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They are gay with their turbans. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928712)

Iranians enjoy the homosexual antics of their president.

My god... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928746)

... it's full of stars!

Re:My god... (1)

Moryath (553296) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928850)

Hey Iran. I got a better virus for you.

STARS!!!!! [penny-arcade.com]

Really, sometimes these guys are too easy...

Next worm: "Stripes" (0, Troll)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928748)

Eat it, bitches.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928888)

And, you're Israeli..? Shocking how you two countries never get along, especially if everybody from each side shares similar views.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (2)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928956)

Israel and Iran got along fine until Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution. Nowadays Iran is the chief financier of Hezbollah and Hamas.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929050)

They got on just fine after Revolution too. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran [wikipedia.org] –Contra_affair

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929148)

I don't consider negotiating for hostages "[getting]" on just fine". And you didn't address how today Iran is the chief financier of Hezbollah and Hamas.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929262)

Katz, Iraq was considered very very bad by Israel at the time. Iran was considered less very bad by Israel at the time. So Israel and Iran did get on at a weapons selling level at the time. wiki/Iran–Israel_relations#Khomeini_era [wikipedia.org] . covers some of the details.

Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's rev (4, Insightful)

fnj (64210) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929144)

The Shah, for all the domestic failings he may or may not have had, oversaw a prosperous, pluralistic nation which was a good international neighbor and not consumed by hatred for scapegoats. Iran did not participate in either the War of Israeli Independence, Sinai War, Six Day War, or the Yom Kippur War.

The Ayatollah appealed to the basest instincts and transformed a nation with a rich history into a one dimensional den of hatred and troublemaking.

Before and after, the majority were muslim, but the "after" brand is unrecognizable compared to the "before."

Re:Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's (3, Interesting)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929326)

The Shah, for all the domestic failings he may or may not have had, oversaw a prosperous, pluralistic nation

It was also a very liberal nation - perhaps the most liberal nation in the Islamic world - where women did not have to wear anything on their heads and could be seen in miniskirts and high heels.

Religious minorities such as Zoroastrians and Baha'i were'nt oppressed and Christians and Jews could marry who the fuck they wanted.

Re:Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's (3, Informative)

kilfarsnar (561956) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929642)

They also had a secret police that brutally repressed any dissent. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAVAK [wikipedia.org] . The Shah came to power when the CIA overthrew the democratically elected President Mossadegh. So there's that too.

Re:Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's (3, Interesting)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930918)

Yeah mainly suppressing the radical fucks causing all the problems in the middle east today. Now look at the results. And the CIA had a lot of help in getting the Shah into power starting with the British who were the ones getting screwed by the nationalization of their oil assets and the substantial amount of IRANIAN politicians themselves who wanted a new government. The CIA did not over throw anybody, at most they spread a little money around and promised future help to those IRANIAN's who wanted control of their government. In 1953 the US and CIA was not the global powerhouse super spies and troublemakers of today. The US was focused on the little problem in Korea at the time and the entire middle east had been British territory who were in the midst of losing their influence after WW2 and did not like having their assets nationalized. They even blockaded the Iranian ports in an effort to weaken the government the CIA supposedly overthrew all by themselves.

Before and after pictures: Cairo University (4, Informative)

HockeyPuck (141947) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929688)

My mother who grew up in Tehran went to school, drove a Benz and who's mother ran the grocery store that my parents owned. Then the Shah was overthrown and my entire family (aunts/uncles/cousins etc) left for the US. The Ayatolla regressed 100 years of progress.

An interesting pictorial:
Photographs [aina.org] of students at Cairo University. Pay special attention to the hairstyles/headdress that the women in the pictures have. In the first pictures, you could mistake this photo for any university in the mid 50s. While in 2004, you'd never confuse this for some university in the middle of Oklahoma.

These photos represent the gradual but steady Islamic radicalization invading the Middle East and the rest of the world in the last three decades. I lived in Egypt until the year 1978 and have never wore a head cover, neither did my mother or grandmother. And this is thanks to a feminist movement that started in Cairo in 1919 under the leadership of the famous Egyptian feminist Hoda Shaarawi.

