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146 comments

they should force them to readd other os! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142026)

they should force them to readd other os!

Re:they should force them to readd other os! (1, Troll)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142474)

Yea right, If anything that probably has strengthen Sony's resolve to keep "Other OS" out. Not that I support Sony having removed the option. But if you make a choice to do something then you get a bunch of criminals pretending to be activists attack you from the choice. It is a strong message that that feature was used by the wrong sort of people, who they will be better off in the future not come back.
If they were true Hactivists they would have hacked their playstations to support the feature once again and posted how to to it to the public.
The latter is Civil disobedience. The first is just criminal.

Re:they should force them to readd other os! (1)

twistedsymphony (956982) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142576)

I can't tell if you're serious or trolling.... I'm going to assume you're serious since you didn't post AC. IIRC they DID hack the PS3 to support Other OS (isn't this what ghotz did?) the PSN "Hactivist" attacks didn't start until Sony decided to sue ghotz BECAUSE he "posted how to do it to the public."

Re:they should force them to readd other os! (1)

zeroshade (1801584) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142662)

If they were true Hactivists they would have hacked their playstations to support the feature once again and posted how to do it to the public.

What rock have you been under? That's EXACTLY what they did. That's why Sony sued George Hotz. Because he posted how to hack the PS3 on his block and via youtube for all to see. Also, you're assuming that the people who hacked the PSN are in any way associated with the same crowd asking for OtherOS to be back and not just some opportunistic crackers.

Re:they should force them to readd other os! (2)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143086)

Again I hold to the fact that I am not convinced that this breach is even connected to geohot in any way more then an opportunistic coverup to cover their asses. I think this was a mass CC# theft intended to use the current tensions between anon and sony as a distraction, possibly even borrow some of anon's members to do a DDOS and keep sony + legal authorities busy chasing 13 year olds while the criminals are unloading money into offshore bank accounts.

Bravo Japan! (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142064)

A government that actually does its job (protect the citizens' rights). Good for them.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

arbiter1 (1204146) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142214)

No networks is secure no matter how many steps are taken there is always a hole to get in

Re:Bravo Japan! (3, Insightful)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142480)

That's no excuse to be lazy about keeping up to date with patches, and apparently having no disaster recovery plan.

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143126)

Their network (and apache) WAS patched. That acusation was crap. Do some research on google.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

frosty_tsm (933163) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143318)

and apparently having no disaster recovery plan.

I do not think it means what you think it means. Go here for more information. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143488)

Because being hacked is definitely not a natural or "human-induced" catastrophe.

They were clearly hacked by robots!

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143502)

It doesn't mean a plan on recovering from a disaster? News to me.

Patches, smatches... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143370)

The issue isn't patches...

The issue is that they didn't encrypt the data so that an embarrassing intrusion became a financially damaging intrusion for their customers.

The two things I am left with that really piss me off are:
- Why haven't they given me the last 4 digits of the card they had on file? Which card should I be watching? They gave the whole damn number to the intruder so telling me the last 4 digits isn't a big deal.
- Why do they even require a card number (which they can't be trusted with) when I never do ANYTHING on the network that requires payment.

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142496)

Then I assume you never bother with firewalls on your home and local systems either, because they're still not secure.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142542)

Perfect is the enemy of Good. The question is not is their setup perfect, but is it good. Odds are it is just the cheapest fix they could come up with.

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142880)

Do you ...really believe this? And that it's helpful? I want to be blunt...I can and have made a secure network. Of course, *I* was the user. And it really only provided five public facing services, four of which ran in different BSD jails with custom per-account firewall settings. There was a brief window where I had to patch SSH.

My other measures would...not be acceptable on a corporate network... needing a special SSH key to get a second DHCP lease that generated an address with routing permissions to the internal VPN ... just not gonna fly. But believe me... if you cracked WPA, you'd get the ability to ping a router and SSH into one host.

But the real question is... was an appropriate level of security undertaken. Just because there's usually way in doesn't mean you shouldn't decide what appropriate protective measures are. If you knew my user account password and login, you *COULD* ssh in. It's not a likely threat given the presence of a nonstandard port, a strange login, and a good password. Of course, I usually used an SSH-key instead of a username/password.

Security is NOT a boolean variable. It's a risk analysis, understanding, and guided acceptance. For a corp the size of sony to either not know, or accept an ancient Apache install is...not acceptable. Sony may not be able to secure their network against the best guy in the world... but they should be able to demonstrate it takes a certain level of competence, skill, and time to penetrate it it completely.

