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Ubuntu Aims For 200 Million Users In Four Years

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the it's-nice-to-have-goals dept.

Operating Systems 441

dkd903 writes "Delivering the keynote at the Ubuntu Developer Summit at Budapest, Hungary, Canonical Founder Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Canonical's goal is to have 200 million Ubuntu users in four years. Canonical has not officially provided any data on how many Ubuntu users there currently are — in fact, the number is quite difficult to track. However, according to Prakash Advani, a partner manager for Central Asia at Canonical, there are an estimated 12 million Ubuntu users."

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441 comments

One right here! (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074538)

Well, you can count me in!

Re:One right here! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074572)

And me out.

Windows for the desktop, FreeBSD for the server, Android for the phone.

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074606)

Am I in or out if I use Ubuntu in VMs on my Windows + OSX boxes?

Re:One right here! (5, Funny)

x*yy*x (2058140) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074670)

I personally find this good solution. You get the stability of Ubuntu, eye-candy of Mac and the security of Windows.

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074780)

You're joking right? More like instability of Ubuntu & the insecurity of Windows. Only reason to run Windows as the host is for graphics/games.

Re:One right here! (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074992)

You're joking right? More like instability of Ubuntu & the insecurity of Windows. Only reason to run Windows as the host is for graphics/games.

*whoosh*

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074904)

Laptop: Windows 7 (Ubuntu in VM).
Desktop/file server: Dual boot Ubuntu (various Ubuntu machines in VM) and Windows XP.

Counting the VM:s I probably have about 3-4 Ubuntu installations that I use occasionally, but I spend 95% of my time in front of Windows 7 on the Laptop. Do I count as I an Ubuntu user, a Windows user or both?

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36075096)

Sounds like you count as 4 Ubuntu users and 1 Windows user. It just goes to illustrate the point of how hard it is to take "installations" and convert a count of those to "users". (And that's even if you have a "phone home" installation counter that the tinfoil hats haven't blocked anyway). Me, between home and work, I have 6 notebooks, 1 workstation (HP Z800 24 GB RAM, 2 quad core CPUs), and 1 "desktop" that is a Windows Home Server. The notebooks are all running Windows 7, but one has a Vista VM on it. The workstation class box has 7 VM's ranging from XP to Windows 7. Oh, and 1 more old desktop machine sitting here that does, in fact, run Ubuntu. Good luck counting me!

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074688)

Windows on the desktop? What time period is this, the mid or late 1990s?

I've ditched Windows for good in 2006 and never looked back. A few hurdles made it a slightly rocky ride, but all of the advantages more than make up for it. To this day, the only thing I find lacking is multimedia players (and I especially miss Winamp).

Re:One right here! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074726)

Being a freetard? What time period is this, the mid or late 1990s?

Re:One right here! (-1, Flamebait)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074914)

I don't know. What time period was it when your mom decided not to abort you? At a guess, I'd say after they'd sucked out about a third of your brains. But cerebral fluid is just as good, eh?

Re:One right here! (4, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074844)

To this day, the only thing I find lacking is multimedia players (and I especially miss Winamp).

Which winamp? The newer versions with all that library management crap, or the old simple "player?" (I ask because I'm definitely a fan of the latter, as it doesn't feel the need to mess with my tree-based organization)

Audacious does the latter, and is almost a clone of the old winamp v2. I can't judge the former because I don't like them even when they do work "well," but I hear praise for Amarok a lot.

For videos, VLC lives on all my machines, Linux and Windows alike (but for some reason, it's a really CPU hog when simply trying to play MP3s, thus, audacious).

HTH

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074644)

They won't win me as a user, or anyone I know for that matter, until they remove the abortion called PulseAudio.

Re:One right here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074772)

I'm sorry, abortion? Why, I didn't know that PulseAudio was created because of an abortion!

By the way, it's abomination! In most languages!

Re:One right here! (1)

Stachybotris (936861) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075060)

I didn't realize that Ubuntu was using Pulse by default - I thought that was more of a KDE thing. But it's not like it's hard to remove Pulse itself (just don't touch libpulseaudio) and revert to ALSA.

