×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Space Shuttle Endeavour Blasts Off On Final Flight

CmdrTaco posted more than 2 years ago | from the one-more-for-the-road dept.

ISS 125

Velcroman1 writes "Space shuttle Endeavour rocketed into space Monday morning from Kennedy Space Center, led by mission commander Mark Kelly on the final mission for the youngest vehicle in the space fleet. Over 6 million pounds of thrust from the shuttle's rocket booster carried Endeavour into orbit, at speeds of up to 19,000 miles per hour, for an expected meeting with the International Space Station on Wednesday. 'It's incredible how you can see this machine hurled into space like the fastest fastball ever thrown, going to Mach 25 — 25 times the speed of sound — and it's an incredible race to orbit,' former NASA astronaut Tom Jones said. 'It's one of the greatest physical sensations an human can experience,' he added."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

125 comments

First... (5, Interesting)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36139942)

Let's design an open-source reusable spacecraft which can reach orbit.

Second...

Let's implement the space elevator, allowing materials and people to get to orbit cheaply.

Third...

Build a spacecraft on an unprecedented scale, in-orbit, using the space elevator. Use that to expand physics research and propulsion systems.

Fourth...

Star Trek...

And you all thought that was gonna say "Post". Haha.

Re:First... (-1, Offtopic)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140144)

Slashdot, where the trolls are insightful and the mods are fucking trolls!

Since when is this offtopic???? It's right on-topic, what with this being the last shuttle flight and all!! First, we design a replacement we can all use (ie internationally), and so on until Star Trek.

Now I know I'm definitely being modded down by people who have a personal problem with me. WELL FUCK YOU. I'm not leaving. Maybe you government shills should.

Re:First... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140162)

I wish you could un-post that rant and let the mods work themselves out.

Re:First... (0)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140274)

+10000 Insightful.

The mods HAVE worked themselves out, and my original post is now at +4, but I've been punished for my rant!

Thanks. And sorry, everyone.

Re:First... (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140188)

Furthermore Susan, I can definitely see a thread developing here where the consensus is that the most successful world possible is one where random joes show up to crowdsource the construction of a much better space vessel from reclaimed scrap, all controlled by open-source systems running Linux on netbooks.

Re:First... (1)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140370)

How did you know where I was going with this?

The only thing you've got wrong is the netbooks; we only need recycled 286 laptops running DamnSmallLinux and a bunch of A/D and D/A convertors to control the vehicle! ;-P

Re:First... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140506)

And shell scripts. Don't forget that any software project can be easily be implemented by Slashdotters using a few bash scripts chained together.

Re:First... (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140678)

This is all well and good, but shell scripts don't have the geek-panache needed to make this sound both cool, and like an idea that would turn someone into the world's richest man if anyone could just be bothered to implement it.

We need a mention of Ruby on Rails and to propose that Natalie Portman be included on the crew for the maiden voyage of Whedon-2517. Then we have geekstered up enough.

Re:First... (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140366)

Build a spacecraft on an unprecedented scale, in-orbit...

We could build it from all the space junk that's out there.. The ultimate dumpster dive!

Re:First... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140484)

You're insane and hopelessly deluded about what we can achieve with technology. We have no such technology. Space Elevator? Why not go full hog and and build a Ringworld? It's just as impossible. Stick to programming. You won't like the rules and limits of the real world. Here's a hint, you can't just type import warpdrive and make it happen...

Re:First... (0)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140632)

Fifth...

Cure cancer with open source and bring about world peace with organic farming.

Sixth...

Some chick like totally gives me a BJ for all my awesome ideas.

Seventh...

I secure the funds and bright minds and navigate the politics to get these obnoxiously presented ideas actually done.


Good luck webmistressrachel ! Keep us posted on your progress!

Re:First... (2, Insightful)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140708)

You know what, if capitalism and greed weren't the norm, we could implement those ideas too. (except the BJ. But if you help me, I might help you...)

There really is enough material resources and labour to do those things, but at the moment they're feeding the top 1% of society instead of advancing technology. The space program hasn't evolved at all since the 80's, the zero-g science we were promised from the ISS has only just started, and we're all head-over-heels about two neverending wars that only happened due to Bush's family's greed.

The biggest problem for people like me is apathetic people like you, who lazily make sarcastic comments like this, preventing the masses from realising they CAN make a difference, and overthrowing those who shouldn't be in power, but are.

