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Verizon Plans Location Warning Sticker

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the problem-solved-boys-good-work dept.

Privacy 79

nonprofiteer writes "After all the location tracking drama, Verizon tells Congress that 'it's going to start slapping a surgeon-general-type warning on the phones it sells: Using this device could be hazardous to your location privacy, and may result in your being tracked!' The actual warning (PDF) is a little drier — illustration with story."

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Not on iPhone (3, Funny)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977126)

There is no way this is going to put on any iPhone Verizon sells.

yes on every verizon phone, basically (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977400)

Hey, can we get that sentence in english?

Meanwhile, this fits every smartphone carried by verizon, from android to microsoft to apple. surprise?

Re:yes on every verizon phone, basically (1)

Anonymous Cowar (1608865) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977606)

He accidentally the whole word.

Re:yes on every verizon phone, basically (1)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 3 years ago | (#35980652)

Do you realize how much pressure one is under when one realizes that the opportunity for a first post is at hand, but that the slightest delay will cruelly dash one's fondest hopes and crush one's sweetest dreams of that elusive, and long desired first post?

Re:Not on iPhone (0, Troll)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978058)

There is no way this is going to put on any iPhone Verizon sells.

Yeah way... i'm sure they'll make a special one just for the iPhone though. It'll just look pretty and have a web2.0-esque theme with a picture of an iPhone with attached anal probe being jabbed into a naked guy's a***....

(j/k)

"Caution: iPhones contain software that may reveal your location to advertisers for the purpose of desplaying more irrelevent ads"

Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

Drathus (152223) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977154)

... when they do the phone setup. Thus freeing you from ever having to see it.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977254)

Interesting tidbit, if you buy any product at an Apple store (iPhone, iPad, Laptop), the store employees hand over the sealed product for the customer to open. They will offer assistance, but the customer is the one who first opens and touches the product. Always saw this as ensuring the customer had the first hands on experience with it, but now I'm thinking this may be legal protection as well. "The customer opened it, and broke any warning labels we had on it regarding terms and conditions."

From what I've heard, Apple also tries to ensure the iPhone resellers follow the same guidelines.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

Ferzerp (83619) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977394)

This is a lie. I used an iphone years ago. I remember the employee of the apple store opened it because she dropped it as she was opening it and I made her go get another one.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

kenrblan (1388237) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977620)

Calling the AC's statement a lie is a bit of an over-reach. It could be that the Apple Store employee you dealt with wasn't very good at her job, or the AC shops at a store that provides better service.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977872)

You are also a liar fanboy

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977982)

The point is that it's not an "apple policy" as AC tries to sell it, as there are concrete observations of the opposite.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978052)

I bought one at an AT&T store, and the employee handled it quite a bit before I ever touched it.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

smellotron (1039250) | more than 3 years ago | (#35982102)

I bought one at an AT&T store, and the employee handled it quite a bit before I ever touched it.

...that's what she said!

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

RollingThunder (88952) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978374)

kenrblan's experience doesn't rule out the existence of the claimed policy; it just shows that if there was one, this employee didn't follow it.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979622)

It's fairly obvious that we cannot tell for certain that there is no such policy as we have only a few testimonies from customers to base our opinions on. Based on these we can only state that if such policy exists, it is not enforced on any meaningful level, meaning the policy itself is pointless.

Or, a far more likely scenario, there is no such policy and AC was just fishing for fanboyism.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#35980426)

Yes, line employees have NEVER acted contrary to stated policies at any time in the history of forever. Glad we cleared that up.

Policies are just that--it doesn't really matter whether anyone follows them. If they're stated, they exist.

Sort of like how it violates the merchant agreements with credit card companies for the register monkeys to ask for your ID if the card is signed, but some still do. Just because they don't follow the policy doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

Re:Which the employee will remove for you... (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977626)

When the who does the what? Last Verizon phone I got was factory sealed and required I do the setup.

That won't help. (1)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977166)

People are lazy and don't care, until it affects them directly. Like those EULAs, no one reads them, even if you might be agreeing to Apple performing biological experiments on you.

Re:That won't help. (2)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977272)

People are lazy and don't care, until it affects them directly.