Re:One right here! (2)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074646)

You can count me out, with Unity/Gnome3.

Also I prefer Arch anyway :3

Re:One right here! (4, Funny)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074782)

Design is at the centre of Shuttleworth’s roadmap for Unity [newstechnica.com] . “I woke up one day and thought, ‘Gosh, I’d really like to make using my universal general-purpose computer that I can do ANYTHING with feel like I’m using a locked-down three-year-old half-smart phone through the clunky mechanism some l33t h@xx0r used to jailbreak it, I can’t think of a better user experience.’ We’re not quite there yet, but this gets Unity a lot of the way.”

Re:One right here! (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074706)

My question is if they define 'Ubuntu' as the main Desktop + Server or if all the extra mainline flavors (Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Edubuntu) count as well. And then what about LinuxMint?

And others, too. (1)

aetherian (2006940) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074540)

Well, with Ubuntu becoming more and more mainstream, I wonder how this will affect other Linux distributions.

Re:And others, too. (2)

DataDiddler (1994180) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074624)

I'm sure the other distros will get some spillover. The more people there are who have been exposed to Linux, the more people will experiment with other distros.

Re:And others, too. (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074878)

Mod up! I got my cousin on Ubuntu years ago (6.06 I believe). He had never been exposed to Linux before. Last time I went to visit him (2 months ago) he had a system dedicated to Debian and another to CentOS.

Re:And others, too. (3, Funny)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074986)

He was smart enough not only get spread out his experience, but to ditch Ubuntu?

You should be proud!

Not bad. (3, Interesting)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074568)

Considering PSN is apparently 75 million users, if the numbers for Ubuntu keep growing then we will hopefully see more developers who consider it worthwhile to port their games over. The first to get there stands to do well out of a niche market like us. I've bought Linux games that I still haven't even played, just to encourage the developers. The reason I've not played them is that my only PC right now is a netbook. I'd build a gaming PC again if there was a vibrant Linux gaming scene. As it is, I do all my gaming on consoles just now.

Re:Not bad. (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074602)

The first to get there stands to do well out of a niche market like us.

You mean like Loki games who was driven out of business because people were pirating their games more than buying? Or LGP which has had to implement a DRM system for the same reason? Even if you take into account the humble bundle all that shows is the average linux person is willing to spend a whopping 2 dollars for a game (average of about 11-12 bucks for a 6 game pack). Yeah, I can't imagine why people just aren't flocking over to Linux for such "grand" pickings.

Re:Not bad. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074674)

Loki only had a good installer that was it. LGP has crappy old games, and with DRM count me out. Might as well use wine then. The windows folks paid far less for the HIBs.

Re:Not bad. (0)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074828)

The windows folks paid far less for the HIBs.

And by "far" less you mean a 4 dollar difference on average. But hey, let's ignore the millions of sales for PC games like Half-Life 2, Starcraft II, etc at $50 a piece.

Re:Not bad. (1)

RanCossack (1138431) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074894)

And by "far" less you mean a 4 dollar difference on average. But hey, let's ignore the millions of sales for PC games like Half-Life 2, Starcraft II, etc at $50 a piece.

Wait, so if the Linux users paid $2 on average and the Windows users paid $4 less on average, the Humble Bundle paid Windows users to download their games?

I realized you just meant 4 less out of the total after rereading, but that was less entertaining.

Re:Not bad. (0)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074926)

Wait, so if the Linux users paid $2 on average and the Windows users paid $4 less on average, the Humble Bundle paid Windows users to download their games?

Did you even bother to read the post?

2 dollars for a game (average of about 11-12 bucks for a 6 game pack)

The 2 dollars per game was the cost of the total price which was around $11.82 for each Linux person divided by the total amount of games which was 5. On the other hand, the Windows people paid on average 7-8 TOTAL for the pack which would be around 1.40-1.60 per game. It's really not that hard to properly read.

