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Sony To Offer Free Identity Theft Monitoring

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the should-be-an-easy-script-to-write dept.

PlayStation (Games) 157

olsmeister writes "Several weeks after having the PlayStation Network hacked, and apologizing to users for the breach, Sony is offering $1 million in identity theft protection for users who sign up before June 18th. The protection is being offered through Debix and is called AllClear ID Plus. This appears to be some kind of custom plan especially for Sony, as their normal offerings are called AllClear ID Free and AllClear ID Pro."

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157 comments

yeah (1, Troll)

frozentier (1542099) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046088)

I'd trust Sony with protecting (or arranging protection of) my identity...

Re:yeah (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046100)

I really can't stand some people here.

Re:yeah (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046122)

I think that was sarcasm.

Re:yeah (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046428)

Maybe he can't stand sarcasm... in that case, he probably shouldn't have come to Slashdot in the first place.

Re:yeah (4, Insightful)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046444)

I think he knows that. This is Sony making a deal with a 3rd party which deals in identity theft to help out people who may be affected by the PSN hack.

Despite it being something that they should really be obliged to do after their screwup, and therefore they shouldn't be congratulated too much, it's also something that the "Sony is the devil" types around here wouldn't actually expect them to do. I think that people should at least recognise that they're doing the right thing here.

Since it seems to be official (although it could potentially be a social engineering trick by whoever hacked the network, since they presumably have the details to upload to the PSN blog, etc), and free, I probably will sign up, despite having already cancelled the card I used for PSN stuff.

Re:yeah (2)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046600)

I think he knows that. This is Sony making a deal with a 3rd party which deals in identity theft to help out people who may be affected by the PSN hack.

Despite it being something that they should really be obliged to do after their screwup, and therefore they shouldn't be congratulated too much, it's also something that the "Sony is the devil" types around here wouldn't actually expect them to do. I think that people should at least recognise that they're doing the right thing here.

Since it seems to be official (although it could potentially be a social engineering trick by whoever hacked the network, since they presumably have the details to upload to the PSN blog, etc), and free, I probably will sign up, despite having already cancelled the card I used for PSN stuff.

It isn't free, it's free for a year. That's not free, that's "Oh, well, we have this insurance in place, so we are not obligated"
It doesn't even come close to being free, but it does set a precedent for the future. Making it free for a year has the effect of sliding it by us.
And I agree, it is something they should be obliged to do, regardless of whether or not they have "screwed up", under the laws of the land. (Or what the laws should be.)

ID Theft? Really? (3, Insightful)

The13thSin (1092867) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047640)

What I don't understand is why everyone is so afraid of ID theft after this hack.

I'm not going to defend Sony here on any of their actions, from the reports so far it seems they really f-ed up (even though it's the actual criminal that should get primary blame), but apart from the possible CC info (which I already had replaced), what informations do(es) the hacker(s) really have? Name and Address? We do realize that for most world citizens that have the money to have bought a PS3 system, that information is already... I don't know, like everywhere? Actively being collected by hundreds if not thousands of corporations and being (legally) sold between entities throughout the world.

The only major thing is the password (though hashed, it might be retrievable with rainbow tables as I haven't read anywhere they also salted it) and the security question. Both can be a problem if you use the same one often of course. But it's not like someone has your SSN and can go open a credit in your name right? Or is it really possible in some countries to do that with just your name and address? I can't imagine, but if it is, those countries really need to rework their financial branch a.s.a.p.

Look, I'm not saying this is extremely inconvenient (cancel CC, get new one and if you didn't use a unique password / security question, change them elsewhere) and I'm pissed this happened, but being afraid of the ID theft because of this hack, seems like being afraid of dieing when you've just been stung by a bee... I'm not saying it's impossible, but seems highly unlikely. But please, if I missed something somewhere, correct me if I'm wrong.

