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Sony Releases PS3 3.61 Update Ahead of PSN's Imminent Return

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the but-methadone's-pretty-good-too dept.

Sony 233

Sonny Yatsen writes "Sony has released the PS3 3.61 firmware update as a part of the phased return of the Playstation Network and Qriocity. The new update now requires all PSN users to change their passwords in order to sign back into the PSN service." And several readers are pointing to reports that the network is slowly being spun up. Snips one anonymous submitter: "Sony Japan told customers today that it would begin phased restoration of its services of its beleaguered Playstation Network which has been suffering from an outage for nearly a month. The company would start bringing back its gaming network this Sunday, on a country-by-country basis, and expects it to be completed by May 31."

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The problems go much deeper (5, Interesting)

symbolset (646467) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130724)

There are reports today that Sony's networks still are oblivious to real security [reuters.com] . Among the serious vulnerabilities are links to globally viewable security consoles in robots.txt files, ID web-management consoles being publicly available and indexed in Google, and more!

I guess the upside is that if the hackers are going to get your credit card from Sony, they already have it so you may as well play your games too.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

jbplou (732414) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130754)

I think the upside is for Nintendo because this is great advance marketing of their new system.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1, Troll)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131004)

I would bet big that Nintendo's new system will not include optional Linux. No one will be touching that feature in a long time.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1, Informative)

jesseck (942036) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131106)

I would bet big that Nintendo's new system will not include optional Linux. No one will be touching that feature in a long time.

And yet, I have yet to hear / read (until your comment) that is was OtherOS which caused this.

Re:The problems go much deeper (2, Insightful)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131194)

Ohh I don't think the attack had anything to do with OtherOS. My statement says nothing of the sort. Apparently, a lot of people believe that this attack was revenge for removing Linux. I believe Nintendo will not want to offer a feature that has such a large backlash if they remove it. Especially a feature their customers are not likely to use.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131382)

I can't believe people actually think it was "revenge". You don't get revenge on a company by attacking their customers and then not even leaving so much as a threatening note...

Re:The problems go much deeper (1, Interesting)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131610)

And yet, I have yet to hear / read (until your comment) that is was OtherOS which caused this.

More like a *lack* of OtherOS.

Face it - was the PS3 the most secure console? After all, the Wii and Xbox360 have been "hacked" to some extent (piracy and/or homebrew), but the PS3 was "secure".

Then in 2009 Sony releases the Slim PS3. Sometime in 2010, the PS3 is completely hacked, which if you go by when the Slims without OtherOS get hacked, happened around 12 months later. And this is a complete pwnage - all security in the PS3, broken.

At 12 months to complete pwnage, it's probably close to the average for consoles. At close to 5 years to first pwnage, it's a record.

Now, did the PS3 simply escape all efforts to hack it for piracy or other purposes because it was secure, or was it because those with the skills to do it were busy writing their homebrew? After they couldn't run Linux or run their homebrew anymore, perhaps they also had the necessary skills to start picking at the locks?

Sony did the right thing at first - homebrewers don't want piracy, and keeping them happy ensured the pirates would have a tough time. Homebrewers are a skilled lot with lots of interesting tools at their disposal and the knowledge to use it.

And considering that OtherOS was removed because of a super theoretical hack that wasn't even used in the end to pwn the PS3...

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

Anthony Mouse (1927662) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131406)

I would bet big that Nintendo's new system will not include optional Linux. No one will be touching that feature in a long time.

Anyone paying attention would understand that the lesson from all this is the opposite: By offering Linux, Sony put off the day when people broke the PS3 for several years. Their biggest mistake was not giving Linux full access to the hardware, because it caused people to have to break their security in order to do that, which is what kicked off this whole mess.

The fact is that there are people who will do whatever it takes to install Linux on anything they own. If you give them what they want at the outset, they don't have to break your security model in order to get it. If you try to make it hard for them, they just see it as a challenge and when they succeed they bust everything wide open and that allows the pirates and the cheaters to get in.

Re:The problems go much deeper (0, Flamebait)

Moryath (553296) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130814)

The upside for everyone else - Wii, Xbox, PC - is that they've been playing their games this entire time.

