new generation of developers and designers. They might attract some people with fat pay checks, but they aren't ever going to get the truly passionate people.

Add to that their craptastic management and stifling bureaucracy and it's no wonder their stock has been dead in the water for a decade.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907184)

2. They have the appeal and sexiness of Cisco or Oracle. They're that middle aged slightly pudgy guy driving a sports car. There doesn't seem to be anybody at Microsoft with any sense of design. At least nobody of any apparent authority.

I know design is mostly a matter of opinion, but I consider the WP7/Zune and the Xbox 360/Kinect UIs as some of the best looking out there, especially compared to Android. Maybe the Microsoft brand isn't as appealing, but some of their latest products, Windows 7 included have been top notch visually.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#35908568)

The Metro UI is pretty cool, I'll agree with that. Supposedly it's going to start showing up in lots of MSFT products. I believe that's a good thing.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35908366)

There is very little buzz around their phones despite them spending over $100,000,000 in marketing before launch.

And you do realize that $100,000,000 is nothing to them, right? That's 5% of their *monthly* profit.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (2)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#35908674)

That works out to about $2,000 per phone sold during that time.

They would have been better off to pay people $1,000 to take the phone and let word of mouth do it's job.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35909264)

You do realise that businesses don't just spend money without any expectation of making a return on their investment? If they spend $100,000,000 on marketing but that only raises $10,000,000 in sales, they've essentially wasted $90,000,000.

Bundling Tricks (1)

bazald (886779) | more than 3 years ago | (#35908794)

The developer tools were downloaded over 1.5 million times...

Seeing as you can't download XNA 4.0 without downloading the developer tools for WP7, I'm not surprised. Bundling is a trick. That particular number says nothing about the number of people developing for WP7.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909970)

"are over 13,000 apps in the WP7 marketplace (faster growth rate than Android and iPhone at that stage "

HAHA The IOS/Iphone platform has over 500,000 apps and Andriod is just behind with under 300,000. 13,000 for a platform that once had 90% of the smart phone market is very laughable.

Hopefully it is growing and I hope that means WP7 apps exclusively and not older WindowsCE or Windows powered apps. It maybe growing but I would totally ignore the Windows market as it is too small. That last sentence makes me feel I woke up in the Twilight zone. MS really lost the ball on this.

My guess is most of the people who download the SDK are the same ones who love free software and download it with VS but never use it.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#35911522)

>Windows developers that were already ignoring WP7

Really? How did you come to know of that? By reading Slashdot?

The developer tools were downloaded over 1.5 million times and there are over 13,000 apps in the WP7 marketplace (faster growth rate than Android and iPhone at that stage).

Yes, and how many of those 13k apps are just recompiled IOS/Android apps?

The market (smart phone app market) has been running for several years now. Most the apps have versions that run on various smartphone OS's.

In my opinion, the 13k don't really mean shit, lets see sales numbers of apps.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906290)

They are trying to reach out to people like me.
Iâ(TM)m working for a big mobile game developer company (hence posting as AC), and I told our CEO, that I'd rather quit and take my whole team with me, than to develop for WP7.
And from talking with others in the industry, including Nokia's own people, I'm by far not the only one.

Developing for Nokia right now, is like buying tickets for the Titanic, shortly after hearing it hit the iceberg.
And I'm saying that as a former level 65 Nokia fanboy. ;)

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906362)

Any reason as to why?

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906678)

They are trying to reach out to people like me.
Iâ(TM)m working for a big mobile game developer company (hence posting as AC), and I told our CEO, that I'd rather quit and take my whole team with me, than to develop for WP7.

That's interesting. I wonder if they are offering deals to XBox developers behind the scenes to get them to develop for WP7, if they are we might see some enticing WP7 only releases.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35908022)

From all I heard, WP7 is awesome to develop for, far better than anything for iOS or Android. Also, Symbian programmers may have the right to be mad at Nokia, but "developing for WP7" is not the same as "developing for Nokia". Moreover, MS has always been very strongly pro-developer (cue Ballmer video). So your post gives no clue at all as to your reasons for not considering WP7 development, which would be useful to know.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909302)

Level 65? Why didn't you buy the expansion and get to level 75? Raiding got in the way of real life? ;)

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 3 years ago | (#35910168)

He got tired of the constant grind and "FedEx" questing.

