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Playstation To Restore Services This Week

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the no-schwag-for-geohot-I-bet dept.

PlayStation (Games) 174

iSimon19 writes with word that after last week's unscheduled service disruption and security breach, "On their blog last night, Playstation representatives announced they were restoring services throughout the week. This also included giving all users a month of Playstation Plus free, as well as select downloads for free with their 'Complimentary Offering and "Welcome Back" Appreciation Program.'"

cancel ×

174 comments

One month is a joke (0, Flamebait)

cheekyboy (598084) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990554)

Comon sony, a month of free Plus is worth $5

Bunch of morons.

I want 1 year free plus, or 1 free legit main game.

bunch r-tards.

Re:One month is a joke (5, Insightful)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990578)

That costs them nothing. I want ID theft protection. They hinted at it, but were very vague.

Re:One month is a joke (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990888)

I can hear the faint sounds of a million whiners all having a cry.

Ahh whinedot, how I marvel at you readerships ability to act like spoiled 15 year olds.

Better (5, Insightful)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990556)

Better would be some kind of detailed explanation of how the hell this could have happened in the first place, and what they have done to make sure it won't happen again...

it started with sony removing other os (0, Offtopic)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990572)

it started with sony removing other os

Re:it started with sony removing other os (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990616)

Stop beating the dead horse.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

headbulb (534102) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990778)

If the dead horse stops wanting to be beaten then the dead horse should stop being relevant.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

Computershack (1143409) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991276)

It stopped being relevant ages ago when Gnome and KDE desktops needed more than the RAM available for OtherOS. I doubt you want to call running Linux on 256MB RAM with framebuffer graphics an enjoyable experience.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991630)

Your opinion is irrelevant. It wasnt Sony's call to remove it and was in fact a violation of law. unfortunately the US consumer protections suck and so they'll get away with it. I didnt really care all that much about the whole thing until Sony went after the First Amendment (squelching Geohot and others for reverse engineering for compatibility) . Now the gloves are off.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991708)

Maybe you should read the DMCA. I'm not saying its a good law (it's terrible), but First Amendment, really?

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991864)

Depends on your interpretation of the first amendment.

If you take a literal interpretation, the DMCA itself runs counter to the first amendment. (The other question is, does the first amendment override the copyright clause?)

Re:it started with sony removing other os (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991352)

Corpses don't want anything. They're dead.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990648)

Has Sony actually confirmed that this has anything to do with hacked consoles at all, I've only heard that as a rumor that was convenient for Sony.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991248)

You think anything over the last 2 weeks is remotely convenient for Sony? The company's reputation is fucked at the moment.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

Lifyre (960576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991400)

Sony fucked their reputation long ago, this just removed the last area of credibility they had...

Re:it started with sony removing other os (2)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990698)

How the hell is this insightful? Unless of course you did the hack.

Until they catch whoever did it, it's really sloppy and premature to assume it was for OtherOS. It was probably for the money.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (1)

Lifyre (960576) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991500)

Actually it is a fairly reasonable (though at this point unsubstantiated) assumption. The PS3 went without hack, crack, or compromise until they removed Other OS then within a short period of time has been completely compromised and that would have potentially opened a door on to the network.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990816)

Don't blame the victim. Yes, Sony was wrong for doing it. However, that doesn't give someone a free pass for breaking into their systems. If you want to argue that it was a catalyst that's fine, but don't try to argue that it was justified.

Re:it started with sony removing other os (2, Interesting)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991520)

Sony is now an infamous international criminal. They are guilty of several million counts of computer intrusion (any one of which would likely get a person locked up for several years) and they committed mass theft/fraud (depending on how you want to look at it). If any natural citizen did all of that, he'd be put UNDER the jail. Since the "justice" system has proven to be a complete failure in this matter, it's entirely expected that vigilante justice will fill the vacuum.