Oh, and they don't have to update to an untested version of the "new system software" that still has a pretty good (as in, "non-negligible") chance of bricking your console with the update-from-HDD method they were using.

Re:The problems go much deeper (3, Insightful)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130924)

The upside for everyone else - Wii, Xbox, PC - is that they've been playing their games this entire time.

I've been playing my PS3 games for the entire outage without it affecting me in the slightest.

Re:The problems go much deeper (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36130822)

Too late I think.

An outage like this one will cause more than a few to rethink why they spend so much time gaming online. Perhaps the issue may serve a higher purpose and get folks out doing something else.

I'm very curious to see how many will cancel their accounts with SOE after this, and of those, how many will be better off for it.

Re:The problems go much deeper (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131600)

or maybe holier than thou assholes like yourself will simply kill yourselves over the fact that not everyone gives a shit about whatever it is that you do with your time.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

yuhong (1378501) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130858)

Note that the the report says some of these are already fixed.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131446)

What's meaningful is that Sony's networks had these vulnerabilities for years. It lines up with their DRM efforts that are easily exploited. It means that the folk involved with decision-making at Sony really are clueless. Hence this won't be the last exploit until that changes.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

Cable (99315) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131232)

If hackers have our credit cards then we need to tell our banks to give us a new card and different number. Either that or monitor the card with email alerts and report it to the bank to dismiss the charges the hackers made and get a new card.

This has happened to me before many times. Web site or network I join gets broken into. Then later my real name, address, phone number, credit cards, and other things gets posted on the Internet with a hacker using my info to buy stuff and fake untrue profiles of me including pictures of me they also stole. I reported Otto the police and FBI but they could not do anything, but the banks can issue new credit cards and the web site with a fake profile of me either deletes it or refuses to delete it based on the terms of service. So some fake profiles I could not get deleted but most I could.

Not knowing who they are, I cannot even file a report on them until I find their real names and addresses to get a search warrant. So the untrue stuff about me and others are in search engines been that way since 1999 as far as I can remember. If they are outside the USA well nothing else to do.

Oh well I guess I got some sort of clones, evil twins, impostors, and the like out there using my name and nothing I can do about. If I try to make it an issue the whole thing would be the stristan effect (sorry unable to spell her name correctly as I am tired and stressed out right now) and it gives those accounts more attention and popularity. Best to ignore it and eventually they will move on to something else. PSN is back up hope it stays up.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131296)

When I give a credit card to a website I assume it will be compromised. When I make an account on my right name I assume the same. It's the cost of the convenience. And yes, I have a Facebook page under my right name. I haven't been robbed yet that I know of, but if I am it won't kill me. Identity theft is becoming so common that anybody can be whoever they claim to be - which is the way it was before we had all this technology.

Frankly it's easier to invent fictional people and build their credit to the point where it's exploitable than to exploit the credit of extant people. The people who do this aren't out to get you. They just want money.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

Kelbear (870538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131654)

I feel that there's a market for added security credit cards.

Not being able to buy things online is a pretty significant inconvenience, but putting your information in the hands of vendors with completely unknown security measures means you're gambling everytime you buy from someone new.

I love the virtual credit card numbers offered by citibank and discover. I wish someone would take this service to the next level with purchase approval cards. The card gets swiped, the owner gets texted, and replies to the text with a blank message (purchases over a dollar limit requiring a password reply). Then the purchase gets approved. Naturally, this wouldn't be something you'd use at the grocery store, and yes there may be cases where someone steals your physical phone in addition to your credit card info. But it would serve a useful purpose as a supplementary card that can be used for transactions where you feel that you can't trust the other party to handle your credit card number.

It's just disturbing how little stands in their way once they get the credit card number. They're just so terribly simply to obtain, and they don't need anything else after they see it. I've had to book hotels where they only accepted reservation through /faxes/ of your credit card number. Best I could do there was call the manager to make sure she was standing next to the fax when it went through.

Re:The problems go much deeper (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131328)

I just fucked a hot Jew. Mazel tov!

Re:The problems go much deeper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131436)

That's awesome, but here's a question: why are you posting on slashdot instead of going in for round 2 (or round n+1)?

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131766)

Recharge time. Duh.

