×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Is Canonical the Next Apple?

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the three-years-to-success-six-years-to-evil-empire dept.

Ubuntu 511

An anonymous reader writes "With the release of 11.04 Natty Narwhal, Canonical is taking Ubuntu in a new direction, which puts cloud services and content like music at the forefront of the Ubuntu experience. Ubuntu is no longer 'Linux,' or 'desktop' or 'netbook'; it's just Ubuntu for clients and servers. Ubuntu has its own desktop in Unity, app store (Software Center), music service and personal cloud. If Ubuntu takes off, will it make Canonical the next Apple? Of course, Canonical doesn't sell computers, but then again Ubuntu can be used on any computer, even Macs."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

511 comments

No. (4, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974362)

No.

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974378)

Not as long as it does not bite the hands feeding it - i.e. the users.

Also, I expect Canonical to be more open than what has Apple become lately.

We've been bitten (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974554)

At my local electronics society we use Ubuntu. We will not upgrade to 11.04, because of Unity and the abysmal problems we have had in the past with PulseAudio. A few members are currently looking how to configure Debian with all the bells and whistles we like and without the ones that Ubuntu wants to push upon us.

So that is 92 computers that Ubuntu will not be run anymore in the near future.

Re:We've been bitten (2)

scharkalvin (72228) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974686)

"A few members are currently looking how to configure Debian with all the bells and whistles we like and without the ones that Ubuntu wants to push upon us."
Linux Mint, Debian edition.

Re:We've been bitten (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974720)

If you don't like unity so much, install GNOME/KDE/Whatever on it. Its a very simple process.

Or switch to *ubuntu. (Kubuntu,Xubuntu or whatever)

Much easier than trying to configure Debian...

Re:We've been bitten (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974772)

If you don't like unity so much, install GNOME/KDE/Whatever on it. Its a very simple process.

Or switch to *ubuntu. (Kubuntu,Xubuntu or whatever)

Much easier than trying to configure Debian...

So I guess we will now also get Gubuntu, for those who prefer Gnome to Unity?

Re:We've been bitten (1)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974898)

You know it takes very few clicks to default to Gnome 2 on 11.04? Weather Unity is good or not, it's lame excuse to switch over to something else entirely when you can just set it up the way you like.

Select "Ubuntu Classic" (or something like that) at the login screen.

Re:No. (1)

mikeken (907710) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974398)

Haha yes exactly what I was thinking. If this was Facebook I would like this. Before I even read the summary--just from reading the article title--I was thinking no way.

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974440)

wow, agreed. What a silly question. Personally I'm, as yet, not liking the unity desktop at all, but I'm giving it a try.

Re:No. (1)

Meatbucket (2039104) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974656)

Next Apple? As in the one that got fame and money from making it's own computers, music players, tablets and phones? Oh Software and cloud services! The one that has has less than 5% in OS market share when it wasn't able to leverage it's other devices. That Apple! Hmmm, well you can sill only run Linux apps so the mainstream market and commercial developers will still shun it. So, yah I agree, No.

Re:No. (1, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974664)

It's sad to see further evidence that the PC party is over, and everybody is jumping the bandwagon of services, content, and flashy UIs (i.e. chasing Apple).

I was a Linux desktop user for 10 years and just switched to Mac - not because of some nebulous "experience" (I still run fvwm over gnome or kde when given the choice), but I was sick of waiting for my laptop to reboot all the time, and the MacBook is the first computer I've ever used where power management actually, really works. For me it's all about nuts and bolts.

Re:No. (-1, Troll)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974732)

I was a Linux desktop user for 10 years and just switched to Mac - not because of some nebulous "experience" (I still run fvwm over gnome or kde when given the choice), but I was sick of waiting for my laptop to reboot all the time, and the MacBook is the first computer I've ever used where power management actually, really works. For me it's all about nuts and bolts.

That would make you a classic example of someone who is actually Apple's natural market -- the non-geek. Obviously, someone who can't even get power management working and uses "fvwm over gnome or kde" is probably either one of those clueless perpetual n00b types or is a liar.