There are two great dangers to vigilante justice. One is that it may act without adequately establishing guilt. That's not in play here, Sony doesn't even deny the root kits and they seem almost proud of stealing otherOS away from people who paid for it. The other is that it can hand down a punishment much larger than the crime. Sony's crimes are fairly large and they haven't suffered very much, so that doesn't seem to be in play either.

However, in this case, it looks more like credit card fraudsters paid someone to grab those 70-something million records and the rest is just collateral damage. In that case, it's all those 70 million people I feel for, not Sony.

It started way before that (4, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991496)

The OP is modded flamebait, but he's actually posting a VERY relevant point. Sony is a shady company with a repeated history of bad decisions and anti-customer practices. There is a very easy way to avoid these types of things: Stop paying Sony to spit on you!

Actually, it started with me when my Sony home theater system broke. I sent it to them, they kept it for over SIX weeks, and when they sent it back, it was STILL broken the same damn way it was when I sent it to them to start with, but with a nasty scratch down the left side. So I sent it back again, and after several more weeks, it finally arrived, this time actually fixed. Or so I thought. A few months later, just after the one-year warranty period expired, it broke yet again. I called Sony, and they refused to fix it again without me paying for repairs, even though they had the thing in their possession over two of the twelve months of the warranty period. Instead, I took the damn thing to a recycling center.

A few months after that, my PS2 broke. It was well out of warranty, around five years old. I don't know what the useful life of a PS2 is supposed to be, but I'd hope it's more than five years. Under normal circumstances, I'd normally chalk it up to crappy luck and not be too mad about it, but since I'd just been through my home theater system ordeal, yeah, it really pissed me off. (That's mad, not drunk, for you Brits.)

Then the root kit fiasco hit shortly after that. Then my computer's Sony DVD burner stopped working. By this time, I had sworn off all Sony products. I think I remember an article hitting Slashdot around that time frame about Sony USB drives being infected as shipped from the factory. Then there was the Blu-ray shenanigans. Then there was the Other OS thing. Then the GeoHot lawsuit.

So yeah, the PSN thing didn't affect me at all. I'm convinced that it happened because of Sony's lax security practices, and it couldn't have happened to a scummier company. Personally, I think that any Slashdot reader who was affected by this is a damn fool and practically deserved it. I've told all of my friends and family about Sony, and most of them avoid the company, too.

My suggestion to everyone here is to stop accepting being butt raped by this company. Don't just post here about how sad/amused/mad/whatever you are, help spread the word. Post these headlines on your social network. If you're reading Slashdot, your geek cred is probably pretty high in your family and circle of friends, TELL people to avoid Sony. Only by putting them out of business once and for all, or impacting them enough to make them make significant changes, will they ever shape up or ship out.

USB malware (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991556)

Here is the info [slashdot.org] about the USB incident I mentioned above. It wasn't a virus, it was another root kit-like software being distributed with MicroVault fingerprint scanner software.

Re:Better (3, Insightful)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990660)

Better would be some kind of detailed explanation of how the hell this could have happened in the first place, and what they have done to make sure it won't happen again...

The Truth: "We got hacked."

Care to tell me why you have such an apparent appreciation for PR bullshit? You're certainly not going to get the truth, especially from a public company..

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990736)

Sony probably will never fully reveal the details behind the attack, but based on the tidbits of info circulating online, there are potentially at least three major areas of failure in the PSN security model that may have had to do with the issue:

1. The security of PSN was dependent upon the security of the PS3 consoles connecting to it. Sony falsely believed the PS3 to be hack-proof.

2. There was no true separation between the PSN developer network and the "live" network. (Compromise one and you compromise the other.)

3. Sony was storing personal info, including passwords, in a non-encrypted format on PSN. One PSN was breached it took the attackers little to no additional effort to acquire this information in a readable format.

If these rumors are true then it seems that PSN was designed with security as an after thought.

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990798)

It's a fucking GAME. It's not the real world, OK?

