Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Apple Patents Keyboard That Knows What You'll Type

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the future-board dept.

Apple 132

fysdt writes "Another day, another patent, this one from Apple for a very curious sort of keyboard that might be easier to type on because it'll know in advance which keys your fingertips want to hit. No, not a device built by Emmett 'Doc' Brown (as far as we know, anyway), or pulled back through time in a TARDIS—just a very special type of board with tiny inbuilt tactile sensors capable of detecting what your spider-formation fingers are about to tap before they actually do."

cancel ×

132 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Errr... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108612)

It detects fingers on keys before you press the key.

Thats like predicting which way a car will turn at a junction by looking at it's indicator lights.

Re:Errr... (5, Funny)

kat_skan (5219) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108968)

That's the nice thing about Apple products though. If they don't do what you wanted, you can safely assume that what you wanted was just wrong.

Re:Errr... (1, Funny)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109428)

>>>If they don't do what you wanted, you can safely assume that what you wanted was just wrong.

I want 10.6 and 10.7 for my Mac G5.
"NO." - Steve
I'm sorry sir. Please forgive me. I'm happy to junk the G5 and upgrade to the current model.

This "Air Keyboard" reminds of the Atari Chiclet keyboard for some reason: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atari_8-bit_family [wikipedia.org]

Re:Errr... (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110244)

I'm sorry sir. Please forgive me. I'm happy to junk the G5 and upgrade to the current model.

As the happy owner of a G5, I'm not sure what you are going on about. The thing is at least 5 years old now (mine is going on 7), and they kept selling updated software for it for several years, and they continue to update 10.5 - the last version to run on it. I'd love it if they would support old hardware forever, but let's be realistic. Even Mozilla and Adobe have abandoned G5, which to me is far worse.

In any case, I'm a counter to you I guess - I am generally quite happy if I can get 7 useful years out of a computer. And I'm not going to "junk" it until it doesn't work anymore. It is actually more useful than when I bought it. I won't be loading Windows 7 on my 2005 Athlon either.

Re:Errr... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36110136)

Here is how it will work....

> I love [Steve Jobs]

> I want to [give all my money to Apple]

> I am [a complete retard]

Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III... (3, Insightful)

Lead Butthead (321013) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109056)

Quoting the immortal words of Montgomery "Scotty" Scott: "The more they overthink the plumbing, the easier it is to stop up the drain."
A keyboard should be just that, a keyboard. All other stuff in this patent is just overthinking the plumbing.

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109134)

Realistically, it'll never make it into a product. All they're doing, then, is patenting new ways to make drains that stop up. This is good for society, since no one will ever design such a drain, much less try to sell it, if Apple's already patented it. Think of the patent system as a giant mop, in this case.

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (2, Insightful)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109216)

Yep, the keyboards we have now are perfect, and there's no reason to incrementally improve them. Why, when it comes time to use something better, it'll be okay that it's completely different because we'll all just jump to that en-masse. I mean, what, is some totally new input system going to have unforeseen consequences? Hah! That'll be the day!

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (4, Insightful)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109876)

We don't need a newer, better kind of keyboard. We need an older, better kind of keyboard! [wikipedia.org]

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 3 years ago | (#36112262)

We don't need a newer, better kind of keyboard. We need an older, better kind of keyboard!

I've never understood the appeal of the Model M. Sure it's loud and clacky, but that seems to be a negative more than a positive.

After all, if you're in a cube farm, someone typing rapdily would sound like machinegun fire, making an already miserable work environment even worse.

And at home, well, using them at night discreetly is just as hard. Good perhaps for parents of kids to put on the kid's PC (and the shared one) so they can be alerted to stray typing, but still. Typing at night on a clacky keyboard slowed me down as I tried to type without waking everyone else up...

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36112162)

There's no reason to keep innovating. There is no "something better". Input systems are made to create a relationship between the end user and the interface as close to 1:1 as possible. Are keyboards a perfect answer to input? For many users, yes. For others, maybe not. This isn't a step in the right direction. People who use keyboards as a preferred input device probably use them as efficiently as possible already. This is just a $150 branded price tag on a $20 input device.