Re:No. (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974752)

How dare he like something you disapprove of!!! Let's call him a n00b and an idiot! That'll show him how big your e-penis is!

Re:No. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974846)

Actually you're just showing off your total lack of knowledge, since the whole "fvwm over gnome or kde" bit is obvious bullshit. Howzat foot taste, LOL?

Re:No. (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974812)

No, I am actually an expert Linux user. The fact is, power management on Linux does not normally work, and hasn't progressed in the last 7 years. I know, I was there.

Re:No. (2, Informative)

clang_jangle (975789) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974926)

It works just fine on my Thinkpad running gentoo. Yes, there are chipsets with little or no acpi support in Linux -- so if you like using Linux don't buy those. You *did* check your choices against the lists of supported hardware before spending, right? 'Cause that usually works pretty well over here... :)

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974838)

Obviously, someone who can't even get power management working and uses "fvwm over gnome or kde" is probably either one of those clueless perpetual n00b types or is a liar.

Says the user with a near 1 million user ID on /.

Re:No. (2)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974928)

I dunno. I always found power management just annoying. On Windows machines it always seems to take more time to recover from hibernation than it would take for a complete restart. Also, power management tends to kick in at random and very inconvenient times. Modern Linux can boot up fast enough that not powering of the machine completely (even to the point of disconnecting from mains) is less and less meaningful.

Also, I switched to Ubuntu because it gave me the "Mac style laptop experience" that some of these fanboys like to crow about.l

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974760)

That's all part of the 'experience', bitch.

So, UX then (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974776)

I was a Linux desktop user for 10 years and just switched to Mac - not because of some nebulous "experience"[...]but I was sick of waiting for my laptop to reboot all the time, and the MacBook is the first computer I've ever used where power management actually, really works. For me it's all about nuts and bolts.

So, basically, you switched for the user experience.

Why do Slashdotters think that "user experience" means "useless flashy graphics?" That's bullshit. "User experience" means "the machine does not frustrate the user." Nuts and bolts are an essential part of user experience, long before we get to the graphics/design stage. No amount of flashy graphics can cover up things that don't work.

Re:So, UX then (3, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974804)

But it can't be due to that! It has to be because he's a part of the Apple cult or he was taken in by the Job's Reality Distortion Field or he's some ignorant hipster! Apple can't possibly provide a better quality product that just doesn't fit into the Apple hater's universe of possibilities!

Yup. (0)

porkchop_d_clown (39923) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974858)

I use linux professionally but I use OS X personally, simply because I got tired of having to manually hack/bash/configure everything to work with whatever hardware I was using.

Of course, I inevitably put MacPorts, Fink or Brew on my machines so I can put all the missing packages on..... ;-)

Re:No. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974678)

My ubuntu 11.04 install has a proper root account, no humanity icon theme, no unity, no ubuntu cloud services, ... So yeah, pretty much what the parent said: No.

Re:No. (1)

dmgxmichael (1219692) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974880)

Agreed, but I'd like for you to be wrong. After 15 years of "This is the Year of the Linux Desktop" I'm not getting any hopes up.

Re:No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974938)

I agree, but it won't stop Canonical from trying.

Ubuntu one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974374)

Ubuntu one a day, keeps the doctor away.

Cash Flow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974402)

That would require them to make money.

Re:Cash Flow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974456)

They do, you idiot. They make millions.

Re:Cash Flow... (2)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974600)

Wow, "millions". Apple just makes a measly $65 billion in revenue and $14 billion in profit a year. I'm sure they are quaking in their boots over the nebelous "millions" that Canonical makes.

Re:Cash Flow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974478)

You say this as though they don't make millions from advertising.
How else would they afford to pay their employees?

Re:Cash Flow... (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974586)

From advertising.