Re:First... (1)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140952)

Yep, you're right about the capitalism thingy. There is a problem with capitalism. You cant sustain it without basically enslaving everyone except a select few at the top. By enslave I am referring to the dollar.

Re:First... (2)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141236)

I'm not apathetic; I find it laughable and counterproductive that people like you come along and spew out a bunch of wild ideas with no plan or research to back them up, no motivation to make it happen, but rather just coming along and asking "why hasn't someone else made this happened yet? Oh it must be because of that one person who most people agree did a bad job."

What about the economics of it, what about the ROI of a space elevator, what materials will it be made out of, what is the timeline, could the money be better used elsewhere, if it's profitable why hasn't private enterprise done it, what the hell do you know about space engineering?
None of these questions do you want the answers to, because it's much more fun to sit around, whine, and post a list of massive projects as if it's some kind of plan or original thinking.

As for "overthrowing those who shouldn't be in power" .. go for it.. Fight the power webmistressrachel!

Re:First... (1)

ModernGeek (601932) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141364)

Protip: If slashdot wants women to stay around, you can't condescend on them for impractical ideas. She was just trying, much more than most women. Something like, "that's a cool idea! Here is some reading about those things". Then she can find out on her own.

Re:First... (4, Insightful)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141342)

Capitalism is not the enemy of progress. It is what creates the surpluses that make spending on progress possible. Nobody is going to spend money on a space elevator if they are worried about having enough food to make it through the winter.

Re:First... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141754)

except the BJ. But if you help me, I might help you...

No offense, but no thanks. I prefer my women to have been born that way.

Re:First... (Third and half) (2)

AchilleTalon (540925) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140960)

Third and half...

find a never ending source of energy to sustain life on the vessel described at point four for at least the number of millenium it will take to head it somewhere across the interstellar space. I should remind everyone the Voyager 1 and 2 probes are now at the very limit of the solar system after a 30 years journey and still emitting a radio signal sending scientific data relying on a Pu238 nuclear energy source which will be at end in about 10 years. At this time, the Voyager 1 and 2 will navigate silently forever the interstellar space at the fastest speed possible using the slingshot effect, but still 40 thousands years away from any other star in this galaxy. So, the question is: How would you sustain life into a vessel travelling interstellar space? Hence, number third and half, which has for corollary if we are to discover any mean of doing this, our energy problem here, on earth, is resolved forever.

So, maybe it should be number 1 in the list.

Re:First... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140970)

Let's implement the space elevator, allowing materials and people to get to orbit cheaply.

I guess I'm late to the game, but a space elevator just doesn't seem incredibly useful. Even if you mitigate the huge risk of LEO debris cutting the tether, all it's good for is delivering payloads to either one spot on geosynchronous orbit, or beyond that orbit. Deploying to any other (i.e. useful) orbit requires the use of a reaction-mass-based payload assist module, whose exhaust will necessarily be aimed right at the tether, to get the needed d(theta)/dt to establish a stable orbit. If you just went up and let go, your payload would simply fall down. Remember, gravity still exerts over 9 m/s^2 at LEO.

Re:First... (1)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141028)

Thank you, that's interesting. I figured that it would provide a practical method for getting bulky stuff up there, since most of the fuel used in current missions is that used to break out of the gravity well.

I'm not perfect, and my post might have been a little idealistic in hindsight.

Re:First... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141196)

Space shuttle SRBs produce 82% of the lift of the shuttle and cost $40 million each. Let's get that contractor to restart the line and make a couple dozen for that project. Who's with me? All we need is 30% of the world's population to donate $1 to the cause.

Re:First... (1)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141252)

"cost $40 million each"

Duh, you thicko! Don't you know how inflated stuff sold to NASA and military has been? It's even joked about in films - try Independence Day for size!

We need to change the system we operate the world under, and then we can have the progress we want. Thanks, gov't shill! x

Re:First... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141568)

Let's design an open-source reusable spacecraft

Let's not give a shit because let's face it, no one who can launch a space craft actually cares about its design being "open source" or not.

Re:First... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142074)

Dude, you gotta calm down. We're geting there. These things take time. You can't expect it's going to be done by the end of the year.

Why do mods have a knack for modding the dumbest comments up? What is so interesting about the obvious?

Re:First... (1)

tokul (682258) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142082)

Let's implement the space elevator, allowing materials and people to get to orbit cheaply.

If you want to move 10 tons of stuff 100 kilometers, you need energy. Lots of energy. If you want to do it safe, you will need protection and more energy for hurling protection together with protected content. Cheap, safe and big enough to matter. You can choose two out of three.

Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (-1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 2 years ago | (#36139952)

3 of the astronauts had lobster for breakfast, maybe they thought it may well be their last meal on Earth?

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/news_space_thewritestuff/2011/05/space-shuttle-endeavour-what-was-for-breakfast.html [orlandosentinel.com]

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

Coisiche (2000870) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140026)

...maybe they thought it may well be their last meal on Earth?.

What? These people that believe that 21st May will be The Rapture get everywhere.

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140072)

Hey, the Rapture followed by global earthquakes and whatever other kinds of horseshit they are predicting should make for pretty cool viewing from the ISS, right?

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140204)

"These people" predicting that are a couple of dozen nuts following one nut leading one church. Who made the same predictions before and was wrong...

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (2)

Vectormatic (1759674) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140230)

Still, they are every-frickin-where. Here in Utrecht (big city in the netherlands), there are billboards all over the train station about how the 21st is going to be judgement day and how we should call to god (including a big "the bible guarantuees it" sticker)

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

c0mpliant (1516433) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140422)

Same in Dublin (Ireland), I was shocked to see a poster proclaiming Judgement day is coming. At first I was excited because I'd never seen Terminator 2 in the cinema as I was too young at the time it was out. Then I realised it was religious horseshite and promptly ignored it

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140982)

Funny, Judgement Day coming and all you think is a new movie in the Terminator series. Love it, I would have thought the same.

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (4, Interesting)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140070)

3 of the astronauts had lobster for breakfast, maybe they thought it may well be their last meal on Earth?

They're off for a week or two of such gastronomic delights as freeze-dried spaghetti, freeze-dried chicken, and peanut butter in a squeeze tube. I'll forgive them for not wanting to depart on a stomach full of freeze-dried Eggo waffles.

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140206)

Having said that - with the fun of going to the toilet in space, maybe they should have laid off the rich seafood and just stuck with a nice high fibre diet.

High fiber is the LAST thing you want.... (5, Informative)

Ellis D. Tripp (755736) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140640)

Fiber is largely indigestible, and comes out the other end in large amounts. That's why it is needed to maintain regularity, afterall. If you are trying to minimize the need for bowel movements, what you want is a "low residue" meal, high on protein, with little to no fiber. The protein gets digested and absorbed, leaving very little to be eliminated.

The traditional launch day breakfast from Mercury through Apollo was always steak and eggs, specifically chosen for the reasons above.

Re:High fiber is the LAST thing you want.... (1)

modecx (130548) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141034)

This is also the reason military MREs (meal ready to eat) have just about zero fiber content, but have a ton of calories, in sugars, protein and fat. They'll stop you up something fierce if you live on them for an extended period of time. Good news is the sugar-alcohols in the included gum can act as a laxative, if you consume enough of those in one go, so many soldiers save them for such a purpose. Fun stuff.

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140390)

At least back in the Mercury through Apollo days, it was traditional for one's last meal before liftoff to be steak and eggs.

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

Monchanger (637670) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140254)

Who cares? Considering what space flight missions entail, lobster isn't that big of an indulgence. Getting lobster in Florida isn't hard. It's not like they were eating Russian caviar. For crying out loud, one of them just had a sandwich. This is a non-story and engaging in such speculation is as ridiculous as was the reporting.

At just past midnight local time, I'd also hardly call it breakfast. With a 9am local launch time and assuming they wouldn't eat for at least 10 hours when the reach orbit, you'd want a decent meal- not just a light breakfast of toast and jam. If the flight doc has no problem with the choice, they can eat whatever they please.

Personally, the thought of shellfish prior to that kind of acceleration into orbit makes me nauseous, but these guys are in far better shape.

Re:Lobster for breakfast as a last meal? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140310)

3 of the astronauts had lobster for breakfast, maybe they thought it may well be their last meal on Earth?

Well, it could be. And, even assuming they come back safely (which I hope they do) ... if you were about to embark on a period of time where you eat nothing but NASA engineered food out of plastic pouches ... I think you'd probably pick the tastiest things you could think of, too.

I think it's more of a matter of enjoying the last comforts of home before you have to poop in a tube and wear diapers in your space suit. ;-)

Fastest fast ball ever? (2)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#36139976)

Does

final mission for the youngest vehicle in the space fleet.hurled into space like the fastest fastball ever thrown, going to Mach 25 â" 25 times the speed of sound

mean that this shuttle launch was actually faster than all previous launches? Or is this merely a way of saying "it's really fast".

