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Think I'm Not American? Pass the Hamburgers.

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the om-nom-nom dept.

United States 362

purkinje writes "Immigrants and their children may choose to eat American food as a way to fit in, a new study found, which may help explain why immigrants catch up to the country's obesity levels in 15 years. The researchers cast doubt on some subjects' Americanness, asking if they spoke English or saying they had to be American to participate; this provokes what psychologists call stereotype threat, the fear you'll confirm negative stereotypes about your group. White participants weren't affected by these comments, but Asian-American participants were more likely to list quintessentially American foods — burgers, BLTs, mac and cheese — as their favorites when the researchers called their status as American into question. They were also more likely to order and eat those dishes, consuming an average of 182 more calories than their non-threatened counterparts."

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362 comments

Mmmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145534)

...mac & cheese!

(Canadian living in America)

Re:Mmmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145630)

Sadly, they mean Kraft Dinner.

Re:Mmmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145984)

Honestly, our packages are cooler. Google Image Search "Kraft Macaroni and Cheese Dinner" (sans quotes) to get some comparison images.

Re:Mmmmmm.... (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146496)

Sadly, they mean Kraft Dinner.

Terrance and Philip pronounce it Kroff Dinner. They should know, from the shape of their heads they are obviously Canadians from the great Northern empire of Canadia.

Re:Mmmmmm.... (1)

pspahn (1175617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146064)

Seriously, if the point of the TFA is to promote more fear about eating crappy food, they should just keep the findings to themselves.

Reading this made me hungry for shitty food.

Pass the chicken nuggets (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145576)

Chances are we get a H1N1 visa...

Bullshit (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145582)

They eat that for convenience and price, just like the rest of us.

They are trying too hard to fit in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145598)

and getting fat beca it. Do most Americans eat that kind of food? I rarely do.

Re:They are trying too hard to fit in (2)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145878)

I am afraid that "most" Americans do eat that kind of food. I will, sometimes, when I'm in a real rush. But, I'd rather take the time to sit down to a meat and potato meal, sometimes rice instead of 'taters, with a veggie or two. I'm not much of a salad eater, but I'll put one away, once in awhile. I LOVE desserts - but by the time I've filled my belly with real food, there isn't much room for desserts, so my weight stays pretty stable at a mere 15 pounds over my "optimum" weight".

I will say, fast foods are addicting. The Big Mac, for instance. If I get one, I want two more. That sauce is just out of this world, I want to eat it til I burst. Sonic's french fries are the same - it's hard to stop myself placing another order once I've got the flavor in my mouth. To me, that is reason enough to avoid fast foods!

But, 30 years ago, I was addicted to Mountain Dew, too!

Re:They are trying too hard to fit in (5, Funny)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146044)

I am afraid that "most" Americans do eat that kind of food. I will, sometimes, when I'm in a real rush. But, I'd rather take the time to sit down to a meat and potato meal, sometimes rice instead of 'taters, with a veggie or two. I'm not much of a salad eater, but I'll put one away, once in awhile. I LOVE desserts - but by the time I've filled my belly with real food, there isn't much room for desserts, so my weight stays pretty stable at a mere 15 pounds over my "optimum" weight".

What a great story. Please tell us more about what you like to eat, because this was so interesting my eyes are bleeding.

Ironically (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145658)

Ironically, the Hamburger is from Hamburg. It's a German meal.

Re:Ironically (2, Insightful)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145722)

Yeah, and French Fries are from France. FRANCE I SAY!

And Salisbury steak is from England! And pizza is from Pisa!

Or people with those nationalities immigrated here and named their inventions after their hometowns in order to drum up sales of the "exotic" food.

Actually (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145786)

Pizza [wikipedia.org] is from Naples

Re:Ironically (3, Interesting)

arielCo (995647) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145948)

Salisbury steak was invented by an American physician, Dr. J. H. Salisbury (1823–1905), and the term "Salisbury steak" was in use in the USA from 1897.

The Ancient Greeks covered their bread with oils, herbs and cheese. In Byzantine Greek the word was spelled or pita, meaning pie. The word has now spread to Turkish as pide, in Balkan languages: Serbo-Croatian pita, Albanian pite, Bulgarian pita, Modern Hebrew pitth via the Judaeo-Spanish pita.

Re:Ironically (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146148)

modern hebrew is pita as well, not pitth

Re:Ironically (2)

MoonBuggy (611105) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145996)

Yeah, and French Fries are from France. FRANCE I SAY!