Also, if there's an input device that is "completely different": NO ONE WILL USE IT EN MASS. It isn't forced. These are products. The company will tank and the input device that is intuitive out of the box will win.

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (1, Insightful)

gnick (1211984) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109394)

It's like the old "build-a-better-mouse-trap" analogy. Sure, you can make it re-usable. You can make it more humane. You can make it with blinkin-lights. But, all we want is something cheap that we can throw peanut butter on, kills the mouse, and we can throw away w/o getting our hands dirty. About the only improvements for keyboards are making the keys softer/quieter, more comfortable, or rearranging them. Does my chair need to react when my bum's about to land?

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109848)

Does my chair need to react when my bum's about to land?

I imagine that would depend on the size of you and your ass... :-)

Re:Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek III.. (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 3 years ago | (#36112256)

About the only improvements for keyboards are making the keys softer/quieter...

Talk about your misfeatures...

Quoting the immortal words from Star Trek IV... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36110408)

Quoting the immortal words of Montgomery "Scotty" Scott:

"Keyboard... how quaint."

Re:Errr... (3, Funny)

shadowfaxcrx (1736978) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109122)

asdfjk;asdjk;lasdfjk;ladsfjk;lSo what happens if you rest your fingers on the keys between typing?asdfjkl;asdfjklasdfjkl;

Now if that keyboard attain self awareness... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109352)

Now if that keyboard attain self awareness, it would start up the notepad (well, OSX equivalent anyways) and key in "you're jerking me around. stop it, you jerk."

Re:Now if that keyboard attain self awareness... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109490)

(well, OSX equivalent anyways)

TextEdit.

Re:Errr... (1)

dimeglio (456244) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109486)

If processors can have execution prediction, why not keyboards?

Re:Errr... (2)

jpapon (1877296) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110090)

Because there's a human in the loop with keyboards; this is not the case for a processor, except in the very rare case (in terms of the processors time scale) that the user affects what is arriving at the processor. For your analogy to work, a human would have to be inputting each command individually to the processor... and the human would have to correct the processor each time it made a false prediction too.

Re:Errr... (1)

dimeglio (456244) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110208)

Although the scale might be different, humans pay in performance when a processor does not predicting correctly. Same goes for the keyboard.

Also, there's always a human in the loop. Unless you are referring to artificial life forms.

If it's anything like the iPhone ... (1)

wsanders (114993) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110726)

This'll feet your be somehow use fill. It actuarily pickaxe the current word mast of the tines.

Re:Errr... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36110962)

Only Apple would try to make "patent trolling" look "hip" and "cool". Only an Apple user would be retarded enough to think it is. Though I guess it's not as bad as their slave labor camps holding the prestigious position of "highest suicide rate".

Judging by the... (2)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108618)

epically inept word suggestions from my T9 phone, this will produce some awesomely funny posts.

Re:Judging by the... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108694)

http://damnyouautocorrect.com/ [damnyouautocorrect.com]

Re:Judging by the... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109018)

Even T9 wasn't as bad as those.

Re:Judging by the... (2)

dwillden (521345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109368)

Hmm maybe I'll run out and reserve damnyoupsychickeyboard.com

Re:Judging by the... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108714)

i can imagine the most oft-prompted phrase will be "i think the rev jobs is god and i'm going to give him all my money"

Re:Judging by the... (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108914)

More like "I don't remember typing in my credit card details to buy apps from the app store?"

Great! (5, Funny)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108636)

I hop it work breaded than predictive testing.
__
Sent from my iPhone

Re:Great! (1)

kehren77 (814078) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108850)

I seem to be the only person who doesn't have this problem with the iPhone. Rarely does the predictive typing feature mess up a word for me and when it does, it's because the word I'm entering isn't really a word (proper name, tech jargon, etc...).

I wish the Mail app in OS X had predictive typing.

Re:Great! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109046)

That's because you have nothing original to say.

What Apple Didn't Say... (0)

penguin_dance (536599) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110766)

What Apple didn't say is it saves all those future keystrokes in a hidden database that syncs up with your iPhone.

Re:Great! (1)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 3 years ago | (#36111368)

Seems perfectly cromulent to me.