Apple makes money from selling stuff.

problem is, Unity is a disaster (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974406)

People have been moving to other desktops like XFCE in droves because of Unity. Unity forces a cell phone UI on the desktop, and people hate it. There are threads with hundreds, even thousands of responses.

There's a perfectly good UI paradigm for the desktop that's been around since the 80's. Constantly reinventing the wheel is one of the things putting non-computer experts off Linux on the desktop. With Windows, some things change sure, but the basic metaphor (icons on the desktop, a start button to launch programs, a taskbar to show your running programs) has been perfectly good for years and people are used to it.

It's always more "fun" to invent some new half-baked thing than to spend time fixing bugs and problems, so that's what happens.

Re:problem is, Unity is a disaster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974454)

LOL "in droves?" unlikely.. Let the data shit on your anecdotes as we see 11.04 stats.

Re:problem is, Unity is a disaster (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974578)

Note that 11.04 also includes Gnome 2, so Unity is the default but optional. When 11.10 removes Gnome 2, then we'll see whether people actually want a dumbed-down UI.

Re:problem is, Unity is a disaster (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974524)

You missed the memo. We have to keep dumbing down Linux desktops until every last thing has been squeezed out. If you tailor your UI for the complete novice, as Gnome and Unity have been doing, that's great for like the first 2 days you use it. But that same philosophy causes problems for more advanced users because the features they want have been ripped out.

Also, they tend to do these "usability studies" where they conclude feature X was only used by 5% of the users, and feature Y by 3%, so it must be OK to sacrifice them on the altar of simplicity. But everyone has a different X or Y they use, so eventually this hurts _everybody_.

Please, Linux desktop people, STOP DUMBING IT DOWN! The world has other OSs out there for that kind of experience, We don't need to do that to every last Linux DE as well.

Re:problem is, Unity is a disaster (1)

cgomezr (1074699) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974728)

Or as Tolstoy would say, "All newbie users are alike; each advanced user is advanced in his own way".

First thing they need to do (5, Funny)

Moryath (553296) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974416)

is start picking better names for their releases.

Compare - Apple side: "Kodiak", "Cheetah", "Puma", "Jaguar", "Panther", "Tiger", "Leopard", "Snow Leopard."

with - Ubuntu side: "Warty Warthog", "Hoary Hedgehog", "Breezy Badger", "Dapper Drake", "Edgy Eft", "Feisty Fawn", "Gutsy Gibbon", "Hardy Heron", "Intrepid Ibex", "Jaunty Jackalope", "Karmic Koala", "Lucid Lynx", "Maverick Meerkat", "Natty Narwhal", "Oneric Ocelot"...

The Apple side is short, and carries images of animals all well-reputed and seen as powerful and respected predators.

The Ubuntu side sounds like the cast list from a crappy saturday morning cartoon show.

Just sayin'...
 

Re:First thing they need to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974468)

"Oneiric Ocelot", just fixin'

Re:First thing they need to do (0)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974506)

Yes. Ubuntu should restart it with "Apple Appholes". That would set them right on path of becoming Apple.

Re:First thing they need to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974508)

Yes, I agree. The Apple names sound like powerful and respected WWII Nazi tanks.

Re:First thing they need to do (2)

Moryath (553296) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974558)

Ok I know you're just flaming, but what the hell.

Which would you rather name your sports team:

The "Wolverines? [wikipedia.org] "

Or the "Dippy Dogs? [wikipedia.org] "

Think carefully. The same principle applies to selling an operating system. Or we can make it a car analogy - you'll sell more of the same car by naming it the "Mustang" instead of the "Cute Cuddly Kitten."

Re:First thing they need to do (1)

tangelogee (1486597) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974884)

Or we can make it a car analogy - you'll sell more of the same car by naming it the "Mustang" instead of the "Cute Cuddly Kitten."

Well, there was the Pinto, or the Beetle, or just say screw it and go with G8, TT, and other equally stupid number-letter combinations...

