Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Internet Could Mean End of "Snow Days"

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the think-of-the-children dept.

The Internet 223

fangmcgee writes "Could the Internet mean the end of snow days? Some schools think so, and they are experimenting with ways for students to do lessons online during bad weather, potentially allowing classes to go on during even the worst blizzard." Alright folks, it's finally happened: The Internet has gone too far. It's time to blow it up and go back to papyrus scrolls and horseback couriers.

cancel ×

223 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Don't think so (2)

VincenzoRomano (881055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178418)

Unless the wired and wireless infrastructure for broadband is made better and tougher.

Re:Don't think so (1)

armanox (826486) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178452)

Also, power lines.

Re:Don't think so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178636)

Not until classes can deal with 21,600 bps dialup connections or a suitable substitute is created (satellite doesn't count). Seriously, a lot of small towns have cable that was laid in the 1950s and never upgraded or maintained.

Re:Don't think so (5, Funny)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178768)

If it's a small town, the kids can walk to school. In the snow. Uphill. Both ways.

Re:Don't think so (2)

MaltoMario (1005995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179172)

indeed. I did same thing, except I had barbed wire on my bare feet for extra traction on the ice.

Re:Don't think so (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179370)

You could afford barbed wire?

Re:Don't think so (1)

obergfellja (947995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179372)

Sunny! I lived in a big town and I still walked up hill... on the ice... both ways.

Re:Don't think so (1)

Ihmhi (1206036) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179500)

Uphill, both ways, in a CAVE, with a box of SCRAPS!

Re:Don't think so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179474)

"(satellite doesn't count)"

Not when there's 6 inches of snow on the dish - do you want to climb up on the roof to clean it off. (

Re:Don't think so (1)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179016)

Also, power lines.

Yes. We just had an ice storm in February, and most of the town was without power for 3-4 days. There will still be snow days, they just might be fewer in number.

Re:Don't think so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179306)

I concur. There are a lot of people who don't have high speed because it's not in the budget or the infrastructure doesn't exist.

Re:Don't think so (1)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179354)

Plus, they'd have to require all students have a computer at home. Who's paying for all those computers?

In the developed world... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179478)

This is not a problem. How many kids do you or your kids know who don't have access to a computer? Very few I'll bet.
All they would need for most of the work would be a web browser. Many of these kits have smart phones these days even those from poorer areas.

Re:In the developed world... (5, Insightful)

cherokee158 (701472) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179554)

You have clearly never known true poverty.

Re:Don't think so (1)

obergfellja (947995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179502)

not just that, but if all students were given the opportunity to obtain a computer (tower or laptop), internet connection to their place of stay, and so on, it would help, but than again, that would be upwards in the millions if not billions (especially for the biggest schools in the states). Than you would have Capitalist conservative yelling "That's UNFAIR, COMMUNIST!" because it leads to giving opportunity to students without forcing them to pay for a service. or something along those lines. Not everyone is able to pay for a service like internet let alone having a computer. Yes, we have computers (everyone commenting here), or atleast access to a computer, but what if you were stuck in a place where you were unable to obtain internet service, let alone a form of transmitting that service into a viable resource (computer)? The idea is good, but without proper funding (and trust me, there are millions of dollars being cut from the schools in the past several years), the idea will just be that. An idea (and a dream).

Power (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178436)

Yeah. Because blizzards and heavy snow never disrupt power or telecommunications. </sarcasm>

Me fail English? Thats unpossible! (4, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178444)

Maybe it can teach the difference between "to" and "too"? Then move on to advanced concepts like "their", "they're" and "there"; the proper use of commas and even that spawn of satan itself, the apostrophe.

Re:Me fail English? Thats unpossible! (1)

MokuMokuRyoushi (1701196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178764)

No, no no, you missed it too. They actually forgot to capitalize - "The Internet has gone to Far" is what it should look like.

Re:Me fail English? Thats unpossible! (1)

KingMotley (944240) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179244)

Perhaps after "too" they should move on to make believe words like "Allright".