Belgium, actually. And properly served with mayo, not ketchup, although I'd be willing to accept ranch dressing as a suitably American substitute!

Re:Ironically (5, Informative)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146172)

Nice try, but the only irony is that all of those are indeed aptly named:

French Fries
For also in the 1840s, pomme frites ("fried potatoes") first appeared in Paris. Sadly, we don't know the name of the ingenious chef who first sliced the potato into long slender pieces and fried them. But they were immediately popular, and were sold on the streets of Paris by push-cart vendors.

Frites spread to America where they were called French fried potatoes. You asked how they got their name--pretty obvious, I'd say: they came from France, and they were fried potatoes, so they were called "French fried potatoes." The name was shortened to "french fries" in the 1930s. http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2033/whats-the-origin-of-french-fries [straightdope.com]

Salisbury Steak

In the late 19th century, Dr. James Henry Salisbury came up with chopped beef patties to cure Civil War soldiers sufferering from "camp diarrhea." http://homecooking.about.com/od/foodhistory/a/groundbeefhist.htm [about.com]

Pizza
Pizza is a type of bread and dish that has existed since time immemorial in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_pizza [wikipedia.org]

And for good measure:
Belgian Waffles
Vermersch started making waffles from a recipe of his wife's when living in Belgium before the outbreak of World War II. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_history_behind_the_belgian_waffle [answers.com]

Even the name Hamburger has its origin in Hamburg, Germany:
Hamburgers
In the late 18th century, the largest ports in Europe were in Germany. Sailors who had visited the ports of Hamburg, Germany and New York, brought this food and term "Hamburg steak" into popular usage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger#18th_and_19th_centuries [wikipedia.org]

The pizza is not from Pisa, even ironically. (2)

WebManWalking (1225366) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146308)

In the first 6 books of the Aeneid (often read in 4th year Latin in high school), it's foretold that Aeneas and his followers would someday be so hungry, they would eat their plates. Then later, in the second 6 books (more likely to be read in college Latin courses), their plates were all smashed, so they hit on the idea of cooking their food on dough and eating everything that way. Aeneas' son Julus, who was too young to know of the prophecy, remarked "Hey look everyone! We're eating our plates!" But everyone older didn't laugh. They remembered the prophecy and were amazed at the innocent wisdom of Divus Julus.

Don't let anyone tell you that the pizza was invented in this town or that, or at this pizzaria or that one. They're just claiming credit for what was actually a traditional dish (literally) that had been around since antiquity.

Re:Ironically (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146610)

Ironically, I'm an American, and I eat Chinese!! :D

Cultural Identification in Food (5, Interesting)

eepok (545733) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145730)

Most, if not all, cultures on this planet use food as a method of identity. If you went to China or Japan or France and still only sought out American-style food, you would likely be outcast. It's the same in America... especially for children! What recent immigrant children have to endure in the realm of food-mockery is genuine. /remembers bringing tamales to school in elementary school //remembers watching my Chinese friend bring dried fish and rice. ///kids are horrible and get away with it.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (-1, Troll)

digsbo (1292334) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145860)

A funny hybrid of these scenarios came up when I saw the little Mexican (I mean REALLY Mexican, most likely anchor babies as I know several of the moms were illegals) kids next door with Taco Bell. It made me laugh, because essentially Taco Bell is an awful version of fresh Mexican food you'd generally not choose if you had the ease of access to the real deal in that town. Yet it's still Mexican(ish) and convenient, and cheap, so they got both sides of the deal.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (3, Insightful)

eepok (545733) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146824)

That's likely due to income. Taco Bell has some of the cheapest fast food in the nation and it's, well, fast! Food quality and nutrients notwithstanding, if you and your spouse have 3 kids and are working multiple minimum wage jobs, you're not likely going to want to cook proper home-made food every night nor could you likely afford better fast food.

As an aside, is it OK to refer to people as "illegals" and their children as "anchor babies"? Being Mexican-American, I enjoy torturing white people when they refer to my ethnicity. One week I'll be "Hispanic", and the next will be "Latino", "Mexican", "Mexican-American", or "Chicano", but I'm yet to hear, from anyone, that it is commonly acceptable to refer to someone as an "illegal" and their children as "anchor babies".

I'm asking out of genuine curiosity. I may just be behind the times.

Illegal Immigrant in my mind says that the person is in the country illegally and plans to stay. An "Illegal" sounds like the person illegally exists. "Anchor babies" sounds like the people had children in the country for the express intent of using immigration policy to preserve their own residence. It's without love for the child.