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991526)

It's a fucking GAME. It's not the real world, OK?

With FUCKING real world consequences, (IDtheftmuch?). Pull your head out of your ass and maybe you won't see reality thru shit-coloured glasses.

Re:Better (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991590)

and those possible 77million credit card numbers are nothing too

Re:Better (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991640)

A game company that tried to inhibit Free Speech on a fundamental level. It may be games to you but some of us take that VERY seriously. Football is just a game too, sonnny

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990964)

Rumor has it, there is a large team of pretty well known penetration testers in there beating the crap out of it before they go live.

Hopefully that helps...

Re:Better (4, Insightful)

milkmage (795746) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990988)

watch the video of the press conference.
this was a KNOWN vulnerability see @about 1:15 http://youtu.be/LeNR_HHhIGI [youtu.be]

epic failure.
how do you prevent it? how about patch your shit.

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991450)

Honestly, I just don't see any way I could feel compensated for this.

Not because of the breach, not the loss of information, but the virtual silence for a week about the lost information and about what happened. It took them 10 days to notify me of the breach. If I hadn't been a regular user and been checking the blog periodically I may not have known for ten days that personal info was stolen. I just think that and the week they took to finally confirm the breach betrays an incredible level of disrespect for their customers and the people affected and it's just totally sucked out my enthusiasm for the PS3.

Frankly, I have no particular loyalty to it. none of the games I own except the original Resistance isn't available on XBOX, and the only reason I even picked the PS3 over the XBOX in the first place is because I didn't already have a BRD player and that whole RROD bullshit was going on at the time.

Interestingly, I've been watching trade-in values on my PS3 on Amazon since Friday. It started out at $200 and is not down to under $171. I wonder if a lot of other people don't feel the same way and are switching or just getting rid of PS3s they maybe didn't use that much already.

Regardless, I think I'm done. I doubt I'll get rid of it, but I'm not connecting PSN again except to change the password and fill the account info with garbage and I'm not buying new games. I haven't decided yet if I'll get an XBOX, but my wife has been bugging about a Kinect anyway, so I might.

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991542)

There is a potentially nasty issue with PSN+, which is that you have to *SIGN UP AND GIVE THEM INFORMATION AGAIN*. (and likely have to manually cancel at the end of the promotion as well or else get auto-billed)

I thought that this would be obvious to most people, but if you give your new information, you're potentially vulnerable again. This is, of course, the same as saving your information with Amazon or any other online site. In general, it's a bad idea to store your complete personal information with any online site.

Myself, I'll stay off of PSN+ for now and just play my games.

Re:Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991760)

Rule #1 of the intarwebs, Don't piss off anonymous. Sony did just that.

That Free Month (5, Funny)

chemindefer (707238) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990574)

Will be paid for by a random credit card number.

I used to be irritated... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990590)

....by cheaters and trolls on free online multiplayers but compared to all the bureaucracy and hassles and risks of PSN and equivalent networks, the jungle of free games comes up better in the end.
1. fire up game
2. choose nick and server
3. Enjoy a quick game where the most skilled prevail (not those who have invested more money/time).

Blog comments (3, Interesting)

hipp5 (1635263) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990592)

Does anyone else have a hard time believing the majority of the comments on the blog post are real? They're all along the lines of, "Hallelujah, Sony is wonderful for getting the service back up!!!!!!!" Or are people so desperate to go back to playing CoD multiplayer that they're willing to take any sandpaper-wrapped anal raping that Sony will give them?

Re:Blog comments (4, Insightful)

koolfy (1213316) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990652)

Never underestimate the stupidity of fanboys in great number.

Re:Blog comments (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990872)

Never underestimate a PR agent with multi-user access.

bell curve (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991148)

Never underestimate the stupidity of fanboys in great number.

More accurately: never underestimate the left-hand side of the bell curve. It tends to explain a lot of things in the general population's behavior.

