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Corporate Mac Sales Surge 66%

Roblimo posted more than 3 years ago | from the one-mouse-button-is-all-the-enterprise-really-needs dept.

Businesses 494

syngularyx writes "Mac sales in the enterprise during Apple's last fiscal quarter grew a whopping 66 percent, significantly outpacing the rest of the PC market, which grew just 4.5 percent in the enterprise. The data from Apple's previous fiscal quarter was highlighted on Friday by analyst Charlie Wolf with Needham & Company. He said though he originally viewed success in the enterprise as a "one-quarter blip," it now appears to be a "durable platform" for Apple." What makes this especially interesting is that Apple apparently isn't looking for corporate sales, and considers them "collateral success" rather than an indication that they should market specifically to corporate buyers.

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Corporate sales? (4, Funny)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216154)

You mean that there are now three businesses using Macs? Amazing!

Re:Corporate sales? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216190)

No dummy.

Obviously the growth from 2 to 3 Macs would be an increase of 50%.

The only logical answer is Apple sold 5 Macs to business as opposed to 3 last quarter.

Re:Corporate sales? (2, Insightful)

wisty (1335733) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216458)

Nah. It's just a few more "freelancers", who hope you can do a couple of jobs off elance, and then get a sweet tax deduction for your "business" computer.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

Requiem18th (742389) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216798)

Damn beat me to this by a !nternet month (and hour)

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216208)

As long as it's not Mcdonald's.

Hey, Jones. Go get your self a Mac and do the sales report.

Later on .....

*Sees Jones at his desk eating a Big Mac while doing the sales report with paper and pencil*

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216826)

Don't be ridiculous. No one who works at a fast food restaurant actually eats the food that they make there.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

wjousts (1529427) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216880)

I had the pleasure of eating lunch in the cafeteria at the corporate HQ of a large fast food company. Interestingly only a small fraction of what they serve in their restaurants was available in their cafeteria with the rest being standard corporate cafeteria type fare. The person I was meeting with even assured me that it wasn't all their restaurant food.

Re:Corporate sales? (4, Funny)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216268)

Heh, its ironic - I'm currently sat in an office where all the computers (a dozen or so) are Macs - iMac 27" to be precise.

The irony is that they are all running Windows 7, not one is running OSX. Business owner bought them because they looked cool, but the business is a .Net software development house.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216286)

Does the business owner know what kind of business he owns?

Re:Corporate sales? (0)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216424)

Talk about wasting money. Apple isn't cheap, plus you need the Windows 7 Licenses. I'm pretty sure that there must be cool looking PCs somewhere.

Re:Corporate sales? (4, Informative)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216560)

The 27" iMac is pretty hard to beat. Consider that a 27" IPS 2560x1440 screen is about $1000 to start with (hell, dell's more expensive than apple on this one), that gets you a small, quiet, mid range i5 system with a real graphics card for $700... It's not unbeatable, but it's a reasonable price.

Re:Corporate sales? (-1)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216624)

Don't feed the trolls. /. people are convinced that Macs are more expensive than their PC counterpart. This is just because you can't find a cheap mac, but you can find craploads of cheap PCs. Which will give you no satisfaction, save a few corner cases.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216766)

The cheapest 27" iMac here starts at 1649€. The cheapest iMac (21") is 1149€. I'm not saying those are bad machines, I think they're great. However, you'll need to add in another 269€ for a Windows 7 Professional license (Can't use Systems Builder or a OEM license to be fully legal). For that kind of money you can get a lot of Dell or HP.

Granted, the resolutions the iMac offer are great... Absolutely non-standard in the PC world.

Re:Corporate sales? (2, Informative)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216636)

"Talk about wasting money."

If you spec out a similar HP or Dell (esp. at corporate pricing), you often pay around the same amount - sometimes more. Seriously, look around sometime and try it. A lot of it depends on where in Apple's refresh cycle you are when you make the purchase, and a lot of it depends on how close to the end of the fiscal quarter HP and Dell are, but generally the prices are close once you start matching spec for spec.

( While I'm pretty sure that some bargain hunter will come up with something that is cheaper if they look hard enough, the general rule applies, and since most businesses don't have the time or expertise to go do the tech equivalent of extreme couponing, it definitely applies here. )

The perception of expense comes with folks being used to seeing the cheap low-end consumer-grade stuff that {$OEM} pukes out in volume. Since Apple doesn't bother with that market, they get the perception of being too expensive.

...plus you need the Windows 7 Licenses.

Those are going to be dirt cheap compared to the seat licenses of Visual Studio that the guy coughed up for - after all, we're talking about a business here.