So, ya... is that normal?

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (-1, Troll)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145886)

America doesn't really have a "food identity" though. It's all just bland, greasy meat smeared with hot sauce, or burnt bacon with hot sauce, or stuff that is sold as "cheese" in the US, industrial sealant in the UK and most of Europe, and illegal in France and Switzerland.

They eat some pretty disgusting stuff in the US, usually made by taking something that wasn't brilliant to begin with, then either boiling it until it's grey or burning it under a hot grill, then dumping hot sauce on it.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145930)

That is utter nonsense. There are many regional cuisines in America, some of which are quite healthy, and many of which are identified globally as part of the "American" table. That the real cuisines are regional rather than national is not peculiar to America, either: "Italian" food is a collection of many regional cuisines, as well.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (3, Informative)

Altus (1034) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146006)

Bullshit!

BBQ, at least as it is prepared here, is most certainly an American invention. Much of the native South and North Eastern food is American, though admittedly influenced by different parts of Europe (but then, who isn't, there was a time when the Italians didn't have pasta). The western states have been developing and refining a cuisine all their own over the past decade or so.

As for Cheese, America produces world class cheddar cheese never mind some of the other varieties.

Sure, Americans might eat a lot of fast food but all you do is show your ignorance by claiming there is no "American food" that isn't crap.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146570)

True, though many cheese snobs would take issue with referring to cheddar as a cheese.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

GonzoPhysicist (1231558) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146658)

Speaking of cheese I've got to represent my home town of Monterey and our man Jack (peppers optional).

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146018)

Spoken like someone who hasn't had a decent hamburger in years ;-) I'm an American who's lived various places in Western Europe for nearly a decade, and a good, not-chewy, not-flat, not-meatloaf-like hamburger is one of the few things I miss about food from my native land.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146046)

I take it that your experience of the US has been primarily in the Midwest.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146298)

Or Arkansas.

I was visiting a friend in NW Arkansas back in the mid-90s and we went to a family chain restaurant that's apparently popular in Oklahoma through NY. The food was so bland as to be inedible.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

SquareVoid (973740) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146068)

Not sure if this is ignorance or an obvious troll. If it is the former, please check out the following comment who has answered this misguided opinion of American Food. http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=232001&cid=18857113 [slashdot.org] If it is the the latter, then I fell for it.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

JSombra (1849858) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146656)

While an interesting post, as soon as i read "we invented the Hamburger." i had to take every example he gave with a pinch of salt...as someone who "knows what they are talking about" would never say something like that And then he finish's it off with his whole little discussion about the potato, without even checking know most of that is wrong because contrary to common Irish belief, the potato did not come to europe until after america was discovered, as it came come south america Actually thinking about, i would consider everything he says wrong unless proven otherwise

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146104)

Shame on you for coming in on a student visa, getting involved with a gang and having a shoot-out. Plainly, your entire American dining experience was at a university dining hall, a hospital, and prison.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146504)

It's true. If you come to Britain and don't eat proper British food, like curries and stir fries, then we think you're a bit weird.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (2)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146588)

The US has many food identities, I grew up on an Indian Reservation which had alot of German and Scandinavian settlers from 1905-1920, there was a mix of eastern and northern European foods along with Plains Indian foods.

The southwestern US has Tex-Mex, northern Mexican and Central American influences, the big cities on the West Coast have their takes on what grew there and what is popular today.

As for all cheese being "industrial sealant in the UK" that is just trolling, Oregon, California and the Midwest have some of the best cheeses in the world, on par with France, Germany, Italy and Switzerland.

Same for the wine, beer and spirits made in the United States.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (4, Interesting)

pelirojatica (533396) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145902)

Indeed. But it turns around, for some of us. The empanadas I was teased about in elementary school are now (20+ years later) coveted by my friends. It's a good thing my mother taught me to ignore the jerks... and how to make empanadas!

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

adonoman (624929) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145904)

As a Canadian of German decent - I agree. Try bringing blood sausage and cow-tongue sandwiches to school for lunch...

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146546)

Bring them and ignore the little morons. I still get crap at work because I like to let the teawurst age a little at room temp before I eat it.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145978)

Yea, go eat a hamburger in Japan and watch the loving stares. Worst than that is you can't ever look Japanese, while you can look American. No fitting in there. While they have a chance at fitting in here.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146348)

The problem is not that anyone can 'look American' but that does not stop him/her from looking, sounding, originating, etc. like something else as well. It's the latter that concerns me and that's how USA national security is ill-affected.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146206)

wow.... tamales, dried fish and rice. Meanwhile, American kids have peanut butter sandwiches, maybe soggy with jelly if they're lucky, or maybe lunchables. They were making fun of you because they were jealous.

