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Telehack Re-Creates the Internet of 25 Years Ago

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the and-corn-dogs-cost-3-cents dept.

The Internet 204

saccade.com writes "Telehack.com has meticulously re-created the Internet as it appeared to a command line user over a quarter century ago. Drawing on material from Jason Scott's TextFiles.com, the text-only world of the 1980s appears right in your browser. If you want to show somebody what the Arpanet looked like (you didn't call it the "Internet" until the late '80s) this is it. Using the 'finger' command and seeing familiar names from decades ago (some, sadly, ghosts now) sends a chill down your spine."

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the finger command (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124270)

Whenever I get the finger command I assume my girlfriend is asking me to get her wet before we have sex.

Sometimes I'm reminded of my old telecom job as I push her mouth towards my penis.

Re:the finger command (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124394)

Seriously. And people wonder why managers didn't want to switch to Linux -- this is it. Every other utility or program is called "dick," "fuck," or some variation of it. No doubt it had a lot to do with the creators (Stallman et al) of said utilities, and the fact that to this day, the only vagina they have ever come close to was their mother's, at birth.

Re:the finger command (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124982)

Not true. Standards were a lot lower in the 70s, no AIDS, dick herpes was just a "cold sore", abortions were cheap and easy. I can easily imagine Stallman getting all kinds of incredibly hairy pussy back in the day.

Re:the finger command (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124430)

people here don't have girlfriends...well except the lower echelons of neurotypicals who want to feel empowered...

It is sad .... (1)

craznar (710808) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124288)

... that I felt right at home.

Re:It is sad .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124448)

No, everyone deserves to feel at home *somewhere*

Re:It is sad .... (1)

arkane1234 (457605) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124504)

I was thinking the same thing...
I miss those days. :(

Re:It is sad .... (1)

secretsquirel (805445) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124526)

does it still count if i had to use leetkey?

Me too. It makes me realize (2)

aussersterne (212916) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124616)

that I am no longer of the "current technological generation" but am in fact a couple generations back.

Yes, I remember updating my office location, hours, and plan for finger-ers and actually miss that—somehow it all felt so much more personal to me than Facebook does today. That is, I suppose, how you know that time has passed you buy.

fingerd * 30 years == facebook (1)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125144)

Never used finger, either.

Re:It is sad .... (1)

Lanteran (1883836) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124752)

"You can slice the whole sort of general mish mash any way you like and you will generally come up with something that someone will call home."- Mostly Harmless (Last hitchhiker's book).

Re:It is sad .... (1)

Reziac (43301) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125156)

Me too... but it was the most fun I've had all day!

Re:It is sad .... (1)

torsmo (1301691) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125202)

Path: utzoo!linus!decvax!microsoft!uw-beaver!ssc-vax!fluke!dan

From: dan@fluke.UUCP (Dan Everhart)

Subject: bristly beards

Date: Wed, 7-Sep-83 16:20:46 EDT

Newsgroups: net.singles

Organization: John Fluke Mfg. Co., Everett, Wash

I've been told that my beard can be bristly and irritating. I really

can't grow it any longer without it looking shaggy. I don't want to cut

it off, because I've been told that I look better with it. (Plus its so

nice not to have to scrape the face every morning.)

Has anyone else had this problem, and what did you do about it?

Dan

... { decvax!microsof, uw-beaver, allegra, lbl-csam, ssc-vax } !fluke!dan

=!=__XXEND__=!=

Things haven't changed all that much. Craigslist is still around.

Damn! I feel old! (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124298)

I a least I was able to finger myself!

Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

The Dawn Of Time (2115350) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124300)

I guess there's something basically human about reliving the past, but I've never really been into it. Computing was super cool back in the day, but it's so much cooler now it's not even the same game anymore.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (2)

tetrahedrassface (675645) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124316)

I think the point is, but may be wrong, is that now it is ubiquitous, whereas before it was something a person wanted or was drawn to do. Computing today is kinda lame really, because it isn't exclusive at all. It gets old, invasive, and yes all over the place. But has it solved any of the worlds problems? *looks around*... we still have plenty. *goes back into cave*

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124544)

Yeah, man, Tahrir Square and the Arab Spring... pretty cool s#$t...