Re:First thing they need to do (2)

xouumalperxe (815707) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974566)

Actually, I'd call their naming strategy a success. In discussions about Ubuntu, I mostly see versions being referred to by the adjective part of the Adjectivated Animal pattern, rather than attempting to refer to the actual version name. People comparing Jaunty to Karmic seems to work remarkably well, unlike comparing 9.04 to 9.10, but like comparing Tiger to Leopard. Plus, ever since Breezy, they've been sticking to incrementing the initials of the name with every version, which is a damned handy mnemonic.

Re:First thing they need to do (1)

Moryath (553296) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974598)

The problem is, even non-apple folks can generally identify the names of the Apple OSX versions.

Mention "Ubunty Jaunty" to a non-linuxhead and you'll get a blank stare.

Try to sell (e.g. convince people to switch over to) "Ubuntu Jaunty" from their current OS, and you'll get it likewise.

See my previous comment to another person above. Want to sell a brand of car? Name it "Mustang" instead of "Cute Cuddly Kitten", you'll sell more.

Linux-heads never pop their head out into the real world long enough to understand that marketing works for a reason... sigh...

Re:First thing they need to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974640)

See my previous comment to another person above. Want to sell a brand of car? Name it "Mustang" instead of "Cute Cuddly Kitten", you'll sell more.

Not in Japan.

Re:First thing they need to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974714)

wtf I can never remember the stupid names, it's just ubuntu 8.04, 9.10, 11.04, etc for me

Re:First thing they need to do (1)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974832)

Same here. I have never managed to remember the name. In fact, searching for some particular feature/bugs etc for a given version of Ubuntu is a nightmare for me - without knowing the names. So then there is the extra search for looking for correct name for a given number - which evaporates from my memory within 5 minutes.

In general, why do we need names while numbers work perfectly fine? Ubuntu version number scheme is one of the best and is very easy to remember it. Android is following the same confusing pattern of names/numbers. Seriously, I don't get it. I know it's related to marketing etc - but still.

Re:First thing they need to do (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974614)

Actually, the Ubuntu names are much easier to search for because they are less common. I always figured that this was their motive for choosing them. For example, you can type "natty virtualbox" or "lucid virtualbox" and get relevant results quickly and easily, that are zeroed in on what you are looking for.

Re:First thing they need to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974688)

If you're going to pick on their choice of names, how could you skip Ubuntu itself?

Yup, marketing (2)

DesScorp (410532) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974690)

...is start picking better names for their releases.

I've long said one of the things that hold back open source products from wider acceptance is that the OS/free software communities absolutely suck at marketing. Marketing isn't everything... the product has to be good... but plenty of good products have failed because the marketing effort behind them wasn't up to par. Mindshare is very often won on the ad page. Like it or not, that's reality. This is why companies spend untold millions on marketing. It's important.

Canonical doesn't sell computers (4, Insightful)

newcastlejon (1483695) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974422)

From TFS. Apple started with hardware and they still sell it. Without the iPod there would be no iTunes, no App Store. Who writes these claptrap headlines?

At least the first post here was succinct - and probably right.

Re:Canonical doesn't sell computers (5, Insightful)

drb226 (1938360) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974904)

Strong agree.

Canonical doesn't sell computers

Also, Canonical doesn't sell their OS. Canonical therefore has a completely different business model than Apple.

uhm (1)

dropadrop (1057046) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974432)

Maybe if you see Apple as a company providing a solution to a wider computing need rather then a hardware and sofware manufacturer, but I would say no.

That said, I do welcome a complete approach, and also taking radical steps on the desktop (despite using Ubuntu on my HTPC and work computer I'm not a huge fan of Gnome or KDE). I tried installing Ubuntu 11.04 on a vmware virtual today and never even managed to get it to boot to the desktop. I guess I would not have managed to test Unity even if I reached the Desktop, so can't really comment on how well thought out the experience will be, but looking at history I don't expect anything as polished as OSX from a usability point of view.

Canonical evil? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974434)

I hope Canonical become a major force. But I hope they never become like Apple.