Re:Me fail English? Thats unpossible! (1)

andrewd18 (989408) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179258)

If only the submitter hadn't spent so many snow days at home instead of in school learning proper grammar! Oh, the humanity!

midwest resident here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178458)

Our internet, while cable based, is dependant on a microwave uplink to the next biggest city- which is often glitchy and disrupted during weather bad enough to cause school delays. Moreover, ice storms tend to kill power a lot.

Online grammar classes (2)

webbiedave (1631473) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178460)

wouldn't be "to" bad an idea for some.

Outages days - the new snow days? (3, Insightful)

Mr_eX9 (800448) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178462)

Your computer and internet still won't go if your power goes out. Or if your internet goes out separately. Also, this will only work in wealthy communities where everyone has broadband and a computer that meets the specifications for whatever terrible software the schools will foist on students.

Re:Outages days - the new snow days? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178688)

And even in the best of circumstances, there is no way that my kid won't lose his VPN token.

Re:Outages days - the new snow days? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178872)

You think there will be any sort of real security? That would cost money.

Thanks for brightening my morning with laughter!

Re:Outages days - the new snow days? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179346)

But can't they just pass a law?
"All parents or guardians of students between five (5) ears of age and nineteen (19) years of age are required to provide children with one (1) laptop computer and a wired or wireless connection to the internet for purposes of education."
See, that wasn't so hard.

What? Funding? That's a Federal issue, duh.

Re:Outages days - the new snow days? (1)

Rick17JJ (744063) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179348)

Over the years, my telephone line and the DSL line have occasionally quit working after a day or two of rain. Whenever I called the repair number for the telephone compay, they always told me that if it did not start working within 48 hours they would send a repairman out. The telephone always started working again within a day or two, so the repairman was never sent out. If a day or two of rain preceded the snow, there is a slight possibility that my telephone and DSL connection will not be working during the snowy day.

We do not get ice storms here in Arizona. At 5,200 foot elevation in Arizona, we do get occasional rain and snow. Whenever we do get snow, the schools and colleges are usually closed for just one day, because most of the snow is gone by the next day.

A few years ago, DSL finally became available where I live. In the past, I was taking several classes at a junior college that had some online study material, and I was always the only one on dial-up. To make matters worse, the telephone lines in my neighborhood were only good for 26.4K, not 56K or 28.8K.

Proficiency (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178468)

This is simply going to cause America to fall behind China in snowman construction and the snowball arms race.

I would have been happy with that (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178478)

Get prescribed amount of work done, then do whatever you want for the rest of the day. Alternatively, this could eventually lead to all learning being done from home, and telecommuting becoming a more acceptable work plan. I'd be happy with that too :) In fact, telecommuting makes a whole lot of sense for a business..

Re:I would have been happy with that (2)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178686)

Wow, your comment made me look at online education in a different way. Before I always just saw it as all the students watching the teacher over a live video, and maybe there being a video stream back if they want to ask questions.

Instead, I think it would be a lot better for the teacher to record the lesson once (assuming the same lesson is taught multiple times in a day or week) and then allow the students to individually pause it to ask a question, which could be done via live video. While the students are watching, the teacher can be grading papers or whatever other work they have to do, instead of having to take that home with them like so many do right now.

The only issue I've thought of so far is multiple students having the same question, but responses to questions could be recorded also and added to the site like a video FAQ for that lesson/course/etc.

Re:I would have been happy with that (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178842)

To be fair, there are few questions on the elementary level cursus that is unanswered by Google.

Re:I would have been happy with that (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178866)

Khan Academy has been implementing almost exactly that (well, no live video feedback, but an interactive big-brother-esque quiz site instead, that sees how long each student spends on each question and where they make mistakes (and where they go over the quiz very quickly, which would mean they've understood the subject), to allow for fine-grained attention...

Re:I would have been happy with that (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178968)

I strongly believe that the traditional teacher lesson is poor way to provide learning to students, but with that aside, you do bring up an excellent idea to improve the current system without changing the learning status quo. Once the videos are recorded, that teacher's services will no longer be needed. The answering of questions can be outsourced, mechanical turk style, to older students and the world at large.

With that said, the real value of school is the everyday social interaction. That becomes more challenging to provide if everyone is at home behind their computer screen.