Re:Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's (3, Interesting)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930990)

It makes you think about how much of the unrest in the world today can be traced back to Jimmy Carter's horrid leadership during that crisis. If he had backed the Shah, how would the mideast be different today? Perhaps no Mujahideen , no al queda, no taliban...

Re:Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35932268)

Before Carter, believe it or not, the US had military posts in Iran.

Carter was well meaning, but he should have kept the Shah propped up, and not pulled the US out of Iran (they were in Iran at behest of the Iranian government, not because they were occupying the country in any way.) Of course, the Revolutionaries won two decisive victories when Carter let the Shah fell. They betrayed Carter, and were able to keep their power by the anti-Shah propaganda. No, the Shah was not perfect; he was a dictator, but comparing the lesser of the two evils, at least he wanted a secular, modern country that could compete economically in the world arena.

Even worse? The revolutionaries executed all the Iranian generals. Guess what happens next? Saddam from next door decides that due to that fact, he is going to take a chunk of Iran. Big mistake. Even with Iran sans any generals of experience, the Iranian people were the ones that kept the invaders out by sheer will and sacrificing their children.

It is sad though. I can picture an Iran with the Shah in power. The Middle East likely would be a lot better off.

Carter probably was the second worst president in recent memory of the US. He put a (pretty much) permanent moratorium on new nuclear reactors, and nixed breeder reactors. From his actions, he pretty much ensured Big Oil and Big Coal would forever be the energy kings of the US with everyone else as squashable bit players.

Re:Iran's history only trashed by the Ayatollah's (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35932830)

I would have liked to have Bush (1 or 2) in office during the hostage standoff. I would have giving it about a week before they started cratering entire towns until the hostaqes were released. Sure the hostages would have probably been killed but the death exchange rate would have most like been 1000 to 1 in favor of the US. And remember the US didn't have any of the fancy smancy precision bombs or current generation cruise missles at the time and would have had to rely on heavy bombers with fighter escorts so the accuracy or lack there of would have necessitated multiple runs just to be sure. I bet the great Islamic reveloutionaries would have also found themselves to busy running for their lives to setup their glorious Islamic Republic.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1, Troll)

kenrblan (1388237) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929222)

That's kind of like saying "The gazelle and the lion were getting along great until the the lion got hungry." The US got along fine with Iran too, when it was lead by the favored puppet. It wasn't long after the revolution that the US started backing Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Just because relations are good between nations at some point, there is no guarantee that the circumstances won't change.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929606)

Of course the US got along with Iran but this "puppet" descriptive gets applied to any country that is not actively espousing hate and vitriol for the US. Regardless of US influence in any foreign government it is the foriegn government itself who make and implement their decisions. Sure the US has influence just like any other country looking for economic and security agreements but the people running the foreign countries can always say "no thank you" but then that means they would not be able to collect any of the goodies the US provides for cooperating. Does anyone think that France, England, Germany, Russia, and China do not offer "incentives" to government officials in the course of looking for the same thing the US is? The US got stuck supporting dictators and autocrats during the cold war becuase if they didn't the Soviet Union would have been glad to step into the void. The US had to work with what was available at the time and they didn't have a lot of good choices in most circumstances. A lot of the small proxy countries had a lot of influence when playing the US against the USSR during the cold war. But nobody ever seems to recognize that fact because all of these "poor" and "downtrodden" countries couldn't possibly be smart enough to use tactics like that.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929266)

And, you're Israeli..? Shocking how you two countries never get along, especially if everybody from each side shares similar views.

Both those countries are MENTAL.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (3, Insightful)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929630)

Israel ain't the one threatening to destroy Iran, though. Come down from your fifty-thousand-foot view some time and examine the issue critically.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930590)

Unfortunately (and more or less completely off topic), AC is correct. The entire Middle East is Bat Shit Insane. And has been for several thousands of years. And likely will be as long as it exists. Too many people. Too much history. Too human and too much damned oil.