Re:yeah (1)

HermMunster (972336) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047698)

In the case of this breach, the ramifications could be long lasting and/or not felt for a long time. Depending on the luck of the die (as there are so many ppl affected, you may not see any attempt of intrusion by them for a long time). My feeling is that this protection that Sony is offering will be for a short time and it will be a limited service. They'll offer you a certain level of protection for free but you'll have to pay for it if you want anything beyond that and that it'll be free only for a short period of time. This just gives the ID theft protection company a way to collect potential customer--resulting in no real protection, just a client info exchange between Sony and the ID theft protection company--worthless and expensive is what comes to mind.

And, Sony has said they'll give the PSN (et al) a free month's service, but the service is down going on a month where the customer's have paid for that month, so in the end they'll have received nothing except the service they paid for.

I certainly hope more of you will read between the lines and figure out when Sony is duping you.

Let's give away our personal info again!! (5, Insightful)

SomeoneGotMyNick (200685) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046092)

So, when we sign up for this (somewhat unknown) Debix service, can we look forward to our full identities being stolen in the near future?

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (5, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046144)

Are you calling all nine of these photogenic-but-irrelevant stock-footage models [debix.com] liars? For shame, cad. And they have "secure phone call" technology! That's, like, CIA shit, man. Totally trustworthy. I, for one, eagerly await the chance to enter all SSNs and CCNs into an improperly secured form when I get an email from the "s0ny h3rbal cust0mer Protection Se4vice" asking me to verify.

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (1)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046374)

They're not really that photogenic. To me, photogenic means there's a hot chick in her pajamas telling me to sign up for an online correspondence school.

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36047778)

They're not really that photogenic. To me, photogenic means there's a hot chick in her pajamas telling me to sign up for an online correspondence school.

I agree, without a hot chick in AT MOST pajamas how are we to take them seriously? They can't even get a hot chick to strip with money, and I think that really speaks to their salesmanship.

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046460)

Great advert. They must have photoshopped out the tenth guy stood at the end, looking angry and scared and clutching his credit cards close to his chest hoping that no-one will steal them.

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (1)

JackieBrown (987087) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046764)

My job accidently sent a spreadsheeet out all of it's employees with our names, address, ss#, and wage.

They signed us up with Debix for 1 year as well.

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (1)

CraftyJack (1031736) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046870)

This is about as comforting as a carnival ride offering free tourniquets and crutches.

Re:Let's give away our personal info again!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36047868)

So, when we sign up for this (somewhat unknown) Debix service, can we look forward to our full identities being stolen in the near future?

Free Identity Theft, Monitoring

Rights (5, Insightful)

swilver (617741) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046098)

What rights am I signing away by doing this?

Who the fuck is Matt Welsh? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046148)

Can somebody please tell me who the fuck Matt Welsh is, and why the fuck his question keeps appearing at the bottom of every single Slashdot page?

Re:Who the fuck is Matt Welsh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046252)

It's the random quote that's always been at the bottom of every single page. It's switched every 15 minutes or every hour or something.

I don't know who Matt Welsh is, but his quote sucks.

Re:Who the fuck is Matt Welsh? (1)

arielCo (995647) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046318)

Why? It's a question and a legitimate one, not an affirmation. Booing at these questions is what fanboyism is about.

Re:Who the fuck is Matt Welsh? (2)

Killjoy_NL (719667) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046326)

This quote has been there for a few days now though, I noticed it because I often see what random funny quote is down there.

Re:Who the fuck is Matt Welsh? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046370)

Except it hasn't been switched in about a month. The fact that pedantic geeks (myself included) have waited a month to raise a fuss about it is rather unlike most slashdot users.

Re:Rights (3, Interesting)

dunezone (899268) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046158)

Actually this is a good point. When the PSN finally comes back on we will all be forced to change our passwords, I guarantee they will put up a new EULA that says by agreeing to this you give the right to sue us or join in a class action lawsuit. Now of course EULA have questionable legality but they will do anything to cover themselves and throwing in a few new sentences might be enough for a judge to side with Sony.

Re:Rights (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046192)

Why would someone who wants to sue SONY for incompetence want to keep using their products?