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

SuperDre (982372) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131350)

If you look closely at the identified problems, you'll see that most of those problems aren't even Sony only problems, but common problems on many MANY websites.. Even a site as slashdot isn't safe for a real hacker if he/she sets his/her mind to it..

Re:The problems go much deeper (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131404)

Many websites have security problems. When we deal with a global brand like Sony we expect better than the results from anonymous bloggers. We expect that they know what security is, and that they act on that. That is the value of the brand.

Re:The problems go much deeper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131464)

honeypot, anyone?

This patch doesn't work for me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36130758)

My PS3 has a different BIOS, that starts-up as a prompt "GRUB:"

Anyone help me out if this will work in my PS3 emulator?

A bit behind (1)

x1r8a3k (1170111) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130802)

You can sign in and change you password now if you live in the northeast. Only thing up now is online games.

Re:A bit behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131156)

I had hoped they would include the maritime provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunsiwck, PEI) in their definition of 'northeast', but, sadly, no. I'm in Nova Scotia and was only able to download the update.

Re:A bit behind (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131770)

I had hoped they would include the maritime provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunsiwck, PEI) in their definition of 'northeast', but, sadly, no. I'm in Nova Scotia and was only able to download the update.

Uhh, wouldn't that be southeast? Geez, you guys don't want to be our 52nd state (don't forget Puerto Rico) until there's a slim chance it might help you out.

Give us the Tim Horton's, you keep the French, and we'll see about that software update.

Bet it falls over from load (1)

raceface (715858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130812)

Common its Saturday night, whats the likelihood it get bombarded?

Phase in schedule posted (1)

PrimalChrome (186162) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130824)

Well, not actually a schedule, but you can see when your state is back online :
Playstation Blog [playstation.com]

Why change password? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36130838)

I have a completely random password that even I don't even know. The password is saved in my PS3 somewhere.

How is it going to help anything if I change the password? Sony could just re-hash with a different salt the next time I login.

Re:Why change password? (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130868)

I had a brother who forgot his password. My father had set up his account for him. He had a devil of a time getting the password reset. The answers to the security questions were a mix of my dads answers and things my dad thought my brother would answer. It took him months of trying things.

This is easy... (1)

Junta (36770) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130914)

Maybe *you* don't know your password, but there is a good chance that the attackers can crack their copy of the hash and know your password. Resalting does precisely nothing because the danger is the attackers getting your password, and once they have that, any salt you apply will make no difference.

Re:This is easy... (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130946)

Unlikely if it was truly random. The attackers likely only got the low hanging fruit. The p4ssw0rd, monkey, and princess fruit.

Re:Why change password? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130916)

I have a completely random password that even I don't even know. The password is saved in my PS3 somewhere.

How is it going to help anything if I change the password? Sony could just re-hash with a different salt the next time I login.

Ah, this sounds like the 1d-10-T problem that's been going around.

Why is the whole network linked to credit cards? (2, Insightful)

whois (27479) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130844)

Seems a big failure on design. If I designed a credit card payment system I would have it only be active in the portion of the network that required people to pay for something.

So... your playstation comes online and you want to sign in and play a game. Ok, the console has been authorized before it should be able to send a token saying "I'm whois let me play games."

In fact, PSN shouldn't really care who you are unless you're trying to buy something. Buying something and playing a game are two fundamentally different things. Your credit card should probably not be linked to the same username that you use for web browsing. There should be two accounts or two privilege levels that require different types of sign-on.

Why does the PSN network care who you are until you buy something? The entire store should still be online and all free downloads available, just no payed downloads until they fix that part. You should be able to play Black Ops without risking your financial future right?

You might say the customer wouldn't put up with the bullshit of having two accounts, or everyone will use the same password twice but:

1. If you explain how it works some people will do the right thing and be protected.
2. We've already put up with crazy amounts of bullshit, like weekly system updates that can't be backgrounded and take forever. Loss of features some people specifically payed for (ps2 compatibility, running Linux), and just a bad UI that can't do simple things like play your mp3 collection while you game or browse the store.

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (5, Insightful)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130894)

You got to love arm chair systems architects. Every thing is easy peasy and obvious. Simple answer is:....