They should be able to demonstrate you cannot do it with simple off the shelf tools. They should be able to demonstrate they have mitigated the most likely risks and prevented reasonably anticipated threats to their users.

If they can't do this, they should be able to demonstrate someone's actually made and signed off on the decision that it's cheaper to lose the accounts, get hacked, and throw their users to the wolves than hire admins capable of fixing it. Because as of today, P(hack) = 1.0 ... not whatever their risk assessment said it was.

And so far, they've done none of this.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142640)

No, that would have been to have standards in place and make Sony follow them before they were permitted to even put up the PSN. This is the same kind of "protect" that the police are there for. "To Serve and Protect"? No. "To Punish After the Fact".

Re:Bravo Japan! (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142776)

>>>"To Serve and Protect"? No. "To Punish After the Fact".

Excellent point. Didn't think of it in that way.
Of course, in order to prevent ANY kind of disaster/theft/etc (i.e. zero such events), the government would have to put its nose into everything. Seems kinda... invasive? Of course if they did that with corporations I'd certainly have no objections.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

zanian (1621285) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142642)

really... Troll? You may not agree, but I don't think he's being a troll. I wish I had some Mod points right now.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142658)

A government that actually does its job (protect the citizens' rights). Good for them.

Right. And just sort of ignores major problems with nuclear reactors. Nice set of priorities there.

Re:Bravo Japan! (-1, Offtopic)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142730)

Bravo Japan! (Score:0, Troll) A government that actually does its job (protect the citizens' rights). Good for them.

And why is this modded Troll?
I don't see anything offensive
or baiting about it. I shared my honest opinion.
Jeez.

Re:Bravo Japan! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142846)

*sigh* I'd mod you up for it if I could (I have the mod points) but ever since I modded down one of the site owners friends I lost the ability to give points. Sure, the system still gives them to me but they don't "stick" and are wiped right after I give them. I guess be careful who you mod down regardless of how much they troll or are offtopic, they might be friends with the sites owners and go crying to them.

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143254)

Cry me a river, and Have a Nice Day.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143152)

If you share an honest opinion that the average slashdotter agrees on it's instant karma, if they don't like it (even if the post is perfectly motivated and well written) you will get modded down. Kind of sad... The modding system isn't there to promote your agenda, it's there to promote the insightful discussions Slashdot is known for!

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142864)

And yet, if the US tried to tell YOU that you were not permitted to run a legal server that you wanted to run, there would be screams of censorship.

The government does not have the duty to protect the citizens from themselves, nor to deny the citizens the right to run a service that is within the bounds of the law.

IF the Sony service is breaking the law, the government has the duty to step in. Until it breaks the law, Sony should be allowed to run its service just as Apple and Google and every other content provider is.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

theaveng (1243528) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143050)

Sony, not being a person, has no right to free speech. The Japanese government may censor the corporation all it wants.

Re:Bravo Japan! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143498)

Consumers, being people, do have the right to conduct business without undue interference.

Also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cutting_off_the_nose_to_spite_the_face [wikipedia.org]

(Cue those who want to make a million excuses why a consumer should not be allowed to buy a good or service from another party, knowing full well the general and particular risks. Also cue those who feel that it is necessary to prevent such a transaction not because it directly hurts other innocent parties, but because... it just goes against social order/global warming/global cooling/insurance premiums/sony sux lolz)

Put another way, my desire to do or not do business with Sony isn't up for referendum.

Re:Bravo Japan! (1)

DinDaddy (1168147) | more than 2 years ago | (#36144220)

A government that actually did its job in this instance (protect the citizens' rights). Good for them.

More like this. Japan's government takes some positive unilateral actions without consulting business on occasion, but on average they're not a lot better than ours in the US.

Kudos to Japan (5, Insightful)

Hultis (1969080) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142070)

This is a very nice move by Japan - rather than bending their laws to maximize corporate profit, a disturbing trend, they do the absolute opposite and force Sony to take measures that protect customers (which will cost Sony quite a bit). Customers win, Sony loses. Excellent, they really deserved it!

Re:Kudos to Japan (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142140)

Because profits are evil, just ask your employer. Dumb slash dots.

Re:Kudos to Japan (2)

Hultis (1969080) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142180)

Nope, but when a country bends over for the companies it might be time to think it over.