Re:Not bad. (1, Flamebait)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074762)

Even if you take into account the humble bundle all that shows is the average linux person is willing to spend a whopping 2 dollars for a game (average of about 11-12 bucks for a 6 game pack).

http://www.humblebundle.com/ [humblebundle.com]

Average Purchase: $4.97
Average Windows: $3.91
Average Linux: $11.82

Stop lying out your ass, that entire post was troll. Nevermind the Linux version of Neverwinter Nights and UT running fully.

Re:Not bad. (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074892)

They were lying about what? Did you miss the part:

average of about 11-12 bucks for a 6 game pack

Then you come back and post:

Average Linux: $11.82

Does not $11.82 come between $11 and $12? So they said it was a 6 game pack vs a 5 game pack. That would raise the average to $2.36/game which is really a negligible difference. Counter this to Half-Life 2 which sold $6.5 million games sold at a far higher average price than the $2.36/game that people on Linux were paying for the Humble Bundle. Or to Starcraft II which sold 1.5 million copies in 2 days at probably $50 a pop. Can you point to a single Linux game that has even remotely that many sales nor as much revenue generated from sales? Right, you can't.

Re:Not bad. (1)

Shikaku (1129753) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075036)

Can you point to a single Linux game that has even remotely that many sales nor as much revenue generated from sales? Right, you can't.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humble_Bundle#List_of_games_offered [wikipedia.org]
US$1.8+ M For 1

Oh wait, you want something not humble bundle?

http://greyviper.com/1400/amnesia-dark-descents-sales-figures-dwarfed-developers-dream-estimates.html [greyviper.com] (date Jan 10th 2011)

200,000+ sales. OK, it's not half life sales but if the price was on average around $13 because of sales that's $2,600,000.

Re:Not bad. (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075136)

So basically nothing even remotely in the same league. Even beaten to death franchises like The Sims has gets more than a million sales just in a week.

Re:Not bad. (2)

Scragglykat (1185337) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074912)

And the Humble Bundle is more or less, children's games. Not knocking them at all, I've purchased all three, but I get them for my niece and nephew. They are not at all comparable to Half-Life 2, Battlefield (series) or any other ~$50 game available. I have yet to play the new Frozen bundle, but they just don't appear to be of the same high-dollar drawing game play caliber as the big companies put out. If you want a good comparison to the first two bundles, I'd go with Angry Birds, which we can see the average user is willing to pay $2.99 for...

Re:Not bad. (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074964)

They are not at all comparable to Half-Life 2, Battlefield (series) or any other ~$50 game available.

Especially when something like Starcraft II sold more copies in 2 days and generated more than a magnitude more revenue than all of the Humble Bundles combined. That anyone would think that saying that some group of people paid $11.82 on average for a 5 game bundle is going to mean some AAA studio is going to rush to make games for Linux is laughable.

Re:Not bad. (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075004)

...on the other hand, plenty of people are making money with that sort of model these days.

You don't need to spend 50 million to make a $50 block buster title with the need to sell millions of copies of that.

OTOH, there are plenty of PC gaming failures littering the landscape. Some of us have even worked on some of them.

Re:Not bad. (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075058)

...on the other hand, plenty of people are making money with that sort of model these days.

Sure there are companies doing it, but if you want to attract companies like Valve you are going to need more to show for it then that the average person paid $2.36 per game for the Humble Bundle especially when the Humble Bundles were only getting like 100,000 donations. On the other hand, Starcraft II sold 1.5 million copies in 2 days or Half Life 2 which sold millions and millions of copies within the first couple of months.

Re:Not bad. (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074836)

You mean like Loki games who was driven out of business because people were pirating their games more than buying?

Or perhaps people weren't interested in buying 10 year old games at the prices they charged. Hey did Pan Am go bankrupt due to piracy too? How about GM? Companies go bankrupt for all sorts of reasons.

Re:Not bad. (2)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074984)

It's far more likely that Loki was driven out of business by dealing with Electronic Arts and the fact that Linux desktop software was just getting started at the time. People like to dredge Loki up as an example and then neglect how very long it's been since then.