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35911252)

whatever...the hate is stupid...it's yet another business opportunity. don't sell your apps on windows phone. who cares? you'll be missing out on what will inevitably be a large market...but YOU KNOW BETTER...

Re:Who are they reaching out to? (2)

Goffee71 (628501) | more than 3 years ago | (#35908424)

I'm sure there are many developers starting out who would rather be a decent-sized fish in a smaller pond (with potential to grow) rather than drown in the morass of iOS apps. As for Nokia, the company is still huge (http://www.cmswire.com/cms/enterprise-20/applenokia-report-earnings-a-game-of-two-halves-010961.php) and I hope this works for them but I wonder if the market has moved on?

The Deck Chairs Are Well Placed (4, Insightful)

Nova Express (100383) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905670)

I believe the new agreement optimally places the desk chairs for Nokia employees to have truly breathtaking views of the approaching iceberg.

Or perhaps I should say iCeberg.

Re:The Deck Chairs Are Well Placed (1)

udippel (562132) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905914)

Deckchairs most often stand in the rear part of the ship ... can they expect anything from behind??

Re:The Deck Chairs Are Well Placed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906200)

Nokia is has been going backwards for few years now, so yes, they will see icebergs...

Re:The Deck Chairs Are Well Placed (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909210)

Deckchairs most often stand in the rear part of the ship ... can they expect anything from behind??

They're in bed with Microsoft.
That usually progresses from a PMITA relationship into a KMITH[*] relationship, so they'll get it both ends.

[*] Kick me in the head

Re:The Deck Chairs Are Well Placed (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909846)

Deckchairs are much easier to throw than office chairs too. Can someone please explain to me why, with all the creative talent in the world now, there isn't either a flying chairs screensaver, or a version of Donkey Kong with Steve Ballmer throwing down chairs instead of barrels or both? At the very least the Billborg icon should now be a mobile chair.

Nokia profits and sales have dropped sharply (1)

walterbyrd (182728) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905678)

Nokia profits slump with huge falls in North American division
. . .
In North America the performance was worse, with sales slumping 36% year-on-year, and by 40% compared to the previous quarter, but starting from a much lower base

http://www.brandrepublic.com/news/article/1066882/nokia-profits-slump-huge-falls-north-american-division/

Re:Nokia profits and sales have dropped sharply (2)

horza (87255) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907860)

You mean people no longer want to buy Nokia phones since they cut off life-support to the operating system, and after shafting all the developers you can be sure no new software will be coming out? Not very surprising.

Phillip.

Shame (5, Informative)

Anonymous Cowar (1608865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905684)

I switched from the n900 to the motorola atrix and I'm going to say it: for a linux geek who doesn't care about an app market, the n900 (and its successor) beat the pants off of android devices. I would routinely go 3-4 days without charging vs my 36 hour android battery life, the slide out keyboard was pretty good and beats the on-screen keyboards any day, and multitasking without having applications hide in the background is still sorely missed.

Now the n900 wasn't perfect, but if it had a capacitive screen, 3g on AT&T, and a 1ghz+ chip, it would have been.

Re:Shame (1)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905714)

Hey, I just got my first smartphone: a BlackBerry Curve 9300 3G. It's great. Unlike every iThing and Android I've ever tried to use, I don't want to smash it to pieces with a toffee hammer. (It also does Ogg and FLAC out the box, which surprised me - I thought Thomson charged 10x as much for the MP3 licence if you did that.) Unfortunately, RIM is run by insane incompetents [wsj.com] and BB is a dead platform walking. Gah.

Re:BB is a dead platform walking (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905828)

Phonez. Phonez. Phonez. OmMyGawd! Phonez!

Let's get some Phones! Let's get some Phones!

This Phone Rulez! That Phone Sux! This Phone Rulez! That Phone Sux!

(Derivative work of Liam Kyle Sullivan)

Re:BB is a dead platform walking (1)

HAKdragon (193605) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906186)

These phones cost 200 dollars!


...let get 'em!