Huh? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974442)

Where do you guys get these titles? lol, the answer is "No" and wow what a stretch.

Apples and oranges (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974460)

Apple was never really a software company at its heart. It was always a hardware company that chose to write its own software.

IMHO, we should all violently protest cloud computing because eventually you will be paying a monthly fee for software and therefore will eventually pay for apps over and over and over ad nauseum until your bank account is empty.

Hardware? (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974482)

Canonical may be forcing people to use PCs like they use cellphones, but people don't like this.

They will never manufacture hardware as Apple does because it's antithetical to what they are. They will never have the control over compatibility issues that Apple does as a result.

Linux unfortunately has no penetration into consumer computing space, but it's for some very good reasons that aren't going to be overcome by trying to turn people's desktops into iPhones vis-a-vis Unity

Re:Hardware? (4, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974652)

Canonical may be forcing people to use PCs like they use cellphones, but people don't like this.

You may not like this (I don't either), but people in general like a computer that is an appliance. This is the reason that the iPad (and other applie products) has caught on so well in the past few years. People never liked dealing with drivers, compatibility, registry editors, getting apps from reliable sources, or system configuration. They want a device that just does what they need, and they don't care if it's highly configurable, so long as it turns on and works every time they go to use it.

Re:Hardware? (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974764)

There's a qualitative difference, though, between removing compatibility issues (like Apple does) and dumbing something down to the point where it barely seems like a PC anymore.

Re:Hardware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974908)

> You may not like this (I don't either), but people in general like a computer that is an appliance

So let those people buy Macs. I moved to Linux exactly to escape the dumbing-down that infested Windows and Macs. Now, it's infesting Linux as well. Argh! Just let us have one damn integrated desktop environment for experts, please. We don't have to turn every linux DE into a clone of a cell phone.

Re:Hardware? (1)

initdeep (1073290) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974910)

The reason people are purchasing these "appliances" from Apple is actually quite simple.
They work within their ecosystem and offer the ability to get what people want.
Now, having said that, there are many more people rocking an iPod than there are ones rocking a complete Apple ecosystem because it's easy to use, easy to get what you want, can be used on the major OS's quite easily (other than iTunes being a crappy manager), and despite other manufacturers attempts, it really is one of the better. more easily purchased devices for mom and pop to buy for little Johnny.

Apple is selling an experience.
Their devices work together quite well. This also means that they don't work all that well with others, so if you've spent hundreds or thousands of dollars over the history of iTunes purchasing songs, do you really want to repurchase them as DRM free, or go the route of burning and re-ripping them so you can have them DRM free?
No, you don't. So you keep using their system.

That's why people purchase these products.
That and they look shiny of course (/sarcasm)

Re:Hardware? (2)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974762)

If Canonical DID start selling computers, it would force the last vestiges of Hardware bits to make an effort to write good drivers for Linux. The biggest problem, to this day, is drivers. The last time I had a laptop and tried to get wireless LAN working on it in Linux, it was painful. Had to install a wrapper to finally get it to work. Sorry, but that just doesn't cut it. And lets not talk about Video drivers either or you'll really get depressed.

Look, I'm a geek. I can fiddle with settings, google problems, tweak conf files and whatnot to get shit to work. BUT I shouldn't have to. IF Canonical did start making hardware for Ubuntu, this could propel the hardware company to actually start paying attention to Linux.

Yeah, I'm crazy.

What a ridiculous comment. (1)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974488)

Apple is first and foremost a hardware company that uses software and services to give it a competitive advantage selling hardware. Canonical is a services company that uses open source software to advance its services business. App stores, clouds and streaming are not unique to Apple or central to its business.

So... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974494)

Is Mahatma Gandhi the next Hitler?

I don't think so. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974530)

I don't think so.
I installed the last Ubuntu and I really like it for a 'pragmatic' point of view. In same way it has a lot of personality and I suppose the users really could like it... but
The problem is, as a developer, you can't make money on linux so it never will have an ecosystem similar to Apple.
On Apple you can make money developing software and on Windows too.