Re:Cultural Identification in Food (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146490)

I don't know about the outcast part, but kids are horrible. I don't give a rats ass what people eat. Maybe kids do, because they are all morons since their experience and mind aren't developed fully yet. I try just about anything. I like eating anything Ive ever tried but Menudo. Even then I can see why people like it.

Asian-Americans 'fitting in' (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145772)

Research indicates that Asian-American SAT scores drop in the third generation and drop-out rates catch up with the rest of the population by the fifth. Following the lowering of ambitions from 'medical school' to 'minimum wage cashier at Walmart' in seventh-generation Asian-Americans, assimilation is deemed complete.

Re:Asian-Americans 'fitting in' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146228)

The above must have been posted by KudyardRipling. Must have been a Navy SEAL Team Six member; it doesn't get any whiter than that.

Re:Asian-Americans 'fitting in' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146302)

except the vaccine is very simple.

Bring the kids back to their homeland and receives their re-education camp training, and they will be immune of the wasteful, viral and deadly influence known as "American Culture".

Re:Asian-Americans 'fitting in' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146312)

Five and seven generations; whatever. How many Americans know anything about their family seven generations ago?

Re:Asian-Americans 'fitting in' (3, Funny)

onkelonkel (560274) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146830)

My kids are in school with 2nd generation Chinese and Korean kids. They call a "B" on a test an "Asian Fail".

Re:Asian-Americans 'fitting in' (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146838)

Fifth generation? Seventh generation???

That's, respectively, ~120 and ~170 years ago. Not even my Northern European ancestors had arrived that long ago...

I don't believe it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145798)

Ever seen an asian chick's cunt? HAIRY!!! American girls have nice clean beavers.

Rtfa (4, Funny)

clinko (232501) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145830)

Anyone who doesn't want that burger isn't un-American. They're inhuman.

Re:Rtfa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36145944)

Indeed, they could be Bovine in nature...

Re:Rtfa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146168)

or vegetarian.

Re:Rtfa (1)

cpicon92 (1157705) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146408)

Are you being sarcastic? I can't tell... I wouldn't eat that thing if you paid me.

Re:Rtfa (1)

zach_the_lizard (1317619) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146690)

Alright boys, we just found ourselves a bot. And you thought you passed the Turing test?

Re:Rtfa (1)

cpicon92 (1157705) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146758)

You found a vegetarian who just ate a snack that was a little too large and therefore finds that hamburger quite unappetizing. That said, I'm willing to be a bot if that's what you want.

Re:Rtfa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146666)

Anyone who doesn't want that burger isn't un-American. They're inhuman.

I'm from Germany, and I just had a reasonably large (1 pound) schnitzel for dinner, with fries and coke to go with it, so I'm certainly not averse to eating unhealthy artery-clogging heaps of meat, but... I think the fact that you consider THAT burger in that picture to be irresistible conclusively proves that YOU are without a doubt an American. :)

(Not trying to say "Americans can't cook and will eat anything", BTW. I'm just commenting on the cultural differences in food, and your own tendency to overestimate the significance of your own culture, and your failure to realize that it, too, is just one among many, without any kind of special status - just like all the others.)

Threatened? Pfftt... (0)

_bulbgiver_ (884187) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145850)

Perhaps they order American food for the novelty factor ? If I eat Sushi/IndianFood/EthnicFood at home everyday, then I might pick a Burger at a restaurant.

Re:Threatened? Pfftt... (1)

casi0qv (1184909) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145986)

This was a controlled study. They were comparing eating patterns between two otherwise identical groups where one was "threatened" and the other not.

Re:Threatened? Pfftt... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146008)

I never RTFA, but TFS seems to be saying that questioning someone's Americanness was statistically correlated with them identifying with the "American" food. Your idea doesn't explain that.

Tasty Food (1)

CynicTheHedgehog (261139) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145862)

It may not be nutritious, but it sure tastes good. I recently worked with some vendors from the UK, and they said their favorite part of America was the food. I imagine that when you only have it occasionally, the ingredients don't really matter that much to you. (Of course, this was food at nicer sit-down restaurants, not fast food.)