Re:Blog comments (1)

madsci1016 (1111233) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990654)

What do you expect? It's all the Sony Kool-Aid drinkers.

Re:Blog comments (3, Informative)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990696)

any comments to the contrary get deleted and banned.

it's a lot like free republic but with more teabagging

Re:Blog comments (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990758)

Very true, and they've been disabling some accounts. Mine is blocked now. I was critical, not rude at all, now I cannot log on.

Re:Blog comments (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991600)

Maybe you shouldn't have been a fuck-tard asshat?

Re:Blog comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990764)

Yeah really. Look at the unbridled anger that comes from gamers when WOW goes down for a few hours. Gamers are on a hair trigger when it comes to outrage. Given sony's past of making fake fan blogs it wouldn't surprise me that a good number of those comments are fake, or at least heavily filtered. You'd expect to see at least a few people saying 'That's not good enough! My credit card info was leaked!'

Re:Blog comments (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990776)

It is interesting, as all "normal" PSN logins used for commenting on that blog expired last week. The cooking keeping them "logged in" to the blog had a 1 week expiration. I guess that only leaves Sony employees to be able to actually log in and comment.

Re:Blog comments (2)

Verunks (1000826) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991788)

It is interesting, as all "normal" PSN logins used for commenting on that blog expired last week. The cooking keeping them "logged in" to the blog had a 1 week expiration. I guess that only leaves Sony employees to be able to actually log in and comment.

wrong, that's the eu playstation blog and as you can see there is no comment there http://blog.eu.playstation.com/2011/05/01/some-playstation-network-and-qriocity-services-to-be-available-this-week/ [playstation.com]
the us version probably has a longer expiration date or maybe they don't expire at all, also sony itself warned about the cookie expiration ONLY on the eu blog http://blog.eu.playstation.com/2011/04/28/issue-with-leaving-comments/ [playstation.com]

Re:Blog comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990800)

Or, those are normal people who bought their games. Envy?

Re:Blog comments (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990810)

are people so desperate to go back to playing CoD multiplayer that they're willing to take any sandpaper-wrapped anal raping that Sony will give them?

Yes, there are such people in the world. Did you even have to ask?

Re:Blog comments (1)

Tihstae (86842) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990836)

You need to login to the Playstation Network to post. Besides Sony employees, tell me who can login to the Playstation Network.

Note: First sentence may not be totally accurate.

Re:Blog comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990846)

As a PS3/PSN user (though I have never put my CC into any game console), I am glad to see service will be restored in short order.

However, I am not placated by this token offering. If it had ONLY been a service outage, a free month of PSN+ would be a great gesture to make up for it. Sadly, this wasn't just an outage, it was a security breach in which user data was completely compromised. Free goodies on PSN are useless to anyone who has to deal with identity theft as a result of this incident.

What I want from Sony:

1. Full liability if users suffer consequences as a result of their weak security model. It was obvious that protecting the privacy and personal information of their users was a complete afterthought on their part, and they should be held fully responsible for this.

2. Going forward, they need to make security of personal information the top priority on their network. Period.

Re:Blog comments (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990854)

If "we" had the time and resources, someone could do a stealth op and determine if those user names existed before yesterday. However, don't discount the other alternative, "threatened censorship". In that case the only comments that would make it through are the ones you see.

Re:Blog comments (-1, Offtopic)

staticneuron (975073) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990856)

"they're willing to take any sandpaper-wrapped anal raping that Sony will give them" You seem to have some very interesting insider knowledge. Care to elaborate?

Re:Blog comments (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990874)

They can't possibly be real. You have to login to the playstation network to comment on Sony's press release post. Can you guess what's impossible to do right now?

Re:Blog comments (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990934)

I don't have a hard time believing they're real. If you look outside of the group of individuals who post on slashdot, Sony has quite a large number of relatively happy customers who want to use the ps3 they bought (or that their parents bought for them). I'm not trying to say anything for or against Sony here, but why in the world would someone who paid a large sum of money for a ps3 not want to be able to use one of the most important features?

