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Countries Ranked In Terms of Internet Freedom

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the we're-number-two! dept.

The Internet 98

msum sent in a report that ranks 37 nations around the would in terms of their internet freedom. Estonia takes gold, the US silver, and Bahrain comes in last.

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98 comments

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Re-post (4, Informative)

Pikkebaas (1665451) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928334)

Re:Re-post (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928372)

Yes... but THIS article is about Estonia being 1st, while THAT article was about Australia being 4th. Totally different, see?

Re:Re-post (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928454)

At that rate #1 next week should be Elbonia.

Re:Re-post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928952)

Right. Fictional countries always have the best Internet Freedom.

Re:Re-post (1)

tsalmark (1265778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929354)

Fictional countries have the best everything.

Re:Re-post (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929692)

Dragons. Which country has the best dragons? I hear that dragon slaying is a lucrative business, if you're any good at it.

Re:Re-post (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35934486)

I much prefer training dragons to be flying mounts...
http://www.howtotrainyourdragon.com/ [howtotrainyourdragon.com]

Re:Re-post (1)

Phoghat (1288088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35940498)

I live on Pern, and it's not all that easy, Let Me Tell You!

Re:Re-post (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35944922)

Nice :)

I will have to pick up those books, when I initially read the name, it made me think of DragonLance, but when I googled it, I came up with Anne McCaffery, and I have not read her work.

Re:Re-post (1)

Phoghat (1288088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35940492)

Too much mud

Re:Re-post (5, Insightful)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928634)

It is indeed a repost, but it goes further even than that. In TFA, which takes the form of an interview, the response to the first question begins:

Robert Guerra: Well, this project is actually the second report.

Sounds like someone might have been nobbled. But in any case, describing countries such as the US or Australia as "free" - when citizens are free to view whatever content they want so long as they have no objection to so-called "Intelligence" services spying on them and taking whatever action they see fit - seems a bit hollow to me.

Re:Re-post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928836)

What intelligence service is spying on you? Google or Apple perhaps...

NSA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928894)

What intelligence service is spying on you? Google or Apple perhaps...

You're joking, right?

In the USA all Internet traffic that travels through major NOCs is monitored by the NSA. It's pretty well known.

Re:NSA (1)

Aqualung812 (959532) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929112)

It's pretty well known.

How about a citation on where that impairs freedom. Can you show any action the NSA has taken to restrict free speech?

Re:NSA (1)

pdabbadabba (720526) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929478)

Or maybe a citation to substantiate the allegation itself?

Re:NSA (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929620)

Or maybe a citation to substantiate the allegation itself?

Slashdot is not, and does not pretend to be a peer-reviewed academic journal. If you really require a citation for such a trivial statement, Google should be more than sufficient if you have been living in a barrel for at least the last ten years.

Re:NSA (1)

pdabbadabba (720526) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929778)

Perhaps your problem is in thinking that "In the USA all Internet traffic that travels through major NOCs is monitored by the NSA" is a trivial statement. Obviously you can post whatever you want...but it seems to me you'd want to support an assertion like that if you want people to believe it.

Re:NSA (1)

arkenian (1560563) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930138)

1.) It being the NSA, while they may very well monitor 'all traffic' they almost certainly throw out every packet not going outside our borders. There's a long list of reasons why this is true.

2.) I wouldn't think ANY slashdotter would be naive enough to have an expectation of privacy for the unencrypted packets they blast around the internet. And while yes, it is probably true that most encrypted packets probably have weak enough encryption that the NSA can break it.... it is almost certainly not true that the NSA has enough computing power to read EVERY encrypted packet that it comes across.

3.) I would be willing to place a substantial wager that google knows more about you than the NSA, unless you make a habit of communicating with people in Pakistan or something similar.

Re:NSA (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35932680)

Even if the NSA was monitoring all the traffic wouldn't it be pretty easy to set up a random message generator to create traffic containing all the potential gotcha keywords or phrases the NSA might be filtering on? After a while I imagine the staff responsible for monitoring these automated detections would become hopelessly overwhelmed making the whole process useless for timely intelligence gathering.