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (2, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124604)

I think the point is, but may be wrong, is that now it is ubiquitous, whereas before it was something a person wanted or was drawn to do. Computing today is kinda lame really, because it isn't exclusive at all. It gets old, invasive, and yes all over the place. But has it solved any of the worlds problems? *looks around*... we still have plenty. *goes back into cave*

Well all I know is that growing up I couldn't talk to people from around the world for free, and if I wanted information I was limited to my local library if and when I could get there. If I was sick I relied on the rubbish doctors in my neighborhood to diagnose and treat me. If I wanted to do real science I had to make it my career, where now I can run all manner of science and math apps. If I wanted music I had to go and physically purchase it. If I wanted to compare prices it would take hours. Nothing was searchable without great effort!

We'll always have lots of problems, but computers sure have solved SOME of mine. Computing is only lame if you use it for lame things.

As for it not being exclusive, that's only a problem if you're an elitist. And besides there are plenty of non-mainstream geeky computer endevours that are very exclusive. Have you hacked a LInux kernel?

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124624)

Well, back in the early 80's, you could talk to people around the world for free. Fidonet was your friend.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124684)

Well, back in the early 80's, you could talk to people around the world for free. Fidonet was your friend.

I was in primary school in Australia. I didn't know a thing about Fidonet, and if I did I couldn't afford it anyway.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

black6host (469985) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124750)

It was free for access, at least on my BBS. Granted it wasn't in Australia, and you had to have your own computer and modem. But you need your own computer now to be on the net so no difference. If I could correspond with someone in Russia I do believe Australia would have been accessible to me as well. And the rest of the world to you. However, I do recognize that you may not have been of an age where you had money to do that. And I may be a bit older than you, therefore having more say or money at the time. Now you do, as shown by the fact that you are here. My point was simply that it was available, and not just to those who had restricted/specialized access. Granted, it wasn't Darpanet but global communication was not restricted to just a chosen few.

Scary thing is, we may be back there again if things keep going they way they are. I do not want the/any government having control over my access to communications. Fidonet, in some incarnation, may become more useful in the future. Leave the net for advertising, we can make our own thing and have it server OUR purposes rather than those who would wish to be our masters.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124760)

In the 80s my parents were making overseas calls via operator. Certainly international video conferencing wasn't accessible.

I hope you're wrong about things regressing to the Fidonet days. That would be a real shame. Microsoft buying Skype is a worry actually.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124990)

I'm 90% certain I still can. Unless all of /. is actually sitting outside my window, and I'm actually shouting this instead of typing it.

Couldn't get on the net back then anyway (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124738)

Instead of google we had the science citation index on microfiche, found an article that could be useful, put in an interlibrary loan, then waited a couple of months for the journal with that article in it to arrive. That's actually when the internet existed! Because so few could access the thing it took so long to grow into what we have now. If I wanted anything from the internet back then I had to ask a postgradute computer science student to get it and put it on a floppy disk for me. After a while a BBS or two managed to get limited connectivity to the internet so I could sent email via the BBS and it would connect to a machine with access to the internet daily and do a send/receive of all it's users mail in one batch. Using ftpmail you could get files if you scripted in the right commands and knew exactly where the files were. The guy that everyone calls a dinosaur that doesn't understand the net - that evil old bastard Rupert Murdoch - had already bought an ISP in America before the general public in Australia had a way to connect directly to the internet.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (2)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125200)

The only thing the computer has done, the way we use it, is to make it quicker to come to the wrong conclusions.

Some people use the computer to make it easier to back up and try a new path having once come to the wrong end-point. That's a real improvement.

But it also makes it easier to just blindly try more wrong paths. Computers induce a lot of churn into our daily lives. I guess that's different. I'm still not convinced it's substantive. Too many of the important problems have too many paths to try, so many that you're probably going to die before you hit a right solution. And if you get used to the churn, I think you lose the ability to recognize a right path, so you often find yourself having backed off a real solution and started on a new wrong one, and by the time you can get back to what was a right path, well, you've changed, and the network has changed.

I've noticed that my cell phone has more storage and more computing power than the Univac 1100 that we used at college. More even than the Sun workstations I used at the university. Shoot, I have a couple of AT&T 7100s or whatever those 68010-based Unix workstations were called stored in a basement somewhere in the States, half a meg of RAM and 20M of hard disk. The OS floppies are still there, I think.

My cell phone has 64M or RAM, a full gig of flash RAM for persistent store. The display has a bit fewer pixels. Or does it? The keyboard, well, okay, that's a loss. Network connectivity? No ethernet, but it is connected to telephone network.