Re:Corporate sales? (3)

jimicus (737525) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216856)

Parent is generally right, subject to a few ifs and buts:

1. Comparison must be truly like-for-like. For instance, the iMac is an all-in-one machine with Bluetooth, integrated webcam and I believe an IPS panel. So if you're comparing something else to the iMac, it also should be all-in-one with Bluetooth, integrated webcam and an IPS panel. These things may not be important to you personally, and if that's the case then by all means don't include them in your feature list when you're going shopping. But you must account for them in any like-for-like comparison otherwise it's not like-for-like.

2. Design and build must be taken into account. All the major vendors have a product line where the laptops have an entirely plastic casing and ventilation in the bottom effectively preventing you from using them actually on your lap; these aren't in any way comparable to a machined lump of aluminium with the ventilation holes hidden in the screen hinge.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

605dave (722736) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216642)

Depends on how you define waste. Some people consider the aesthetics of their work place very important, so to them the expense is not a waste. If design is not something as important to you then yes, it would seem wasteful to buy Macs to run Windows.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

EastCoastSurfer (310758) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216734)

At one point a 27" IPS screen alone was about the same price or more than the 27" imac. If you wanted a screen of that size and quality it made complete sense to buy an imac and wasn't a waste of money at all.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216452)

The irony is that they are all running Windows 7, not one is running OSX. Business owner bought them because they looked cool, but the business is a .Net software development house.

Apple doesn't mind. Do the developers mind?

Re:Corporate sales? (1, Interesting)

Chris_Stankowitz (612232) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216540)

I know of a couple of offices in NYC that do the same. The iMacs were bought because they are aesthetically pleasing, however the business software is windows only and is ran in a VM on the system. A lot of effort and money went into designing the entire office and the extra cost of the macs makes sense in my opinion. You don't buy a luxury car and then cover the seats with ratty old t-shirts.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216618)

The iMacs were bought because they are aesthetically pleasing,

Sounds like they didnt do much shopping. Dell and HP have several knockoffs, and if you go to Newegg theres an entire section dedicated to "All-in-one" PCs (read, iMac knockoffs).

Re:Corporate sales? (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216600)

Ive heard the sentiment "but the hardware is better". I usually explain that there isnt any fairy dust that they sprinkle on the Seagate drives (Dell uses Seagate as well), Foxconn motherboards (again, dell uses foxconn), Hynix RAM, nVidia Graphics, or Intel processor to make it more durable; so if theres any "durable" theyre paying for, its for a really really nice, $1500 case.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216782)

Well, with the newest iMacs, there is in fact magic fairy dust sprinkled on the hard drives: They have a custom power connector and firmware that also handles temperature sensor reporting to the SMU. If you swap the drive for another(even one of the same model; but without the Apple blessing) the system goes into full thermal freakout mode.

Re:Corporate sales? (1)

cozzbp (1845636) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216664)

Don't know why this is modded as flamebait, should be insightful. I work for a rather large university (35,000 students) and we of course have servers/workstations of all varieties. We had a lot of trouble with getting Snow Leopard to work right with our Active Directory, but had lots of issues, and eventually had an Apple engineer come out and helped us write a script that modified timeout values for locating the domain. While he did solve the problem, he was very arrogant, and really didn't want to be there. But with Apple discontinuing the XServe anyways, I don't think they want enterprise business very badly. And if they did, they would allow me to legally have Mac VMs on our ESX hosts.

Re:Corporate sales? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216670)

Well, count my business as number 4 in the very near future. Just last week I went to the boss's office to clean the latest series of viruses and exploits off of his Dell. I'm fucking sick of it. I was hired to write Android applications for the sales staff's tablets I don't have time to play wet-nurse to fucking shit-ass click 'n' drool windows jockeys that don't have sense enough to keep their anti-virus up to date. It's fucking Windows! Keep your security shit on point! Guess what. I told the boss we're going to the Apple store to explain the situation and they'll "fix you right up". Problem solved and my time less wasted.

Collateral success vs indication of support need (4, Insightful)

Chas (5144) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216196)

Translation: Hope these businesses don't want actual enterprise support from Apple. Rude awakenings to ensue.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216234)

These business are probably mom and pop shops or startup hipsters who'll never run anything more enterprisey then Outlook on the Macs.

not necessarily (2)

Weezul (52464) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216398)

Mac's are fine for web development. Mac's are unwise for developing data processing software, which naturally run on Linux, or end user applications, which naturally run on Windows.

AddressBook, iCal, and iChat are all kinda light weight for business needs, but MS Office et al. exists for Mac OS X. Mac's are suboptimal though if you need more specialized business software than MS Office.