Loki was a porting house and had the same problems as any porting house including those for Macs.

Re:Not bad. (3, Insightful)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075092)

That's why you can then point to LGP as well which had to implement DRM a couple years back because most Linux people were pirating their games. Until Linux people can show that they can match the millions of PC games sales that average $40-50 a pop that you can get from making Windows games, it will never get first-class AAA game titles (getting a port of a AAA game title months to years after it comes to Windows doesn't count).

Re:Not bad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36075056)

2001 called. It wants its business model back. Nobody pays full price for PC games anymore. I certainly never will again. The problems are the following.

*Most of today's games contain at least some form of malware designed to stop me from playing on my netbook (with no CD drive) or spy on me.
*Today, the publishers generally sell you half a game and then the other half at some later point via DLC. Notice all the short games when compared to older incredible titles like Deus Ex and Unreal.
*This is for a second assuming that people still make PC games, when hardly anyone does. Most of them are poorly ported consolized garbage, with no modding tools and packed with more bugs than the Pizza place across the street from me.

So, I'll go on buying from Gog and the indie developers. The rest of the PC game market can collapse for all I care.

Re:Not bad. (1)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074612)

Lol. You really crack me up.

So you support gaming only on the free linux, but avoid the bad non-free windows gaming by going to totally propritary route of consoles, where not only the hardware is propritary, but people have to pay to microsoft and sony to be allowed to make games...

Re:Not bad. (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074636)

Why did you leave out Nintendo? You had/have to pay for dev kits for their consoles as well. At least Microsoft lets indie people make games without needing to have office space and other ridiculous restrictions like Nintendo imposes.

Re:Not bad. (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075032)

The DRM that comes with PC gaming on Windows is just plain annoying.

That was actually one think that Loki had in it's favor. They had PC ports that were minus the annoying DRM.

It's too bad that LGP decided to implement DRM of their own. It's even sadder that I've never cared to buy anything they're offering. Whining about piracy really won't help.

Re:Not bad. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074928)

PSN has 75 million *paying* customers. That's the difference.
 
The Linux/OSS community had and still has too many people out there screaming "free as in beer." This is going to make the mainstream gaming community not as keen in porting.
 
Oh, and your rant about "I pay for games I don't even play" isn't helping either. Any dev who'd see that would think "sure, he's buying it now but when it's a dozen titles a month going for market prices that aren't in the same league as indie table scraps where is he going to be?" People like you who pay just to boost the numbers of a fringe market won't be able to keep up with those prices when they're no longer fringe. You're inflating the market to make it look like there's a future market. Not that the idea can't work but when you go around screaming that you're making a fake market for a product that you don't even use it's only going to make those consumer numbers look inflated to your potential producer. Not a good idea at all.
 
No. The kind of core user that still seems to be into Linux for Linux's sake isn't doing much to bring the mainstream in. Sorry guy, but the mainstream wants to make a profit. The Linux community still treats the idea of software-for-profit like a disease.

Well, they screwed up with 11 (5, Insightful)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074578)

aint gonna be drinking that koolaid.

gonna look for an alternative.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (1)

AntiDoto (1921914) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074658)

Agreed, I had been using Ubuntu for the last couple years but I've already switched away because of 11.04.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (4, Insightful)

yog (19073) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074740)

Yes, I am so mad at myself for upgrading to this latest release. Suddenly, wireless stopped working, and the new UI is horrific, and even after wasting hours of my time fixing all of this, there are these video artifacts that come and go, and the whole system just seems less stable than before. I suppose in a few months it'll be fine again, but this is getting old.