Re:I would have been happy with that (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179036)

Replying to myself, but I guess you probably meant that the students would still go to class. That could still reduce the staff to a couple to a small handful of supervisors, which is still good from a taxpayer perspective.

Re:I would have been happy with that (2)

andrewd18 (989408) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179332)

Get prescribed amount of work done, then do whatever you want for the rest of the day.

I was homeschooled from fourth grade through twelfth. This is pretty much what I did, except I did it in week chunks. My mother would plan out the school year in advance then hand me my workload for a given week. I would then crank through as much as I could, often getting my work done on Wednesday, leaving Thursday and Friday for leisure time.

That schedule allowed me to start up my own computer repair business when I was 16. It was great - I could schedule clients during normal business hours when I might have been in school wasting time for the slower kids to catch up.

Education (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178484)

...for students to do lessons online during bad weather... The Internet has gone to far.

Not far enough if you're using 'to' instead of 'too'.

Re:Education (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178956)

You grammar Nazis can go two hell!

Optional (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178490)

I think it's a good idea as long as students are not penalized for not participating. Unless the schools want to provide PCs and on-demand dial-up connections to students that don't have a computer or Internet, it would hardly be fair to expect students to go to the public library to get online if schools are closed due to weather. Believe it or not, there's plenty of students that would take advantage of this even if it was not mandatory, if only for a review/Q&A style class online.

Snow days are healthy (4, Insightful)

Strange Ranger (454494) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178492)

Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
 
Snow days are healthy. By Saturday it'll be muck, or ice, and the kids will be stuck inside, yet again. And since it's May, let's not forget it's dark by dinner time in the winter. Let the kids play outside, for their own good. It's only a few times per year.

Benefits of "learning" at home (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178604)

So much doom and gloom, very few pointing out pluses.

Who says it has to be the kid who does the homework. It can be a parent, or someone else. it can even be a kid elsewhere. Think of the job opportunities this opens up!

The only reason for brick & mortar schools is socialization.

Re:Snow days are healthy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178708)

On top of that, snow days are already accounted for in areas that experience significant snowfall. Doing this just moves the end of the year 3 days earlier in my town and most surrounding school systems.

Re:Snow days are healthy (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179026)

Are you in the Southern Hemisphere? Here in Scotland it's still pretty bright around 10PM :)

Re:Snow days are healthy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179076)

He was referring to *during the winter*, chuckles. Here in the northeastern US it's light past 8pm.

Re:Snow days are healthy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179152)

Are you illiterate? Reread his comment. He was trying to remind all north-hemisphere folks that it gets dark early in winter. Someone had too many snow days.

Re:Snow days are healthy (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179480)

First of all, thanks for being a fucking douchebag, AC.

Yep, I must have not finished off the sentence, since "Since it's May, let's not forget it's dark by dinner time" seemed so bizarre to me. I still think it's worded strangely.

Re:Snow days are healthy (1)

drooling-dog (189103) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179476)

Let the kids play outside, for their own good.

Ahh... A blast from the past: snow forts and snowball fights. Most kids I know are going to spend their snow day on their lardy butts in front of the computer anyway...

As an adult... (1)

Psmylie (169236) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178494)

As an adult, I fully support keeping kids learning as much as possible. In fact, cancel all holidays and summer vacation. It's for their own good! And it keeps them off my lawn.

Of course, if I were still a child, I suppose I'd see the massive injustice in all of this.

Re:As an adult... (-1, Troll)

mini me (132455) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178758)

As an adult, if you want to keep your kids learning, keep them out of school entirely. School is fun, but the learning has to happen after hours because the teacher -> student model is simply a babysitting service. If you gave children the entire day to learn, they would be much better off for it.

Re:As an adult... (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179068)

If you gave children the entire day to learn, they would be much better off for it.

There would also be an even higher percentage of fat-asses.

This is illegal, you know (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179246)

This works only if you don't live in a jurisdiction that requires a parent to have an accredited teaching degree. For example, homeschooling as we know it is a federal crime in Germany [wikipedia.org] .

Re:This is illegal, you know (1)

mini me (132455) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179440)

The problem is the idea of schooling. I was a student for enough years to know that the only information that retained value was the information I learned on my own. There is no benefit to having a teacher in the equation, especially when all of the worlds knowledge is everywhere you look, including your pocket.