Re:Next worm: "Stripes" (1)

blackpaw (240313) | more than 3 years ago | (#35935364)

Actually it does and Israel has the nukes to do it. Whereas, despite us MEMRI misinformation, Iran has never threatened to destroy Israel.

makes sense (2, Funny)

neo8750 (566137) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928792)

This makes sense that they would notice such a thing in iran around this time. If i did the math right it should be about 6 pm which is around the start of twilight/dusk meaning...STARS are just appearing in the sky and thus able to spotted during their attacks. I feel as the night presses on the attacks will only get stronger. We have two choices to fight back against these attacks. Either put up more streetlights and fight with light pollution or we can just hold our ground till sunrise which will cause this enemy to retreat in to the oblivion that is background light. Either way we must stand up and fight against these tiny attackers.

Re:makes sense (2)

Moryath (553296) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928882)

Didn't you know? Stars are the ancient enemy of Al-Ilah the Moon Deity, the forces of the Djinn, who fight against the Holy Angels and seek to corrupt humans.

Re:makes sense (1)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929340)

Before we jump too deep in to theology, let's throw out a bit of political conspiracy. Isn't "cyber-war" the perfect boogyman? Sure - Communists and CIA mechanizations have been traditional levers to move a population's fears in the past. But eventually, that sort of thing has to manifest somewhere; who is a Communist or CIA conspirator? But cyber attack? That's in a fantasy world. Or at least - a dark, mystical realm of black boxes that the population may be familiar with but rarely understand. One can hold off providing any proof of these nefarious doings in these magical boxes. Yet since these black boxes are attached to so many important things, one can stress the dire nature of any attack. Of course, such attacks are always foiled by brave patriots. And thus no damage is ever produced - no need for inconvenient proof. But oh what could have happened. Fear it.

Re:makes sense (1)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929508)

> Of course, such attacks are always foiled by brave patriots. And thus no damage
> is ever produced - no need for inconvenient proof.

And you forget one more use. The ever ready excuse. An aging poorly maintained facility goes foom! Accept blame or play the cyber card. Imagine you are Imanutjob in Iran. Your Russian designed and built of crap brought in through an international blockade reactor goes foom! and radiates a million people. Accept blame or claim the Joooossss! and the Great Satan sabotoged the facility with a fiendish cyber attack?

Stock market system somewhere crashes. Chinese hackers might prove more expedient as a 'cause.'

It is really a perfect answer to any problem. Hell, Sony's networks are still out. Who is to say last week's Amazon outage won't eventually be blamed on the wily hackers.

Re:makes sense (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929548)

I hear you, the cyber attacks on Georgia and Estonia never happened....all a conspiracy by the CIA...they are behind everything...even the things of which they are in front.

Re:makes sense (2)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930452)

I hear you, the cyber attacks on Georgia and Estonia never happened....all a conspiracy by the CIA...they are behind everything...even the things of which they are in front.

Of course - you only see the CIA agents you're supposed to see.

On a more serious note - that's the fun thing about this environment (I suppose it applies to espionage in general - forest of mirrors and all that). There really ARE shenanigans going on. But the exact nature and motivations aren't always clear. And because of this ambiguity and past history, it becomes very easy to either see enemies in the shadows or claim that there are enemies as a cynical fiction intended to motivate others.

I say this as someone who's spent over a decade doing exactly that; authoring horror scenarios to motivate others. Nothing drives home the need for good infosec practices, policies, and funding like a round of "spook the horses." My presentations outlined past attacks and vulnerabilities. They talked about mitigating possible future attacks via yet-unknown vectors. They were based on sound analysis of our environment and need to protect it. But in the most cynical reading - I was writing a fiction to induce action.

Add in some less-than-sound analysis and political grand-standing and we have the new tool for propaganda.

Re:makes sense (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35933012)

There has been CIA participation in a lot of questionable enterprises over the years and they may occassionally do their job which is to protect US foreign interests but they usually cause more problems than they fix. I always find it amusing when people talk about how powerful the CIA or the US is with Isreal running the entire show behind the scenes. If Israel or the US was that powerful how come they still end up having all these problems. Especially Israel, if they were as powerful as people say wouldn't they have solved that whole Palestenian issue by now? If you really have that much power why continue putting up with the troublesome neighbors for almost 50 years?