Is this actually a story, or an anecdote? There is no F'ing A.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (1)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140174)

I want to know who threw a fastball mach 25. I mean, I think I remember bugs bunny throwing a baseball in to orbit once, but other than that.. the quote doesnt make much sense.

Kunimitsu Tezuka (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140316)

Only it was a tennis ball, [youtube.com] not a baseball... ball.

Re:Kunimitsu Tezuka (2)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141770)

What? I was referring to the cartoon "Hare We Go" where Bugs proves to Columbus the world is round by throwing a ball around the world.. when it returns, it has custoems stickers from all over the globe on it.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141138)

I want to know who threw a fastball mach 25. I mean, I think I remember bugs bunny throwing a baseball in to orbit once, but other than that.. the quote doesnt make much sense.

Chuck Norris once roundhouse kicked a baseball at mach 25, but I don't think anyone's thrown one that fast.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (2)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140318)

Made me cringe, too, I think it was written by a Luddite who fancies himself as a "writer".

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (1)

Mr Z (6791) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140816)

Yeah, I couldn't tell if I was reading a Slashdot article or a YouTube comment. The article needs some serious editing to turn it into English.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (2)

Cytotoxic (245301) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140604)

Yeah, really bad hyperbole. As spacecraft go, low earth orbit isn't all that fast either. The folks who walked on the moon went a fair bit faster than Mach 25 (17,500 mph). And that's not even a blip on the 17 km/s that Voyager I is coasting along at. That's 163,198.8 mph for those who are metric-challenged.

A really good fastball travels at 100mph. Using that as an analogy for something going 175 times faster is a bit inadequate. And using that as a superlative in a world where "fast" is 10x faster than your fastball....

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (1)

tyrione (134248) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140972)

Yeah, really bad hyperbole. As spacecraft go, low earth orbit isn't all that fast either. The folks who walked on the moon went a fair bit faster than Mach 25 (17,500 mph). And that's not even a blip on the 17 km/s that Voyager I is coasting along at. That's 163,198.8 mph for those who are metric-challenged.

A really good fastball travels at 100mph. Using that as an analogy for something going 175 times faster is a bit inadequate. And using that as a superlative in a world where "fast" is 10x faster than your fastball....

Aint Gravity a bitch? Seriously, you're comparing apples to oranges. The amount of thrust the boosters would exert if they were outside of the Earth's low orbit would have them blasting well past the Moon or becoming an impact zone causing a new crater.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141292)

And that's not even a blip on the 17 km/s that Voyager I is coasting along at. That's 163,198.8 mph for those who are metric-challenged.

Er, no, try 38,028 mph [wolframalpha.com] . Even off the top of your head, you know 20 km/s == 72 000 km/h, so the answer has to be in the ballpark of 36 000 mph.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141982)

Wow, at that speed, it would only take 74,000 years to reach the nearest star system.

Re:Fastest fast ball ever? (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140920)

That, and the speed of sound decreases with altitude (density), so Mach would increase even if velocity remained constant. I haven't done the math, but at some altitude, presumably even a 100MPH fastball could travel at Mach 25!

OK this is ridiculous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140042)

No article. Quotes that finish but don't start. Sentences that start without even a capital letter. Typos all over the place. Somehow in three lines of drivel we are informed of what Mach 25 means (this is Slashdot - we know) but not much else.

I know, I must be new here...

Re:OK this is ridiculous (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140094)

We just wanted readers to be certain that this is, in fact, Slashdot. And not an actual news source.

Re:OK this is ridiculous (1)

Andrewkov (140579) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140096)

Mach 25, is that faster than the fastest ever fastball?

Golly!

Re:OK this is ridiculous (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140362)

Yep, and Space Shuttles are 'hurled' into space instead of using their engines.

Also ... it's a 'race', I honestly didn't know that. I wonder who the other competitors were? Isn't space exciting!

Here's how it went where we were (1)

HangingChad (677530) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140080)

"There it is!"

"Where?"

"Oh, it's gone."

A few seconds later we got a glimpse through gaps in the clouds as it passed overhead, about the same time we could hear it. Hit the cloud cover right after the roll maneuver.