And the OS is a derivative of Linux that Docomo (and NTT) refuse to acknowledge, much less live up to the license requirements of letting me access it, so I can't run dc (or bc) or vi on it.

I want a portable Unix workstation the size of a pocket calculator. I know it could be done.

Nostalgia makes sense to me.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124710)

But has it solved any of the worlds problems? *looks around*... we still have plenty. *goes back into cave*

Yes, the internet failed to solve all the problems of the world, therefore it's worthless.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

inKubus (199753) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124908)

So what's next? We got to go out and keep going. We have nothing to lose because we don't have anything.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (2)

Oshawapilot (1039614) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124374)

Agreed. I was excited to find a BBS a few months ago that was still running the same software I used when I was a SysOp myself in the late 80's. After about 15 minutes online the nostalgia effect quickly gave way to the reality that, well...it just sucked. +++ATH0

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124422)

Yeah, Win84 was a mess.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

Lord Byron II (671689) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124436)

Oh God, AT modem commands. I haven't given those any thought in probably over a decade. Wow, I remember having a particular command string that I liked for some particular reason (I think it gave me an extra 1200bps at the loss of some stability). Thanks for the nostalgia.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

Daneurysm (732825) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124484)

I remember having a modem directory where I had procomm, pcplus, telix, telemate and MTE.

I remember that telemate was the best (protocol selection, external protocols, text/notepad windows, dos window, etc....but I used MTE 'cuz it gave me fake MNP-5, the data compression/error correction(MTE = MNP Terminal emulator)...at 1200 and 2400bps it made a difference....I forget which v.32/42 or "bis" protocol that is....my gut tells me v.32.

I had two favorite initialization stings....one for my telecom program and one for my BBS....I remember ATX0DT being at the begining of everything for dialing... AT, attention, X0...I think that has something to do with the 'hook' setting....I think that made it keep from putting the speaker off hook until the handshake and connection were all finalized and you got your "CONNECT 2400" or whatever your string was....but I'm probably wrong. Been a while. As for my BBS initialization string, who effin' knows, I remember it being epic in length and detail.

Good times, for certain. Seems like a couple lifetimes away by now, though.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

Pathwalker (103) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125178)

X0 was the shortest text output from the modem; I usually went for the opposite extreme with X4, so it would log everything while it was connecting.

I remember that for a while my lines were in horrible shape, so I would use s7=255 to disable the dropout detection, and ride out the line noise.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

chesapoodle (2005990) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124636)

Sitting on a shelf behind me is Procomm, Qmodem, Compuserve and, golly, a book from BYTE. Oddly enough, I can still do the AT commands because I had them all memorized from back in the day when I was a telecom bit flipper. 8-) Man this is taking me back to XModem CRC and all that fun stuff. Good times ::leans back in rocking chair and drinks an adult beverage::

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124562)

bbs? bbs.goldengate.net is up and running on telnet. (Aquarius bbs)
After you have an account, read the public messages for even more bbses.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (2)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124734)

You may find a BBS, but you won't find the people you talked to.
It's not the technology that has changed the most, but the users.
If you want nostalgia and nerd talk, go to /., before the designers ruin it with video and ajax, driving the old school nerds away.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124802)

"If you want nostalgia and nerd talk, go to /. ..." ...and wait 45 seconds even on 8 core machines before your one line answer finally gets posted, just like in the olden days.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

The Dawn Of Time (2115350) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124856)

You're aware that is flood protection, right?

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124466)

Computing today is pretty lame.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124532)

Computing was super cool back in the day, but it's so much cooler now

You don't use facebook or youtube much do you? The internet back then was more information and less opinion. There's a lot more information out there now which is great, but _everybody_ wants to share their opinion with _everyone_, and nobodies opinion except mine is worth listening to! ;p

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (1)

evildarkdeathclicheo (978593) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125068)

It used to be unique, and special, now it's just something that everyone does. Nerds don't like not being unique, even if some wish they could fit in. It's not so much nostalgia as it is loss of identity.

Re:Nostalgia never made sense to me (2)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125282)

Nostalgia is about mortality. Those of us who remember those times also are aware that we were 20 years younger then. Technology may develop indefinitely, but we will pass on. Those technologies of the past bring us back, ultimately, to a time 20 years farther away from our own deaths.

future.txt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124340)

Nice text!

Im too young for arpanet, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124350)

seems just like the old school BBS systems... who remembers MUD? wait... maybe i am old...