Re:Blog comments (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991240)

why in the world would someone who paid a large sum of money for a ps3 not want to be able to use one of the most important features?

Which is exactly why the PS3 was hacked in the first place: to restore the Other OS feature to people who paid for it.

Re:Blog comments (1)

tao (10867) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991326)

You know, much as I begrudge Sony for the removal of Other OS, it would be a gross misrepresentation of reality to call Other OS "one of the most important features" (at least without qualifying it with "for a small minority").

Re:Blog comments (5, Informative)

SailorSpork (1080153) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991062)

OF COURSE they are fake. Try to log in and post for yourself. You try and it says "Sign in here with your PlayStation®Network ID to interact with the community and participate in the conversations." I tried and got a note saying "Site Maintenance Notice. The server is currently down for maintenance." It's the same system tied to the PSN servers that are out. Meaning these comments are being crafted by their PR and Marketing departments, as well as (possibly) other normal Sony employees and developers.

Re:Blog comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991378)

Hehe, this are one my favorites:

"im just happy that its coming back on they dont need to give me anything but it is a cool bonus" (of course not, is not like it was their fault that the service was down...oh wait)

"the press conference only took about 24 minutesvery informative. I think people will begin to understand how important it is to have Government agency’s involvement in catching these idiots. Pretty soon everybody will be BACK online. Let’s go Sonylet’s go!!!" (...?)

Re:Blog comments (1)

The End Of Days (1243248) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991396)

Well it's kinda like how there are people who will equate wanting to play games online with getting raped.

Takes all kinds of jackasses to make up a world, son.

Re:Blog comments (1)

whiteboy86 (1930018) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991458)

The core player will stick with the best platform, no matter what... I imagine it is hard to derail them until some worthy competitor to "PlayStation" arises, but given the state of things (Xbox aside), this is very unlikely.

Re:Blog comments (3, Insightful)

westlake (615356) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991588)

Does anyone else have a hard time believing the majority of the comments on the blog post are real? They're all along the lines of, "Hallelujah, Sony is wonderful for getting the service back up!!!!!!!

When a system is brought down, people blame the mischief and malice of the hacker and the culture they believe supports and sustains him.

Whenever the geek summons the masses to the barricades he will far more often than not find them aligned with the other side.

There are 70 million PSN accounts.

What would that make it? 35 times the size of Slashdot?

Some more details... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990602)

From the press conference [joystiq.com] :

The web server was cracked through a known exploit - in other words, it wasn't patched.
Passwords were NOT encrypted.
The credit card data WAS accessed. It was encrypted, and the crackers MIGHT not be able to use it.

Re:Some more details... (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990780)

According to engadget the password data wa hashed.

Re:Some more details... (2)

xero314 (722674) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991516)

Passwords were NOT encrypted.

From the article you linked: "That same reporter asked if passwords were encrypted. I believe (translation not being perfect) that Hirai said they were not."

This is clearly fear mongering. The writer admits that they are not sure what Hirai said. Plus saying that they were not encrypted would actually be accurate if the passwords were stored correctly. Encryption implies the ability to decrypt. Password should be stored as a one way Hash, not encrypted. There is quit likely just some misunderstanding of the reporters part.

The credit card data WAS accessed.

From the article you linked: "Nikkei just asked if all 10 million credit cards got out. Hirai said "we can't rule out the possibility" that credit card info was compromised" Again, there was no statement that the Credit Card data was accessed. It has been stated that there was no proof that it was accessed. Now that might just mean that they have poor logging on the access of that data, but that in itself is in no way a statement saying that credit card data was accessed.

Re:Some more details... (1)

GPLHost-Thomas (1330431) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991684)

Plus saying that they were not encrypted would actually be accurate if the passwords were stored correctly. Encryption implies the ability to decrypt. Password should be stored as a one way Hash, not encrypted. There is quit likely just some misunderstanding of the reporters part.