Re:Re-post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35932072)

Robert Guerra: Well, this project is actually the second report.

It's the second report because Freedom House already published a similar report in 2009, and Guerra says as much right after the above. So no, there is no added news here compared to the previous /. story at all; it's a plain old dupe.

Re:Re-post (1)

kdemetter (965669) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928936)

Talk about internet censorship : my country (Belgium) is not even mentioned in the report.

Re:Re-post (1)

tsalmark (1265778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929382)

When it comes to the most revolting swear word in the whole of the known universe, I think a little censorship is to be forgiven.

Re:Re-post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35932200)

Chile has laws protecting the net neutrality (some time ago there was an article saying it was the first one), and it is also not mentioned there...

Disturbing that you need laws to protect it (1)

LostMyBeaver (1226054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35939060)

And besides, anyone who writes a law to protect freedom on the Internet clearly doesn't understand it well enough in the first place to write a law to protect it.

Censorship is always going to exist where ever you go, however, it can always be circumvented. If there are any laws needed, it's laws to protect the individual who chooses to go around the censorship.

As an American in Norway (1)

LostMyBeaver (1226054) | more than 3 years ago | (#35939140)

I have to say I thought it was quite humorous that the majority of countries where freedom is taken for granted are simply not included.

For 12 years, I stood up each day in school forced to pledge my allegiance to a flag and the country it stands for under some god I don't even believe in. It's as if they were also trying to force their religion on me as well. The simple fact that we are forced every day to re-pledge our allegiance at risk of being penalized by the principle are taunted by some religious freaks is a simple proof that at even at the basest level, the freedom "All humans are given by their god" is subject to allegiance to a country which recognizes the necessity of forcing it.

I am in possession copies of Merriam Webster dictionaries starting in their earlier years and updated for each time the accepted American definition is altered for the words "Freedom" and "Liberty". You'd be surprised how often this occurs.

Given that America feels the need to force people to believe they are in fact free through propaganda and government sponsored reeducation and that the government regularly changes the definition of liberty and freedom to suit their purposes and therefore guarantee they are the most free people with the greatest liberties, it is truly pathetic that under these circumstances they can't even place #1 on a report they sponsored either directly or indirectly.

When I moved to Norway 13 years ago, I learned about freedom when I realized that it's not an issue here. People aren't sold freedom, they aren't regularly reminded of these great god given liberties (which the Bush attorney general publicly stated are really more of an opinion as opposed to a right the day they chose to suggest the habeas corpus did not apply to those who did not pledge their allegiance to the flag or to those where their allegiance was in question either), instead people simply live and let live.

It is wonderful to live in a place where you're simply free and no one has to sell it to you.

FREEDOMHOUSE is a propaganda vehicle (0)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929386)

Freedomhouse, the creators of this imaginary list are a propaganda front [wordpress.com] for the US Gov. As with most propaganda, their "list" is completely bogus - to any impartial observer there is just no way the US could make it to third place of world stage based on the facts. [dotweekly.com] . However propaganda is not effective unless you get everyone repeating it without thinking - which raises the question - how is this organization they gaming the slashdot story posting system ?? Are we to have this propaganda tripe plastered across the headlines every other week?

From above link:

Freedom House
-1301 Connecticut Ave. NW, Floor 6; Washington D.C. 20036 Tel. (202) 296 5101 Fax: (202) 293 2840
http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=2 [freedomhouse.org]
From: “By Way of Deception, We Shall do War” | by Deanna Spingola | September 16, 2010
* http://www.spingola.com/By_Way_of_Deception.html [spingola.com]

Communist apologist Eleanor Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, George Field, Dorothy Thompson, Herbert Bayard Swope, and prominent journalists, academics, trade unionists, theologians, and public officials founded Freedom House, a CFR front, in October 1941. FDR encouraged the group’s covert propaganda activities as he hoped it would persuade U.S. citizens to accept entry into World War II. Freedom House was also instrumental in facilitating and supporting post-war policies like the Marshall Plan, NATO, and the UN.