Why, oh, why, can't Canonical just leave the UI alone? I don't want the window controls like "x" moved from the top right to the top left! I don't want to have to learn a whole new (and buggy) application launcher paradigm! Just work on adding more device support and making Linux more stable, more reliable, and more portable than ever before. We need more webcam support, more USB sound card support, more video drivers--there's plenty of work to be done under the hood. The UI takes care of itself--as people get more used to it, as more and more usage tips and FAQs appear on the internet, it gets easier.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (2)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074742)

Partially agreed. I'm not happy with it due to the issues with Nvidia cards and Xorg server. Not their fault but that's a showstopper IMO. Unity (2D especially) needs work but it's not nearly as bad as the KDE4 fiasco. I think Unity will really be together in 12.04. Personally I use Lubuntu on my ancient laptop and either Lubuntu or Kubuntu on my desktop. I Have Unity 2D installed on my laptop as well just to play with it as it progresses.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074790)

I love the new UI really. Less BS, does what I need.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (0)

H0p313ss (811249) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074810)

aint gonna be drinking that koolaid.

gonna look for an alternative.

I'm yet to find anybody who like Unity outside of Ubuntu development. Anyone? Anyone at all? [youtube.com]

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (1)

RanCossack (1138431) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074952)

I liked it on my netbook.

I suppose I like it *more* than where Gnome is going, but I was/am pretty happy with my modified setup using Gnome 2.

Cripes, though. :/ Every time I read up on Gnome ignoring another set of interoperability standards I feel like giving KDE a try again... I love Linux, but it really depresses me how even the simplest things can't be agreed on.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (1)

Scragglykat (1185337) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074974)

I like it :o) It has its drawbacks, but aside from any bugs and issues with other parties' drivers, it seems pretty well put together, and I'd feel safe setting my parents free on it, yet if you know where to go, you can be a power user too. I think it's mainly aimed at the people who just want their daily apps available to them. I haven't seen this level of hatred at something that can easily be changed by the user, since Coke released New Coke... OMG! I know I can still buy Coke Classic, but I ****ing hate the whole company because they released this other product that isn't what I'm used to. What do you mean it's still early in development? I don't care! I don't like change!

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (2, Interesting)

js_sebastian (946118) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075000)

aint gonna be drinking that koolaid.

gonna look for an alternative.

I'm yet to find anybody who like Unity outside of Ubuntu development. Anyone? Anyone at all? [youtube.com]

I like it, and I'm not involved in ubuntu. It's sort of beta-quality in some ways (mainly because you can't configure it much yet without going to configuration files), so if you have no enthusiasm for trying the new thing I would wait until the next release. It's only in October after all. Personally I enjoy experimenting with it, and I find it pretty sleek and very responsive. Have upgrade my laptops and will soon upgrade the office desktop as well.

Initially, all changes cause a little confusion, but that does not mean they are bad (like moving the x button to the left of windows... it is neither better nor worse on its own. After a few days you get used to it and it works just as well). Unity is also targeted at non-power users and new linux users, who do not have such strongly ingrained habits that resist change. And for that user segment I think it is successful. If they want to reach 200 million users they need to convince people from the windows/mac world to switch, after all.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075026)

I'm yet to find anybody who like Unity outside of Ubuntu development.

It's better than standard Gnome on a netbook. But the pre-Unity Ubuntu netbook interface was better still.

The problem is trying to push a netbook/tablet interface onto desktop machines that have big screens and are used for real work.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (1)

supersloshy (1273442) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074888)

GNOME Shell, IMO, is much more usable than Unity. Give it a try on Fedora 15 or Arch Linux! It takes a while to get used to, but once you wrap your head around it, it's very nice.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074940)

Sadly, I agree. I really loved Ubuntu too. I'm also the type of person who loves to try new things out, and I was genuinely curious about 11.04 and looked forward to giving it a whirl. To be honest though, it is a disappointment, and is a step backwards. I'm thinking about Fedora now.

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36075028)

aint gonna be drinking that koolaid.

gonna look for an alternative.

Gotta love teh intarnets. Always amuses me how absolutely fickle and whiny people are around these parts.