...my lawn...get off it...etc... (1)

Daneurysm (732825) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124366)

Yeah, it's cool. Yeah, it is reminiscent of my first years on "the net." But it isn't terribly impressive, I had a similar faux OS matrix-login coded in Telegard/Renegade menu files.

While it is geeky and kinda cool the appeal is limited. Anyone who isn't already familiar with this will not understand what is going on at all. Anyone who is already familiar won't be impressed.

I hate to piss on parades as I appreciate and encourage anything like this...maybe I'm just getting old.

Re:...my lawn...get off it...etc... (1)

Iskender (1040286) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124664)

While it is geeky and kinda cool the appeal is limited. Anyone who isn't already familiar with this will not understand what is going on at all. Anyone who is already familiar won't be impressed.

I think you shouldn't be so quick to assume that others will be equally disinterested. I was born around the time things might have looked like this and I found it plenty interesting. It was interesting to see how much basic familiarity with the Ubuntu command line helped despite it being "bad Unix".

Re:...my lawn...get off it...etc... (1)

Daneurysm (732825) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124702)

Then you are in that narrow band of between and/or overlapping "famliliar" and "unfamiliar" that can really be intrigued by this....but again, maybe I'm just getting old. These days pessimism is my first sign that I am both alive and awake every day...

Hilarious (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124376)

"operator: Slashdotted..367 users, holy shit"

Hopefully the real ARPANET was a bit more scalable (2)

oravecz (543740) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124382)

operator: Slashdotted..367 users, holy shit

And just like that, the Internet is dead

Nicely done! (2)

Tony Isaac (1301187) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124400)

Very nice reproduction, it's scary that I could actually get around on it. I just had to see if I could still write an old-fashioned BASIC program. Worked like a charm.

In those days, it was just us nerds who used computers. We just HAD to show everybody our little secret, didn't we! Now EVERYBODY's on the Internet!

Even the ability to handle load is simulated! (1)

dFaust (546790) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124404)

It seems to be getting Slashdotted, the site isn't consistently responding for me. Oh, and while paging through the finger results on my first connect I got this (for realsies):

"operator: Slashdotted..367 users, holy shit"

Slashdotted (1)

BlueScreenO'Life (1813666) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124406)

I was enjoying the green-text-on-black-screen nostalgia when suddenly this broadcast transported me back to 2011:

operator: Slashdotted..367 users, holy shit

Re:Slashdotted (1)

ildon (413912) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124414)

All I see is "Session closed."

Re:Slashdotted (1)

ildon (413912) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124424)

Nevermind, reloading the page a few times fixed it.

Re:Slashdotted (2)

BertieBaggio (944287) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124586)

Is that how you normally fix a slashdotting?

Re:Slashdotted (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125014)

That, or how you normally make it worse.

Re:Slashdotted (1)

ildon (413912) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125034)

That, or how you normally make it worse.

This.

Re:Slashdotted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36125182)

I was reading your post when I was suddenly transported back to 2001.

367 users?

I remember the great old days when the name 'Slashdot' was only whispered hurriedly in dark corners, for even daring to speak that name would release thousands upon thousands of curious geeks, destroying servers with casual nonchalance as a man might swat a mosquito.

Slashdotting, I fear, no longer is.

If it doesn't have Gopher (0)

raddan (519638) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124408)

telnet, FTP, and Archie, then it isn't the real thing.

I was fortunate enough to have a father who worked at BBN at this time, and so I was immersed in network technology as a teenager. I remember him excitedly showing me a copy of NCSA Mosaic (an early web browser) and I was like Text documents? What's the point?" Funny.

Re:If it doesn't have Gopher (1)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124478)

telnet, FTP, and Archie, then it isn't the real thing.

I was fortunate enough to have a father who worked at BBN at this time, and so I was immersed in network technology as a teenager. I remember him excitedly showing me a copy of NCSA Mosaic (an early web browser) and I was like Text documents? What's the point?" Funny.

The summary says Telehack is supposed to be from the 1980's... Gopher, Archie, and Mosaic didn't come out until the early 1990's.