Re:Rights (2)

Killjoy_NL (719667) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046332)

It's like training your dog, if it poos in the house, you discipline it, you don't throw it out.
And for people like me who have a big catalogue of games for the PS3 don't want to throw them out.

Re:Rights (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046430)

Sounds like you have some things to list on eBay or Craigslist to me.

Seriously, are you going to keep feeding this company? Okay, you spent money -- a lot of money. At what point would you consider Sony "too much" to continue dealing with? How bad would it have to get? Or perhaps you are afraid to let go like the way people are in a bad marriage?

Games are NOT an investment. Once you spend that money, it's only worth what you can resell it for.

Re:dog (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046554)

Except Sony bit Geohotz, and it peed on our file registry's. It doesn't play well with the other pets. Yeah, ditch it!

Re:Rights (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046626)

It's like training your dog, if it poos in the house, you discipline it, you don't throw it out.

Suing SONY and given them a fine are two different things. Here's a better example. If my neighbor hits my parked car and I sue him, I don't see why I would want to associate with him anymore. And on the other side of the coin, my neighbor might want me to sign a waiver before I come over to his house for fear that I'll sue him again.

Re:Rights (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047722)

And like training a dog, unless you catch them at the moment they squat the discipline is completely useless.

Re:Rights (4, Insightful)

ProppaT (557551) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046396)

This right here is what I've been waiting to see. You know there will be a new EULA. If Sony is smart, they won't include anything like that in the EULA (the last thing they need is more bad press), but I'm definitely waiting to read a lawyer's take on the EULA before I hit accept (normally I wouldn't, but in this case you know there's going to be a dozen or so breakdowns of the whole thing...and, besides, I'm too lazy to read it myself).

We really need to rework this whole EULA agreement deal. If companies are going to bombard us with new ones on a regular basis, they need to be bulleted points confined to a one page or so document. We already spent a ton of money on these dumb consoles, we shouldn't have to be required to read a 30 page legal document every time Sony decides to patch a bug in their software.

Re:Rights (1)

tixxit (1107127) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046922)

Seriously. If I could just diff old-eula.txt new-eula.txt I'd be as happy as a pig in poop. Instead, I'm supposed to re-read the mammoth PSN EULA every other month.

Re:Rights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046420)

EULA : SONY becomes the sole proprietor of said identity, reserves the right to change that identity to whatever the fuck they please, whenever the fuck they want, and the EULA supersedes are law in any country, anywhere, any time. Now shut up and type in your credit card number.

Re:Rights (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046566)

Can't be that bad, your soul belongs to Apple, your personal info to facebook and your creditcard-number to SONY.

Insurance (4, Insightful)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046104)

If I understand this correctly, Sony will sell you insurance to the tune that, if doing business with them gets you ripped off, you get reimbursed?
And a year for free!
I have the lifetime policy, I don't do business with them.

Re:Insurance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046254)

I have the lifetime policy, I don't do business with them.

You mean you have the Lifetime Plus policy; you're also protected from initial transaction ripoff (i.e.: trading money for something made by Sony)

Sony finally learned from thier error! (1)

loftwyr (36717) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046112)

They learned from their break-in. Now, Sony gets 10% of any revenue gained from the stealing of identities from their service. The finance team wouldn't let them lose this opportunity.

Does this cover everyone? (2)

richy freeway (623503) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046146)

It looks awfully like an American company for American users. What about the rest of the world?

Not that I care as I don't own anything made by Sony.

Re:Does this cover everyone? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046202)

The bloomberg article is pretty specific that it is for US customers only. Kind of a nice double-fuck-you for customers from the rest of the world. At least they are making sure I'm never even going to consider buying a Sony product or game again, the way they treat this issue.

Re:Does this cover everyone? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046256)

The rest of the world doesn't need identity theft insurance, as banks are liable when they fuck up.

Re:Does this cover everyone? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046366)

The rest of the world doesn't dish out credit to anyone who walks in and gives them a name and address, surely? Isn't that just an American tradition?