And for the most part, it will never affect most people directly, thus they will ot care.

It's a bit like the Facebook privacy issue: If they knew, they really wouldn't care. The sad reality is that most people are of the "If you're not doing anything wrong, why do you care if the police have a CCTV in your living room?"

Re:That won't help. (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977790)

"If you're not doing anything wrong, why do you care if the police have a CCTV in your living room?"

That could be dangerous in Maryland...Sodomy, Fillatio and Adultery are all illegal, though it is only a $5 fine from what I understand.

Re:That won't help. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977946)

Or, maybe it is that there are two classes of people, the rich and everyone else. The rich have politicians, laws, law makers, and law goons at their disposal. When you have that much against you it seems like too much to care. Just keep your head down and your nose clean and you'll get out of this, well, not alive, no one does that, but hopefully less harassed than those who stick their heads up.

It can't hurt (1)

krewemaynard (665044) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977302)

I'm glad Verizon is stepping up, and that this is their idea rather than some random bureaucratic regulation. If, as you say, "People are lazy and don't care," then it's not like a law would do any better than Verizon's warning anyway.

Re:It can't hurt (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977588)

If the option is get a phone with this warning or no phone at all, then this is not stepping up. This is then just as useless as not offering the information.

Really? (2)

oGMo (379) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978176)

So we assume by "phone" you mean "cell phone" which presumably connects to "cell towers". Since when is this information not already logged and gathered by the telcos running the towers? If you're worried about "location privacy", how about not carrying around a device which broadcasts a unique ID that's collected by third parties?

Yes, this is already a matter of a either a phone or complete privacy.

Re:Really? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978208)

Who said complete?

We are talking about selling location off to advertisers and other scumbags with marketing degrees. Even the phone companies should not be holding that data any longer than needed for billing.

Re:Really? (1)

postbigbang (761081) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978382)

Maybe more of us will turn off the phones when not in use. Too bad they take longer than Windows 98 to boot up these days.

Re:Really? (1)

tomhudson (43916) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979110)

Too bad they take longer than Windows 98 to boot up these days.

I suspect Windows 98 would boot up pretty fast on a 2ghz cpu (provided it didn't freak out at the hardware).

Re:Really? (1)

postbigbang (761081) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979164)

It might do that. But what could you do? Windows 98 was full of memory leaks, incompatibilities, and ok, some really cool games like the original Duke Nukem.

Re:It can't hurt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35979586)

If the option is get a phone with this warning or no phone at all, then this is not stepping up. This is then just as useless as not offering the information.

Or you can just switch to another provider... oh wait...

Re:It can't hurt (1)

murphtall (1979734) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979214)

yea, it sure is nice that Verizon is stepping up and getting it out in the open that they keep personal data for 7 years. So Verizon has on record where you were in 2004. Um, yea, thanks for the honesty, i think.

Re:That won't help. (2)

Viewsonic (584922) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977384)

Very little of it has anything to do with people being "lazy". EULAs are so long and convoluted that even most lawyer types still have no idea what they are agreeing to. The same will go for this sticker, people wont have any idea how much tracking information is being given out. Some would take "could be" meaning none, etc.

This really isn't a solution to the problem. The solution would be to come up with many regulations to slap down on companies since the competition is doing it as well.

Re:That won't help. (1)

purpledinoz (573045) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977522)

The solution would be to come up with many regulations

I'd rather see very few smart regulations that would achieve the same thing without adding so much cost.

Re:That won't help. (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979484)

Like those EULAs, no one reads them, even if you might be agreeing to Apple performing biological experiments on you.

South Park fan I presume. :-)

Re:That won't help. (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#35985454)

Yeah like when they try to do a human centipede method like in South Park season's 15 premiere [southparkstudios.com] . Ew!

It STILL won't read!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35989508)

People are lazy and don't care, until it affects them directly. Like those EULAs, no one reads them, even if you might be agreeing to Apple performing biological experiments on you.

Um, dude, what are you talking about?

All of us read the agreement. Who doesn't read the agreement?