Re:Here's how it went where we were (1)

jittles (1613415) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140402)

I watched it from work this morning, about 120 miles away. We didn't hear it here, obviously. But, once it got above the clouds it became very visible. The haze + early morning sun made it impossible to see through the lower level of haze. Shortly after they kicked the SRBs into full blast, it again disappeared into the haze. Total viewing time was approximately 10 seconds.

The best launch I've seen so far was a twilight launch. I went to the beach and was able to see it for a good 60 seconds. It was amazing.

Re:Here's how it went where we were (3, Interesting)

Cytotoxic (245301) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140676)

My "wow, shuttle launches are amazing" moment happened during a night launch. We were listening to the radio broadcast while watching from the causeway. As they ticked off the milestones and speeds, we watched it transform into a brilliant white star slowly descending over the Atlantic Ocean. It was still well above the horizon and bright in the sky when the NASA announcer told us the shuttle was "now passing over the horn of Africa".

That was a "wow" moment.

Re:Here's how it went where we were (2)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141090)

Yeah man, cool. I was lucky enough to see one of the last night time launches from Melbourne Beach. You could read a newspaper by the light from that shuttle and we were like what 20-30 miles away? Wait let me go all Google Earth it and get some reasonable #s about the mileage before the pedants jump on me. 40-45 miles away, Ok? We crossed the causeway down in Vero and headed North till we got to one of the more remote public beaches. Don't remember exactly which one. Smuggled our brewskies over the dunes, using the walkway, then settled in for the launch. They broadcast the NASA talk across a local radio station down there so we tuned in out little handheld radio. Everyone else had them too. You did not need any help to know when they lit the fire under that bastard cause I swear you could feel the heat. The beach lit up like an instant dawn and you could see the shuttle slowly climb towards the scanty night time clouds. They were the wispy kind that are more of a haze. The kind you would never notice unless the moon passed behind them. When that shuttle penetrated that layer of clouds they turned all pinkish and yellow from the exhaust. Needless to say, this lit up the sky even more and everyone just kind of went Wow. I still get teary eyed thinking about that night and all the money we waste on other crap like wars and incredibly full bank accounts for a select few. We should be out in space by now. I mean we got to leave eventually, why not now?

poisoning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140196)

'It's one of the greatest physical sensations an human can experience,'he added."

I don't remember which astronaut mentioned it, but he told that it felt" a bit as a food poisoning."

Time for the beaming up to be invented.

Waste of taxpayer $$$ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140218)

As we struggle with our smothering debt problem, why are we launching millions of dollars into earth orbit, never to be seen again? This is such a blatant abuse of hard working peoples money that people should be brought up on treason. Put NASA on the ballot in 2012 and see how many people vote to continue it. As we near a vote to extend the governments debt limit and with millions of Americans without work or worth, someone needs to take a stand. There's nothing for us in outer space, that's why it's called SPACE. We should use that money to drill for more oil.

Re:Waste of taxpayer $$$ (3, Insightful)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140380)

It's a drop in the ocean compared to the trillions being spent on wars and CEO bonuses^W^Windustry bailouts.

Re:Waste of taxpayer $$$ (2)

Monchanger (637670) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140756)

As you yourself pointed out one sentence earlier- it's not called "space", but "outer space". The name means all the space outside Earth, not "emptiness". When you graduate to second grade you'll learn that Earth is insignificant in the grand scheme of things. We're already using the sun and moon to generate energy, and there's lots more stuff we can take advantage of once we develop the technology. Considering oil prices aren't dropping, it's probably a good idea not to rely on it long-term.
One of the missions of this flight is to get the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer installed so it can be used for detecting dark matter, which is likely a key area of research necessary for any possible uses of using what's actually out there. As stupid as your rant was, this actually is a method of government trying something which may help us develop energy. You could say it's similar to oil exploration, but with more balls and brains.

As for that idiotic political statement, NASA's funding for this mission wasn't determined by recent events. Space exploration is not responsible for the debt, nor will its de-funding solve the problem. Suggesting that taxes be used to pay for drilling reveals how little you understand government, industry and taxation. That's not the US government's job. The US government is already handing out $4B a year to these corporations and they've done nothing but stockpile. If you want more money spent on drilling, you might want to ask your friendly oil company to invest instead of hoarding money (XOM alone has over $13B cash on hand) and taking advantage of high prices (see current record profits with no equivalent uptick in R&D). Or feel free to lobby congress to nationalize the oil industry so you can complain to someone who actually listens to nutjobs.

And "treason"? Really? You might want to look up that word in a dictionary.