Re:Shame (3, Insightful)

bdkraem (1141653) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905798)

Now the n900 wasn't perfect, but if it had a capacitive screen, 3g on AT&T, and a 1ghz+ chip, it would have been.

You've obviously never used 3G on AT&T.

Re:Shame (1)

Mia'cova (691309) | more than 3 years ago | (#35910334)

No one has.

Re:Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906014)

It's like that with practically everything though. The N900 was just enough "off" to miss the boat. Even though it might be much better in other areas it didn't get the important ones. The important areas are the things that will cause the most people to hand over money so the product can continue to exist.

The fact is that iOS and Android are where all the common people are because they support the things those people want. Therefore those platforms have staying power and it's where I will hang out despite the substandard OS, programming environments, and hardware.

Re:Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906722)

Now the n900 wasn't perfect, but if it had a capacitive screen

That's what I was waiting on :'(

Re:Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35907182)

Now the n900 wasn't perfect, but if it had a capacitive screen

That's what I was waiting on :'(

Capacitive screens are stupid. You lose tons of interesting features just so you can "pinch to zoom". If it's not for a gesture feature like that, the reason given is usually games. Using a mobile phone as a controller is also a horrible idea, even if a thousand internet companies are trying to convince you differently.

Re:Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35907220)

I got a Pre Plus as I didn't care about a market and wanted linux.

As a linux system it works great, really great, as a phone it's terrible, really terrible. 25% of calls crash the phone (seriously), it's battery life is about 30-40 minutes use or 16-20 hours standby (30 without wifi), the messaging app is a joke (you can't scroll the text you've typed in) and you're unable to copy and paste phone numbers or email addresses in the address book. The promised messaging system support never came (they were supposed to officially support Skype, MSN, Facebook and more, instead we've got Google Talk and AIM). Today I tried to hang up a call, 2 minutes of the persons answering machine later I had to pull the battery, it then took a full 8 minutes to turn back on.

And HP don't give a crap about updating it or fixing bugs, which is somewhat surprising when it's their flagship phone in the EU...

Re:Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35907446)

My N900 is currently overclocked to 1150Mhz without a problem.

Re:Shame (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35907452)

n900 was the unicorn, the first and the last... amen

Re:Shame (1)

npsimons (32752) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907686)

Now the n900 wasn't perfect, but if it had a capacitive screen, 3g on AT&T, and a 1ghz+ chip, it would have been.

You can overclock the N900 [maemo.org] . I've not tried it, but some people claim to get it to 1GHz. As for the touchscreen, I kind of like being able to use my fingernails. The lack of 3G on AT&T sucks, but then AT&T sucks in general. I switched to T-Mobile and while I don't get 3G where I live (in the boonies), I regularly get 3.5G in more populated areas.

Re:Shame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35908264)

I switched from the n900 to the motorola atrix and I'm going to say it: for a linux geek who doesn't care about an app market, the n900 (and its successor) beat the pants off of android devices. I would routinely go 3-4 days without charging vs my 36 hour android battery life, the slide out keyboard was pretty good and beats the on-screen keyboards any day, and multitasking without having applications hide in the background is still sorely missed.

Now the n900 wasn't perfect, but if it had a capacitive screen, 3g on AT&T, and a 1ghz+ chip, it would have been.

Has it occured to you that if it had a capacitive screen, 3g, and a 1ghz+ chip it would probably have a 36 hour battery life as well?

Microsoft releases actual cow turd as phone (4, Funny)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905686)

Desperate to stay competitive against iPhone and Android mobile devices, Microsoft has released a two-pound lump of actual cow faeces that they claim constitutes a phone.

Windows Phone 7, in development for several years, strips the mobile telephone down to its fundamental essence: futility, annoyance, malfunction, inconvenience and a socially unacceptable odour. Confounding analyst expectations, the turd is in fact shined.

US mobile carriers hailed the turd as the perfect physical complement to their world-famous customer service. "This powerful product will promote our growth!" said John Harrobin of Verizon Wireless. "We're marketing them as edible."

"We think we can really work the brand equity," said Steve Ballmer, modelling the optional shoulder-length rubber gloves. "Everyone works with our stuff all day every day. They know who Microsoft is and what we do."

"How about making our customers actually swallow our bullshit physically?" said John Harrobin. "Windows Phone 7 was my idea."