Coming soon.... (1)

GeneralSecretary (1959616) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977204)

So the way it works is as long as they post a warning label on it they can do it? Look for: WARNING: We may listen to all your calls, read all your text messages, and beat your highscores on Angry Birds

Re:Coming soon.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977430)

Uhhh... okay... uhhhh... okay... uhhh... ok-- Hey! How dare you!

Re:Coming soon.... (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977848)

You think they can't already listen to your calls and read your text messages if they wanted to? They can have their towers tell your phone to use unencrypted channels and thus snoop everything.

interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977210)

Hmm... Telecoms can track your physical location without installing anything on your phone. Apple and Google can't because they don't have raw data from the towers. Verizon does.

Wonder if it will make this list... (0)

quangdog (1002624) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977220)

15 Stupidest Warning Labels: http://www.oddee.com/item_88437.aspx [oddee.com]

Re:Wonder if it will make this list... (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977382)

I LOL'ED:
"6PCS Precision screwdriver set not to be inserted into PENIS"\
"Do not eat Ipod shuffle" (found on apple's website)
  "If you cannot read (...) warnings, do not use this product"
"Use care when operating a car (...)" (on a bottle of dog's pills)
"Do not use for personal hygiene" (on Scrubbing Bubbles Fresh Brush)
"Do not hold the wrong end of a chainsaw"

"DO NOT put any person in this washer"
"We are sorry that our president is an idiot, we did not voted for him" (on an american clothing label, in french)
"Be careful of bad language on this mobile phone, because a partner's feeling is going to be bad" (on a cellpone)
"This product moves when used" (on a Razor scooter)
"Never use a lit match or open flame to check fuel level" (found on a jetsky user manual)
"All ranges can tip if you or child stand sit or lean on open door" (on an oven)
"Do not iron" (on a lottery ticket)
"Machine can fall over and cause serious injury or death" (on a vending machine)
"Caution: Please do not use this directory while operating a moving vehicle" (On a Bellsouth Yellow Pages for Augusta)

Re:Wonder if it will make this list... (1)

Undead Waffle (1447615) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977998)

"We are sorry that our president is an idiot, we did not voted for him" (on an american clothing label, in french)

This is not from a clothing label unless you consider bags clothing. It's from Tom Bihn. I have a laptop bag with this label on it.

Re:Wonder if it will make this list... (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#35980486)

Really? You have a laptop bag with slogans calling other people idiots while simultaneously abusing basic french grammar? Is this a hipster thing, where the irony is the point?

Re:Wonder if it will make this list... (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977402)

Probably not. Open the PDF yourself and look (it's buried in there, and actual graphic of the label) - it's worded well.

Re:Wonder if it will make this list... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35980138)

Wow, you really got that Stockholm syndrom / crab mentality combo really deep up your behind, don't you?

Hating the one trying to protect people and supporting those harming them. In my book that makes you one of the harmers, and means you'll be hung with them.

CentiPad? (1)

Smidge207 (1278042) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977298)

Read the click-through EULA? Your lips can be sewn to another's anus?

HumancentiPad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977312)

"By clicking yes, you agree to have your mouth sewn to another Verizon's user's butthole..."

Nice to see... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977326)

Verizon catering to all the unfounded hysteria of the past couple of weeks.

OMG! there is a file on my phone of all the Cellphone towers and Wifi Accesspoints my phone has seen... THEY ARE TRACKING ME!!!!!! OMGOMGOMGOMGOMG!

So we resort to this stuff instead of actually informing the consumer as to the truth? Are they also telling the users that their constant use of Foursquare gives far more data than the Location service database does?

Why cater to the idiots that foam at the mouth? (Like the mass number of MORONS here on slashdot that went nuts without even bothering to even LOOK at the data they "discovered")

Actual Text (1)

quangdog (1002624) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977446)

For those too lazy to go RTFA, here is the actual text of the warning label:

"Remove Before Use This device is capable of determining its (and your) physical, geographical location and can associate this location data with other customer information. To limit access to location information by others, refer to the User Guide for Location settings and be cautious when downloading, accessing or using applications and services."

Dry, but straightforward.

Re:Actual Text (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979136)

It should also say that it can note determining its (and by inference your) velocity as well to within legally acceptable accuracy. Then they can call it the Heisenburg Certainty Warning. You could get issued an HC Citation automatically, compounded for the duration of the violation.