Truefax (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108640)

The poster bought one of these and I took it upon myself to go back in time and post this for him before he thought to type it.

You're welcome.

It will be called (1)

indecks (1208854) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108642)

"The Red Ball" because it can predict murders.

Creepy (1)

SolemnDwarf (863575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108664)

Would you ever have to take your fingers off home row?

I tried pretending my work keyboard would do this. Just made minute movements with my fingers. It actually made me nauseous. Weird...

What a letdown (0)

RogueRat (1710322) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108688)

Wow, this article was way less interesting than the title promised. Why did this make front page?

Touch typing? (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108690)

Does this mean that resting your fingers on the home row would be equivalent to mashing down on the keyboard?

Already done: (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108708)

http://www.theonion.com/video/apple-introduces-revolutionary-new-laptop-with-no,14299/

You can have my mechanical, long stroke keyboard.. (1)

khraz (979373) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108726)

... when you pry it from my cold, dead hands.

Re:You can have my mechanical, long stroke keyboar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109288)

This is Apple, remember. They're trying to deprecate your hands entirely, as they're not elegant and stylish enough and have too many points of contact. I'm certain a Genius will be happy to liberate your inferior hands as well as the keyboard they are clutching, from your arms and replace them with iStubs. They might even get them in white next year!

I prefer me knowing what I typed (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108736)

I prefer me knowing what I typed. Which is why I use a Man's keyboard An IBM type M. I might not always type, but when I do it is on a Model M.

Re:I prefer me knowing what I typed (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108798)

I prefer me knowing what I typed. Which is why I use a Man's keyboard An IBM type M. I might not always type, but when I do it is on a Model M.

You roll without a display device too? Damn! I at least like to see my monkey-phalanges attempting a Shakespeare.

Re:I prefer me knowing what I typed (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#36111726)

I often type while looking at something else. I typed this whole comment while talking to someone in my office.

Re:I prefer me knowing what I typed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108864)

Now we have it from the least interesting man in the world.

Put the earbuds back in (1, Insightful)

EraserMouseMan (847479) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108744)

And so you're going to tell us that this will revolutionize everything now, right? And what a visionary Steve Jobs is? And how Apple is the only company capable of being innovative these days? And the stock price... Got it. Thanks.

Re:Put the earbuds back in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109956)

I concur, after all, my wireless Logitech keyboard lights up the keys when it senses movement over the them.

Are we sure this is a good thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108782)

Cause if http://damnyouautocorrect.com/ is any indication....

So... (1)

TimeElf1 (781120) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108800)

Instead of Damn You Autocorrect, we will have a new site called Damn You Precognitive Keyboard!

Re:So... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109038)

Instead of Damn You Autocorrect, we will have a new site called Damn You Precognitive Keyboard!

No, it would be called the "You will be Damned" precognitive keyboard.

Hello, computer. (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108820)

Scotty: Hello, computer.
Dr. Nichols: Just use the keyboard.
Scotty: Keyboard. How quaint.

In other words (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108834)

In other words

Apple to fanbois: "we know what yo want to do with your fingers"

Re:In other words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36110654)

Touch epeen. Nuff said.

How about predicting mistakes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108884)

What good is a keyboard that knows what typos I am going to make, but does nothing about ti?

What's the point? (2)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108896)

I don't see how a little blast of air is going to help me type -- and having the key move by itself when I press it seems like it would remove the tactile feel that lets me know that I pressed it -- if I wanted an on-screen keyboard with no tactile feel, I'd use one. I use a real keyboard because my fingers like to know when they press a key.

Unless key prediction gets *much* better than what I've seen on my phone, it seems that I'd quickly learn to ignore any hints given by the keyboard since more times than not, it would be wrong.

Re:What's the point? (1)

sammyF70 (1154563) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108984)

You might be on to something with that : "This iPhone virtual keyboard provides EXACTLY the same experience and amount of tactile feedback as the iThink4U Precog Keyboard!" .. I wish I were joking.

Re:What's the point? (2)

Altus (1034) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109114)

Of course mechanical feedback is nice, but the idea here, I suspect, is to be able to have tactile feedback that is as effective as mechanical feedback but in a package that is far far smaller. the thinner keyboards get the less mechanical feedback you get from them and the smaller devices get the smaller their keyboard have to be. This isn't to make keyboards better... its to make them smaller without making them suck more. Theoretically this might give good tactile feedback on keyboard that is simply a flat surface with no moving parts, just touch sensors.