Jaunty: Yay! This is great! Happies!
Karmic: Yay! This is better than Jaunty! Happies!
Maverick: Yay! This is better than Karmic! Happies!
Natty: DEATH AND THE DEFILEMENT OF SHUTTLEWORTH'S IMMORTAL SOUL MUST NOW COMMENCE BECAUSE HE HAS CHANGED SOMETHING THAT I CAN EASILY UNDO AND I AM TOO LAZY TO GIVE IT A CHANCE. All who do not hate it as much as I very clearly are drinking teh koolaid and are rabid cultists. So sayeth I, such is law, as I am talking ON TEH INTARNETS, and am thus right and just.

And the most hilarious part of all is how we can't figure out why nobody takes us seriously any more! It's great! It's almost like we actually ARE a bunch of introverted basement dwellers who instantly and predictably overreact the second our tiny, tiny worlds change in the slightest way! Keep up the amusing work, Colin!

Re:Well, they screwed up with 11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36075110)

Yeah... those damn internet people... aka "users". Aka "the people Mark might want to listen to if he intends on hitting 200 million".

User Experience (5, Insightful)

literaldeluxe (1527087) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074618)

If Canonical wants Ubuntu's user base to grow substantially, they need to integrate usability testing into its design cycle. That's not the only thing that matters, but there's just no way to beat Microsoft or Apple's software without improving the user experience.

Re:User Experience (0)

heypete (60671) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074664)

Curse me for using the last of my mod points in a previous thread.

Seriously. They need a lot more user interface testing. /sticking with 10.04 LTS for the time being

Re:User Experience (1)

eugene ts wong (231154) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074848)

I agree. There is no way that I would trust Cannonical until they can prove that they stopped messing around with things that already work. I'm sticking with Kubuntu 10.04, but as soon as I find a better operating system, then I'm moving over.

If they would only focus on improving the things that people keeping asking about, then Linux would have ruled the desktop ages ago.

Re:User Experience (1)

RanCossack (1138431) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074962)

I downgraded from Maverick to the LTS when I had trouble with a Natty upgrade -- it's actually pretty nice.

Re:User Experience (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075046)

"user interface testing" is overrated.

Now avoiding obvious bugs that impact usability is another matter.

Unity is the kind of nonsense that you end up with when you fixate on "user interface testing".

200 million? how? (2)

MrDoh! (71235) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074640)

Replace Ubuntu front end with an Android VM?

Re:200 million? how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36075034)

go back to gizmodo, douchebag. that shit doesn't fly around here.

Goals (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074662)

I have an equally unrealistic goal of getting laid and having a larger cock .

Re:Goals (2)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075106)

I have an equally unrealistic goal of getting laid and having a larger cock .

Go to prison and you'll get both.

See, these things are possible if you just change the way you look at things. Unfortunately, like the example I gave, that's not what I had in mind when I asked for change.

Good luck with that... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074682)

It seems as though more and more people are trying other distros, and with plenty of good reasons. When I began using Linux, Ubuntu was where I started. I ran it for many years. When they decided to integrate PulseAudio by default, I started considering other options. I now use Debian Squeeze and am happy with it, but for example:

The other day I built a USB stick with Ubuntu for troubleshooting purposes. While I was in the live system, I tried to listen to some music on my local hard drive. I was then subjected to occasional skipping/stuttering in the sound... in 2011... on a six-core machine... with EIGHT gigabytes of memory. There is no excuse for this. It never happens on my native Debian system, so don't blame the drivers. I then had to rip PulseAudio out of the live-USB that I had made and re-route everything to use ALSA just to get stable sound that would play continuously without issue.

Now they're completely changing the desktop environment too, with Unity and all. We just want a stable operating system where the devs concentrate on fixing *problems* and not changing a bunch of things just for the sake of change. I can only imagine how many games will stop working/have problems when they switch to Wayland.

In short, if your goals are to have 2 million users, you should probably try and keep existing users first.

The problem for me though is what to tell other newbies to Linux. My cousin just asked what flavor of Linux I recommend. Do I tell him to use Ubuntu and give him the impression that Linux can't play a music file without occasional stutters? Do I tell him to use Debian and have a slightly more difficult time setting things up, but a better system in the end?