Re:Kudos to Japan (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142242)

profits at the expense of all else is. don't be a fucking idiot

Re:Kudos to Japan (3, Insightful)

LastGunslinger (1976776) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142252)

Your logic would imply slavery is fine so long as the business employing it makes money. Profits are neutral. The methods used to make them are not. Neither the consumer nor the worker should be harmed so the company can profit.

Re:Kudos to Japan (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142690)

What is with the link between profit and slavery issue. When ever someone has a political stance that government interaction on the average will have more of a negative impact then a positive one they bring up this lame 150 year old slavery debate as "Proof" the their idea is wrong.
Extremes on either side is bad and Evil will occur. If you want to twist your logic around the reason for slavery success was because government supported it and enforced slavery laws. I can see if there were no slavery laws for or against, that slavery wouldn't be an issue as the people if they felt they were treated unjust they will just walk away. As the government would enforce capture and return any runaway slaves.

That said, I would like to agree with the rest of your comment, however there is an old saying "You can't please all of the people all of the time" A business cannot run selling a product for less then the market price and paying their employees above their market price. Also the cost to be 100% sure is often astronomical while 99.9% sure is affordable. These choices are not not of Evil, but trying to obtain the right balance.

Re:Kudos to Japan (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142262)

Yeah, capitalism is so right, just ask the working class of your country. Dumb american.

Re:Kudos to Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142476)

Dumb socialists

Remarkably shortsighted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142490)

You're an idiot, dumb anonymous xenophobe.

Unless you live in a pure communist state, your working class is paid by capitalist industry.

Re:Remarkably shortsighted (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142838)

Unless you live in a pure communist state, your working class is paid by capitalist industry.

It's the capitalist industry that is paid by the working class. Who do you think pays the taxes, buys the products, and even does the work for the industry in your capitalist paradise?

Re:Remarkably shortsighted (0)

smelch (1988698) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143194)

Wow, you're a complete jerkoff. If you are so hardlined on separating the "workers" from the "capitalist industry" you've clearly missed the point. "We buy your products" is no better than "I produce your products", to which you would reply "workers in the factories produce those products", to which I would reply make your own damned factory if its so easy. In fact, manage a factory. Oh, thats right, most people can't and if you didn't get the rewards of doing a difficult job nobody would want to. I mean, my God, its almost like capitalism is a system that requires producers and consumers and most of the time people are both. People complain of low wages and not getting the profit for everything they create, but at the same time starting a business is risky and most people wouldn't and don't do it. When people do and are successful suddenly they owe everything to you? No, fuck off, you're both dependent on each other. Turns out the people running businesses are a lot rarer than the people who can work in them, and therefore make a lot of money. When a worker stops working or can't do the job, he can be replaced fairly easily. If he can't, he usually gets paid more. Are you shocked? I'm not, it makes total sense.

You've heard the phrase the rich get richer? Well how come that doesn't apply to lottery winners? Is it maybe because they don't do the right things with their money? Its so easy to say people are rich because they have money, but yet when people are handed large sacks of money they end up losing it all, helping nobody, providing no products, and just consuming. What good does that do for anybody? None. But go ahead, continue to think the rich owe their existence to the "working class". Yes, they do need people to work for them, but if they weren't employing the working class, the working class would be out somewhere sucking their toes, barely surviving on scraps.

Re:Remarkably shortsighted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143722)

Oh, thats right, most people can't and if you didn't get the rewards of doing a difficult job nobody would want to.

I propose that most people can. Sure, there are always going to be malcontents that can't hold a job, much less a management position, but it used to be that the majority of management "graduated" from the lines to overseer positions to management positions until a bunch of MBA grads decided that only other MBA grads could possibly know how to get people to perform tasks that they themselves have never performed but are damned certain that their years at Harvard qualify them to tell other people how to do it.

Stick that in your spreadsheet and graph it. In triplicate, but only after you've gotten your "buy-in" from all the appropriate "stake holders" during your endless supply of pointless meetings.

Re:Kudos to Japan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142402)

Profits are not evil. Putting profits over the well being of your customers, is.

Re:Kudos to Japan (1)

drb226 (1938360) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142166)

Sony doesn't necessarily "lose" if these forced changes can help them regain customers' confidence. Getting the OK from Japan could be a great boon to Sony, and a chance for them to say "hey look, we redid everything and now everything bad is all better!" (whether or not it actually is)

Bedfellows (5, Insightful)

Krazy Kanuck (1612777) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142090)

It says a lot when the country a company is headquartered in tells them their stuff stinks.

+1 Japan for asking what everyone else lacked the sense to question.