Re:Tasty Food (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146050)

If it's not "nutritious", then it probably doesn't fully achieve the potential of the particular "cuisine" either. ...it's like the guy talking about Taco Bell vs. Tacos in general.

Re:Tasty Food (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146322)

Actually not so much. In traditionally agrarian cultures, like the US for most of its history, high calorie and fat content generally help the laborers produce more and so unhealthy or less than nutritious foods become staples because they meet the most pressing need (i.e. efficient delivery of massive calories required for field work). Now that doesn't necessarily make it the height of cuisine but it does make it quintessentially American in this case.

Re:Tasty Food (2)

DanTheStone (1212500) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146058)

That isn't because our food's amazing, it's just that the UK is the very bottom of the ladder.

Re:Tasty Food (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146716)

What's the old joke? Oh yeah:

Heaven is a place where the lovers are Italian, the cooks are French, the mechanics are German, the police are English, the teenagers are Japanese, the movie makers are American, the musicians are Russian, the women are Swedish, and the bankers are Swiss.

Hell is a place where the lovers are Swiss, the cooks are English, the mechanics are French, the police are German, the teenagers are American, the movie makers are Japanese, the musicians are Swedish, the women are Russian, and the bankers are Italians.

Re:Tasty Food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146288)

Fast food is tasty too. Or mcdonalds wouldnt be in business...

As someone who has lost 40 pounds let me tell you. It is the tasty food that has the carbs. Most 'diet' food has a bland crapy twiggy taste. Bread is tasty and it is in MANY dishes.

Wie, bitte? (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145910)

Und warum glaubt deise Leute daß Hamburger Hackfleisch besonders Amerikanisch ist? Meine deutschen Vorfahren würden etwas über das zu sagen.

-jcr

American... (0)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 2 years ago | (#36145990)

Never have eaten a burger, BLT or mac and cheese

Re:American... (1)

Kreigaffe (765218) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146086)

What a droll and uninteresting life.

Re:American... (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146380)

My tastes go more Tex-Mex, Indonesia, Thai, Fusion.

American, Soul, British, German and Scandinavian seem droll and uninteresting to me.

Re:American... (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146688)

American is fusion. For British, try a Soul in its Coffin, Fish and Chips or a Shepherds Pie. Hell, try Bangers and Mash. You have to go to an authentic joint otherwise its all crap. For German just eat a good sausage with some saurkraut, German mustard, and German potato salad. Also, you have to go to an authentic joint otherwise its crap.

Re:American... (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146772)

Plains Indian food isn't fusion and that's American. Salmon, crab legs, fried chicken, hot wings aren't fusion either.

There are alot of invested in the US or Canada dishes that aren't "fusion".

Re:American... (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146600)

Man, you cannot call yourself Wyatt Earp. You can probably forget about the BLT, they pretty much suck. Ive had better Tempeh bacon BLT's. But a good gourmet mac and cheese is awesome. Theres a place in Kalispell, Montana that throws lobster in it. A burger is something that you definitely need to try. Go eat a burger at a reputable joint in Denver and you will probably want to kill yourself for never eating one. Denver has extremely good and affordable ethnic restaurants, burger joints, brat joints, and steak houses compared to anywhere else except maybe New York.

Re:American... (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146750)

I was always underwhelmed by Denver's restaurant choices in the mid 90s when I lived in Denver compared to Portland or Seattle.

Maybe it's gotten better since '97.

Anyone really suprised? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146000)

Food is a great shibboleth, because it's completely ubiquitous within social groups but very different between them.

I moved to an upscale part of the south of England recently from a northern city. So far every time I meet anyone else who is from a similar background we will more often than not end up going to a chippy (incidentally, the only one in the entire city, back home I had 3 within 5 minutes of me). For anyone not familiar with a true northern fish and chips, there's a reason it's not served at any Michelin starred restaurants.

Re:Anyone really suprised? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146178)

What makes a fish and chips "northern"? It's just fried fish and potatoes, right?

Re:Anyone really suprised? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146640)

Maybe for people that never move. As someone who was born in another country then moved a lot in the USA, due to being an army brat, that does not work on me.

Behind the curve (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146002)

It sounds like they're behind the curve. 3rd generation Americans like myself are just trying to eat better, not "American". There are few ethnic dishes that my parents continued to make, and none that I make myself--but I'm certainly not ashamed of them. If I had the time and enough people in my family to eat it, I'd happily make a pot of stuffed cabbage on a regular basis. Why should anybody be ashamed of that? It's so... Un-American!