Re:not necessarily (0)

OptimusPaul (940627) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216548)

Business software is a sham.... and you obviously don't know what you are talking about. data processing software can run anywhere, plus most if not all of the tools than runs on limux will run on a mac without trouble. Additionally with the wide availability of VMs it doesn't really matter what you host platform is. But I do agree that iCal is light weight, it's getting better but needs a lot of work. AddressBook is adaquate for the needs of businesses.

Re:not necessarily (2)

John Bresnahan (638668) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216820)

I have a Mac specifically because it will run EVERYTHING. I run Windows 7 in a VM, and I could run it natively if I wished, and I can run Linux (or other *nix systems) in a VM.

I refuse to rely on Windows as my primary OS, and I don't want to rely on a "Hackintosh" system. I used to run Linux as my primary OS, but got tired of its limitations (primarily video and multimedia stuff). So, this is the most versatile and easiest to use system.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (5, Interesting)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216568)

Actually, I would bet heavily that the increase is tied strongly to one simple thing – everyone wants to develop an iOS app.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (3, Insightful)

telekon (185072) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216330)

As if there were no rude awakenings to ensue when trying to get "enterprise support" from Dell, Microsoft, and Symantec.

Enterprise support is a joke. If you don't have an IT staff capable of supporting the hardware and software you're buying... you're doing it wrong.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (1)

drolli (522659) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216396)

Yes and no. If your capable it staff figured out that something specific which is needed and should work really does not work and that it is a problem of the preinstalled software/hardware then it if a difference if you are put trough to the "did you check it is plugged in" customer phone support, which will file a case which will rot in the depths of their database unless 10000 other customers have the same problem, or if you actually have a support contract.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (2, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216460)

I've had no problems getting same day engineer callouts to replace parts in enterprise systems from Dell - the difference is, Dell offers enterprise orientated options, Apple does not. And the Dell systems weren't expensive in comparison either.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (3, Interesting)

LoganDzwon (1170459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216574)

At another job I supported Apple Xserve and RAID. We had a "spare parts kit." It had one of every part in n xserve, "the RAID had it's own similar kit." When anything failed I swapped out the part myself with the spare parts kit, then Apple overtightened a replacement part with a pre-paid shipping for sending the failed part.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (1)

HisMother (413313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216638)

"overtightened" --> "overnighted" ?

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (3, Interesting)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216684)

Actually, Apple does have enterprise support options: You just have to know where to look [apple.com] (and don't let the "server" page name fool you - OS support sits right at the top of the page).

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (4, Insightful)

pleasegetreal (744605) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216490)

Obviously, this person has never actually worked in a corporation before. We get excellent support from both Dell and Microsoft. Can't speak to Symantec. If a piece of Dell hardware requires replacement, a simple email to them results in the replacement part arriving the next day via Fedex. If a Mac has a problem, the answer is "take it to your closest Apple Store".

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (5, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216648)

Here's an example of the different levels of support that we got from Apple and from Dell when a machine failed in the university lab where I used to work:

Dell sent out a technician to fix it. He brought spare parts with him, and fixed it on the spot. We weren't paying for an expensive support contract - just the standard support Dell gives to large customers - so it sometimes took a day or two before they sent someone out. The machine was out of action for a day or two, and a technician had to spend about 10 minutes on the phone to get it repaired.

Apple kept us on hold or about half an hour, before telling us that we had to take the machine to the nearest Apple Authorised Reseller. The nearest one to Swansea was in Cardiff, which is about an hour and a half's drive away (city centre to city centre), plus a little walk at each end since you couldn't park near the shop in Cardiff. The would then send it to their repair centre, who would take up to three weeks to fix it. Once it was fixed, it had to be collected from there. Machine was out of action for three weeks, and it effectively took an entire day of technician time (two round trips to another city with the machine) to get it fixed.

Somewhat strangely, Mac owned by individuals bought through the Higher Education store got much better support. They sent out a box the next day, you put the broken machine in it, and a day or two later it returned working (normally - I had one experience where it took them a month to admit that they'd lost it, then two attempts to send me a working replacement). For some parts, they send the replacement out, and you put the old one in the box and send it back with the courier when it arrives.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (4, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216904)

For what you pay Apple for a three year support contract which requires you to send the machine in or bring it in, you get onsite service for the same period from pretty much any other vendor. I live on a one-lane road in the back of beyond and HP sent a technician to work on my laptop even though I'm three hours away from the place from which they sent him. Of course, he did actually manage to break the laptop further, but Apple is capable of doing the same thing and I should probably thank him because I ended up getting a better one as a replacement.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (1)

EastCoastSurfer (310758) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216816)

Dell support has been okay. They will send a person out same day to replace most things.

Most support that we use is provided by a 3rd party contract now. If they end up supporting Macs too then it will not matter what type of machines we have.