Photo: Steve Ballmer ecstatic at Windows Phone 7 sales [newstechnica.com] .

deweaponization unstarted, we could be finished (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905706)

what would/did the unemployed queer cave dweller jesus say/do? this one's (depopulationing) on the bunny's eternal infernal scorecard? saycrud saturday is looming large? always extra hoopla around j day (judgments, eternal rewards...)? hold on to your honest intentions.

They're out to screw QT, KDE and Linux... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905710)

... and get Microsoft into the mobile phone space. This is a brilliant deal for Microsoft and the beginning of the end for Nokia.

Nokia shareholders deserve everything that is coming to them for allowing a Microsoft proselytiser to take charge.

Re:They're out to screw QT, KDE and Linux... (2)

PeterKraus (1244558) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906022)

Can you stop spewing this Qt bullshit around? It's been debunked every single time in every Microsoft/Nokia thread. I'm not gonna bother posting the link to the Nokia community agreement, I might get an RSI from doing so!

Red letter ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905864)

Nokia have finally bent over for Microsoft.

Re:Red letter ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906080)

Nokia have finally bent over for Microsoft.

And each device ships fully loaded with the resulting santorum.

s40? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905928)

IIRC, Symbian Series 40 was on nokia 9290. Since then, AFAIK, devices have been switching to Symbian S60.

That said, I'm still scratching my head why Nokia didn't go with Android. That is where the momentum is, and will be for the foreseeable future (IMO). I'd love to put Android on my E90. [wikipedia.org]

Re:s40? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35906078)

S40 never have used Symbian OS. Series 40 software platform have always used NOS operating system (NOS = Nokia Operating System). S60, S80 and S90 software platforms have used Symbian operating system.

Nokia has released in last decade multiple different combinations of Symbian OS + S60 software platform (execluding S80 and S90 software platforms just now) and that has been one reason why developing applications for Nokia phones has been difficult.
Then Nokia got idea that it calls the old jungle of the Symbian+S60 as Symbian^1 and then transform to Qt versions as Symbian^2 and todays Nokia phones use Symbian^3 and there would have come out a Symbian^4 and so on. But Nokia throw away that naming and toke only the strong Symbian brand and calls its own software system as such, even that Symbian includes today a Symbian OS + S60 software platform and now Qt framework.

Nokia have used Linux OS (=Linux kernel) in Maemo and its next generation version, MeeGo. So Nokia had skills to make Linux OS work on their hardware systems and build a own software systems on it. But Nokia got something offered by Microsoft what it could not deny. It was promise to have bigger market share.

So today Nokia will have four OS's in use for mobile phones, NOS, Linux, Symbian and CE. In later Nokia throws away Symbian and Linux and Nokia will keep only NOS and CE, where NOS is for basic phones and CE in smartphones.

    Android would be a best choice for Nokia but they were too scared to take the small leap of faith...

Re:s40? (2)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906874)

That said, I'm still scratching my head why Nokia didn't go with Android.

Because they don't want to fight for the barebones margins of being another Android handset maker?

Re:s40? (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906920)

And before someone will come back to try to dispute me read this [cnn.com] . Apple makes rakes in 50% of the smartphone profits worldwide. Nokia rakes in 15%, RIM 14%. The other manufacturers (HTC, Samsung, Motorola, etc) who are basically the most of the well-known Android handset makers are fighting over the last measly 20%. Why would Nokia want to fight a race to the bottom when it comes to profits?

Re:s40? (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906942)

And before someone tries to say "but that article is from October 2010!!!" to dispute its accuracy here [onlinemark...trends.com] is one from February of this year with more data that shows about the same breakdown.

Re:s40? (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906964)

And here [onlinemark...trends.com] is one from February with newer data showing about the same breakdown. Basically being an Android manufacturer is like being a PC manufacturer. It's a low-margin race to the bottom.

And margins on windows boxes will be... (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906986)

Android or Windows, you're a box shifter. All box shifters have razor thin margins.

Look to see the dev team layoffs coming in the next couple of years. Developers are a luxury that a box shifter can't afford.
 

Re:s40? (1)

Verdatum (1257828) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907064)

Because you don't get millions of dollars when you go with Android!!