Re:makes sense (1)

qfman (1983486) | more than 3 years ago | (#35938596)

My how quickly we forgot stuxnet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet [wikipedia.org]

Re:makes sense (1)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 3 years ago | (#35938670)

Exactly. Whenever someone begins to doubt the boogyman, invoke Stuxnet.

Re:stuxnet vs CA vs hashstamp (1)

deskpane (2067094) | more than 3 years ago | (#35947846)

deskpane build 250 hashstamp appended
By hashstamp, I mean that you post the hash of whatever, and the post is datestamped and can't be edited or deleted, although it would be nice to have a "flag", indicating that someone has paid X dollars to claim that their password was stolen and so the hashstamp is possibly invalid, or even that such a challenge has been validated.
To automate this, a filename such as e.g. deskPane_w.....zip MUST begin with a dot-com name fby underscore. A hashstamp-server might send mail to hashmaster@deskpane.com to verify stuff. The first thing you would do, is say post the hash of your self-portrait, in case your ownership is challenged. "No edit, no delete" is thus powerful, no one can ever get rid of that hash, so this would be a great ritual for setting up a new domain.
*COMPARE* this to the stuxnet thing. With hashstamping the server could obviously notify the hashmaster when new hashes are posted. Even assuming the notification got lost, for important companies they COULD just view the hashstamp-journal, to verify that no-one-else has been sneaking in bogus hashstamps. With stuxnet, a copy of the certificate was SILENTLY stolen, so those files could be signed, and the true owner of the certificate has no way of knowing this is happening.
From this perspective, the advantage of certification is that it saves on communication costs. But today we can EASILY afford a server-query, each time we install a program. The use of certificates is thus viewed as a dinosaur from the dial-up-days, when hashstamp-server-queries might have been too costly. But today, this advantage of total visibility seems decisive, at least to moi, owner of www.hashstamp.com.
Anyway knowing of no such hashstamp server, for today I just append the hashstamp of my release-candidate-build, this one might ship. I was so dissapointed when slashdot allowed editing of user journals, now to get the no-edit/no-delete I have no choice but to comment in some security-discussion.
file C:\zzzz\zzzzWcDemo\deskPane_win32_win64_2011_APR_24_00250.zip nbytes 0x62868B 6456971 CRC32 28e1ac5e MD5 87c595fe508de6eea992274de3e4a651 SHA-1 9d4225e0d60e732306880cef6d61a11ad933679d SHA-256 bcb31cd8a57750439c3c95eaee8506374c7efde5de5573698b7f5c86937640fe

Re:makes sense (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929350)

Ok, time to put down the crack pipe.

Call me a jerk, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928804)

...I am not sure I can feel that sorry for the Iranian government.

I *do* feel very sorry for Iran's people, though...

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928860)

That's not the point here. The Iranian people gain nothing from nuclear weapons testing, so this won't affect them. Good riddance.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928884)

Obvious troll is obvious.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (3, Insightful)

LavouraArcaica (2012798) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928942)

Defending themselves from countries like USA is not a thing that 'affect them'? If nuclear weapons are so bad, why most rich countries have them in the first place? Come on, dictadorship is bad. But being invaded by another country is way worst.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

jav1231 (539129) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929028)

Which would be why we have them. FTW

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

cobrausn (1915176) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929060)

I feel secure in the knowledge that to launch a nuclear attack on the US is to basically ask to have your entire country set on fire. Not sure it's worth what we pay for it, but it's there. Considering that I live here (for now) and we have this tendency of pissing the rest of the (nuclear armed) world off, I'll take what I can get.

Didnt hurt japan did it... they did well (0)

cheekyboy (598084) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929206)

Common, you mid east countries, is it real real bad that usa invades you, takes over, runs your country and sets it up to be all good and powerful.?

Id be sending a big invite.

It would take 100 years of normal progress to equal 15 of a usa invasion.

Who cares if giant corporates setup shop and make trillions in profits.

Re:Didnt hurt japan did it... they did well (1)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929930)

Fat load of progress you did in Iraq, sure. Getting a nuclear weapons program running is the only rational act - as shown by North Korea (whose regime does indeed suck, but that is a different matter), it is the only thing that keeps you from getting a friendly visit to bring you "freedom".