Why not click the link to http://blog.us.playstation.com/ [playstation.com] from the article and make the obvious change to the url (say to http://blog.eu.playstation.com/ [playstation.com]) to see if other regions are offering something similar if you are so curious? Why would expect an article written to an American audience would do that for you?

After the facts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046172)

This is like offering you an umbrella after they pour a bucket of water over your head.

Fact: Your data is stolen and is currently being sold in underground markets!

Re:After the facts (3, Insightful)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046260)

Not like that at all. Since it's a service that attempts to deal with the results of your data being stolen, not a service that attempts to stop your data being stolen in the first place. So it's more like a damp hand towel than an umbrella in that analogy.

More Hacks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046234)

Sony gives you a free ID Theft Protection service, which will in turn, have their servers hacked next week.

Re:More Hacks (1)

equex (747231) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046646)

I had to read the headline 3 times to make sure I was reading it right and then thought the same as you. This is just funny.

starts in the maternity ward, before identity lost (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046236)

each infant to be assigned a personyfied spiritual protector, to keep us from being bodily, mentally, identifically, or spiritually, damaged, even at that stage of our advanced development, which is still hampered, or almost completely halted, by ANY hostile environment, or negativity training, we were never intended to experience or witness, slathered upon us, even as infants.

fake 'weather' f'ing up friendly fri., again (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046372)

talk about real time biblical style fowl 'weather', on a truly profitsized basis, leaving the deities with more than enough extra souls to cull through, while at the same time, leaving plenty of stuff for the 'fate' ravaged faithful, to fearfully hypothesis about, as their eternal reward looms. as it was written, unless of course (as it is also written) we disarm ourselves, & our rulers, at once? see you there?

Kind of pointless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046306)

I've already changed my credit card and moved since the time long ago when they got my info, so the info that was leaked is all invalid anyways.

Will I need to give them my CC#??? (1)

JohnRoss1968 (574825) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046334)

Yeah I trust SONY......
Might as well just post my CC# on 4chan

Re:Will I need to give them my CC#??? (1)

vegiVamp (518171) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046792)

Compared to Sony, I consider the regulars at 4chan a gentle, civilised people.

Re:Will I need to give them my CC#??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36047980)

There are no "regulars" on 4chan. Every damn one of them is irregular and abnormal.

What should they do? (1)

QuasiSteve (2042606) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046354)

Judging by the negative reactions already, I wonder.. what should SONY do?

Right now they're offering all sorts of stuff that usually isn't offered at all. You get a small post on a website or in (a) major newspaper(s) at best that tells you there was a breach, oopsie, and go contact your credit card issuer if you think that's a Bad Thing.

But clearly doing more than most other businesses do, isn't good enough.

So what should SONY do?

Viable options only, please. "Die in a fire" and "pay me $1M" and such I'm gonna guess aren't viable - solid arguments as to why they would be are welcomed nevertheless, they might yield a +5 Funny if nothing else.

Re:What should they do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046918)

They could add some new features to the ps3. Add the ability to host media to other network attached devices, voip, install Other OS option maybe

Re:What should they do? (1)

man_the_king (1139561) | more than 2 years ago | (#36048026)

I think, that for this "Die Sony Die!!!!" lot, ANYTHING that Sony does is NEVER going to be enough.

/. is the home of the "I hate Sony, therefore they are wrong" crowd.

Freeze your credit (3, Insightful)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046414)

As a victim of Identity Theft, I'd recommend to the people impacted by the Sony debacle (or any other ID breach) to freeze your credit. It costs (in New York, varies in other states) $5 per credit company per person. There are 3 major companies, thus $15 per person. Of course, this fee might be waived if you are a victim of ID theft. Details (and state specific fees) can be found here: http://www.consumersunion.org/campaigns/learn_more/003484indiv.html

Once frozen, nobody can check your credit or open new lines of credit. If you need to allow this action (e.g. because you are buying a car or applying for a job which requires a background check), you can temporarily unfreeze your credit. You can even specify who the temporary unfreeze applies to and for how long. (For example, "Friendly Car Loans can read my credit file from May 6th through May 20th.")