Anyone knows linux users don't pay for software, so all the attention will be where you can get money developing and promoting: Windows, Mac, iOS, Android even ... Windows Phone 7 but not a system where no one will pay for your work.

Just my opinion...

Re:I don't think so. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974816)

http://www.humblebundle.com/ [humblebundle.com]

Scroll down, the average linux user paid almost twice as much as the average mac user, and more then 3 times as much as the average windows user.

No. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974538)

No, it isn't. The comparison is a ridiculous apples to bulldozers sort of thing. Not even two fruit.

New Website has Broken Links (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974544)

They say their website should reflect their high professional standards in their blog-post, but it seems they didn't do basic testing:

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop-archive/why-is-it-free

Oh lordy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974546)

@ubuntu.com'er here.

Canonical has a bit of control of the community, but it has that control *indirectly*.

Canonical hires productive Ubuntu'ers to work on Ubuntu as their job. Sure they might get some assignments, but the changes put forward for Ubuntu happen at the twice-yearly Ubuntu Developer's Summit. Hell, Canonical even flies in Ubuntu hackers who might be doing work next cycle who are not in their employ.

The point is, it's a community. Canonical is funding it, sure, but I take zero orders when I make changes.

If you don't have Ubuntu... (2, Informative)

bmacs27 (1314285) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974552)

You don't have Ubuntu.

Re:If you don't have Ubuntu... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974850)

If you don't have an iPhone then you don't have an iPhone.. And my response to that is. Thank God I don't, because I got an Android phone and not stupid to buy into Apple's suggestions on how everything should be.

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974562)

2011 is the year of the Linux desktop! Well, maybe 2012... 2013... 2014... ? Buhler... Buhler...

No. (-1, Flamebait)

Manip (656104) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974572)

Apple is a UX company. Their entire role, from their perspective is to give users the best possible user experience. This thinking is in their products, their software, their sales, and even their after-sales services. You can argue there is room for improvement and most would agree, but you'd struggle to argue that Apple's goal isn't a great UX.

Linux, and by extension Ubuntu, don't care about the UX. They design geek software for a very niche audience who want complexity and full access by default. This kind of business model is almost 180 degrees away from what the mass consumer market is moving to. The only success Linux has had is with integrated applications (Android, Microwaves, Routers) where the UX is designed completely from scratch by a third party private company.

So, no, Ubuntu or Linux won't be the next Apple. Microsoft won't be the next Apple either, because both make UX a secondary concern.

Re:No. (3, Insightful)

jsvendsen (1668031) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974708)

Do you even know what Ubuntu is? Have you ever used it?

Linux, and by extension Ubuntu, don't care about the UX.

What? Ubuntu has always been about streamlining user experience as compared to other distributions. With varying degrees of success, sure, but that's always been their mission statement.

The only success Linux has had is with integrated applications where the UX is designed completely from scratch by a third party private company.

You mean like exactly what Ubuntu is doing with Unity? I almost hope you're a troll. "UX"..., sigh.

Probably not... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974580)

But i've suspected for several years now that Mark Shuttleworth had delusions of Jobshood.

Missing the point (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974634)

Apple is a cult of perception. While they may have a slight leg up on the rest of the market in their dominant areas the fact of the matter is that it's still a fashion statement given the premium you have to pay. The difference between Macs, Windows and Linux is like the difference of showing up to the country club in a Benz or a Bentley They all do the basic functions that you got them for in the first place and, with the exception of a very limited number of users, each of them does everything the end user will need with a different gloss and hood ornament put to them.

why not (1)

Jeek Elemental (976426) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974676)

design is arguably a strength of ubuntu, I think they are getting pretty damn good at it too.
It runs on everything, which is a unique strength compared to others. Eventually, instead of having a different os on every gadget, ubuntu on all.
Its easy enough to use for non-techies (my whole family uses it) while having full linux power under the hood.
They have tons of karma, I would like them to succeed, which hopefully is a common sentiment and will pay off.