Also, the predictive stuff isn't based on what you typed last but based on sensors detecting your fingers heading toward a key, so it should work very reliably.

I'm not sure if this would work well enough or not, but I would be curious to try it.

Re:What's the point? (1)

dwillden (521345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109642)

Unless you've had too much caffeine that morning. They the shaking of your over caffeinated hands may cause issues with accuracy. It'll pick the right key bbbbbuuuuttttt hhhhhiiiiitttt every letter multiple times.

Mod parent up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109986)

He actually RTFA!

Re:What's the point? (1)

danlock4 (1026420) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110060)

It seems more to me (from having read the summary) like this would benefit the typing speed of hunt-and-peck typists and detract from the typing speed--slow down--touch-typists. *shrug*

I wonder if it could be a way to improve keyboarding skills for programmers, etc., by using macros more efficiently? Hmm...

I think I'll go change my .sig to "Why do I always add a slightly-OT sentence to the end of my posts?" (to increase insightfulness? informative status? or maybe it's just the way my brain fails)

Re:What's the point? (1)

RareButSeriousSideEf (968810) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109766)

Unless key prediction gets *much* better than what I've seen on my phone, it seems that I'd quickly learn to ignore any hints given by the keyboard since more times than not, it would be wrong.

I shared your opinion until recently, so I was surprised to see how much better prediction has gotten with alternative keyboards on my Android device. SwiftKey is all about prediction, and it learns quite quickly. It has a decent training set right out of the box, but a week later it's night & day.

Swype isn't as sophisticated as SwiftKey with next-word prediction, but the idea of tracing in lieu of keystrokes is great. The first beta was almost unusable, but after trying beta 2, I switched and I'll probably never go back to key-tapping.

I think smarter keyboards will be a short-lived phase though; voice recognition is really coming of age the past few years, and when it works it's far more efficient than even the most accurate predictive keyboard. (Well, unless it predicts your whole next paragraph, I guess...)

Complexity, failure, etc... (2)

alispguru (72689) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108912)

Keyboards are electromechanical nightmares anyway, so there would have to be a BIG advantage to anything that made them more mechanically complex.

Consider that the failure modes on this would make individual keys have different sensitivity when typing.

Bleah. Count me out until they've had a few years in harsh environments.

BTW, here [appleinsider.com] is another link to a similar story - the submission seems slashdotted as I type this.

Re:Complexity, failure, etc... (1)

rich3rd (559032) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109380)

On the upside, maybe the compressed air will keep crumbs and other foreign matter out from underneath the keys, thus helping to prevent one of the most common modes of failure with existing keyboard technology.

How is this different (1)

esocid (946821) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108916)

from any other predictive keyboard out there?

A: It has an apple on it.

no data in TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108964)

I want to know whether this can improve my typing speed. If I can do 110 wpm now, does this help?

Or is it another one of those things that helps the least proficient while hurting those who can already do it well?

Either way TFA provided no useful data *at all*.

You won't be allowed to type "smut" (1)

Old97 (1341297) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108970)

And your text will be reviewed to determine its worthiness. Also, Apple keeps 30% of your words.

Autocorrect (2)

bradgoodman (964302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36108976)

Oh, come ON! The last thing we need is my work PC doing the same kind of auto-correct nonsense that my iPhone does! You really need it on an iPhone where typing is cumbersome, however, I believe this would slow you DOWN on a PC. The reason is, typing becomes quick, intuitive and "muscle-memory" driven. To have to react to the computer (or keyboard) doing things for you as you are in the middle of typing a word would completely - not just slow you down - sort of throw a stumbling block in front of you. Granted, you could ignore it, or deal with it after the word is done - however, this wouldn't be any better than turning it off - or doing what spell-correction does today.