Re:s40? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35911594)

But is it worth it if it ends up gutting the company? Microsoft has handed a lot of companies their heads, and it looks like a MS got the best end of this deal, too. The deal didn't smell any sweeter being negotiated by an MS refugee. That added some real horse shit to the deal, for sure. Now, MS gets one more chance to put their OS on known successful hardware (al-a the S60 devices: e90, n900, etc.). As I said, I think Nokia should have avoided MS like the plague. They should have taken their chances providing excellent hardware that is capable of running Android. Perhaps, with their experience with Maemo they could have tried for a truer GNU/Linux OS with Qt graphics. They threw in the towel instead, and that is what is so discouraging. The CEOs had so much tunnel vision, his first option was to run right back to MS. That should have been his last option! Ah, irony.

Good bye Nokia (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905932)

Good bye Nokia. It was nice knowing you. You should know from history that they will take your technology then shut you out.

Re:Good bye Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35910212)

Except that Nokia's most valuable technology is cellphone hardware, and I doubt MS has any interest in that.

Corporate Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35905960)

What's this mean for in-house app deployment? We've been using Symbian for years for our corporate mobile apps, we looked into Windows Phone 7 but for some utterly stupid reason you can only do deployments through the public App Hub or if you get every phone with a dev license. So what's this agreement mean for corporate apps?

Things change (2)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#35905990)

The N95 was once the most popular phone. Then the iPhone happened. Then the iPhone was the most popular phone and Android happened, Then RIM introduces Ping and (at least in Holland) they sell a bundle.

People have zero brand loyalty or memory in the phone market. They buy whatever they want to, based either on some personal preference or because their cronies got one. It is funny with the RIM's. Both a business elite phone AND a phone for youngsters (Ping is cheaper then SMS apparently or easier, god knows, or cares)

Don't count Nokia out yet. MS might have had a long loosing streak but... well, they are used to it.

What is often missing is that Nokia got 1.00.000.000 in the deal. That funds a LOT of development. MS bought the 360 (which I note an awful lot of so called nerds here have got) with its Windows/Office income. It can buy a phone. If not this round, then the next and the next and the next.

There are worse places to be then at the end of a MS cash dump.

Re:Things change (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906260)

There are worse places to be then at the end of a MS cash dump.

Well considering how poorly most of MS partners do, if I were Nokia, I would go over that agreement very carefully. The worst place that Nokia can be is that MS ends up with their IP like when it happened to Sendo.

Or they could be Bungie (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906438)

Bungie was a Mac company. You heard of them? Little project they did, called Halo. Cornerstone game for the xbox.

Good thing they did too. The game was supposed to be on the PC as well, where it would have been laughed of the charts for being an overly simplistic shooter.On the Xbox it scored big because there was nothing else and MS bankrolled them all the way.

And while Sendo was getting it hard up the ass, they could buy plenty of lube with the cash to got in exchange.

Getting the shaft is how a lot of people make their living. Money makes up for a lot of things.

Sure, Nokia MIGHT have made a come back with MeeGo. But now they got cash now. Surely that is all that matters? Right? RIGHT?!?

Re:Or they could be Bungie (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906684)

MS didn't just partner with Bungie; they bought Bungie. They divested themselves of Bungie in 2007. And for every Bungie, there are more counterexamples of partnerships that went bad.

And while Sendo was getting it hard up the ass, they could buy plenty of lube with the cash to got in exchange.

But lost all their IP. Since Sendo never made a product, their IP was the only thing real asset they had left.

Re:Or they could be Bungie (1)

wombatmobile (623057) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907280)

> But now they got cash now.

$1B is not much cash considering Nokia employs 130,000 Finnish human beings. Do you know how much the payroll is per year for 130,000 Finnish human beings?

Re:Or they could be Bungie (1)

duguk (589689) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907584)

> But now they got cash now.

$1B is not much cash considering Nokia employs 130,000 Finnish human beings. Do you know how much the payroll is per year for 130,000 Finnish human beings?

Probably more than it is for 130,000 Chinese human beings who'd rather commit suicide [slashdot.org] than work for Apple?