I will concede that not all students learn my way, but not all students can learn from teachers. If we aren't going to respect the differences in people anyway, why do we select the one that requires massive infrastructure for the benefit of the few?

I doubt it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178498)

The teachers' unions will never put up with it.

Re:I doubt it (1)

cyber-vandal (148830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178738)

Ah yes the all-powerful unions that have completely failed to stop any of the changes that all but destroyed them. The teachers' unions will talk shit but do what they're told. This isn't 1975.

Re:I doubt it (1)

BigT (70780) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179106)

You're obviously not in Washington state. The WEA owns the legislature here.

Not really (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178524)

If we look at work @ job, it is still not 100% home based jobs yet. People still need to go to their office so that they get paid. So, by only looking at education, the point of view above will be incorrect

That would just suck (1)

eric02138 (1352435) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178542)

Growing up, my friends and I would live for snow days. Why don't you also take away Mom, Dad and apple pie, too? Granted, with global warming, there seems to be fewer big blizzards, anyway. Now kids will have to pray for an increasingly unlikely confluence of events: a major blizzard, plus a major network outage. Sigh.

Re:That would just suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178724)

Why don't you also take away Mom, Dad and apple pie, too?

And, while we are at it, mother's basement, too?

Re:That would just suck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179028)

Yep. no huge snow storms covering the east coast at all this past winter. nope. I was nearly stuck at home trying to deliver my own daughter because of snow.

They said that about radio, too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178556)

As a kid, I recall reading about how kids in Australia that lived a long way from the cities, attended class via radio.
I bet they didn't get snow days either (or the Australian equivalent).
Everything old is new again.
Even if they do this, (and I agree, with the current poor quality of internet access, usage caps, etc, we aren't ready for this)
I think they should pick a random day or so a year and call a day off just because it's fun. I grew up in the middle of Wisconsin and
have fond memories of snow days.
**kent (not really anonymous, just at work)

Can the teacher make it to the radio station? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179278)

As a kid, I recall reading about how kids in Australia that lived a long way from the cities, attended class via radio. I bet they didn't get snow days either (or the Australian equivalent).

Wouldn't they get days off when the weather is so bad that the teachers can't make it to the radio station?

Spelling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178574)

Since the submitter wrote "to far" instead of "too far" I think they should be thankful for all the school time they can get.

Re:Spelling (0)

cyber-vandal (148830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178772)

And Allright as well. How long does it take to proofread a summary?

Re:Spelling (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178856)

I'm still trying to figure out how he managed to spell "papyrus" and "couriers" correctly.

Re:Spelling (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179116)

"To" instead of "too" could have been a simple typo. I know full well the difference between them, but sometimes do it to. o.

Even if he doesn't know the difference, he's done pretty well creating Slashdot and doing it for a living :p

Re:Spelling (1)

BigT (70780) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179170)

Spell check makes sure you spell the word correctly. It does not make sure you spell the correct word.

Spelling != grammar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179320)

I'm still trying to figure out how he managed to spell "papyrus" and "couriers" correctly.

spell check can correct "papirus" and "courriers", but cannot distinguish betwixt "to" and "too".

Could backfire on the schools (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178578)

The schools thing they're getting one over the kids.

But hidden within the proposition that Internet learning is an acceptable substitute for school learning is the germ of the schools' own demise: what happens when someone proposes all-Internet education?

Re:Could backfire on the schools (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178838)

That could never happen.

http://www.phoenix.edu/ [phoenix.edu]

Whoops.

Re:Could backfire on the schools (1)

Whatanut (203397) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179164)

Actually, there's even more to it than that. All-internet including K-12 grades is already available.

http://www.k12.com/ [k12.com]

NO!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178582)

I would instantly pretend my intarweb connection was dropping.

The Awkward Engineer [awkwardengineer.com]

Re:NO!!! (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178898)

I would instantly pretend my intarweb connection was dropping.

We checked your ISP's logs (no warrant required) and observed you posting annoying comments to Slashdot all day. Interspersed with repeated access to RedTube.com.