Re:Didnt hurt japan did it... they did well (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930826)

I was against the Iraq war from the beginning, and I still think it was a bad idea, and poorly executed. We had no justification for going in there.

However, despite it all, things are starting to turn around for Iraq. Their democracy has issues, but it is surviving. Their electricity production has finally passed what it was before the invasion. People are living mostly in peace.

Of course there are a lot of issues, but can you really say that in ten years, things will be better in Syria? Maybe they will, maybe they won't, but anyone who says they 'know' is an ass. The next ten years will be very interesting from a sociology perspective.

Re:Didnt hurt japan did it... they did well (1)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931082)

You can as well not say if things will be better in Iraq in 10 years. Not considering the fact that this war was not the least bit about freedom, I kinda prefer if people who actually want freedom rise up for it themselves. Tends to lead to longer-lasting results. And yes, I completely agree with you there - the next ten years will be very interesting. Not only with focus on the middle east...

Re:Didnt hurt japan did it... they did well (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931202)

Yes, exactly. Who knows which one will be better off? It was an experiment with a somewhat unwilling populace, and not morally justified, but it is hard to say whether it will turn out well or not. No one knows.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931000)

As an American, I don't want Iran to get nuclear weapons for purely selfish reasons, but I think they are good reasons. Iran has a country dedicated to hating the USA. They call the USA the great satan. They call for its destruction.

Now, I don't care how bad you feel for what the US did with Mossadegh, you'd have to be utterly insane to favor nuclear weapons in the hands of someone who wants to destroy you. This should be obvious.

Also, being invaded by another country is not necessarily worse than dictatorship. Sometimes it is worse, sometimes it is not. It really depends. In the extreme counter-example, you have Vietnam invading Cambodia to get rid of Pol Pot (because they were tired of dealing with refugees). Obviously when the US invaded Iraq, it didn't have the same moral justification, but in some cases it does exist.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

LavouraArcaica (2012798) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931756)

Yes, they call USA 'the great satan' and USA call them 'the axis of evil'. I really don't see a big difference here.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35937252)

No, what you're not seeing is the nature of the situation. It isn't about who's morally superior, it's about this: if someone is going to be killed, between me and them, I want it to be them. Maybe you are suicidal, but I am not.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

LavouraArcaica (2012798) | more than 3 years ago | (#35946806)

It's true: it's not about who's morally superior, but not being suicidal. In this way, let me remind you that invading another countries will not stop terrorists attacks. Actually, it's most likely to increase the number of these attacks against USA. Now, please stop the FUD.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35948880)

Actually, it's most likely to increase the number of these attacks against USA.

Why do you think that?

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 3 years ago | (#35932034)

While I agree with much of what you say, the average Iranian does not care one way or another about America. My understanding is that they hated W, in the same way that many of us do not like Iranian leadership (not sure how they think of Obama). However, you will find that the average Iranian is just an person that simply wants to live life freely.

But, I agree with you about the nukes. If we can stop them long enough for sanctions to kill their government, then we have done OK. Personally, I am sick and tired of all of the wars that we are in and part of. Obama putting us in Libya is just plain stupid.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#35937240)

For a while I had an anti-war message in my sig, but I'm actually ok with the Libya war. The war was going to happen either way, and if we can help the non-dictator side end up victorious and thus avert slaughter (Khadaffi promised to go from house to house killing people when he won), we ought to. As long as we don't colonize there, or start doing bad stuff.

As to the execution of the war, it's been rather muddled and directionless. If we're going to do something, we ought to at least do it right.

Re:Call me a jerk, but... (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35937070)

A nuclear weapon would only sign their death warrant. They have no long distance delivery system and even if they were able to sneak one into the country they could not even come close to preventing the US reprisal. Even passing one to a non-state actor could be traced back to it's original origin pretty easily. MADD has been effective for the bigger powers because they have enough weapons and the means of delivering them to destroy the entire planet several times over.

Poor Article (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928810)

Not a very good article, most of it is a rehash of Stuxnet. Only Useful Information:

"Fortunately, our young experts have been able to discover this virus and the Stars virus is now in the laboratory for more investigations," Jalali was quoted as saying. He did not specify the target of Stars or its intended impact. "The particular characteristics of the Stars virus have been discovered," Jalali said. "The virus is congruous and harmonious with the (computer) system and in the initial phase it does minor damage and might be mistaken for some executive files of government organisations."