Do you *seriously* expect any random reporter to understand the difference between encryption and hashing? :)

Token offering (3, Interesting)

grilled-cheese (889107) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990662)

I'm not going to go back to the PSN until Sony gives me a year of credit monitoring and the ability to sue them (not that I would, but thank you SCOTUS).

Re:Token offering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990680)

They actually were recently sued for not protecting data properly. However, im just happy the services are returning and we are receiving some compensation

Re:Token offering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990724)

I was going to say that they offered a year's worth of credit monitoring in the email that they sent out but apparently not.
From the email:

To protect against possible identity theft or other financial loss, we
encourage you to remain vigilant, to review your account statements and
to monitor your credit reports. We are providing the following information
for those who wish to consider it:
- U.S. residents are entitled under U.S. law to one free credit report annually
from each of the three major credit bureaus. To order your free credit report,
visit www.annualcreditreport.com or call toll-free (877) 322-8228.

Re:Token offering (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990730)

A class-action of the people against SCOTUS would be interesting, as a challenge of the constitutionality of the ruling.

Of course, that would mean another court would have to be established - perhaps one actually comprised of the people, one that works for the people.

Yea, that's a pipe dream.

Re:Token offering (2)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990974)

So this court upon which you will conferring the power to review the Supreme Court is going to be directly elected and fairly frequently I take it?

Want to guess what happens to judicial precedent when frustrated voters who don't know anything other than they are frustrated toss out one party and vote in the other each election cycle? Can we at least make the terms like five years or something so we can just know that for even numbered decades abortion and weed are legal, the second and tenth amendments are void, the first amendment is absolute and for odd numbered decades the reverse. That will just make things easier.

Thanks

Re:Token offering (4, Informative)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991158)

Oh please, both parties ride the drug war hobby horse, and both parties love restricting the first ammendment.

In theory, such a court exists. But in practice... (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991308)

that would mean another court would have to be established - perhaps one actually comprised of the people, one that works for the people.

Such a court exists in theory; it's called the ballot box. Three-fourths of state legislatures can call conventions and propose and ratify an amendment to the U.S. Constitution. However, due to MPAA-owned news networks' influence on public perception of candidates in debates, especially at the primary level, elections are just as corrupt as every other branch of government.

Re:Token offering (3, Interesting)

nobodyman (90587) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990774)

Agreed - they totally screwed over their entire user base and as a consolation prize they are offering more of the same. In fact, I bet that acceptance of this "Complimentary Offering" is contingent upon agreeing to not sue Sony or take part in any class-action lawsuit.

Once again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990704)

FUCK SONY!

Couldn't have happened to a more deserving company.

(damm shame the fallout is going to hit the customers of sony instead of sony itself... but hey.. that's the risk you take being a customer to one of the most dickish companies on the planet.)

Re:Once again. (1)

zippthorne (748122) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990834)

But... it didn't really happen to sony. It happened to their customers....

PS4? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990714)

There are two outcomes.

People remember, they ignore the fact that the PS3 had no games for a long time after its expensive launch. They remember how Sony treated their consumer base like shit. Sony's litigiousness and actions with GeoHot et al.

People forget, fork over $800 so they can play MGS5.

The latter is the most likely yet suicide inducing. The former would be ideal. Also Konami decides to pick up the Playstation brand, they develop PS4 and do everything better than Sony.

PSN+ is a double edged sword (4, Informative)

TerminaMorte (729622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990818)

You can download some games for free, but you must remain a PSN+ member to keep playing those games. So in reality they're offering you a free month of a service they expect you to keep paying for. Would be much more impressed with a year of free PSN+

Netflix (0)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991350)

you must remain a PSN+ member to keep playing those games.

Which differs from the business model of Netflix in exactly what way?