In 1982, President Reagan created the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) in order to acceptably manage CIA activities. Freedom House, the group created in 1941, became a part of this network. NED helped to finance Freedom House. Paul Wolfowitz, in the early 1980s, along with his neoconservative allies, collaborated with numerous Trotskyites. With the hidden funding and under the cover of conservative think tanks, the U.S. government can influence the public and conceal its interventions in foreign politics.

Recall that Freedom House was organized in 1941 to promote World War II. They are still propagandizing. William Howard Taft IV (S&B, PNAC[69]) is its current chairman. It is an international non-governmental organization that endorses a one-world government and opposes all nationalist governments. It has offices in offices in Algeria, Hungary, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Uzbekistan, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine. Taft supports the Law of the Sea which places all of the oceans under the jurisdiction of the UN. Since 1941, the group has developed ties to the CIA, the Brookings Institution, the U.S. Institute of Peace and other institutions and government agencies. Freedom House, a propaganda vehicle, is also a front group for the CFR, the British counterpart of the Royal Institute of International Affairs. In 2005 Freedom House was receiving U.S. government funds “for clandestine activities inside Iran.” The organization receives about 66% of its budget from the U.S. government. [70] See the list of their board members here. Other financing comes from the Scaife Family Foundation which finances many groups and individuals, especially those associated with the CFR, including, Newt Gingrich’s (CFR) GOPAC, the Federalist Society, the Media Research Center and Joseph Farah’s World Net Daily – all of which selectively dispense “conservative views.” The National Endowment for Democracy, a proponent for one world governance also finances Freedom House, &c. [71]

Re:FREEDOMHOUSE is a propaganda vehicle (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35931310)

This is a reminder that Atlas Shrugged Pt 1 is holding steady on rottentomatoes.com at 6% (critics approval) while 85% of the audience apparently enjoyed it. As for why I mention this, whatever you conclude about my reasons is only what I wanted you to think.

Re:FREEDOMHOUSE is a propaganda vehicle (1)

geegel (1587009) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931960)

By the way I'm really glad that Slashdot is sticking it to the man. In the report Iran is actually the champion on freedom censorship not Bahrain (lower score, higher freedom). If you can't beat them, confuse them.

Source [freedomhouse.org]

Re:FREEDOMHOUSE is a propaganda vehicle (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#35932598)

I find it funny that Hillary Clinton talks about internet freedom while they drag some old guy out and cuff him:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=My29YT1T4R4 [youtube.com]

I guess US citizens are now to restrict their protests to the Internet ;).

Re:FREEDOMHOUSE is a propaganda vehicle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35934726)

Go back to bed, China.

Re:Re-post (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35930210)

So far we know that Australia is 4th, Estonia 1sr, US 2nd, the place of Bahrain is 37.
As nobody RTFA here, we need quite a few reposts to complete the list. I have full trust in CmdrTaco, he was very good in dupes so far, maybe he can do even better...

Re:Re-post (1)

Phoghat (1288088) | more than 3 years ago | (#35940532)

CmdrTaco? I think he is supposed to get his own cartoon on Adult Swim.

Re:Re-post (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 3 years ago | (#35934074)

And the list is incomplete too. Considering that there are 193 states in the world (or more if you are considering some that aren't fully recognized) then the list may even be incorrect.

Around the would.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928340)

Are you from Boston?

fgdkshhflkhs (0)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928356)

Around the would?

How about "around the won't" like in "I won't read this article" because subby is an idiot.

--
BMO

Re:fgdkshhflkhs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928386)

So THAT was the lyric to that old Daft Punk song!

Around the would, around the would...

Re:fgdkshhflkhs (1)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928412)

One thing Daft punk left out was "proofread it"

--
BMO

Oracle is a greedy corporation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928388)

and Larry Ellison is a homo.

Bahrain? (4, Informative)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928390)

You mean Iran? Did you even read TFA?

And not even a link to the original report? It's really not hard to find. [freedomhouse.org]

Re:Bahrain? (4, Informative)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928410)

And here [freedomhouse.org] is the report itself.