Re:Bedfellows (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142122)

It says a lot when the country a company is headquartered in tells them their stuff stinks.

Well said.

+1 Japan for asking what everyone else lacked the sense to question.

+1 You for saying it. Have a Nice Day.

Re:Bedfellows (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142292)

It says a lot when the country a company is headquartered in tells them their stuff stinks.

Well said.

I second this.

+1 Japan for asking what everyone else lacked the sense to question.

+1 You for saying it. Have a Nice Day.

+1 You for +1ing OP. Have a Nice Day Too, Sir.

Re:Bedfellows (1)

jaskelling (1927116) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142142)

Seconded. Bravo for the business equivalent of "proof or it didn't happen" as far as Sony's claim of having everything fixed.

Re:Bedfellows (4, Informative)

idontgno (624372) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142186)

This is certainly not something I would have expected of the Japanese government, although I'll admit I hadn't thought very much about it since the business-friendly era of the "bend-over-backwards and kiss business' butt" MITI [wikipedia.org]. Of course, that was international trade, and this is about domestic business.

I have the beginnings of a theory, though. The recent revelations about the government's virtually non-existent oversight over the nuclear power industry, and TEPCO in particular, may have sensitized the entire Japanese cabinet and bureaucracy to public perceptions of being asleep at the switch... hence, the surprising and almost-literal leaping to the defense of the public interest against a danger to network and financial security. (Yeah, comparing Fukushima to the PSN hack is ridiculous, except for the change in behavior of the government between the two events. Correlation != causation and all..)

As a theory, it strains my credibility, and I just thought it up, but who knows?

Re:Bedfellows (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142446)

As a theory, it strains my credibility, and I just thought it up, but who knows?

Well, the same thing had occurred to me.

In in the wake of the nuclear plant, er, 'problems' ... and not getting responses from the company for quite some time when they were asking for updates ... I think it highly likely that the Japanese government isn't looking to just simply take companies at their word.

And, yes -- obviously the importance of the nuclear reactors vs the PSN outage are nowhere near one another. But, that doesn't mean that it might not signal a bit of a shift in the way their government is viewing such things -- "trust us" is no longer something they'll accept.

Maybe more governments will realize that if they're the ones who are supposed to be regulating and controlling -- well, then they need to be doing that, and be accountable for it. Not getting updates from TEPCO probably drove home the point that they need to be much more in control where they need to be.

Re:Bedfellows (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143396)

And then there was the Toyota debacle a year or two ago with the sudden accelerations and the denials. Japan doesn't want to lose much more face in the market.

Re:Bedfellows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143604)

Were you in a coma when NASA demonstrated that Toyota was right all along?

Re:Bedfellows (0)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142290)

Japan, like most of those ranting against Sony in these forums, is just waiting for free hookers and blow. And unicorns, no unicorns - no forgiveness.

Sony no longer the favorite?! (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142110)

Seems like Japan used to bend over backwards for Sony. This ongoing outage is seriously harmful to Sony's reputation. It's deservedly so, but interesting to see happen nonetheless, especially at this time when Japan could use a little financial love.

Can Sony really be this incompetent, and/or incapable of hiring in the necessary talent?

Re:Sony no longer the favorite?! (2)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142248)

Seems like Japan used to bend over backwards for Sony.

That happened to be the case. However after one earthquake, one tsunami and one muthafucking nuclear disaster they've grown some extra skin and decided Sony deserves some good facefarting.

Re:Sony no longer the favorite?! (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142372)

With the fukushima daiichi incident fresh and lingering in the japanese publics eyes, exhibiting additional signs of blatant regulatory capture is counter intuitive to fat-cat politicians, and their political careers.

Prior to the disaster, there was a revolving door between government employees and politicians and the (ahem) regulated nuclear power industry-- a connection that was lambasted by inquiries and probes into the reasons for the spectacular failure of Fukushima Daiichi in preventing a meltdown. Turned out that the captured regulatory agencies turned blind eyes to major warning signs about the reactor, and did so consistently.

Now that the shit has hit the fan, Japanese politicos are busy trying to save face, which is probably why they are taking such a hard stance against Sony. Additional embarrassment would not help them win back public confidence, while even token gestures like this one may distract and give talking points to weasel out of having hell come to breakfast.

Then no Portal 2 for all their PCs... (0)

schwachs (557337) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142154)

let's face it, a ton of the people who bought the PS3 version of Portal did it just for the "free" copies on the Mac and PC. I can finally get it on all my platforms in my house... the PS3 so far is a one game platform in my house and that's Little Big Planet (and LBP2).