Re:Poor Article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928862)

The virus is congruous and harmonious with the (computer) system and in the initial phase it does minor damage and might be mistaken for some executive files of government organisations.

I LOL'd.

Re:Poor Article (1)

Jaysyn (203771) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929472)

... some executive files of government organizations....

Iranian euphemism for goat porn.

Re:Poor Article (1)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928874)

I bet they're running scared now, because the fact of the matter is that they can never again be certain that a worm is not operating surreptitiously on their systems. So what else do we expect them to say?

Re:Poor Article (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929168)

What are their options?
Build their own OS? Expensive, needs time and no fun for the top developers.
Import a one task "black box" OS from Europe/Asia for sub sets of the production line? Expose their funding/procurement networks as the expensive new OS is sold and then sabotaged again?
Do the best with Windows but finally understand it should have never been trusted?

Re:Poor Article (1)

katz (36161) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929654)

I agree with you. This is what I had meant to convey.. perhaps these attacks are already too entrenched in their systems for them to continue with any modicum of confidence.

Re:Poor Article (1)

memyselfandeye (1849868) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930564)

General System Order 1) - Fly someone to France and then to Detroit. Have them download the Linux flavor of your choice and fly back to Iran. Install your Linux flavor of your choice on clean hardware with resin filled USB ports, locked cases, and a network with no internet connection. Buy a DSL line and connect to a single terminal for all your goat porn needs.

Anyway, I'm pretty sure Oppenheimer didn't need Linux to make yellow cake.

Seriously, this is just ridiculous. The real problem isn't that they are being abused by western 'cyber worms,' but that so many people who hate our way of doing things refuse to think that our way of doing things may actually be better than their way of doing things. I'm not talking about politics here, just good old fashioned system security. Stop freaking pirating MS Windows and expecting your super secret high tech 1970s science experiment to work correctly.

2.5 cents of not knowing WTF is really happening over there. Spend some time to learn how the Internet actually works before bitching about how it works.

Re:Poor Article (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931032)

I think they just installed a new Service Pack and the results were just as devestating as Stutnex.

Knee-jerk reaction #1 (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928812)

The information provided in the Reuters article is total crap, and some propagandist thinks that the name "Stars" is subtle. Good thing you have all those young experts, Gholamreza Jalali! Otherwise some might mistake the Stars virus (which does minor damage) for some executive files of government organisations! Gee, the Israelis and Americans sure are cyber-stupid to try the same cyber-thing twice on you guys! You're so clever!

Re:Knee-jerk reaction #1 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35928934)

Well it wasn't said if it is a RED STAR or STAR and stripes (RAID virus) so commies are not out of the question yet.

Re:Knee-jerk reaction #1 (1)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929120)

> Gee, the Israelis and Americans sure are cyber-stupid to try the same
> cyber-thing twice on you guys!

Dunno, what else we got? Even the crazed cowboy warmonger Bush didn't have the stones to pull the trigger on a raid on Iran's nuke program and with President Zero even a threat of physical force[1] isn't credible. And with the current state of near hostilities between Zero's minions and Israel these days the hope of them riding in on a white jet and solving the problem for the world isn't that high. So again, what else we got?

And as long as the Iranians insist on running Windows on their critical terror infrastructure why not keep abusing it? With a little luck the world might at least get that lesson pounded into them, that Windows == fail.

[1] Against enemies that is, neutrals or friends are a different story. Support any foe, oppose any friend seems to be the current administration's motto. Perhaps they misheard JFK or something... or perhaps they are just on the other f*ck*ng side.

Re:Knee-jerk reaction #1 (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929180)

Support any foe, oppose any friend seems to be the current administration's motto. Perhaps they misheard JFK or something... or perhaps they are just on the other f*ck*ng side.

You mean how the Bush family has intentionally, deliberately, knowingly, and willfully done business with both the Nazis (Prescott Bush ran a corporation whose sole purpose was to funnel funds to the S.S., the "business end" of the Nazi Party) and with the Bin Ladens for years and years?