There's an app for that (1)

sunderland56 (621843) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977480)

How long until there is an app that intentionally provides bogus location information to the API, and inserts bogus data into the location history files?

Re:There's an app for that (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977618)

Applications don't provide location data to the API, it's the other way around. If you wanted to do that, you'd need a heavily modified, rooted iPhone, at which point you might as well just disable Location Services entirely.

Re:There's an app for that (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977638)

Or you just need to have a modded location service that will submit fake data to the untrusted application. Not sure about iPhones but this would be something nice to have in an android ROM.

Re:There's an app for that (1)

gnarfel (1135055) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978456)

There is a jailbroken iPhone app called FakeLocation that does exactly this.

Re:There's an app for that (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978934)

I think for the sake of sanity it should always return the same location (e.g., Central Park), but otherwise, yes, that would be great to apply to untrusted apps. You'd still want trusted apps to get real location data so that your phone remains useful (otherwise, don't buy a smartphone), but feeding fake data to people who are just using for "advertising" is a great idea.

Re:There's an app for that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35981866)

There is a big hole in the grand plan. Cell Towers. They track the nearby phones so that when a user moves out of range, they can do a soft-hand off to retain services. The company can log your general location with those.

Re:There's an app for that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35980870)

CatchMeIfYouCan is available on android market

Is it really the law to spy on everyone? (1)

WaffleMonster (969671) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977554)

Was it just me or did TFAs say that it was law for telcos to store location data on everyone for years?

I realize the systems need to keep track of where you are in a cell network so that they can send you information but what law says this data must be stored in case there is ever a LEA inquery at some point in the future?

How about just let us turn it off? (1)

whois (27479) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977652)

Instead of putting a warning, can I have a provider that just doesn't track me? That lets me turn tracking on and off when I need it for a specific application, or track on a specific application basis?

Re:How about just let us turn it off? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35977752)

Android does.
Settings -> Location
Uncheck all especially Google Location Services which is not needed.
Then use a widget to turn on GPS only when needed.

Re:How about just let us turn it off? (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977874)

Even if the phone OS doesn't track you, you're still being tracked by the logged registration events your phone has with the cell towers.

Re:How about just let us turn it off? (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#35981338)

Sure you can, that's how the iPhone works. It's also how Android handsets work, with the added difference that they send data to Google (that you can opt out of).

What a tiring world we live in... (1)

sloth jr (88200) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977894)

The shit we get ourselves riled up about is downright depressing.

I'll note that prior to cell phones, every time you used your phone, the telco already had location info on you - the service address!

Re:What a tiring world we live in... (2)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977960)

The shit we get ourselves riled up about is downright depressing.

I'll note that prior to cell phones, every time you used your phone, the telco already had location info on you - the service address!

They could not, however, tie it to you. Yes, if you used the phone at home. But what about the pay phone at the local 7-Eleven? How did the telco have location info on "you" from there?

Primary concern (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35977942)

The linked to letter states that "Protecting our customers privacy is our primary concern" or something to that effect. If that were true, then why not do something that disables the ability to track the individual customer. A stupid sticker doesn't seem that their concern is that great.

Verizon is the second largest cell phone company in the US. They should be able to have some clout with what the phones do and don't do and what the applications do and don't do.

I'd switch in a minute if Verizon started offering phones that actually protected my privacy. I imagine millions of others would, too.

Re:Primary concern (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978178)

why not do something that disables the ability to track the individual customer. A stupid sticker doesn't seem that their concern is that great.

Well, the reality is that your phone has to register with various cell sites. Otherwise, how does the system know what tower to use when you receive a call? And, dare I say it, some people actually like the convenience of being able to use a Navigation system and be able to say, "I want to go to this address" and not have to put in their present address.

The problem is that most people don't actually understand this. "The phone knows where I am." It's not the phone, necessarily, it's the whole phone network. You've undoubtedly heard of the various criminals who said, "I was nowhere near the murder scene" when, in fact, cell tower records show them making a call from there. So I think a warning label is reasonable--the nature of the system is such that it can figure out where you are.