Re:Good luck with that... (3, Interesting)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075002)

Yeah, I'm pretty much in the same boat.

I do like some of the ubuntu derivatives, which seem to do a good job addressing the flaws in Debian and Ubuntu. Give Linux Mint [linuxmint.com] a try... which is pretty easy since it's distributed as a LiveCD/DVD with an install to HD option. It's what I've been recommending to people for a while.

I've even migrated my main server to it from Debian (my one gripe is that the installer doesn't support software RAID configurations as readily, but I'm used to setting those up manually anyway).

The other one I like for netbooks is eeebuntu [eeebuntu.org] 3. Haven't played with their Aurora beta yet, but eeebuntu was pretty good with getting an nice fully-featured compiz-fusion environment on my eeePC with most of the hardware and powersaver features supported out of the box.

Yeah, I guess I'm counted on that list (3, Interesting)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074704)

I've downloaded two different versions, wrestled with them for a while (first on dual-monitor support, later on sound card issues), and ultimately went back to Windows. I'm a geek, but even I'm not THAT much of a geek to stick with Linux apparently (though Ubuntu definitely was the most user-friendly Linux distro I've seen to date).

Re:Yeah, I guess I'm counted on that list (2)

anyaristow (1448609) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074866)

I've installed at least two versions on at least two machines and am currently using none of them. My video driver installation queries made me want to choke the living shit out of every condescending, snarky Linux geek that had new hoops for me to jump through, and the actual solution was far simpler than any of their suggestions.

The last time I let the updater install many changes at once I was left with an un-bootable Linux partition. I don't have time to screw with it. I'm back to Windows on both of those machines and the new machine is a Mac.

Re:Yeah, I guess I'm counted on that list (1)

kesuki (321456) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074896)

for (almost) zero knowledge puppy linux is the easiest, one 125MB download and burn, and a usb drive or a dumpster dive desktop with hdd and you can get a full linux. text editing, email, browsing, a calender app, file managment tools (good for simple hd recovery) ... the hardest part is setting the cd/dvd to boot, runs faster than ubuntu supports old hardware... its still gnome based though, if that matters to you. and it has a wonderful blu-ray dvd and cd burner tool for converting hdds to blu-ray etc.

More like 200 million ex-users... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074724)

...if they keep breaking stuff / replacing working software with experimental crap.

Re:More like 200 million ex-users... (1)

fwarren (579763) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075042)

I have to agree. They mentioned this on the Linux Action Show.

11.04 Unity 3d is a version 1.0 product... buggy
11.11 Unity 2d will be main environment with users able to switch to Unity 3d if they think their hardware can handle it. Thus also a version 1.0 product...buggy.
12.04 Wayland Graphic drivers, version 1.0 product..buggy.

So that "polish" users are looking for does not start till 12.11 at least. That is 1 year of 4 years that is going to be frittered away on their own 1.0 products.

Three Canonical board members have left in five months: chief operating officer, and Reg contributor, Matt Asay was the first to go in December after just 10 months with the company. He called his decision "difficult" and the move to a mobile startup "a leap of faith". That leaves Canonical with a board of four people, when it should be eight. The COO's seat has been vacant since Asay's departure. Chief executive Jane Silber is doubling as COO but the plan, Silber said when Asay left in December 2010, is to recruit a replacement.

Meanwhile Shuttleworth is working harder at monetizing the whole works and in what I am going to characterize as a "frantic frenzy for Canonical to start breaking even" he is carefully listening to the community, and then by fiat doing what he wants to do anyways.

At the rate he is going, he will be lucky to be at 12 million users once 12.11 is out the door.

Re:More like 200 million ex-users... (1)

greg1104 (461138) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075074)

Four of them here. That's how many systems I've converted from running Ubuntu to Debian Squeeze in the last two months. Ubuntu had a great opportunity to pick up users during the years when Debian released too infrequently to be viable for the desktop, and no other Linux distribution was built on that base and targeting the desktop well. At this point I see no reason to ever consider Ubunut's latest unstable bling when there's both a two-year Debian release cycle and more regular desktop releases from distributions like Linux Mint.