*tongue firmly in cheek*

Re:Things change (1)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906480)

The CEOs of MSFT "partners" live in their own little bubbles of self-deception.

"We're not as dumb as those other guys that got eaten by Microsoft. No, no, we're different"

Yep. Every single time.

--
BMO

Re:Things change (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906430)

There are worse places to be then at the end of a MS cash dump.

Nokia will need it. Few companies have spent so much producing so little.

Re:Things change (1)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909928)

People have zero brand loyalty or memory in the phone market. They buy whatever they want to, based either on some personal preference or because their cronies got one.

Y're a youngin', ain't ye? Because I remember when this was said about computers! Back when the Apple ][ ruled the roost, Commodore was an industry titan, and Atari was struggling to clear it's stain of "video game company", people switched back and forth routinely! GEM used to be what Windows became, and for the most part, people bought computers for their features, not their compatibility.

Those days, however, are long, long, long gone. Over time, as the ecosystem of computing matured, the apps became richer, deeper, and more integrated. People's preferences and expectations solidified and words like "training curve" and "ROI" became commonplace.

It will happen here, too, and already is starting! Mobile phones are fast becoming a niche software development platform, and vertical business apps, once developed, will be maintained indefinitely for their original platform. Over time, this wild free market will calm down and commoditize , as all markets tend to, and increasingly become stodgy and boring. Pretty soon those vertical apps will be joined by horizontal apps that everybody uses and expects, and when that happens, the wild growth phase of mobile-devices-as-computing-devices will be over.

Microsoft knows this; they spent 10 years anticipating this only to find that it didn't happen all that time because of them. Now, they're playing as hard as they can to re-assert themselves. I would say I wish them luck, but I really don't.

I've spent 20+ years dealing with their horribly designed, insecure, unstable software. I suffered through Windows Mobile 5 and 6. I suffered through every release of Windows from 1.0 forward. (I still have a copy!) I want nothing whatsoever to do with them.

But hey, that's just me.

Well done Nokia (5, Funny)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906170)

Your decision to partner with Microsoft is as sage and wise as allowing your balls to be shaved by a mental patient.

Re:Well done Nokia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35907420)

Better than partnering with the Linux developer community:

http://www.businessweek.com/globalbiz/content/jun2008/gb20080612_288518.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_global+business

Re:Well done Nokia (1)

Simon Rowe (1206316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35909506)

Your decision to partner with Microsoft is as sage and wise as allowing your balls to be shaved by a mental patient.

with a chainsaw.

Nokia must get Qt onto WP and S40 (2)

DonZorro (452879) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906320)

Nokia has been kicking developers around for the past couple years.

and then developers were promised that Qt would allow great portability. Qt showed great potential.
Now, when developers started to invest considerable time with Qt, Nokia sends mixed signals or releases statements that are plausibly deniable about their commitment to Qt and Symbian's future.
Elop issued the burning platform memo to condemn Symbian, instead of allowing staff to work through the Symbian UX issues.
Recent releases and updates have shown considerable improvement with Symbian UX issues, just when the CEO gives a strategy to turn the big Nokia ship into the Microsoft vortex or whirlpool.

Developers need Qt as the life raft or life jacket to help them stay afloat in these turbulent waters.
Nokia should get Qt to be supported on WP and S40 phones.

Without any such concrete action from Nokia, most developers will move to Android or another platform.

Qt (1)

wombatmobile (623057) | more than 3 years ago | (#35907316)

Elop wants developers to focus on Microsoft technologies.

The full board of Nokia Oy appointed Elop.

Got it?

Re:Nokia must get Qt onto WP and S40 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35907830)

Nokia partnered with Microsoft ergo nokia is dead ergo qt is dead.

Re:Nokia must get Qt onto WP and S40 (1)

Jerslan (1088525) | more than 3 years ago | (#35910428)

Mobile Qt (AKA: Qtopia\Qt-Extended) may be dead, but full-blown Qt is too widely used for it to just die. If nothing else the Community Edition will likely live on as an Open Source project.

buzzwords spotted (1)

richlv (778496) | more than 3 years ago | (#35906332)

LEVERAGE ! ECOSYSTEM !

yeeeeeeah. that gotta help nokia share price. not really :)

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?