Your mistake is believing that Obama and Bush are not on the same team. Understanding politics in America? You fail it.

Re:Knee-jerk reaction #1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929270)

You do realize that Osama is estranged from the rest the Bin Laden family? Understanding Family in America? You fail it.

Re:Knee-jerk reaction #1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929730)

Orly? Did he tell you that himself?

Doubtful (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928826)

Ahmadinejad is just upset the Playstation Network is still down.

Whoops! My Bad! (1)

sirgoran (221190) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928880)

Was that your server I attacked? I'm sorry.

I thought it was the Dancing with the Stars host.

(Must remember not to drink and hack.)

A nickel's worth of free advice (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 3 years ago | (#35928978)

Hey, Iran, maybe you shouldn't be replying to those Nigerian scam emails instead of blaming it on your enemies. Just sayin'.

Just about only target I'm happy to see... (1)

wisebabo (638845) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929030)

... taken down.

I'm not a hacker by inclination (or ability!) and I normally look dimly upon vigilantees who take it upon themselves to bring about "justice". But in this case I'm happy to see the Iranian nuclear program stalled through almost any means possible; to imagine their president Ahmadinejad having a nuke is almost as bad as imaging the Taliban/Al Qaeda having one! I mean, really who would benefit from Iran getting a bomb? I'm not sure even the Iranians (ultimately) would!

If only the dear leader had been tricked into buying Siemens industrial control systems for his centrifuges. (I guess the problem with having sanctions against North Korea for so long is that they were forced to develop all of their own technologies).

Re:Just about only target I'm happy to see... (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929788)

For myself, I'm waiting until the Madhi returns. Here's my scenario:

The trumpets blare, the clouds of heaven part, the Madhi in all her beauty majestically sweeps down to Earth. The Righteous Islamics are in a deep funk since the Madhi was rumored to be male. She assures them in a thunderous voice that indeed She is the Madhi, throws a few lightning bolts for effect.

After a bit of meet and greet, She looks at her watch and declares that time is money and She's a bit busy this week. The Righteous Islamics are horrified claiming She was to be on Earth for seven, nine or nineteen years and rule with Jesus cleansing the world of injustice and women's rights.

With a fiery stare that shakes them to their sandals, and with a steel-eyed stare, She tells them that only by converting to Judism can they achieve a truly perfect world. And now, She'd like to get back to Her golf lessons.

The trumpets blare, She sweeps majestically back up, the clouds of Heaven close back in. And G-d looked upon the faces of the human females and declared them good. And He looked upon the faces of the human males, and made a snide remark which might have been something like "I'd give them a few more pointers but Muhammad already claimed to be the last."

Good. (2)

Urkki (668283) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929056)

Good.

I left it to the excerice for the reader to decide what is good:

A. that at least some kind of war is being fought on Iran

B. that it's viruses instead of bombs that are being delivered to Iran

C. that Iran discovered the virus before it did damage

D. that Iran is fighting it's own propaganda war by these false claims

E. your own choice, explain below

Re:Good. (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930614)

I'll go with you this one. Mod the parent up. Huh, perhaps if Iran used OpenBSD as its firewall, it would have been safe - LOL!

STARS on the scene (1)

ALeavitt (636946) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929156)

I knew that Iran was in league with some shady characters, but the Umbrella Corporation? What the hell are they thinking?!
I, for one, am glad that STARS is already on the scene, protecting us from Wesker and Ahmadinejad's zombie outbreak.

Re:STARS on the scene (1)

BigVig209 (959850) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929528)

DANG IT! I was hoping to get to this one first. Well played, ALeavitt.

Doing this is bad idea. (1)

Tei (520358) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929182)

I could imagine just now a lot of very nationalistic teenagers stuiding software technologies with fruction. To make any teenager into a hacker, you only need to put him a goal. A good goal create good hackers. Defending your country seems a rather awesome goal, so this will create better IT hackers in Iran. I don't know what is the short term goal, but the long term result will be making Iran much stronger in cyberwars thingies.
On the other hand, hackers are a double edge sword...

right... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929234)

Perhaps they should stop the genocidal grandstanding about wiping Israel off the face of the earth?