If you don't like it, here's a crazy idea: TURN OFF YOUR CELLPHONE. Only turn it on when you need to make a call. When you are done with the call, turn it off.

I know. That's crazy talk.

Re:Primary concern (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979450)

why not do something that disables the ability to track the individual customer. A stupid sticker doesn't seem that their concern is that great.

Well, the reality is that your phone has to register with various cell sites. Otherwise, how does the system know what tower to use when you receive a call? And, dare I say it, some people actually like the convenience of being able to use a Navigation system and be able to say, "I want to go to this address" and not have to put in their present address.

The problem is that most people don't actually understand this. "The phone knows where I am." It's not the phone, necessarily, it's the whole phone network. You've undoubtedly heard of the various criminals who said, "I was nowhere near the murder scene" when, in fact, cell tower records show them making a call from there. So I think a warning label is reasonable--the nature of the system is such that it can figure out where you are.

If you don't like it, here's a crazy idea: TURN OFF YOUR CELLPHONE. Only turn it on when you need to make a call. When you are done with the call, turn it off.

I know. That's crazy talk.

The issue is not about tracking your phone to receive calls or using a GPS. The problem is tracking what you are doing on your phone, where you are doing it and selling the information to marketing firms and others.

For some reason, using a Garmin as a GPS does not transmit any data about me or what I am doing to Garmin. Why does AT&T or Verizion need to know when I am at Starbucks and how many times a day that may be? Worse yet, why should they be able to sell that information? Same thing for all of those apps on the phone.

Other than billing purposes, why would the cell phone company need to know where I am or what I am doing? Other than billing purposes, why would the cell phone company need to know how I was using my phone (voice or data). And even for billing purposes, why would they need to know anything more than whether it was voice or data and for how long (but not who or what)?

As or turning off the phone to keep the cell phone from tracking you and what your are doing, that is fine, unless you actually use your cell phone to receive calls.

Put it this way, before smart phones, when phones were "dumb," this kind of tracking data wasn't available, and yet, the cell phone companies functioned quite well. Of course, contracts were more expensive then. Probably because they weren't profiting by selling your personal information. What would happen if your bank started selling information on where you wrote checks or used your debit card? Would your response be to not write checks or use the debit card?

Re:Primary concern (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#35980566)

If you don't like it, here's a crazy idea: TURN OFF YOUR CELLPHONE. Only turn it on when you need to make a call. When you are done with the call, turn it off.

Turning it off isn't enough. You have to pull the battery/SIM card. They stress this immensely in DOE security training briefings. Cell phones can be powered on remotely (the power off is a soft-off, more like suspend to RAM than a hard power off), and the mic and cameras can be switched on to transmit data without activating the screen so that the phone looks like it's still off.

Re:Primary concern (1)

Impish (669369) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979750)

According to the submitted letter in article (and I haven't got a Verizon phone, so I cannot check) they say they have location services turned off *by default* on all their phones. Also according to the submitted letter if you turn on location services (all three types) you get warnings regarding "the application will know where you are and share with, etc.".

So you have:
1) Sticker on the front saying what location services does.
2) Location services turned off by default.
3) Warning when you turn location services on.

After all that people complain about "Verizon isn't taking my privacy seriously!"? I don't know about the rest of the services, but come on, that's a lot of warnings a user needs to go through. I'd say they've done their due diligence.

Note I'm just talking about location services here, if Verizon is ignoring your privacy elsewhere, that is another thread.

Re:Primary concern (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 3 years ago | (#35984188)

According to the submitted letter in article (and I haven't got a Verizon phone, so I cannot check) they say they have location services turned off *by default* on all their phones. Also according to the submitted letter if you turn on location services (all three types) you get warnings regarding "the application will know where you are and share with, etc.".

So you have:

1) Sticker on the front saying what location services does.

2) Location services turned off by default.

3) Warning when you turn location services on.

After all that people complain about "Verizon isn't taking my privacy seriously!"? I don't know about the rest of the services, but come on, that's a lot of warnings a user needs to go through. I'd say they've done their due diligence.

Note I'm just talking about location services here, if Verizon is ignoring your privacy elsewhere, that is another thread.