No worries (1)

keitosama (990483) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142272)

Portal 2 hasn't even been released over here yet, so PS3 owners should know what to expect in advance.

Re:Then no Portal 2 for all their PCs... (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142536)

Wow - me too! I've bought a bunch of PS3 games, but the only ones that anybody in my house ever plays is LBP and Katamari. The rest of the games I've bought have been very disappointing. My wife bought me Portal2 and it was good, but short.

Say no? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142190)

Can someone remind me how can a government say "no" to someone operating a legal service again?

Re:Say no? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142260)

When said govt can send real ninjas to your house to slaughter you while you sleep.... freaking ninjas!!!

Re:Say no? (1)

snspdaarf (1314399) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142356)

You mean like, "Get all the planes out of the air, turn back international flights, and nobody goes up again until we say so"?

Re:Say no? (1)

OldeTimeGeek (725417) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142532)

Big difference. The Federal Aviation Administration, a US governmental agency, is responsible for the airspace over the United States so I would say it was well within its rights to shutdown the airspace over the US. It's nowhere near the same thing is it would be if they told a private company that they couldn't do business in the US because of a data breach.

Re:Say no? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142610)

Corporate charters exist at the pleasure of the government. If your corporation would prefer not to have all its assets nationalized it will play along.

Re:Say no? (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142964)

So kiss off any concept of private property.

Re:Say no? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36143068)

So kiss off any concept of private property.

...a concept which you expect the government to enforce. Ironic, no?

Re:Say no? (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142654)

The service is not legal if the Japanese government does not allow Sony to operate it. You know, kind of like how buying and selling marijuana is illegal in the United States?

What constitutes a "legal service" is entirely dependent on the law of the land. If you are in a country where the law requires you to seek government approval before operating a service, then your service is only "legal" if the government allows it.

Now, whether or not it is morally acceptable to have such a legal system is another question entirely.

When it's not a legal service (3)

name_already_taken (540581) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142738)

Can someone remind me how can a government say "no" to someone operating a legal service again?

When it looks like you're operating it in a way that does not comply with all of the laws.

You can read into that the Japanese government believes that PSN is not a legal service in Japan if PSN does not protect the privacy of the users.

"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (2)

cmholm (69081) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142196)

proven that they have taken the necessary measures to secure their network

IIRC, one rather glaring issue was the use of a bone-stock Apache install that evidently hadn't kept up with any security updates. I wonder what sort of Powerpointology Sony will be needed to prove worthiness, and whether there's enough folks at the Media and Content Industry department to knowledgeably gage the degree to which Sony got its act together?

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (2)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142238)

There were also the glaring issues of not hashing passwords, storing all kinds of sensitive information in plain text, failing to offer sunset on old customer data, etc...

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (2, Informative)

zen_la (1377775) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142288)

"One other point to clarify is from this weekend’s press conference. While the passwords that were stored were not “encrypted,” they were transformed using a cryptographic hash function. There is a difference between these two types of security measures which is why we said the passwords had not been encrypted. But I want to be very clear that the passwords were not stored in our database in cleartext form. For a description of the difference between encryption and hashing, follow this link." Source: http://blog.us.playstation.com/2011/05/02/playstation-network-security-update/ [playstation.com] [playstation.com]

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142676)

I see!

I had heard it reported that they transmitted cleartext information over the wire protocol, and even read a packet dump taken some 2 weeks or so before the breach at PSX-SCENE. Hackers there reported that cc data and other sensitive information was sent in cleartext. [psx-scene.com]

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143342)

When did they not hash passwords? They said they didn't *encrypt* passwords, but clarified that later that they meant they were hashed not encrypted. I actually found it rather reassuring that they understand the difference (and, yes, passwords should be hashed and not encrypted).

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142280)

What retarded OS are they using that doesn't get security patches for apache2* packages?

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (1)

jgtg32a (1173373) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142284)

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (1)

cmholm (69081) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142558)

So, the "unpatched" theory was based on nothing by Spaf's gut. It would seem Dr.Spafford is resting on his laurels. Great.

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (1)

suutar (1860506) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143708)

Spaf said he didn't actually know anything. If folks take his ruminations as gospel even when he disclaims them, what can he do about it?