Of course, the credit bureaus don't like you freezing your credit because it means you can't sign up for those "Save 5% on your purchase by opening a credit card with us today" store cards. It also means they can't sell your credit information to other companies. But, honestly, those negatives for them are just more pluses for us.

Re:Freeze your credit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046722)

^THIS

I froze my credit 2 years ago and never looked back. In that time, I had to thaw it twice for mortgage refinancing, but that's it.

Credit monitoring = "we'll tell you if get robbed"
Credit freezing = "you can't get robbed"

'robbed' in this case means new lines of credit opened on your name by someone else. Regardless of any of these precautions, thieves could still run up charges on an existing line... So always read your statements!

Re:Freeze your credit (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047016)

You have to spend money to temporarily lift the freeze. This is just a moneymaking proposal. Further, in California people over the age of 65 get half off the fees. Fuck that, they're about to die anyway, *I* have my life ahead of me.

Re:Freeze your credit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36047120)

Why should you have to pay for this? What did these credit bureaus do to get the right to collect all this information on you? Can I start calling up banks, say I'm from CreditMojo and ask for credit information on all their customers?

Re:Freeze your credit (1)

joost (87285) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047344)

Thank you for this information. Why is not everyone doing this all the time? Seems like a useful thing to request for negligible cost.

Re:Freeze your credit (1)

augustusgloop (944016) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047846)

^^^^ THIS I froze my credit (and wife's) two years ago and never looked back. I've had to thaw them a couple times for mortgage refinancing, but that's it. And in NC, setting the freezes and thawing are free, so no costs to me so far. Credit monitoring : "We'll tell you after you've been robbed" Credit freeze : "You can't get robbed" "Robbed" in this case means having someone else open a new line of credit in your name and then pollute your credit history. None of these measures will protect you from someone abusing an existing line of credit, so always check your statements!

Not ID theft! (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046536)

I know... this is old but simply needs to be repeated until people "get it." ID theft is, at the very least, a misnomer and in my opinion an outright lie.

What this all boils down to is data that can be used to access accounts with banks and lenders. They created this insecure system for THEIR convenience. Now they are calling all that data "your identity" and when someone exploits their system, it is "YOU" who are the victim somehow. This is insanity. There was a great video about identity theft and the banking system someone linked to on youtube once. Hilarious but accurate. Some british comedy I recall. Anyone got that?

This system of convenience at our expense has got to end. It's simply ridiculous.

Re:Not ID theft! (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046992)

I'll reply to you with a spin on our favorite theme.

It's not identity theft... wait for it ... it's identity *INFRINGEMENT!*

No one can strip you of your identity right? (Certain prisons excepted.)

They are ... COPYING your identity! Your identity is your (ongoing) original creative work that no one can duplicate right?

So all personal details are "derivative works" of your identity!

This goes for credit cards, maybe SS #, and a lot of other things.

You "lease" Sony your card info ... so if they get hacked, they just allowed a copy to be infringing! Sue them for $875,000 per account!

Re:Not ID theft! (2)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047552)

No. Just doesn't fly.

The fact is, this "key information" is being used as a "key" to gain access to resources. This same "key information" is being used to assign liability for the ab/use of these resources. The personally identifiable information is copyable, true. But it is used to gain access to things that shouldn't be accessible. This has no similarity to copyright infringement. And if it did, then we are not the owners of our "copyrightable information" then are we as we do not have the right to sue for infringement. The parties who are actually and directly harmed do, however -- that would be the financial institutions involved.

Why only in America? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046620)

I see their only offering this to the people of Northen America, what about us in Europe.

Re:Why only in America? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046726)

Actually it is only for residents of the US. Canada and Mexico are left out as well and will likely not get anything from this.

Re:Why only in America? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046770)

Why would anyone want to pretend they come from Europe?