Just will make a new excuse (1)

Nyder (754090) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178614)

"Sorry teacher, but I couldn't do my homework during the snowdays because:

The Snow knocked my Internet Down.
Too poor to have internet.
My Dog ate my computer.
My dog chewed on my ethernet cord.
My dad was too busy watching porn.
Nuke Duke'm was finally released and my dad spent the snow days playing it.
Um, Fuck off, it was a snow day, so i did what all kids do, went out and had fun.

Re:Just will make a new excuse (1)

leuk_he (194174) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179064)

>>he Snow knocked my Internet Down.

Go to your neigbour

>>Too poor to have internet.

see 1.

>>My Dog ate my computer.

Get a bigger computer

>>My dog chewed on my ethernet cord.

He ate the wireless internet cord also?

>>My dad was too busy watching porn.

YOu just said "my computer" so you don have (and need) a own computer!

>>Nuke Duke'm was finally released and my dad spent the snow days playing it.

YOu got to be believable.

>>Um, Fuck off, it was a snow day, so i did what all kids do, went out and had fun.

Isn't fuck a very heavy swear word over there... now you are in trouble!

The school lunch program (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179362)

Too poor to have internet.

Children who qualify for taxpayer-subsidized lunches and taxpayer-subsidized rides to and from school would ideally qualify for taxpayer-subsidized Internet access and a taxpayer-subsidized budget subnotebook PC.

My dad was too busy watching porn.

Then prosecute the dad for aiding and abetting truancy.

Nuke Duke'm was finally released and my dad spent the snow days playing it.

Then prosecute the dad for aiding and abetting truancy.

it was a snow day, so i did what all kids do, went out and had fun.

Also truancy.

As for the other situations you mentioned, I'd have to see the full text of the proposal first.

The Internet has gone to far. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178702)

The Internet has gone to far.

Where is that?

Re:The Internet has gone to far. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179380)

Far is a small town in Norway. Two towns over from Hell [wikipedia.org] .

For once (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178750)

For once I'm glad I'm not in school anymore.....wait I already do work from home....crap.

Why not just teach classes online? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178784)

You could automate teaching and have a help chat that pops up to help kids that are struggling on a subject. Buddy up older students to help younger students, just like in the old K-8 one room school house.

It could even be a work at your own pace 12 month a year school. You could bring the student to teacher ratio to 1000 to 1 and still give a better experience, more hands on and at the students pace.

Expansion of government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178792)

Education is compulsory. If students are required to do homework online, this means that an internet connection will have to be provided by the taxpayer.

Snow days? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178814)

What are they supposed to be? Not once was my school day canceled no matter how much it had been snowing, and no matter how cold it was.

Time limits (1)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178880)

Unfortunately, this wouldn't work in our household (and it would be a convenient excuse for kids in other households): each of my kids' accounts was set up with time based use restrictions (first in Vista/Win7 OS, then migrated to Windows Family Safety or whatever they're calling it). On school days, they can't log on and use the computers until after 4PM each day. I'm not going to change their settings each time we have a snow day.

Nope, my kids will just tell their teachers that their mean, nasty parents have the comptuers configured so that they can't use them during the day. Tough crap schoolmaster overlords.

What Snow day? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36178900)

I've heard about "Snow Days" for years, and thought how unfair. I live in a place where it 70 degrees year round, the suns always out, and if I didn't have a job I'd wear shorts all the time. I'm proposing "It's too damn nice to go to work day." I bet the internet will ruin that too.

That's alright (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178934)

Let them authorize classes through internet during snow days. Then question why it should be different on a sunny day.

No snow days (1)

wye43 (769759) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178954)

In my country(45 latitude) there are no such thing as "snow days". When there is snow (quite usual in the winter), kids simply go to school as usual.

Re:No snow days (1)

jitterman (987991) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179070)

I live in the southeastern US - we very rarely see any amount of freezing precipitation, so in spectacularly hilarious fashion we shut down everything when there is anything more than minor sleet here. No slick-road driving skills (myself included), lack of road-clearing equipment, and general lack of sufficiently warm clothing to keep us toasty for extended periods of exposure all combine to make us fearful of -.5C/31F degree weather. Our northern countrymen enjoy making sport of us for this.