Re:Netflix (1)

TerminaMorte (729622) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991532)

None, which is my point. As a gesture of good-will it isn't much. Would you accept a free month of netflix if they had gotten all their customers CC info stolen? Probably not, since it's next to worthless.

Re:Netflix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991544)

Netflix doesn't give their month free as an apology, they give it to you as a marketing gimmick. It's a bit insulting really. Like finding a rat tail in a burger, and the restaurant giving you a 'free drink with sandwich purchase' coupon as an apology -and- making you pay for the first sandwich.

Re:Netflix (1)

MimeticLie (1866406) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991562)

What do you have against Netflix? Your comment and sig are both quite critical, seemingly apropos of nothing. We're not talking about the merit of services which you have to keep paying in order to use (you could have also mentioned Rhaposdy or World of Warcraft or a number of other things), we're talking about whether a short credit for one of those services is good compensation for an outage and breach like this.

GP's criticism is valid, I think. Hell, since you brought up Netflix, don't they give 1 month free trials? And Microsoft gives 1 month trials of Xbox Live with game purchases. 1 month of PSN+ is worth fuck all.

Re:Netflix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991566)

Including the special features, you could probably experience every minute of material on a movie DVD in a day or two. Or, if you wanted to watch a whole season of a TV series, you could watch an episode or two per day and be done within a month.

Whether its with via a long single-player campaign, addictive multiplayer options, or unlockables/achievements, I'd expect a game to keep me entertained with at least more than a month of gameplay.

Re:Netflix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991574)

Netflix didn't have their shit hacked in the first place, risking your credit card and enough info for someone to steal your identity.

A Head for Chopping (4, Insightful)

Tihstae (86842) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990826)

From the Blog Post: "The company is also creating the position of Chief Information Security Officer"

Translation: During this difficult time, we have discovered that we have no security on our network and no one to blame for this. We will now have someone to blame and publicly humiliate when (not if) this happens again.

Re: A Head for Chopping (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991180)

And next month (when this all happens again):

Those responsible for sacking the people who have just been sacked have been sacked.

Same deal as back with the CD-Trojans? (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990832)

Hand the plebs a few trinkets and beads and hope they forget quickly how we compromised their privacy and opened the huge can of worms for them.

Gee, Sony, a bit more innovation! Especially since this can is heaps bigger than the last one!

Re:Hand the plebs a few trinkets (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991044)

Heh I called it (as one of many) in a post in the other thread a few days back. Now we're just waiting for Sony's total immunity from the lawsuit.

Geohot unlocks the hardware code? "Destroy his credibility!".
Sony leaves open millions of credit cards? "Have a free month of service!"

Wakeup call US? (3, Interesting)

mrcvp (1130257) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990842)

When is the US consumer ever going to learn that the credit card is one of the worst inventions ever! Of course it's Sony's fault but you are using a broken system. Make direct online banking the standard, not some insanely insecure card or some horrible third-party service like paypal. Here in The Netherlands we Have iDeal [ideal.nl] We need to get to such a system on a global scale. The tech is there and it's more secure, so what the hell are they waiting for.

Re:Wakeup call US? (1)

Legal.Troll (2002574) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991192)

Yeah, because making random online purchases directly from your bank account with your own cash is MUCH safer than making purchases using the cash of a credit card company who can only BILL you for purchases you've allegedly made. Great comment!

Re:Wakeup call US? (1)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991244)

iDeal is a third party system. It's run by a corporation called Currence b.v. And it's the same one factor security used by every other system.

Now there is some advantage in that the authentication is done by the bank rather than the retailer, so the information is only in one place, but the bank can still be hacked. It also seems it would be vulnerable to man in the middle attacks.

What we really need is some sort of two factor security. One thing that happened to me recently was a system Verizon used when I had to retrieve my account password from them. They called my on record phone number and provided me a code I had to type into the website to get the password.

What if instead of the CVV2, every transcation had to be confirmed by a one time code provided via a second channel (like the phone).