My favourite fast food (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146082)

Is still fish and Chips, though I will eat a burger(without the tomato) and fries.
Preferably not Mcd's

BTW I have been here for nearly 9 years and a citizen for 3

what are U.S dishes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146134)

I can't come up with 1 U.S dish, name one? When someone tells me about one I almost always trace it back to some european country.

I wonder if this is (partly) an evolved trait? (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146150)

When an animal is threatened, it seems to make sense for it to take in extra calories, if they're available, that it can use for fight or flight. Only so many extra, or it will just want to lie down and snooze, but nature isn't usually so generous with calories for evolution to take that into account. Of course, the choice of the form those calories comes in does seem to be specific to the threat.

Re:I wonder if this is (partly) an evolved trait? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146642)

Do not mention this in public again... Gartner will sue you for unlicensed use of their Magic Quadrant!!!

Paradise (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146158)

You know you're living in paradise when this is news.

When McDonald’s opened in Moscow (1990), many patrons were pleased with the _quality_ of the food.

Genocide (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146354)

White people have the right to have their own countries.

Anybody care to disagree?

Re:Genocide (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146814)

According to those who have plaques on the wall, said class lost that right after the Second World War. Hitler caused white people to forfeit that privilege. Have you not heard that the United Nations was established to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of white self-determination[COUGH] war"?

Doesn't it suck to be insufficiently different to so as not to merit membership in a protected class?

I've noticed this at my job (2)

tool462 (677306) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146382)

We have a very diverse group here at work. Probably about a dozen different nationalities, but the cultural divide is pretty much split along two axes:
Ominvore/Vegetarian
Drinkers/Non-Drinkers

If you make a 2x2 grid and populate it with people based on their eating and drinking habits, you'd find that members of each group don't interact much with those outside their group. And if they do, it's much more likely to be from a neighboring cell on the grid than from opposite corner

Re:I've noticed this at my job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146594)

Omnivores and drinkers represent the secular and/or nominal Christian West. Vegetarians represents the Dharmic religious sphere. Non-drinkers represent the Abrahamic Strict Monothe[BOOOOM!]

Suicide bombers...

Mirrors my own experiences... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146444)

I've lived for periods of time in several asian countries. I was surprised with how some nations' people thought about food. Many times they just assumed that only their people could consume it, and that other peoples, particularly non-asian people wouldn't be able to eat it... or would get sick because their bodies were different and couldn't handle it.

For me, growing up in California, I eat everything. So for me, it's just delicious food. Often when I go to meet friends' friends or families for the first time, many would be really concerned about meeting me since "I wouldn't be able to eat", or it might make my body sick. Of course, they were always delighted to find out that I could eat their food - often better then themselves - and from that point on I was never "American"... I was one of them. The exception would be some restauranteers. Some of them would just see me as a weird American... the 'exception' to the norm.

In many countries being able to share a meal with another person is a sign of community, of belonging. It's both intimate and social. The funny thing here, though, is I bet many of the immigrants in America rarely eat with Americans... more likely they don't want to integrate with Americans, but want to look like they do.

They're more American than I am (1)

dave562 (969951) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146448)

When I started caring about my diet and wanting to improve my health, I found myself eating a lot of "Asian" and "Middle Eastern" types of food. I was a vegetarian for a while, but have since started eating meat again. The idea of trying to make vegetarian equivalents of traditional American foods often leads to some not so great results. On the other hand, there are other cultures that eat primarily vegetarian diets and have been doing so for generations. Not surprisingly, their food tastes great despite not having any meat in it.

american too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36146664)

Most of them are american too. They born in american contiente.

Royale With Cheese (3, Informative)

no1nose (993082) | more than 2 years ago | (#36146722)

Jules: Mmm-mmmm. That is a tasty burger. Vincent, ever have a Big Kahuna Burger?
[Vincent shakes his head]
Jules: Wanna bite? They're real tasty.
Vincent: Ain't hungry.
Jules: Well, if you like burgers give 'em a try sometime. I can't usually get 'em myself because my girlfriend's a vegitarian which pretty much makes me a vegitarian. But I do love the taste of a good burger. Mm-mm-mm. You know what they call a Quarter Pounder with cheese in France?
Brett: No.
Jules: Tell 'em, Vincent.
Vincent: A Royale with cheese.
Jules: A Royale with cheese! You know why they call it that?
Brett: Because of the metric system?
Jules: Check out the big brain on Brett! You're a smart motherf*cker.

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