Re:No snow days (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179192)

"snow days" are not simply when there happens to be snow... it is when there is an abnormal cold weather pattern that makes transportation unsafe (for example, -40 degree weather with heavy snow and gale-force winds), or else when an atypically large amount of snowfall happens in a short time period such that the city or town's snow removal facilities simply cannot evacuate it in a timely manner, and the transportation infrastructure of the town or city is effectively paralyzed for a while (usually no more than a day or two)

Re:No snow days (1)

SwedishPenguin (1035756) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179272)

Same here in Sweden.
Though I suppose we do get unofficial "snow-days" when the subways and commuter trains stop working due to some switch being frozen solid and when the roads haven't been cleared because politicians have outsourced the damn snow-clearing to the lowest bidder. ;)

Gone to far? (1)

gbrandt (113294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36178998)

Where is this place 'far'. And how do you get there.

Unless you meant gone 'too' far.

Penetration rate. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179002)

The penetration rate among American households was around 73%, last I checked. So what happens to the 27% of the households who do not have internet access? Do they just suck back the snow day? Those, who are in all likelihood, living in poverty, don't need the education that will be given to those with money and internet access. Seriously, schools? Geez....

Re:Penetration rate. (1)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179378)

Hey, these are kids we're talking about here. Stop talking about "penetration rate", you perv. :-P

Teachers Love Snow Days Too. (1)

Kernel Corndog (155153) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179042)

I can't remember ever hearing my parents (both teachers) being disappointed about snow days. They love the break away from baby sitting other people's kids too. I doubt this will happen any time soon... what about the poor kids who don't have internet or can't afford broadband? Maybe if the internet were a public utility....

Missing Virtual School Days (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179120)

Sure my kids missed 3 days of school due to snow, but our land line was down for 5 days and we didn't have any power for 10 days, so they would have missed virtual school too.

Power? (1)

Convector (897502) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179160)

Well, it's a good thing that harsh weather never interferes with the transmission of electricity, or this plan might have a serious problem.

Article writers are late to the party (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179276)

At my place of work, thanks to a very liberal telecommuting policy, we did away with snow days years ago.

Snow days? (1)

flashingcurser (934530) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179318)

What is this "snow day" you speak of? We in Montana have never heard of such a thing. Snow happens all winter, most of the spring and fall, and hell sometimes in summer.

Gone where? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36179368)

Gone 'to' far? Perhaps you had too many snow days?

A little ahead of the curve.. (1)

lionchild (581331) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179384)

I think we're still a bit ahead of the curve here. The problem being that those who are most often, though least reported, having issues with snow days are those folks who live in rural districts, which are in the last mile for high-speed. These schools are not going to be able to serve those children who are the reason they're calling the snow day, those who are out in the rural parts of the school district, who can't be reached by bus.

This may be a reasonable option for suburban districts, as a much larger portion of their students may have access to broadband at home. However, in current economic times, with local libraries and free wi-fi at McDonalds, it's easier and easier for a family to put Cable TV, Cable Internet and DLS on the chopping block when it comes to saving money in the monthy budget while one parent is out of work or under employed.

instead of snow days (1)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179452)

Instead of snow days, the kids will have "over my bandwidth cap days".... Please excuse Timmy from the online lecture, we used up our bandwidth using Netflix

Happened to us with work (1)

Maxo-Texas (864189) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179540)

It changes the definition of "Salary" when you don't get the days off you used to get for bad weather. But no bump in pay yet. Sure waiting for the boomers to retire and tighten up the labor market.

Should be about 20 million "extra" retirements over the next 10 years. Hoping that will help.

hahaha (1)

Kingrames (858416) | more than 3 years ago | (#36179566)

RIIIIIIIIIIIIGHT.

Lemme get this straight:
You expect teachers to TEACH, from home, to students who can't even behave themselves in a normal classroom, while said students are effectively at home lounging around surrounded by stuff to distract them. It only takes one student being naked/topless/whatever for said teacher to suddenly be a felon. It only takes one student playing starcraft in the background to create enough of a distraction to negate the lecture. It only takes one absent student in the web conference to create a snowball effect.

GOOD LUCK!
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>