Management has no idea how things work. So they turn everything off at once during a breach. And turn everything back on in small steps with tons of testing along the way. It is a best practice as old as computing.

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (5, Interesting)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130970)

In fact, PSN shouldn't really care who you are unless you're trying to buy something.

Or unlocking Trophies, or listening if you're receiving messages from other players, or setting the status of what game you're playing, or to check whether or not you've got game invites periodically...

Oh, wait...

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131134)

All of which should be optional, not forced.

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (1)

The Dawn Of Time (2115350) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131286)

Which of those activities has anyone ever been forced to do?

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131210)

When I worked for a spook house, the network was very nice. And not in any way connected to the internet. And there were people with sticks and bricks and bats (oh and carbines too, not pistols but rifles), that made sure that no "company" data got anywhere near the live internet. Its not that there wasn't at least one internet connection per office, its just that there was a locked door, and you needed to ask to go in, and blank media went in, and unblank media came out. It was like a diode. If you wanted the latest source code to something off the net, no problem. It was all one way. Radios, cell phones, televisions, scanners and any other device you can think of wouldn't work in there either. People streamed music over the lan for others to listen to. At any given moment, there were 4 or 5 different streams people could listen to over the computer. But it was cds brought in (past the full scrutiny of security), and played locally, and listened to locally. I also worked for a 911 call dispatch center. Some people there wanted a live internet connection right on the 911 workstations. You can only protest against a group for so long. It went in. When viruses caused serious problems (very directly related to lifesaving), everyone agreed that it had to go (and it did, and no complained again, and it only took a week to go from live to gone). Money isn't life and death, but sometimes its close. Credit card info should be stored on a separate system from the net, or at least dispatched from a secure site to the rest of the PSN. Sony has been good in electronics (although their use of proprietary formats makes you never want to buy from them again), but their computer products have been sucking for quite some time. I don't want or accept any data from them. I updated my PS3 up to when I heard about otheros going away, and my updates stopped. I've never been on PSN (and don't intend to). Mostly I use my PS3 as a media player: DVD/Blu-Ray, MP3, and as a dlna receiver.

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131292)

Seems a big failure on design. If I designed a credit card payment system I would have it only be active in the portion of the network that required people to pay for something.

So... your playstation comes online and you want to sign in and play a game. Ok, the console has been authorized before it should be able to send a token saying "I'm whois let me play games."

In fact, PSN shouldn't really care who you are unless you're trying to buy something. Buying something and playing a game are two fundamentally different things. Your credit card should probably not be linked to the same username that you use for web browsing. There should be two accounts or two privilege levels that require different types of sign-on.

Why does the PSN network care who you are until you buy something? The entire store should still be online and all free downloads available, just no payed downloads until they fix that part. You should be able to play Black Ops without risking your financial future right?

You might say the customer wouldn't put up with the bullshit of having two accounts, or everyone will use the same password twice but:

1. If you explain how it works some people will do the right thing and be protected.
2. We've already put up with crazy amounts of bullshit, like weekly system updates that can't be backgrounded and take forever. Loss of features some people specifically payed for (ps2 compatibility, running Linux), and just a bad UI that can't do simple things like play your mp3 collection while you game or browse the store.

interesting things,you can revere something go-to :http://www.globality-finance.com

Re:Why is the whole network linked to credit cards (2, Insightful)

AdamHaun (43173) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131320)

Has it actually been confirmed (by Visa, Mastercard, or Sony) that credit card numbers were stolen? Not just anecdotes -- we'd expect a few of the millions of PSN customers to be victims of ID theft anyway.

Woo Hoo Go Sony (0)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130854)

Can't wait for PSN to be back up. Waiting has been like watching water boil. I have been doing all kinds of stupid things in the meantime. Like swimming, learning to play guitar, and spending money. I can't wait for my cheap, relaxing hobby to be fully back. Who cares about all the drama. I hope Sony all the best so I can get back to using my stuff. Let the haters hate somewhere else for awhile.

Re:Woo Hoo Go Sony (2)

lexsird (1208192) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130886)

Indeed, you don't miss it until you don't have it. That reminds me, I need to polish up my Mortal Combat moves .