Good (3, Funny)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974700)

If Ubuntu takes off, will it make Canonical the next Apple?

We can only hope. Unity is GPL, as is the vast majority of the Linux ecosphere. If Ubuntu becomes as big as (i)OSX and Win7 everybody in the linux community will gain a tremendous amount. Drivers, support, money - it will all get exponentially better for us.

Re:Good (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#35974808)

That will not happen at least in the next 10 years, and likely never. I have my wife using the last Long Term Support version of Ubuntu (Lucid) and after a few months of working fine it now locks up and freezes--requiring a power-off reboot--several times a day. I have reinstalled it fresh and it occasionally still does it. It's 2011, this is just completely unacceptable.

And then when you go to Ubuntu Forums to try to figure out how to fix it, you find 163 pages of suggested incantations to put into the terminal to "see if maybe that will work". Forget it. Windows 7 just works.

Rather unlikely! (1)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974758)

Apple is whatever it is because of its long story in taking unorthodox choices and consequent revolutions.
Which means a lot of work, a lot of betting and a bunch of wins.
What I've seen so far is changing a default color schema, a "new" font and a new naming schema.
Not even the "new" desktop is really new as

Unity is a shell interface for the GNOME desktop environment

(Very first line in Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] )
Ubuntu, like Unity, is a shell around something else (Debian) with very limited value added.
Just "going to the clouds" (tm) doesn't make a winning company (alo because everyone else is going there).
No, I don't think Canonical will be the next Apple (or even Microsoft). It's more likely it will be the next Mandrakesoft.

Re:Rather unlikely! (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974936)

Not a bunch of wins, just some wins. Apple has a long line of cast of products, market failure, and money spent on things that never made it to light. All of which is normal process for getting good products and RnD technologies.

Can Canonical get the attention of other big guys? (4, Insightful)

alispguru (72689) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974826)

Apple went to the major printer manufacturers and said "You should support Rendesvous/Bonjour". And they did it.

Apple went to the music labels and said "You should sell your stuff through iTunes - it's safe with our DRM". They later said "You guys should drop this DRM jazz". Both times they were heard, and Apple got the rights it needed.

Until Canonical can do something similar, they're not an Apple replacement candidate.

From an admin's perspective (2)

Torodung (31985) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974830)

No, because I actually care about what happens to people using Canonical's products. ;^)

--
Toro

Glad he doesn't have an iPhone

Yet another pointless speculation article... (3, Interesting)

supersloshy (1273442) | more than 2 years ago | (#35974920)

1) Unity is built on top of GNOME. They didn't develop even half of that.

1.5) Unity, IMHO, is much less usable than GNOME 3's default desktop and quite a few people I've seen online agree with me. This is not absolute though and YMMV.

2) Every other distribution (almost) has an "app store"; it's called a freaking package manager and they've been around for a long, long time. Simply having a simple-to-use UI for one doesn't exactly qualify it as an "app store".

3) The music service is just a re-branded 7Digital (which is a great place to buy music btw; they even sell some things in FLAC).

4) The "personal cloud" is just a Dropbox competitor (with syncing for some apps, which is a nice touch).

I have a feeling that these types of articles are only made for advertisement views and nothing more, as I've rarely seen an article like this that actually makes sense. Plus, Ubuntu is overhyped. I used it from 7.10 to 10.04, and after I tried switching to something else I never looked back. The exact same desktop I got in Ubuntu was actually less buggy in Arch Linux, which doesn't patch things nearly as much as Ubuntu does. Honestly, if you disregard the package manager, there's very, very, very little difference between Ubuntu and any of the other popular distributions like Fedora/OpenSUSE (if you're a desktop user that is). The only reason it's still popular, as far as I can figure out, is because it's hyped so much as being "the easiest" and "the most feature-filled" and whatnot, when every other distribution has caught up with and, dare I say, surpassed Ubuntu in usability.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...