Re:If it doesn't have Gopher (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124568)

Gopher came along around '90. This would be around '86. FTP and telnet should be available, I agree. I don't remember but I seem to recall Archie coming along around the time Gopher did -- which lead to Jughead and the oh so sexy Veronica (merging the Archie indexing/search ideas on top of Gopher protocol). I remember the first version of Mosaic I saw it was so freakin' cool -- it could start rendering before the whole doc was pulled back (wink wink nudge nudge M$); might have been around 0.4 or so -- running on a Dec VaxStation -- much much cooler than MIDAS. How about those old bitnet addresses and how flaky some of the decnet-bitnet gateways were. Not to mention, the first time I'd ever heard of a worm passing down a network -- almost like catching a virus by shaking hands.

I guess the amazing thing was that you could go from idea on a napkin to de-facto standard in a month or two. That, dear friends, is what makes me nostalgic; not the green screens and fixed fonts, not the limited options, not playing zork -- just the fact that a great idea could rule the world fast enough so that it didn't take forever to reach market.

Only Rudy's on at CMU (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124434)

finger @cmucspt
[cmucspt]
Login Name Tty Idle Login Time Office Office Phone
ern Rudy Nedved pts/0 1h May 06 21:15 (37.15.57.24)

Although there would have been a lot more of us on.
                   

Found myself! (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124464)

If I could only get a message through to my past self....

I think it would be:

"Forget the Amiga and Commodore! Buy all Apple stock you can! Hold through the lows! Sell just before the Mayan calendar ends!"

I miss Usenet the most. (2)

taxman_10m (41083) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124482)

Please, someone recreate the golden days.

Re:I miss Usenet the most. (3, Insightful)

bitMonster (189384) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124736)

Me, too. God, these web forums are awful. Including this one.

We didn't CALL it the Internet... (1)

atari2600a (1892574) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124486)

...BECAUSE IT WAS NOT THE INTERNET. It was the MOTHERFUCKING ARPANET. One uses the INTERNET Protocol, one uses a CLUSTERFUCK OF OUTDATED ONES.

Re:We didn't CALL it the Internet... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124502)

Jesus fucking tits, take a chill pill.

Re:We didn't CALL it the Internet... (1)

atari2600a (1892574) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124950)

I'm sorry, it just pisses me off when people do stupid stuff like refer to the epoch of the internet to the first ever networking of 2 mainframes or something just as retarded (like this).

So familiar... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124488)

Hey ... wow! Feels like Linux 2011! Maybe this *is* the year of Linux on the desktop, after all...

Simpler (4, Insightful)

bragr (1612015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124490)

I like the days of yore better. Computers were simpler then. The software, the hardware, the protocols, all of it.

Back then it was possible to understand everything that was going on in your system, and there is something very beautiful about that. You could know how every command worked and how it did it, down the the binary data it was sending down the serial port if you wanted. Now, even though I know what seems like an encyclopedic amount of information about computers, there are large gaps in my knowledge where I either know nothing or I have only a general idea of whats going on.

Then again I can now play Angry Birds on Chrome so that kinda sooths the nostalgia.

Re:Simpler (3, Interesting)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124646)

And a bit farther back it was possible to fix a computer yourself (*really* fix it, not just swap out a CPU or motherboard) - I remember helping to troubleshoot an old DEC PDP-10 [wikipedia.org] (still alive way after its time) with a voltmeter - much of the logic was on wirewrapped cards. You could see the bug fixes because they were in different colored wires. I even had to enter the bootloader on the front panel register switches (just enough to get it to read the rest of the code from the paper tape reader).

Re:Simpler (1)

thebra (707939) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124658)

I like the days of yore better. Computers were simpler then. The software, the hardware, the protocols, all of it.

Back then it was possible to understand everything that was going on in your system, and there is something very beautiful about that. You could know how every command worked and how it did it, down the the binary data it was sending down the serial port if you wanted. Now, even though I know what seems like an encyclopedic amount of information about computers, there are large gaps in my knowledge where I either know nothing or I have only a general idea of whats going on.

Then again I can now play Angry Birds on Chrome so that kinda sooths the nostalgia.

Excuse me, just passing through, didn't mean to step on your lawn.

Re:Simpler (1)

Tony Isaac (1301187) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124786)

I miss those days too, in a way. But "simple" is a matter of perspective.

Today, if I want to write a simple data entry form, I can throw it together in a few minutes, and in a few more minutes, it will even look nice. I for one don't want to go back to slaving for days over a single screen, not to mention figuring out how to store and retrieve the data, or worry about how multiple users can access it at the same time! Back then, you had to make your own nuts, bolts, and screws. Now we have some real power tools!