Re:Woo Hoo Go Sony (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131250)

Combat much, do you? Good luck with the lag.

Re:Woo Hoo Go Sony (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131138)

Let the haters hate somewhere else for awhile.

You really don't understand SONY at all, do you?

DLing it now (1)

rjejr (921275) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130864)

Slowly I turn, step by step, inch by inch. How many people are going to change their password to SONYSUCKS?

Re:DLing it now (1)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130940)

How many people are going to change their password to SONYSUCKS?

Far less than the number of people changing their password to ANONYMOUSSUCKS

Re:DLing it now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36130990)

Why? The Internet is untrusted and it has been repeated from the start so if a bunch of nobodys can bring Sony down then the blame lands on Sony and only Sony.

Re:DLing it now (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131038)

They suck because they brought down a service used by millions of people for no good reason. They could of supported the lawsuit against Sony over OtherOS. Instead they vandalized something people where enjoying. So yeah Anonymous sucks.

Re:DLing it now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131234)

To be fair, they sucked a long time before that.

Re:DLing it now (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130974)

Most of the people who would do that either A) Never owned a PS3 because they were totally boycotting PS3 before this happened dude. B) Have traded it in.

At least it happened to Sony (1)

Aboroth (1841308) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130882)

I am not in favor of the innocent users becoming victims, but if this happened to any company, at least it happened to Sony. There are few companies that deserve this more than Sony.

Re:At least it happened to Sony (3, Insightful)

kylemonger (686302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130930)

There are no innocents, only those who are apathetic. If you're still putting money into Sony's pockets after the crap they've pulled then you are part of the problem and deserve to suffer along with Sony.

Re:At least it happened to Sony (2)

PRMan (959735) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130964)

Harsh, but somewhat deserved. The problem is that the mass media barely covers this stuff and the average person has no idea.

Re:At least it happened to Sony (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131006)

...the average person has no idea.

That's what they get for not reading Slashdot...

Re:At least it happened to Sony (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130952)

I am not in favor of the innocent users becoming victims, but if this happened to any company, at least it happened to Sony. There are few companies that deserve this more than Sony.

It's not even really a case of 'deserving' it. They created ill-will with a group of people, and those people retaliated. In the short term, a lot of people are getting burned by the outage. Looking at the big picture, however, Sony will have to think long and hard about whether or not to remove features in the future.

What the 'hackers' did was criminal and not justifiable. They should not have done this. (I bet somebody replies without having read this bit.) But if Sony shows any wisdom at all, they'll learn from it.

Lesson Learned (0, Troll)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131058)

Lessons companies will learn:

1) Do not offer Linux.

2) Spend more money on security.

3) Have a simpler system with fewer features

4) Lie about security breaches. Never tell the customer they happen.

Re:At least it happened to Sony (1)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36130960)

There are few companies that deserve this more than Sony.

Now it's time to hunt down the Anonymous members responsible push them over and take away their lunch money. Thats about all you can do to basement dwelling 12 year olds.

Re:At least it happened to Sony (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131000)

Wait, who's responsible?

Fuck you. (-1, Troll)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131028)

Microsoft has done more to damage computing and freedom than Sony ever has and even they don't deserve this. No one deserves this kind of break in and head ache.

Seriously.

Fuck you.

Yes, I'm a PS3 fanboy, but that's because my ps3 doesn't check my controllers for a lock out chip, and they let devs be incredibly open development wise.

It's a bad time to be a PS3 fanboy, I'll admit, but, given the alternatives? Microsoft is really evil and Nintendo just doesn't have the games I want to play. PCs still suck for gaming. Bad time for gaming over all.

Can't it be the Dreamcast era again?

Re:Fuck you. (1)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131056)

they let devs be incredibly open

This whole thing got started because that is entirely incorrect you fucking moron. Sony got what they deserved, and hard. Chances are, it'll happen again.

Deal with it.

Re:Fuck you. (1, Funny)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131246)

You do know that there are developers who makes games for a living right?

Not everything is homebrew. Thanks to Sony's actual openness, I have Portal 2 for Steam.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131280)

If you live in a society where whites, and only whites, are free to drink from public water fountains, are you actually living in a free society? Go rent a brain.