Re:Autocorrect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109112)

Oh, come ON! The last thing we need is my work PC doing the same kind of auto-correct nonsense that my iPhone does! You really need it on an iPhone where typing is cumbersome, however, I believe this would slow you DOWN on a PC. The reason is, typing becomes quick, intuitive and "muscle-memory" driven. To have to react to the computer (or keyboard) doing things for you as you are in the middle of typing a word would completely - not just slow you down - sort of throw a stumbling block in front of you. Granted, you could ignore it, or deal with it after the word is done - however, this wouldn't be any better than turning it off - or doing what spell-correction does today.

Whoever said this would be on a full-size PC (or mac?)

Viral funny site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36108982)

Register your new domain: damnyouautocorrectingkeyboard.com

Questionable idea... (1)

MaWeiTao (908546) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109020)

I fail to see how where you fingers hover could have any correlation to what you might be about to type. If you're in a proper position for typing your fingers are always going to be resting on a set range of keys. Also, people routinely type too quickly for this to be effective.

I suppose the people at Apple might have simply been brainstorming and just patent any idea that shows the vaguest hint of potential.

What surprises me is that predictive text hasn't been coupled with full-size keyboards. I imagine it would work a lot like how input for a lot of Asian languages works. There's an app I've been using for some time on my Android phone called SwiftKey which I think is impressive. The suggestions are driven by a log the app builds of what you've typed. It's not perfect, but occasionally I can complete a sentence without typing a single word, by just going through the suggestions. When I first saw that headline this is the sort of thing I thought Apple got a patent on.

Not a fan of that writer (1)

rebelwarlock (1319465) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109052)

This part threw me off: 'The second method involves a pneumatic (that would be "air-related") system' So they expect people who can understand the diagram and are willing to read up on a recently patented device to not know what "pneumatic" means. I'd be very interested to know what their target audience is.

But? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109070)

Good going Apple! SO now your keyboard will be all "You were gonna press 'X' so I put an 'X' on the screen"

And I'll be all "Oh there's an 'X' there. Now I don't have to press it!"

And the universe will implode

I HOPE YOU'RE HAPPY

So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109074)

...a keyboard that blows?

Actually, Doctor Who did use a Mac keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109128)

In Silence in the Library [wired.com] set many years in the future.

Wouldn't this method... (1)

hellwig (1325869) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109132)

Wouldn't this method require everyone to be a practiced touch-typist? I mean, in order for the keyboard to predict where your fingers are going, wouldn't YOU have to know where your fingers are going? Too many people these days hunt and peck. Obviously there are people who scrape the letters off their Dvorak Simplified keyboards just to screw with others, but I imagine people interested in Apple products might not be so disciplined. Especially if those same people have gotten used to typing on an iPhone or iPad.

Re:Wouldn't this method... (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109768)

Obviously there are people who scrape the letters off their Dvorak Simplified keyboards just to screw with others.

Actually, I just set the OS keyboard layout to Dvorak and type on it without looking at the keys...

Additionally, I do own a keyboard with no key-cap markings, but I purchased it this way... [daskeyboard.com]

I find that people are more confused if the key they press has a differently labeled key than the character it generates than if the keyboard has no key-cap markings at all.

(Most keyboards have keys that can be popped off and re-arranged to your preferred layout, but some keyboards mount the F and J keys differently, or have a different key shape for each row...)

Dvorak keyboards that can be used without selecting the OS keyboard preference are expensive because they have to translate the scancodes themselves. You know what I'd be exited about? US Smart phone manufacturers allowing me to select or modify the on-screen keyboard layout... Even the Apple II supported Dvorak, (in fact, OSX supports both single hand layouts (optimized for left or right only). ) oh that's right Steve, I forgot, I didn't want to use any other key layout on the iPad than the one I don't use...

Apple Patents Keyboard That Uses Tactile Air (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109162)

But it doesn't know what you are going to type in advance, just when your finger tips are close to the keys you want to physically depress. It then sends back air pressure as a tactile response. There, did that sound as confusing as the original post?

ugh (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109222)

Great, but it will probably predict it will probably be programmed to predict what the typical Apple user will type: "Let's hit up The Levee for PBRs" "OMG that guy totally almost hit my Vespa" "Dude we should hit up that Animal Collective show next Saturday" "Dad, I really need that $2000 for rent as soon as possible" "Of course I have a career, I'm an unpaid intern at an indie music label"

Time to register a domain (1)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109246)

damnyouautokeyboard.com

As it turns out .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109302)

This keyboard cannot write the words "PC", "windows" or Linux....

isn't this already being used everywhere (1)

josepha48 (13953) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109330)

This kind of thing has been out there since, well for years now in desktop apps. So why the patent now, isn't it obvious, or are they going to try and go after google/android and all the other web sites and applications that use this feature.