Re:Original Report (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928418)

Yep, we're off to a bad start. A dupe with a juicy spelling link for the Spelling Brigade in only two sentences of TFS.

Who did the voting on this? (2)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928398)

And how is freedom on the net even measured without a subjective component?

Gold goes to... (1)

indre1 (1422435) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928414)

...Estonia because it only exists on the Internet (www.ee [www.ee] ): noone can actually point it's location on a map.

Re:Gold goes to... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928508)

I can. Just south of Finland.

Re:Gold goes to... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928586)

South of Finland... in the sea? Atlantis?

Re:Gold goes to... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35930364)

Soon. Wait for the next attack wave of the PutiNazis..

Re:Gold goes to... (0)

rossdee (243626) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928796)

Its on the east end of the Baltic sea, along with Latvia and Lithuania. It was part of the USSR for a while.

I know they dont teach world geography in US schools.

I have never met anyone from Estonia, but I did know an old lady from Latvia.

Re:Gold goes to... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928984)

Its on the east end of the Baltic sea, along with Latvia and Lithuania. It was part of the USSR for a while.

I know they dont teach world geography in US schools.

I have never met anyone from Estonia, but I did know an old lady from Latvia.

Well, they do teach geography very poorly - it's not covered as a separate subject - it's more of an aside in history classes ("this event happened here, for example ");.

Because nothing of major importance to world history happened in Estonia other than it being occupied by various other countries during WW2, most US students will have no idea where it is, or even know that it is an actual country.

Really, knowing about all the countries in the world is good thing, but other than trivia value it's not that useful in your day to day life.

Re:Gold goes to... (2)

Freultwah (739055) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929292)

Really, knowing about all the countries in the world is good thing, but other than trivia value it's not that useful in your day to day life.

It's not as if anyone is requiring you to name every country's capital, population, main cities, GDP per capita etc. Just knowing a country exists and approximately in what part of the world is a good thing, especially when you happen to meet somebody from that country or have to do business with it. It also comes in handy when planning a trip. More, it can help you avoid looking like complete arse. ("Oh, Estonia, I thought you just mispronounced Australia. Yes, Estonia... It's somewhere in Africa, between China and Paris, yes?" — Actual story.) I am sure you can come up with a few other good ideas how to use knowledge to your benefit.

Re:Gold goes to... (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931574)

Because nothing of major importance to world history happened in Estonia

It was one of the two Nazi-occupied countries that were declared Judenfrei (completely free of Jews - usually achieved through eradication), along with Luxembourg.

Re:Gold goes to... (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | more than 3 years ago | (#35934536)

Which was an easy thing to do, unfortunately - both countries are tiny. But while larger than Luxemburg, Estonia is much less important. I should know - I was born there.

Re:Gold goes to... (1)

Freultwah (739055) | more than 3 years ago | (#35934670)

Yeah, that's the black eye. The Jewish community was very small, the majority of them managed to flee from the Nazis to Russia, quite many were hidden from the Nazis by Estonians themselves, but a visible bunch were indeed murdered.

NKorea not worth mentioning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928438)

It's been said that in NKorea, they have their own internet. It's one giant WAN. But, if you wish to gain access to the outside, you will have an MP officer standing behind. It's to ensure you don't breach a signed contract in blood that you won't go outside your pre-defined scope/objective at research.

God forbid someone stumbles upon a typo-squatted site where porn pops all over the place. Talk about a land-mind moment with a bullet to the head.

Larry Ellison: Americas Greediest CEO (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928448)

http://toomuchonline.org/americas-greediest-the-2009-top-ten/

1: Larry Ellison

Larry Ellison appeared on our “greediest” list last year. He may appear every year. No one may better personify, personally and professionally, the self-absorption, arrogance, and insensitivity that separates the merely greedy from the greediest.

In 2008, Ellison, the CEO of Oracle business software, contested the $166.3 million tax appraisal on his Northern California estate. The assessment appeals panel gave him a $3 million tax refund in a ruling that will cost the local school system an annual $250,000, the cost of hiring and supplying three teachers.