Re:Fuck you. (0, Troll)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131310)

Because locking down the bootloader and removing OtherOS is just like apartheid.

Seriously. Get some perspective.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131386)

Analogies are not invalidated by a difference in scale. You screamed your surrender to the AC above.

Re:Fuck you. (0, Troll)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131392)

Yes they are. That's what godwin's law is predicated on. You anti-Sony nazi.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131434)

I love how fanboism renders you so intellectually blind that you think analogies and ad hominens are interchangeable.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131640)

Woosh.

Seriously. Locking out homebrewers isn't on the same level as apartheid. Are you fucking serious?

Re:Fuck you. (1, Insightful)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131414)

openness

You don't know the meaning of the term.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131076)

There trolls man. They sound more evil than they probably are.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

bloodhawk (813939) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131090)

they let devs be incredibly open development wise.

ummm they actually got arse fucked for being the exact opposite of incredibly open development wise. But I doubt you will see it that way as you are really grasping at straws with your fanboism here, not even Microsoft come close to depths that sony have dredged in their extorting and screwing of consumers.

Did it because they were bored. (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131148)

Your grasping at straws. This didn't happen because someone was seeking revenge. Thats like saying American went to war with Iraq over weapons of mass destruction. failoverflow hacked the PS3 because they were done hacking the Wii. George Hotz hacked the PS3 because he was done hacking IPhones. Anonymous attacked Sony for the lolz. Breaking these systems is their hobby. They would have done it eventually regardless of what Sony did.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131240)

My ps3 can talk to steam. Unreal 3 supports pc made mods. I can play super sf 4 with the same controller I played sf3 on ps2 with.

Microsoft doesn't allow this.

There are such a thing as non homebrew developers.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131284)

even they don't deserve this.

Sony deserves everything anyone can throw at them at least since the rootkit debacle.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131330)

What about the millions Microsoft threw at business and government trying to squeeze FLOSS out with FUD?

What about the fact that Microsoft shipped an OS that could be root kitted by a CD claiming to be red book audio?

What about Microsoft's insistence on sticking with ActiveX and their broken ass implementation of DOM objects and JavaScript?

On and on and on. Microsoft is actually evil. Sony has done bad things. There is a huge difference.

Seriously. Get some perspective. Sony nor Nintendo want $60 a year from me for online play and Netflix.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

Sir_Lewk (967686) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131474)

Everybody knows Microsoft is evil. Its also offtopic.

The topic here is that Sony is evil, a fact that everybody here with a sense of rationality recognizes. Microsoft being evil in no way precludes Sony from also being evil.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131660)

Not in reference to this thread. The root poster said that Sony deserves this. They don't. No one does.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131532)

What about the fact that Microsoft shipped an OS that could be root kitted by a CD claiming to be red book audio?

I could tolchock you with a pipe wrench and steal your wallet, but the difference between me and Sony is that I won't.

Likewise, with Microsoft and the rootkit business.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

GillyGuthrie (1515855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131520)

The Dreamcast was a failure, by most reviews. I find it funny you're idolizing this failed console, while stating current PC gaming sucks. Oh... and speaking of evil... I would have to say Sony is more evil than Microsoft because at least Microsoft never revoked a system function (Other OS) or install rootkits without notice (thank god for Mark Russinovich).

Re:Fuck you. (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131704)

Is a game like Garou: Mark of the Wolves going to ever come out on PC(PC based arcade hardware not included) first over a console? No.

PC gaming is limited because it's so damn open you cant assume anything and have to build for the broadest possible configurations.

Re:Fuck you. (1)

GillyGuthrie (1515855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131760)

PC gaming is limited because it's so damn open you cant assume anything and have to build for the broadest possible configurations.

Perspective is everything, I guess. I see open configs as the future of computing, and "walled gardens" as nothing more than companies' business models to sell their overpriced products. Of course this is a generalization, and I really would like to go into a DRM discussion at this point... but taht's not necessary.

Re:Fuck you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131688)

Microsoft stfu and went and hid in a corner. It's Mr. Jobs and the Apple fanboys that you're angry at now. Get with it!

SOE games restored today (2)

kfsone (63008) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131014)

Sony's SOE games (the MMOs, such as EverQuest) have been down for 2 weeks. They brought them back online earlier today.