Re:"Prove", ie. "Patch Apache"? (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143522)

I wonder what sort of Powerpointology Sony will be needed to prove worthiness

Slide 1 - Intro slide
Slide 2 - Previous configuration - Insecure (include at least 4 bullet points, include lots of buzzwords)
Slide 3 - New configuration - Secure (include at least 6 bullet points, include even more buzzwords)
Slide 4 - Conclusions/Q&A

Remember, if you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit.

Sony is claiming this is voluntary... (4, Insightful)

onlysolution (941392) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142250)

Sony is saying that this is a voluntary effort to cooperate with Japanese authorities, as they are not actually legally obliged to wait for permission to restart their services in Asia.

However, it's worth pointing out that in Japan it is common to allow companies and individuals to take "voluntary" actions to save face or prevent a public appearance of contention. There is also generally a greater public expectation of privacy amongst the Japanese, so their regulators are more less amused with Sony than American authorities.

Make of Sony's voluntary claims what you will.

/. Hypocrisy? (1, Insightful)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142258)

In one story we have commenters berating the US government for unveiling a "cybersecurity plan," and here we have them praising another government for ordering a private corporation from continuing operations.

What gives?

Re:/. Hypocrisy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142294)

Different laws of the land. USA doesn't care what businesses do with your data, EU goes bonkers if your screw up, and it would appear Japan takes data seriously too.

Re:/. Hypocrisy? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142438)

I agree. It's almost as if slashdot commenters weren't just one homogenous unit with a fixed opinion on each issue, but instead were a collection of individuals with differing views on any given subject.

Re:/. Hypocrisy? (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142688)

Perhaps because the Japanese government is pressuring Sony to do more to protect user data, whereas the US government is pushing for companies to make it easier to access that data.

Censorship (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142492)

OK, so how is this different from censorship?

Re:Censorship (4, Insightful)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 2 years ago | (#36142546)

censorship is about preventing speech because of its content, this is about preventing a database of personal and financial details from going online because its safety is dubious ?

Test Platforming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36142598)

Looks like the rest of the world is the test bed for the new security "upgrade". I wonder if they prefer that all other customers get hosed if it fails again and that the core consumer group gets preferred treatment in order from losing further confidence in at this stage. is it possible they do this to shake down and other latent issues while saving (what little is left) face in Japan?

Xbox sales (1)

rjejr (921275) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143314)

When I saw US was near the top of the list for the PSN getting back on was all I could think of was Xbox 360 sales, US vs. Japan.

Now for the obligitory response: (1)

lexsird (1208192) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143612)

Hahahahahahahahahahahahaaaaa! FUCK YOU SONY! OH IN YOUR FACE!!!! *dance wildly while singing GO JAPAN GO JAPAN*

Holy fuck this has been the biggest bunch of epic bullshit to come down the pike out of a corporation in a long time. ONE MONTH of being down, Sweet Jesus, where is the lynch mob? Has anyone been following what a bunch of idiots Sony is with ALL of their security? Reuters had to call and tell them about massive screw ups they had in basic security from a causal outside probe by a security expert. Their expert used a browser and google and found big fat gaping holes in their security. The guy didn't even dig into them hard...lol...what EPIC FUCK OFFS!!!

Yes, I am one of the pissed off people who's information got ripped off thanks to their completely shitty security. Yes, I am one of the pissed off people who's new PS3 will NOT let me use NetFlix. I am one of the pissed off people who's games are FUCKING NIGH WORTHLESS because they require the PSN.

WTF do we have to do to get a positive reaction? Do we have to collectively wrap our PS3, games and accessories in burlap, soak it in gas and launch it through the window of the store we got it from? Why is it only Japan that is telling Sony to do the right thing? Where the holy fuck is our piece of shit government in all of this? We pay these worthless cocksuckers enough in taxes, they should have been on this weeks ago. Leave it to our corporate lackey government to set with their thumbs up their collective asses on this while we take a dick in the ass.

This just punctuates why we have to be politically active in addition to our other chores in life. We have people in power right now that come from a previous era, they are corrupt as fuck, and seriously haven't a damn clue about tech. We need to send these sorry old fuckers packing out to pasture and get some people in that know what they are doing. We need a new party, of new blood, new ideas and that is NOT FOR FUCKING SALE.

I support this. (1)

sllim (95682) | more than 2 years ago | (#36143824)

I just got off the line with Clear.com helpdesk.
The doofushead on the other end of the line posted my clear username/login info for me, even though I never asked for it.

People are just so clueless with security, it is pretty disgusting.

Japan forcing Sony to prove they have secured there network - I like this. I like this a lot.

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