Ellison, the holder of a $27 billion fortune, spent a good bit of 2009 sparing no expense to build a yacht speedy enough to win next year’s America’s Cup, the world’s top sailing race. His new racing yacht has a $10-million mast “18-stories tall and sails large enough to cover a baseball infield.” Some 30 designers and scientists spent 130,000 hours putting the vessel together.

For more casual water fun, Ellison takes to the seas on his 453-foot mega yacht, the Rising Sun, a boat he co-owns with Hollywood mogul David Geffen. This five-story little ship boasts 82 rooms and a basketball court that doubles as a helicopter pad. The construction cost in 2004: $200 million.

On the business side, Ellison did his best in 2009 to top the $557 million he took home as Oracle’s CEO in 2008. His magic formula: Ellison’s a serial merger. He buys companies, takes their customers, and fires their workers. His top 2009 gobble-up: Silicon Valley’s Sun Microsystems.

The Sun merger, analysts believe, will almost certainly end up eliminating more jobs than the 5,000 positions lost when Oracle bought out rival PeopleSoft.

And did we mention the dividends? Oracle this past spring announced plans to pay out its first dividend. The announcement, CNBC estimated, meant a $57.5 million quarterly check for Ellison in May and another $230 million in dividend checks over the next 12 months.

In 2009, the old Silicon Valley joke still rang true: “What’s the difference between God and Larry Ellison? Answer: God doesn’t think he’s Larry Ellison.”

Re:Larry Ellison: Americas Greediest CEO (2)

Millennium (2451) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928716)

So just because he's rich means he doesn't have the right to be treated fairly by the tax board?

Blogs ranked in terms of repetitiveness (1)

kervin (64171) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928466)

...Taco doesn't do well [slashdot.org] .

Sorry state of affairs (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928484)

When Germany places third in Internet Freedom, then the bar must be pretty low. Germany censors web sites. Germany recorded everyone's connection meta data about phone calls and internet connections. Germany makes people who provide open wireless LAN access take the fall for crimes which are committed by other people via that WLAN. In Germany, blog operators are liable for comments if they fail to perform a fair amount of editorial supervision. Germany requires every web site which is written for a public audience to list an email address and a phone number of the person who takes responsibility for the content.

Just like in Independance Day (2)

rikkards (98006) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928492)

Canada is nowhere to be seen.

Re:Just like in Independance Day (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928530)

Canada is nowhere to be seen.

Well, depending on the whims of the moment, you can lump it in with either the UK, France, or the USA. Sooner or later they should just pick one and give up the charade.

Re:Just like in Independance Day (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#35933230)

lots of nations where no where to be seen.
Spain, Japan, France Sweden, Norway, Finland...
Just take a look at all the white on the map http://www.freedomhouse.org/images/File/FotN/Map.pdf [freedomhouse.org]
In other words this is just about useless because how free the internet is in large part comes down to opinion. In some nations "hate speech" is illegal, in some sexually explicit pictures of 16 year olds is perfectly legal. Which limitation or lack of them makes that nation more or less free?
It is pretty easy to say that Cuba, Iran, and North Korea's internet are not "free" as in speech while the US, Canada, and Germany are "free" as in speech. But even then you will have people disagreeing with that. And trying to rank how free the free ones are or how repressive the repressive ones are is just an wasted exercise as is this whole study and Slashdot story.
 

Re:Just like in Independance Day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35935202)

because they didn't have staff / contributers in canada who answered the survey:
http://www.freedomhouse.org/images/File/FotN/Contributors.pdf

What? (0)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928534)

"the US silver"

This enough is proof how bogus this ranking is.

Re:What? (2)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928704)

"the US silver"

This enough is proof how bogus this ranking is.

I think they only look at government suppression, not government sanctioned corporate suppression, nor government surveillance.
Also keep in mind that this is a US company, who would be sawing off the branch they sat on if they said that their internet was suppressed.

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928738)

"the US silver"

This enough is proof how bogus this ranking is.