Re:Waste of taxpayer $$$ (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141546)

You have delusional faith in our technology. For all practical purposes, space IS empty. There's nothing we can do there. It's empty. Face it, get over it, and move on.

Race? (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140234)

"it's an incredible race to orbit,"

Who are they racing? They were sitting around on the pad for so long its a wonder one of the commercial space tourist companies didn't beat them up there..

Re:Race? (1)

RdeCourtney (2034578) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140302)

They're racing gravity... most of the time humans win, sometimes gravity wins...

Sometimes? (1)

denzacar (181829) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140348)

Dude. Gravity ALWAYS wins. That's the law.

Re:Sometimes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140530)

Not always. After billions of year our moon hasn't fallen yet and it is even getting farther from Earth over time. It is slowly winning against gravity.

Re:Sometimes? (1)

Inschato (1350323) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140662)

It's just gravity from a different direction pulling(pushing?) it away from Earth, it's still losing to gravity. You can't beat gravity. Not until we invent some sort of anti-gravity that works in some way not currently known to established science.

Re:Sometimes? (1)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141162)

Yeah but the earth will call it back home one day. The moon is only allowed to get so far then it hits that "dont get out of the yard" barrier and has to come back.

Re:Race? (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141344)

You mean the commercial space tourism companies who haven't managed to field any efforts for the 50 years of manned space flight? You're right, there isn't a race. Unless you count Russians selling seats at a loss on our dime.

English, motherfucker, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140246)

do you speak it?

I might even be able to understand what subby was talking about if there was a FA.

So long and thanks for all the fish (2)

TimeElf1 (781120) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140290)

That's all she wrote till 2016 barring more budget cuts. It's the passing of a era it makes me rather sad.

Re:So long and thanks for all the fish (1)

e9th (652576) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140498)

Was STS-135 [nasa.gov] cancelled?

Re:So long and thanks for all the fish (2)

StoneCrusher (717949) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140718)

"STS-335, the rescue mission that would fly only if needed to bring home the members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission, currently the final scheduled shuttle flight. "

http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/sep/HQ_10-222_LON_Annc.html [nasa.gov]

Re:So long and thanks for all the fish (2)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141220)

No, STS-135 (Atlantis) [nasa.gov] will fly.
"The NASA Authorization Act of 2010 directs NASA to conduct the STS-135 mission. The Space Shuttle Program has added the mission to the manifest to prepare for a potential target launch date of June 28.

Atlantis will carry the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module to deliver supplies, logistics and spare parts to the International Space Station."

Re:So long and thanks for all the fish (1)

Illy-chan (2071302) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140666)

Same... Why the government would kill such an awesome program is beyond me. Yes, I would rather go hungry if it meant I could live on the moon. Besides, we should all remember. Star Trek was when the space program was government based. Aliens was the private industry...

Re:So long and thanks for all the fish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141234)

I was in FL last week (missed the shuttle by a week). Saw a lot of "coolest pad" billboards (from NASA meaning pad 39a) and almost wanted to cry. The manned space program is only 8 years younger than me (given Alan Shephard's sub-orbital flight back in '61) and I've been following it ever since. Then, I got very angry. Our so-called 'science' president ends manned flight program. 2016? Here's hoping but a government program ended can be a b*tch to get started again.

former gov.gov ventura censored everywhere now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140340)

first they laugh at you...... not 'funny' any mre?

Are you sure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36140416)

"an human"????

We put a Brit into orbit on its last flight?

Home Video (3, Interesting)

Infiniti2000 (1720222) | more than 2 years ago | (#36140772)

Taken by a friend of mine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UIYVjqAd3Y [youtube.com]

Rare Picture (1)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141200)

Taken by a friend of mine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UIYVjqAd3Y [youtube.com]

Awesome video, I'm glad he decided to go with a tripod or at least keep it stationary. Here's an amateur picture from the other side [twitpic.com] .

Re:Rare Picture (1)

Infiniti2000 (1720222) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141402)

Thanks, I passed along your comment to him. He took a bunch of stills, too, but obviously all from the same vantage point, ground level. He has not posted them with public access, however, and I'm not gonna go through the hassle of copying them. :-)

Tomorrow's pyramids (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 2 years ago | (#36141450)

Future generations will walk to the rusted ruins of Pad 39A as they walk to the Pyramids today, and wonder at the massive effort required to accomplish such a pointless but impressive task.

Re:Tomorrow's pyramids (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36141672)

Eloquent troll is eloquent.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...