Of course you cannot use most of the features of your phone with location services turned off. No gps, no weather services, etc. You also are still being tracked, as an individual, by the cell towers and if you use messaging, by their gateway. Now obviously, the towers need to track you because they need to know things for billing purposes or even routing calls to and from your phone. That is reasonable.

However, Verizion and AT&T (and Apple, even) also track where you are as in what stores you are in or other places of interest. Then they offer this information to vendors (they sell it). Ever wonder why the pop up adds on your phone tend to be about things you are interested in (other than the porn ones, of course)?

Just as there is the capability to hide your identity when surfing the web from your home computer, there is the capability to do so from your phone. Yes the cell company needs to know where your phone is to route calls and billing. They don't need to know where you are or track you for using a GPS. I'm pretty sure Garmin isn't doing that. And they definitely do not need to know that you tend to surf such and such web sites or play such and such games while at starbucks every morning at 7:45. They don't need to know that, nor should they be allowed to sell that information without your consent.

Until they take steps to rectify the real privacy issues, they are not taking privacy seriously.

Telcos Have been always been able to locate you. (1)

Oryn (136445) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978160)

I'm not sure what all the fuss is about, the cell towers have to know roughly where you are in order to route your calls, sms messages and even to make your phone ring. The only difference I can see is that this info is now being stored on your phone, why is that a problem? We are all carrying round this bit of grey matter which is doing the exact same thing.

It is still just possible to not be tracked if you follow this advice.
Don't use a credit card, and don't use a cell phone, don't even carry one, and don't use social networking of any kind, don't use any store based loyalty cards, don't have or use a bank account, buy everything with cash, work strictly cash in hand for someone who doesn't want or need to see your national insurance number or social security number, don't use or own a car use public transport instead, never fly anywhere, don't have any subscription based TV or radio services in fact don't have any subscription services such as land line phone or internet, Don't respond to any mail that drops through your door. In fact it might be best to be homeless or sleep in a tent.

Get Real people, just about everything we do in modern life allows us to be tracked in some way or other, why should a cache file used to help the phone and its application know roughly where it is make any difference?

If you are not breaking the law then you have nothing to hide. If you are breaking the law then be worried, be worried about the fact that we are all leaving DNA trails behind us all the time in the form of skin particulates and hairs. Be very worried because big brother is watching and recording, but also know that if you are not in the spotlight then he doesn't care.

Re:Telcos Have been always been able to locate you (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978808)

I'm not sure what all the fuss is about...

It's an Apple story.

Re:Telcos Have been always been able to locate you (1)

Oryn (136445) | more than 3 years ago | (#35978878)

I'm not sure what all the fuss is about...

It's an Apple story.

But its an android story too

Phone location tracking Telco location tracking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35978512)

Does cell-based location tracking on a phone give companies more visibility than potential location tracking in the network? The latter can be done invisibly without anyone ever coming to know. And telcos have personally identifying data. I'm probably missing something.

Only buy a "smartphone" with a removable battery.. (1)

Paracelcus (151056) | more than 3 years ago | (#35979054)

And keep it out when not in use (it also makes the batteries last longer) I also keep my phone in a small waterproof case (Otterbox) with a conductive inner coating (that I added).

Re:Only buy a "smartphone" with a removable batter (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#35980098)

Not very practical, is it?
  It's a smartphone, so you're using for a lot more than just phone calls, otherwise you wasted your money.
  And then you have to power it down every time you're "done using it", take it out of the case (if it's in one), remove the battery cover, remove the battery, and store the battery and put the cover back on and put it back in the case. Then reverse all of those steps when you want to use it again. Not worth it.

Re:Only buy a "smartphone" with a removable batter (1)

Paracelcus (151056) | more than 2 years ago | (#36004626)

It's a very stupid "smartphone" I got it for $40.00 from ConsumerCellular.com, and it's really only for emergencies!

Re:Only buy a "smartphone" with a removable batter (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 3 years ago | (#35981348)

I also live inside a giant faraday cage, and I don't have a connection to the mains water supply - that's how they get the tracer chemicals into you.

I am not on the electricity grid either, since the EM fields control my brain.

I also never use coupons at the store. That's how they track you!!

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