Weak. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124514)

.wall
?unrecognized command
Type ? for a list of commands .write
?unrecognized command
Type ? for a list of commands .talk
?unrecognized command
Type ? for a list of commands

starwars (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124520)

type starwars and see ASCII movie..... lmao

if there is no web browser or gopher (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124530)

WHO WAS INTERNET?

Session closed ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124570)

I got "session closed", what did you get? ;-p

Man, the Internet of 25 years ago ... I think I got my first modem ever in early '89 ... So that's 22 years at best ...

Wow ... vt52, pascal, bangpath, TeX, alt.binaries, uudecode, multitasking, c, Linux, code monkey ... Ahhh, the memories of youth. :)

Wow, the Internet that came before me ... What a mystical place ... I can't express the glee when I discovered FTP and free stuff.

Now my mom has a e-reader she's trying to hook up to her wifi. Does anybody else find themselves watching their parents buying technology we could never have possibly explained to them less than a decade ago?

The stuff my parents have as everyday devices didn't exist when I was a kid ... And when those devices were in their infancy, my parents had no idea of WTF what was.

Crap, where was I ... in conclusion ... Get off my damned lawn while i go watch Knight Rider reruns.

Slshdotted? (1)

BertieBaggio (944287) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124580)

The site is only responding intermittently here:

operator: Slashdotted..367 users, holy shit

Anyway, as abuses of HTTP go, it's pretty cool :) If the site starts working again, do yourself a favour and have a go at lostpig. It's a fun, well-written award-winning little text adventure. Info and link to flash version here [tads.org] .

Re:Slshdotted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124778)

What the hell kind of crap-ass server/admin can only handle 400 users? I can run that many on a 15 year old Pentium2. I regularly handle 20 to 40 thousand simultaneous users on a modern quad-core Xeon.

Telnet alternative (2)

XSpud (801834) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124598)

I just got this message when logged in: "operator: direct telnet telehack.com will be faster than the web interface"

Re:Telnet alternative (1)

bitMonster (189384) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124652)

And it is.... slightly.

Mod parent +1 informative! (1)

reiisi (1211052) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125220)

telnetting in works!

...sad... (1)

YankDownUnder (872956) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124666)

It's sad that, regardless of what those of us did THEN, and all the BBS's we ran, the stuff we did, today, we're nothing - we're faded history, barely recognised, barely known - and money, time, effort, time that we put into it all, is nearly nothing. Only once in a while does someone touch upon all that we've done, and we're still basically snippets... In IRC, nearly regardless of again, what we've done and where we've been, we're just "someone else". That all said, I'd do it all again, and will not regret it. Now I want an Atari again...damn!

Re:...sad... (1)

ZorinLynx (31751) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124866)

This is why people like Jason Scott are my heroes.

They're preserving our history, the history that the rest of the world doesn't care about and would happily forget.

Re:...sad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124930)

thats pretty much a direct quote from the guy who sold dates in egypt in 3000bc when they made the pyramids.

The only command you'll need :) (1)

Fnagaton (580019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124808)

zrun zork

Ahhhh memories. :)

What's it supposed to be? (2)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124834)

I'm not sure what 80s system it's supposed to be emulating. It's not a BBS. It's not TOPS-20. It's not VMS. It's not SAIL. It's not ITS. It's not an ARPANET TAC. It's not Multics. It's not UNET on UNIX.

Re:What's it supposed to be? (2)

hey hey hey (659173) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125062)

I'm not sure what 80s system it's supposed to be emulating. .

Seems kinda TOPS/10 to me.

Not Quite (2)

hduff (570443) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124838)

I had an amber monitor . . .

Re:Not Quite (2)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125274)

Haha, yeah, our computer classrooms were all equipped with amber VT terminals. Some were actually white, but not one, as far as I can remember, was green phosphorus.

And we had... hundreds of these terminals, all connected to some powerful (for the time) Sun server. I never had as much fun on the internet, as back then. It was all mesmerizing. And people were genuinely excited and glad to connect across the world. Now we are all so fucking jaded.

That was the first pipe of the series, right? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124852)

...

prescient futurama jokes are awesome. (1)

tempest69 (572798) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124868)

.joke
He who loves a one-eyed-girl thinks that one eyed girls
are beautiful.