Next stop: migrating CentOS server systems, another distribution I no longer have any taste for, to Scientific Linux. That the developers were so clueless that dag [wieers.com] is giving up on them, there's another distribution that's lost its way.

Ubuntu released for men (0)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074766)

THAWTELESS, West London, Monday (NNGadget) — Canonical, Inc. has announced the release later this month of Ubuntu Linux to men [newstechnica.com] .

Project founder Mark Shuttleworth explained that "this stuff is difficult to explain to girls" and thought they'd have gotten the hint when he called 8.04 "Hairy Hardon." "Worrying about sexism in open source just detracts from the battle for Linux. So we've put the tits back into the default desktop. And arses."

Crime-fighting geek Shuttleworth, who dresses as a billiionaire playboy by night, swore that plenty of women liked him lots and that he obviously wasn't unable to get laid or anything, having gotten seriously rich in the dot-com era, not to mention having gone into space. "Chicks dig that stuff. Trust me, I've met lots of girls. More than five!"

Canonical Community Manager Jono Bacon echoed this sentiment on his blog. "We just don't understand how come women are 15% of all computer programmers but only 1% of open source programmers. It must be a bit complicated for them. That's why I've written this spontaneous blog post, completely unrelated to anything my boss may or may not have said, on all the fantastically talented women in free software, even if none of them seem to work much on Ubuntu any more. Also, I'm absolutely confident that saying I'm in a computer geek heavy metal band will get me lots of chicks too, even if their pretty little heads can't understand Linux."

A special women's edition of Ubuntu 9.10 will be released on a bright pink CD. "It doubles as a makeup mirror!" said Shuttleworth.

Do past users count? (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074812)

I put Ubuntu on a machine about 4 years ago. But it was too toyish, and I haven't done it since. But are they counting me? I wouldn't mind.

love it for a server os (1)

aahpandasrun (948239) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074852)

Well, I'm running an Ubuntu server. I absolutely love it. Much easier to manage than a Windows server (which I have to deal with at work). But, it won't work for me for a Desktop OS due to lack of MS Office, iTunes, Photoshop, and games.

Ubuntu brought me back to unix hobbying (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074886)

I learned Linux on Slackware, then migrated to Mandrake and Red Hat. After a while, I got tired of having to deal with gruesome package management issues every time I wanted to set up a new installation or upgrade. I slowly stopped using Linux out of frustration because I just wanted a good platform to code on, not one that would become a hindrance.

An IT buddy turned me on to Ubuntu years back and it's been my home networking platform of choice (save the OpenBSD firewall). I even got my boss to install it here in the office for intranetworking. Hey, Ubuntu maybe didn't develop their tools, but as an out-of-the-box experience for a programmer who isn't looking to become a network admin, it's all I've ever wanted!

Not with Unity they wont..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36074916)

Not with Unity they wont - I changed to Mint - Seems much like the "old" Ubuntu - I think they seriously misjudged opinion with Unity

Not if they keep releasing crap like Natty (1)

GoramFrackinWacko (995587) | more than 2 years ago | (#36074936)

I never could find a definitive answer, so my comments are conjecture backed by reading the whitespace between the forum post lines. It appears Natty uses a new release of xorg's X server, and Nvidia hasn't released drivers compatible with it. I wouldn't mind so much if that fact had been stated up front, thereby saving me two days of misery trying to make it, nay anything do xinerama across two monitors. But alas, I wasted an entire weekend and wound up back on 10.04 anyway. I even tried the Nouveau driver, and I suppose it has potential, but it ain't ready for use yet. People who take single desktop/dual monitor capability for granted won't give (K)(X)Ubuntu a second chance.

Lost opportunity (3, Interesting)

diegocg (1680514) | more than 2 years ago | (#36075054)

Ubuntu could have become the de-facto linux system for phones and tablets, but Android was faster.

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