1 year?! (1)

bezpredel6 (1796620) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046808)

Seriously, they offer credit protection for 1 year??? Like the your personal information that they had stolen from them EXPIRES in one year or something? With all those millions of records at hand, chances are whoever has their hands on this data will not even get to you until 3-5 years from now (good luck proving then that sony had something to do with it:( )

"Sony To Offer Free Identity Theft Monitoring" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046824)

Yup...it's been stolen

PSN still down (2)

residieu (577863) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046880)

So will they be up and running by June 18th so we can sign up?

And will this be one of those "Free for one year, and then we'll start charging you $20 a month unless you remember to cancel", type things?

77 Million people affected - 1 million dollars (2)

Agent0013 (828350) | more than 2 years ago | (#36046934)

In some reports, there were 77 million people's credit information stolen, but Sony is only setting aside 1 million dollars. Sony must be getting a really good deal on this credit monitoring they are giving out. That or they don't expect very many people to sign up for it. Sorry, it was only for the first 100,000 customers, you are out of luck.

Re:77 Million people affected - 1 million dollars (1)

BStroms (1875462) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047294)

Actually, it's a million dollars of insurance per customer. Of course, they're paying far less than a million per customer for that insurance, as the security company knows the average customer is going to cost them far less than that.

Re:77 Million people affected - 1 million dollars (1)

Agent0013 (828350) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047338)

Opps, sorry. I guess that's what happens when I don't read TFA!

Okay... what about Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36046946)

I noticed that this is good for the US only. What about Canadians?

Stop the Insanity (1)

InsertCleverUsername (950130) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047004)

My first thought when seeing yet another tale of mass identity theft is, why this is still happening so often? There are good solutions to security (I haven't seen any major banks hacked, have you?) and there's no damned reason why every business on the Net needs to store enough personal information on me to destroy my credit either. What will it take to give businesses or government (if they could be bothered to do any favors for the bottom 99% of us) the incentive to stop allowing this?

My second thought is that Sony is a bunch of asshats with a completely cavalier attitude towards their customers.

Update - 3rd attack inbound? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36047122)

At least that's what CNet heard through the grapevine [cnet.com].

Interesting is this:

The failure of Sony's server security has ignited investigations by the FBI, the Department of Justice, Congress, and the New York State Attorney General,

Excuse me? New York State AG? Weren't those PSN guys arguing against Hotz that they are in California and not New York??

In other news... (1)

LittleBigScript (618162) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047238)

...Sony discovers a way to profit off of the data theft of its customers by upselling services after a 1 year trial with two of its business partners.

Sony business practices are brilliantly Machiavellian.

Why do *we* have to take action? (1)

scorp1us (235526) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047306)

This is Sony's fault. They should take every CC number they have, go to Visa, Discover, or MC and say. "We've had an epic data breach and we need to protect our customers. These are their card numbers. Please bill us." If they can't go directly to Visa or MC, then the first several digits encodes the issuing bank. They should then go to that bank and repeat the request fro the customers of that bank.

Only in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36047394)

Sony has yet to offer this protection to Canadians. More reason to jump on the Canadian class action lawsuit bandwagon.

Does it auto-renew? (1)

livings124 (783222) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047744)

I wouldn't put it past Sony that this free plan auto-renews after the time period (into one of the paid plans).

I can see it now... (1)

10101001 10101001 (732688) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047906)

User: Ack! My account!
Sony: Yeah, it was trashed by those three guys. I think they were called the "Something Brothers".
User: You were watching?
Sony: Uh-huh!
User: Then Sony, why didn't you tell me about it?
Sony: But I did tell you. I told you just now!

(Full pardons to Cowboy Bebop...)

Your identity loss was a pre-existing condition (1)

Fractal Dice (696349) | more than 2 years ago | (#36047958)

So does that make Debix a prime suspect for the hack? They are suddenly getting a large number of customers locked into their service.

US only (so far) (1)

Tomahawk (1343) | more than 2 years ago | (#36048160)

"...A program for U.S. PlayStation Network and Qriocity customers..."

Hopefully they will do the same for the rest of the world too.

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