Re:Wakeup call US? (3, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991382)

Make direct online banking the standard

And do what for payments in person?

Here in The Netherlands we Have iDeal

How is the iDEAL payment flow noticeably different from that of PayPal, which you call "horrible", other than that iDEAL is branded by the bank and not eBay?

Re:Wakeup call US? (1)

cpct0 (558171) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991592)

Mmm, well, there is the PCI standard that's supposed to protect you against such things, disallowing ANY kind of credit card number keeping. I guess Sony weren't PCI compliant, and I guess this is why they are being checked by all these groups, because such thing should've never happened, at least for the CC#. I know, I had to go through that test last year, and it's quite secure.

For the account info, that's something else, they screwed up and that's it. Let me guess, their passwords were sent through a SHA-1 or some other crappy password verifier. :)

Please hash the passwords next time. (1)

Vandil X (636030) | more than 3 years ago | (#35990852)

The only card I used with PSN was one that is now expired and from a closed account.

This incident, however, ensures I use PSN points cards for any future PSN purchases.

It only does... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35990968)

Free Kool-aid?

Sony trying to cover *THEY* took the network down (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991022)

If you read Sony's comments regarding how they don't believe any credit-card info was stolen, but you should keep a watchful eye on your accounts

*ITS A RED HERRING*

-SONY- brought down the network. Themselves. No-one hacked in and took it down for them. Sony decided the losses they were taking from their crappy authentication for the PlayStation Store warrented taking down the network to prevent them "losing" any further "profit".

Sony even notes this when they state the PlayStation Store will not be up again for quite some time. The network came down as a result of them needing to close the store to prevent additional credit card fraud against them. When they couldn't fix something so systemically broken as their Customer-client-???-Sony authentication model which allowed their network to sell things for free, they shut the entire network down; afterall, this is Sony, and they are ENTITLED to profits.

SCEA (Sony Computer Entertainment of America) should have to face a Congressional Inquiry as to the actual reasons and happenings of the network being brought down. After all, they are attempting to deceive the US of A public citizens (to the tune of 30+ million) with fear mongering and uncertainty cast to their financial futures with their press releases. I remember some billionaire Saudi-turned-Afghani-Freedom-Fighter making 'press releases' aimed against the USA with fear mongering and doubt, but those tapes were labeled as terrorist communications.

But in this, I digress closer to Godwinism. SCEA/SONY needs to disclose the actual happenstance of the Network failure/closure, and there are a LARGE number of shareholders who need to be informed about the security and status of the corporation in which they invest.

Re:Sony trying to cover *THEY* took the network do (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991846)

Godamn. Lookit this post. Sperg much?

They are a business, why else would they be doing anything if not for profit?

The only sane thing to do in the event of a network intrusion is to disable access as throughly as possible until you can fix it.

Complimentary Offering? (1)

One Louder (595430) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991032)

So...um...to get the "free" Playstation Plus and "Complimentary Offering", would I have to give them my credit card number?

compensation for PSP owners too? (2)

Vectormatic (1759674) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991048)

I dont own a PS3, but my psp is unable to log into the PSN facilities too, which sort of annoyes me (or in case of the PGP-GO owners, completely blocks them from buying new games at all)

I wonder if us PSP owners will also recieve some compensation for the loss of service, and worse, the leaking of our private information

Re:compensation for PSP owners too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#35991886)

psp and psp go uses the same psn as ps3 so why wouldn't it?

No Thanks (1)

WarpedCore (1255156) | more than 3 years ago | (#35991050)

The PSN+ month free offer is worst than a them offering customers a gift card. It comes as absolutely no loss to Sony offering this because it's just a way to ensure and wrap more people into their revenue stream. I liken the move to something more of a casino comp in that they'll lure you in with a shitty buffet so you can piss away more of your money on some false hope.
I'll pass on their token gesture, scripted apology, and boneheaded-ness of connecting with the customer.
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