Activating it per state (4, Interesting)

saikou (211301) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131020)

What I'm curious about is why do they re-activate the network per state [playstation.com] .
As of right now, just California and a few New England states seem to be "online". One server per state? Sounds a bit odd.
Oh and the map is stored on Flickr. For a moment there I thought someone hacked their blog system too, and just posted faked-up "we're about to go live again" message.

Re:Activating it per state (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131066)

California is huge population wise. It could easily need its own server.

Re:Activating it per state (1)

GillyGuthrie (1515855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131554)

I have heard legend of my company's old IT manager. He walked in one day and asked, "Ed, how many servers do we have?" Ed thought a moment, counted the physical servers in addition to the virtual servers, tried to come up with a number and ballparked, "Twenty or so." the manager replied, "That's too many."

the hilarious part is that the manager had no idea what a "server" was. I mean, literally no idea. The parent post reminded me of that story.

Re:Activating it per state (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131580)

Yeah that a true. But not knowing anything about servers. I do know California is big.

Re:Activating it per state (1)

dave562 (969951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131104)

I'm guessing they are doing it for the purposes of load testing. They selected two high population regions of the country on opposite coasts. If the system gets overwhelmed, they can spin up additional resources.

Re:Activating it per state (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131258)

Either that or they left a honeypot open to find the tool(s) who did it..

As a famous admiral once said: It's a trap

Re:Activating it per state (3, Funny)

guttentag (313541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131332)

According to the map [playstation.com] there's a giant storm front of jumbled X, O, SQUARE and TRIANGLE symbols headed for Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. That may explain why those states are still offline while California, which should only just get grazed near San Diego, is already up and running. Not sure why Alaska's offline, since the map clearly shows the storm passing far to the north of Barrrow...

Time to hack Frito Lays. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131022)

Imagine the butthurt of nerds everywhere if the Cheetos supply ran out.

Sony got what they deserved, period. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131186)

I bought every Sony game system on release day including the PS3. After all of the crap they have pulled, I will never own another Sony product. My PS3 is now exclusively relegated to Blu-Ray player, and even at that sometimes it hangs while trying to figure out all of the updated DRM junk they build in to those disks. I also have an Xbox 360 and gaming desktop, and thats where I will stay for gaming. Sony's incompetent management has made mistake after mistake, shafting their customers at every turn. The best thing that could happen for Sony is a class action lawsuit that would force them to split into two companies, one a content provider and the other a hardware manufacturer. All of this customer abuse got started when they got into content ownership.

Bring back Other OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36131272)

Sony should apologize and return Other OS functionality. I think this will please most 'hackers'. I would be happy because then I could actually update my PS3 and use PSN again. I have been without PSN access since they removed the functionality.

Re:Bring back Other OS (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131326)

I can see them doing this for the PS3 fats. Not for the hackers though. The hackers will never be pleased by something like that. They were hacking the PS3 before OtherOS was removed. The hackers do it for the challenge. Some also do it for your credit cards.

They won't add it as a new feature for new PS3 slims. They sell those at a loss and hope to make money on games. People using PS3 as components in super computers don't buy games. They will definitely add it if they can get the tax breaks for general purpose computers back.

Generalizing.. (2)

headkase (533448) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131384)

So, the PSN cloud failed for a month. It has made me rethink my enthusiasm for Google's ChromeOS. With my fat-desktop I can still do useful things with it without a network. With ChromeOS I'm not sure I can do anything if the network is disrupted. And initially, I was like: "Awesome! Want!" when Google announce ChromeOS..

Re:Generalizing.. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131730)

Much of the point of ChromeOS is that applications will have offline functionality. But don't let facts get in your way or anything. This seems familiar, did you post this same troll before?

Re:Generalizing.. (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131752)

And initially, I was like: "Awesome! Want!" when Google announce ChromeOS..

I'm genuinely interested: what made you think "Awesome! Want!" with regards to an "OS" not on your own computer?

too late (1)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131530)

I think that Sony has lost a huge amount of psn customers. And also gaming networks did.

EQ2 Servers are back up (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#36131652)

EQ2 servers came up about 5pm PDT today.

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