And why is that? This is a relative ranking; it just means the other parties below the US are worse. It doesn't mean the US is awesome - although it looks like we are better than many places. You do need to keep in mind that even a dirty swimming pool looks good compared to a sewer.

Re:What? (1)

u17 (1730558) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929444)

And why is that?

I haven't heard of other countries arbitrarily seizing domain names from web sites that the government doesn't like, without due process, without a way to appeal, and without even notification. But this is exactly what the US has been doing recently [1, 2]. This ranking is completely worthless.

[1] http://torrentfreak.com/u-s-government-seizes-bittorrent-search-engine-domain-and-more-101126/ [torrentfreak.com]
[2] http://torrentfreak.com/us-resume-file-sharing-domain-seizures-110201/ [torrentfreak.com]

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35931230)

How true this is. The study is a report in normative terms. I wonder how well nations would do on a criterion referenced assessment? Trouble is, who would develop the criteria under which they would be assessed.

Re:What? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928776)

Well, they didn't include every country, and they certainly excluded some countries that would have ranked higher than the US (Canada, which is currently PATRIOT ACT free, is one that immediately comes to mind).

Re:What? (4, Insightful)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928950)

Right, so basically the US is the second most internet-free country, from a list of countries.

Hold the presses.

I'm the richest man in the world if we only take homeless people as my 'world'.

Re:What? (1)

nbossett (1835098) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930110)

Depending on how you do the weighting, Canada could still come out behind. Among other things, it has done much more than the US to forbid reporting of some current legal proceedings. Obviously, it's a really subjective list (some countries should obviously rank poorly because they're bad on all or almost all metrics, but it's much less clear near the "free" end of the list which factors should matter the most).

But.. (1)

tomthepom (314977) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928538)

.. where did Australia [slashdot.org] rank?

United States, seriously? (1)

stopacop (2042526) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928622)

US officials can seize your domain without a court order while in Iran or China, they would just block you! Remember the massive domain seizure that ended up being wrong?

Freedom? That's strictly up for debate!

Re:United States, seriously? (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928814)

Freedom? That's strictly up for debate!

Only if you've paid your Subversive Activities Registration Act fee [cbsnews.com] to South Carolina.

Re:United States, seriously? (1)

pbjones (315127) | more than 3 years ago | (#35935490)

thanks for the link, I'm submitting my form now, before the site is /.'ed.

Re:United States, seriously? (2)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929006)

US officials can seize your domain without a court order while in Iran or China, they would just block you! Remember the massive domain seizure that ended up being wrong?

Freedom? That's strictly up for debate!

Well considering that the US can seize your domain regardless of what country is hosting your content, that ability probably shouldn't even be considered, as it is the same everywhere.

Re:United States, seriously? (2)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929122)

Every domain name ultimately comes from ICANN, which is located in California, and therefore if the US government tells them that they can't sell (well, rent) a domain to someone, they can't. That is one of the limitations of any centralized service: it has to abide by the laws under whose jurisdiction it operates. However, domain names are luxuries: any properly-configured* website can be accessed by its IP address rather than its domain name, and if your server is located outside the US, they can't actually shut you down unless your local authorities concur. You just won't have an easy-to-remember URL if they revoke your domain name.

*Not to imply that websites that can't are improperly configured, per se, only that it's possible to configure one properly such that it can be. Some fairly significant changes might have to be made... for instance, servers that host more than one domain would have to move everything to a single tree (e.g. 1.1.1.1/~site1/...).

Re:United States, seriously? (1)

luk3Z (1009143) | more than 3 years ago | (#35938754)

USA is the worst internet freedom enemy IMHO. USA government or other "secret agencies" seizure many sites and eavesdrop telephone lines. Surveillance in the USA is on high level. Are Americans blind ?

what's the point of reading slashdot (1, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928752)

if its own editors don't even read it. because just scanning the headlines for one minute a day and having a barely workable human memory would send off dupe alarm bells

so taco: please tell us what website you are reading so we can stop reading here and go there instead, since you obviously don't consider slashdot worth your time. you obviously think slashdot is beneath your interest level

its insulting to slashdot's readers, and it just leaves you with the feeling that if the powers that be around here don't even care enough to read their own site, so why am i reading this site? its a major turn off

how long has the dupe problem dragged on?

what exactly is your fucking problem that you can't scan the headlines of your own fucking website for one minute a day?