I think you had to be there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36124882)

Before the time of Google and instant information, to truely appreciate the challenges and wonderful triumphs that were possible. And of course, being in a community with ONLY the top 1 or 2 million in intelligence was nice also. It was a magical time and now it's just noise. Sure there's some smart kids and I really like the whole "being nice is cool" thing, ala reddit, and etc. but I've seen it a million times: once everyone is doing it, it's not cool anymore. But I think this is a time when the roots of tech, the old timers, really need to step up and make sure this thing lasts in the true spirit of what we intended it to be. It truely is a new form of freedom, but it could easily be the makings of a new form of slavery as well. We need to remember that the net is about communitity, not a group of people or a city but this idea that everyone has something to contribute and that the easier it is to contribute, and the more that is contributed, be it good, bad, valuable or worthless, makes it more valuable. The fact that we are greater than the sum of our parts, really just bits of electricity in the world's largest circuit. Let's make sure that free flow is ALWAYS here.

You had to be there (2)

inKubus (199753) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124888)

I think you had to be there, before the time of Google and instant information, to truely appreciate the challenges and wonderful triumphs that were possible. And of course, being in a community with ONLY the top 1 or 2 million in intelligence was nice also. It was a magical time and now it's just noise. Sure there's some smart kids and I really like the whole "being nice is cool" thing, ala reddit, and etc. but I've seen it a million times: once everyone is doing it, it's not cool anymore. But I think this is a time when the roots of tech, the old timers, really need to step up and make sure this thing lasts in the true spirit of what we intended it to be. It truely is a new form of freedom, but it could easily be the makings of a new form of slavery as well. We need to remember that the net is about communitity, not a group of people or a city but this idea that everyone has something to contribute and that the easier it is to contribute, and the more that is contributed, be it good, bad, valuable or worthless, makes it more valuable. The fact that we are greater than the sum of our parts, really just bits of electricity in the world's largest circuit. Let's make sure that free flow is ALWAYS here.

Re:You had to be there (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124960)

You know what was fun? Finger was mentioned, and it was still up in use until about oh 2004 or maybe 2006 with a lot of game dev's who used it as part of the .plan system. And for a lot of people interested in the industry it was a seriously kick ass way to get dev. input and help on your own projects. I dunno I guess while everything has become grand, great, and pretty kick ass. There's a lack of personalization these days on the whole.

Damn it ... GET OFF MAH LAWN! *wave spike cane of doom menacingly*

It looks like its the early 1990's, but it's not. (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124964)

I don't mean to sound narcissistic, but I was browsing through the newgroups circa 1991, and could not find some of the posts I had made in various groups at the time, although I can easily find them on google groups.

Re:It looks like its the early 1990's, but it's no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36125196)

No. It's not. It's more like 1987.

I know, cause I was there, and can actually finger myself as online at my first job after graduation.

I was using Datapac in 1986... (1)

beaverdownunder (1822050) | more than 3 years ago | (#36124980)

So I've been on here the whole time. God I feel old =/

Cf: http://sdf.lonestar.org (1)

ivi (126837) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125078)

Last time I checked, the Subj site & a few related ones STILL offered
"command-prompt" (a,k,a. shell access) to the Internet, eg for students
& others (eg, some disabled or on dial-up lines) with need or interest
in accessing the 'Net in similar ways.

Still, it was nice to be reminded of earlier times... :-)

Best viewed in full-screen mode. (1)

scottbomb (1290580) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125180)

This looks like some interesting reading. We had a Commodore 64 back in the 80s. Very few people had modems and I had never heard of ARPANET (I was a teenager at the time) but CompuServe was just taking off.

No time like the present (1)

laslo2 (51210) | more than 3 years ago | (#36125264)

It's fun to remember those days. I loved my Commodore 64, and later my PCjr (shush). Telehack is pretty cool.

Today I have a SSH app on my iPhone (green on black, of course). I have a dual-monitor Fedora 14 box on my desk, and next to that I have a HP DL380 dual Xeon server (both machines were retired as surplus). I also have a MacBook with OS X. I have DSL at home, and an orgasmically fast network available on campus which I can reach through a VPN. (I'm not counting the Arduino stuff, or the HP-16C calculator.)

I've never added it all up, but I've probably got more computing power in my backpack and pockets on a given day, than many ARPANET *sites* had back then.

Yes, I'm still pretty 0ld 5k00l- but damn, we have such nice toys now. I think I'll stay here. (Although I will confess to having wanted to click a 'Like' button on this article, I'm so used to Facebook. I'll hang my head in shame and report to the dungeon for my flogging.)

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