Re:isn't this already being used everywhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109504)

Anyone and everyone would patent the kitchen sink if the thought they could get away with it, where have you been the last 10+ years?

Re:isn't this already being used everywhere (1)

Altus (1034) | more than 3 years ago | (#36111184)

No. No it is not. In fact, I can safely say that I have never seen a keyborad that does what this article describes and I suspect you haven't either.

Like MS software knows what I want to do next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109458)

APPL getting more and more like MS everyday

AAPPLLEE KKEEYYBBOOAARRDD (1)

tekrat (242117) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109560)

II''mm uussiinngg iitt nnooww..

Re:AAPPLLEE KKEEYYBBOOAARRDD (1)

XiaoMing (1574363) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109724)

Slw Fngrs I Se?

Nethack, No! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36109586)

OMG I meant 'j', not 'k'!

Honestly, Professor (1)

NEDHead (1651195) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109652)

I was trying to write a brilliantly thoughtful and original paper, but my keyboard wouldn't let me....

A better solution would be for us to move to... (1)

QilessQi (2044624) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109710)

...the Decabet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRtyBBiyYhI [youtube.com] . 10 characters = fewer keys = fewer keystroke errors.

Actually we could make it simpler and enter things in binary, so we'd only need two keys: 0 and 1.

Or maybe cycle through a conventional alphabet with two keys: "Next Character" and "Yeah, That One"....

So last year. (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 3 years ago | (#36109712)

I just patented a keyboard that types what you mean.

Judging by my last 5 "Reply to All" emails.... (1)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110628)

What I WANT to type, and what I SHOULD type, are two radically different things.

What's even the point? (1)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110662)

Seriously, what is the point of this? You don't WANT software responding to what it thinks you're going to do, you want it responding to what you actually do. I (and many others, I'm sure) tend to rest their fingers on the keys when not actively typing - if the keyboard were to detect that as input typing would become impossible.

And don't even think about applying it to gaming. First, there's the fact that if it mis-guesses, you're screwed on any sort of twitch shooter, platformer or fighting game. Second, if it DOES work properly, you've increased the already-massive gap between PC gamers and console gamers (multiplayer interplay between PC and consoles is extremely rare in no small part because gaming on a mouse/keyboard is so superior to using a gamepad - even with the console players having autoaim, it's still completely unfair).

Re: (1)

maucer (1162541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36110800)

All I know is that I want one. Especially if it has 3G

That would work ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36111044)

I wonder what would the keyboard guess about me trying to type this:

for (int i = 0; i cellCount; i++)
                                {
                                        ListViewNF lv = new ListViewNF();
                                        lv.Font = new System.Drawing.Font("Microsoft Sans Serif", 7F, System.Drawing.FontStyle.Regular, System.Drawing.GraphicsUnit.Point, ((byte)(0))); .............

I'm patenting myself! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36111076)

I know exactly what I'm going to type ... most of the time.

Patent: X with Y (1)

Tei (520358) | more than 3 years ago | (#36111246)

New patent.
"detecting position of hands" with "hands"

I propose something.

If a patent can be described in a single phrase, It is automatically canceled.

If a patent can be described in a single phrase, It is automatically canceled with the form X with Y. And CEO of the company is jailed 30 days.

Great idea! (1)

Tarlus (1000874) | more than 3 years ago | (#36111376)

just a very special type of board with tiny inbuilt tactile sensors capable of detecting what your spider-formation fingers are about to tap before they actually do

Because what could possibly be annoying about hardware-level autocompletion!

Keylogger (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36111964)

So... it's a steam punk keylogger. Great.

keyboard on my nokia e71 (1)

ideaz (1981092) | more than 3 years ago | (#36112300)

already does that :D
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>