The editors DO read (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928844)

They read the numbers on the cheque the advertisers cut them thanks to mindless drones who continue to post on the site creating content to sell ad impressions.

Mindless drone 593017, signing off.

What about France ? (1)

Scotch42 (1120577) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928764)

with the HADOPI and LOPSI laws... isn't it woth of evaluating or the response would be scary at best?

or Canada, or Japan, or Spain, or NZ, or .... (1)

Comboman (895500) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929364)

It would be nice if the study was a little more inclusive.

Everything is relative. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928924)

This is a list of the bottom 35 countries... out of 193. Getting silver is like winning the special olympics.

Re:Everything is relative. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929010)

It depends. Wheelchair basketball, sled hockey... some of those guys are actually really good. Besides if you watch the real Olympics almost all the athletes are injured from over training.

The special Olympics are look how well this guy can do without a leg. The normal olimics is look how well this guy can do with a perfectly fine leg but every thing else bash bruised and broken. (my apologies to Douglas Adams)

Re:Everything is relative. (1)

FritzTheCat1030 (758024) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929256)

Besides if you watch the real Olympics almost all the athletes are injured from over training.

Yes, well that and the fact that they had to stop taking their steroids long enough to pass the drug test.

Countries Ranked in Terms of E-Peen Size (1)

SockPuppetOfTheWeek (1910282) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928940)

Fixed.

WRONG. Want the real truth? Try this report. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929376)

This report is complete bullshit. If you want a comprehensive report, and not something that is influenced by political fashions of the minute, take a look at the Electronic Police-State Report: https://secure.cryptohippie.com/pubs/EPS-2010.pdf

Funny Freedom (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929378)

That's funny. Prisoners of the net ranking which prisons offer the most freedom.

Not a single scandinavian country (3, Interesting)

Lord of the Fries (132154) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929400)

You hear about the zeal for progressive freedoms in the Scandinavian countries from time to time it seems to me. Things like the Pirate party in Sweden. And Iceland wanting to make a free press safehouse out of its country. And DVD Jon in Norway. I was kinda shocked that none of Norway, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, or Finland was in this report. Kind of a stupid report IMO.

Re:Not a single scandinavian country (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35934426)

I would guess Sweden(*) and Finland is somewhere between Estonia and Germany. All those countries have to follow EU directives. Apart from sometimes being designed intentionally to restrict personal privacy and freedom, EU directives usually cause a lot of unwanted side effect when they become incorporated in national laws and regulations. As long as EU is what it is, you won't see zero remarks from an EU country in a report like this one.

Denmark have become increasingly xenophobe and nationalistic since the 70's and now the country is almost as bad as USA. They are also part of NATO (as well as EU), so in the name of The War on Terror, I would guess they score pretty bad.

Norway is the hardest country to guess about. Norway is the most bureaucratic and the country with most extensive regulations of the Nordic countries. At the same time, although usually kind of lazy and avoiding confrontation, when it comes to things that the Norwegian population think is really important, least of all shit from their own government, they can be quite forceful. I have no idea if this is something that Norwegians would find worth fighting for, in that case they might actually have zero remarks, but if they don't, they may have a really bad score. They are also part of NATO, but have managed to stay relatively independent and not follow orders from USA.

Iceland is easy, if not USA have leaned on them (they are one of the founding nations of NATO after all), I would guess that they have a better score then Estonia.

It is kind of interesting that many NATO countries score bad in this index, probably because they have done what the US government have told them to do, while USA itself score relatively good. But then, the ethics followed in US internal and US external policy’s have always been very different.

It is also note worthy that I can only find three countries in this index that I consider democracies in the modern sense of the word (Estonia, Germany and Australia). There are a lot of democracies in the world, even if they are small, it is strange that they are not part of this report.