Genocidal rhetoric + nuclear program == preemptive strike.

and so it begins.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929296)

if only I had known, I would have been a watchmaker.

Same sh_t everywhere... (1)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 3 years ago | (#35934374)

As Herman Goering said... "Naturally the common people don't want war... But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy... All you have to do is to tell (the people that) they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country."

Why does that sound disturbingly familiar...?

Translation : Making Nuclear Weapons is hard. (2)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 3 years ago | (#35929506)

As in, to keep from having to explain his holiness why they are having such a hard time with peaceful nuclear work it is useful to have a bogeyman. An Israeli / American bogeyman.

Figure if they run out of viruses then they can start on physical sabotage.

while running an antivirus on his centrifuge PLC: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35929902)

"My God, it's full of Stars!"

Beats the alternative (1)

Walter Wart (181556) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930254)

Iran has been at war with Israel since the fall of the Shah. It supplies, arms, trains and to some degree directs Israel's most effective enemy Hamas/Hezbollah. A targeted electronic weapon which slows down the progress of the Persian nuclear program is mild compared to Jerusalem's other alternatives.

The Golden Rule.. (1)

SuperCharlie (1068072) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930302)

Seems like we here in the US would suffer a lot more than Iran from cyber-terrorism.. While it may feel good today to digitally attack them, I fear that the eventual reprisals might be much worse than what we are simply stalling.

Re:The Golden Rule.. (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 3 years ago | (#35930636)

Well, yes and no. I don't think the US did it. And, given that Iran is prone to hyperbole and sabre rattling, there is cause for some concern.

Awww, that is just too bad. (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931730)

Keep hitting them. We need to stop the nukes long enough for sanctions to take out their government. As it is, common ppl in Iran are getting VERY irate with their government since they are spending more on helping Venezuela, AQ, etc than they are on improving their local economy. With oil sales in the crapper, Iran's tanks are FULL. And Iraq is replacing all of the Iranian oil. Of course, it is highly likely that we will see loads of attacks on Iraq and possible saudi arabian oil fields in an attempt to stop them from making up the difference.

Regardless, this is a waiting out game.

Re:Awww, that is just too bad. (1)

cdrguru (88047) | more than 3 years ago | (#35933044)

You seem to think that the government of Iran has a goal of helping the people living there. From what I understand the government of Iran is there to have power and to control a country. The fact that there are other people living in that space is relatively irrelevant.

This is the principal danger in an Iranian nuclear arsenal. MAD doesn't work when you don't take an interest in the civilian population. Clearly from the last round of elections there are a lot of people the Iranian leadership wishes would just go away. With the leadership in a bunker a nuke in Tehran might just take care of future election problems.

Sanctions aren't going to do anything. The population isn't going to be able to overthrow the current leadership because they are willing to pull out all the stops and do whatever it takes. Unless the US and UN want to have another Libya on their hands.

Yet again, Slashdot reveals itself (1, Troll)

compucomp2 (1776668) | more than 3 years ago | (#35931860)

to be a bunch of pro-American hypocrites. If China, Russia, or Iran were doing this to the Americans, you guys would be advocating wiping them off the face of the earth. It's like a sports match. You get all sanctimonious and angry when the other team does it, but when your team does the same thing, it's all good and fine and justified because the other side is a bunch of evil commies, Islamists, or whatever boogeyman you have this year.

Re:Yet again, Slashdot reveals itself (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35932176)

to be a bunch of pro-American hypocrites...

Are you sure you read the same Slashdot I do? Slashdot is full of wannabe hipster Apple fanboi anti-Americans.

keep them coming (1)

schlachter (862210) | more than 3 years ago | (#35932280)

great work...keep the viruses coming. Let the whole world join together to overwhelm Iran with cyber attacks. If we can avoid a conventional war through this action...it's the only responsible thing to do.

. . . good thing? (1)

jafac (1449) | more than 3 years ago | (#35934452)

As a civilian, standing in the line of fire, and considering it was Iranian hackers who supposedly pulled off the SSL cert hack last month, I'm not looking forward to the escalation of this little war.

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