(*) I'm Swedish, so I should be able to calculate the score for Sweden. But since the report don't describe the metrics used, I can't. Also, Sweden have implemented, and reimplemented, and sometimes reimplemented again, all of EU:s oppressive Internet directives. Depending on when the investigation took place during 2010, you would get very different results. The most important part of Swedish Internet Freedom is the very strong legal protection of independent and free media outlets (even private bloggers) and the legal protection of the anonymity of informants to media outlets, as long as the media outlet have an "ansvarig utgivare" (a registered person responsible that the media outlet follows Swedish laws (which are very lax compared to US laws)). A system like that don't seem like it would be covered by this index at all, it is to different from the US mindset. That said, we have two political parties in our parliament that in large want to restrict freedom on internet, the Moderate Party (the largest Swedish government party, but received less votes in the election 2010 then the most dominant opposition party) and the Christian Democratic Party (the smallest of the government parties). Both of these parties are part of the current right-wing (from an European perspective, of the scale left from an US perspective) government coalition since 2010 and no new election will be held until 2014.

Re:Not a single scandinavian country (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35935150)

Found the Questions ( http://www.freedomhouse.org/images/File/FotN/FOTN2011.pdf ).

What Sweden would get: A 0-2 remarks B 1 remark C 3 remarks

In particular
A
1. 0-1 Rural Sweden have worse internet access then urban Sweden. But even in rural parts of Sweden, internet access is better then in most urban parts of USA.
4. 0-1 Some registration requirements for ISPs, EU regulations.
B
1. 1 A child porn filter is blocking some sites, implementation required for ISPs.
C
2. 1 Laws against incitement to racial hatred, but they are lax compared to those in Germany and USA
5. 1 Politicians that are part of the parliament are the only non-military personel allowed to fully inspect the Swedish military bodies that monitor internet traffic. Some journalists have been allowed limited access to those military compounds.
6. 1 EU regulation

Re:Not a single scandinavian country (1)

loneDreamer (1502073) | more than 3 years ago | (#35946548)

As far as I know, here in Chile we have the only net-neutrality law worldwide. We do not have censorship due to intelligence, nor deep-package inspection nor any other bullshit. No ridiculous laws about child pornography (yes, VERY illegal, but the actual measures taken are IMHO, much wiser). I don't think we are even mentioned.

Bad report ... pointless to me .. a Canadian! (1)

Raffix (1875856) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929434)

Where's Canada?

There's no internet freedom without free speech (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35930216)

I think it's funny and tragic that countries in Europe, where free speech is not a given right and individuals can be thrown in jail for speaking their thoughts, should score at all on a measure of 'internet' freedom.

How is it possible to claim that there is internet freedom in a country where if you put your thoughts on a website you could be arrested and your website shut down?

Re:There's no internet freedom without free speech (1)

Teun (17872) | more than 3 years ago | (#35932458)

I believe Germany is pretty much middle of the road for European internet freedom policies, looking at a bunch of others isn't going to sway the outcome of this study by much.

article is discredited (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35933946)

I discredited the article because they were claiming that liberals were giving more freedom to the internet, when liberals are the ones who want control unless they meant it differently.

missed something (1)

pbjones (315127) | more than 3 years ago | (#35935308)

the table in the article shows Thailand being worse than Bahrain, or am I missing something?

Re:missed something (1)

pbjones (315127) | more than 3 years ago | (#35935378)

ooooops sorry, I missed the it was best to worst (100) which still leaves several countries Worse than Bahrain, so is it a crap article, or do they fudge their own figures?

China (1)

gaelfx (1111115) | more than 3 years ago | (#35936698)

Well, China can't be far up there, since the report is quite clearly hard-blocked (which means the connection is always reset when trying to access it). Interestingly enough, imdb is also blocked, which just seems stupid. I really need to get a vpn.

Paid For By the US Government - Literally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35958660)

Freedom House, the publisher of the report, get 80% of its budget from the U.S. Government. (Wikipedia) No wonder they don't take into account things like domain name seizures, illegal intercepts, and the DMCA.

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