Re:Collateral success vs indication of support nee (0)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216948)

Translation: Hope these businesses don't want actual enterprise support from Apple. Rude awakenings to ensue.

As opposed to the "enterprise" level support they get from vendors once the "standard" corporate Windows machine gets infected with tons of malware? Wipe and reload isn't always the best answer, even though it seems to be the only one vendors know.

deja vu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216220)

I swear I read this here a couple of days ago ... ... and the comments are just as stupid as last time ...

Whopping Mac Sales..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216222)

*sigh*

mac sales surging in my pants (2)

slashpot (11017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216228)

I have mac sales surging in my pants.

Bring-your-own platform (4, Insightful)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216230)

This is an interesting change. At my former employer, they piloted a program to allow developers to develop on a Linux box rather than a Windows one, but it was not utilized by many and the desktop team found the support too painful for their taste.

Now looking at a different article from TFA: http://blogs.computerworld.com/18330/apples_mac_steals_windows_enterprise_sales [computerworld.com]

"What's driving the growth? Wolf writes, "Notwithstanding its premium prices compared with Windows PCs, the Mac should continue to grow faster than the PC market, propelled by the halo effects now emanating from the iPod, iPhone and iPad along with the international rollout of Apple Stores. The cost of ownership is emerging to be another key factor. Square Group chief, Darren King, notes, "Total cost of ownership (TCO) for a Mac vs a comparable Wintel device over 3-4 years is actually lower!" Think about that."

"Eight out of 10 organizations said they are "more likely to allow more users to deploy Macs as their enterprise desktops" in 2010-2011, up from 68 percent in the 2009 survey," the researchers said."

It's interesting that the coming decade might herald, rather than the switch we might have anticipated to Linux desktops (following the Year of Linux on the Desktop of course), a switch to desktop autonomy and self-governance at work.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216282)

TCA of Macs is lower because IT doesn't support Macs

Re:Bring-your-own platform (2)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216332)

Could be.

I was just pondering, however - not being a developer any longer, I don't see why I couldn't be as productive with an OSX desktop. The enterprise stuff I administer comes mainly through Citrix. We've recently switched to a remote-desktop substitute that is kicked off from a browser as well.

I don't see what, for me, would count as "advantages", but I don't see any costs, per se.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (2, Informative)

telekon (185072) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216388)

I work in IT at a large private university. The official gospel is that 'we are a WinDell campus', but the students all buy Macs, and my group actually all use Macs for most tasks, except where there's some stupid reason we have to use Windows. So IT here have slowly moved toward full Mac support, and it'll happen elsewhere, as the pressure to support them increases. Think about shops in the early 90's that were all Sun or SGI, and as the cost and convenience factors ushered in the great tragedy of 'Windows is Enterprise', IT departments were dragged with much cursing and gnashing of teeth to support Windows.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216708)

Granted I only look after 5 Macs, but the number of support related issues in the last three years has amounted to 2.

One case where the scanner wasn't working (Snow Leopard updated how it worked). The other was how to connect to a windows share on the network.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0, Troll)

Spad (470073) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216338)

The TCO claims from that article appear to be ass-sourced without any actual evidence to back them up.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (2)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216342)

"Total cost of ownership (TCO) for a Mac vs a comparable Wintel device over 3-4 years is actually lower!" Think about that."

I'm sure this varies drastically based on company size and requirements of the employees. If you were going high-end anyway, then the capital outlay difference is far lower. If the users are virus-magnets, then even expensive hardware may pay for itself in short order.

But for a big company with many lower-end users and the virus situation under control, it's hard for me to understand how TCO could be lower - though 3-4 years is a long time to make up a few hundred bucks.

But yeah, if I were setting up a bunch of new computers at a real estate office or something similar in scale, I might try Macs.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216444)

symantec is around $18 per year per user plus a server or vmware instance and the costs for that. that's $90 over 5 years in savings just for no anti-virus

Re:Bring-your-own platform (1)

Issarlk (1429361) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216500)

Too bad that there's malware targeting Macs now.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216806)

As a percentage, how much malware would you say targets Macs vs. how much targets windows? For shits and giggles, how about throwing in a number for Linux too. Troll.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216502)

I'd rather have a virus than Symantec!

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216576)

symantec is around $18 per year per user plus a server or vmware instance and the costs for that. that's $90 over 5 years in savings just for no anti-virus

Running on any platform without anti virus software is a bad idea..... i would revove that $90 / £55.73 from your calculations ;)

Re:Bring-your-own platform (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216584)

No clue what you're paying, but Symantec for me is $11 a year and Microsoft Forefront is $9 a year per seat.

Also, if you think Mac's are going into a corporate environment without an anti-virus you're out of your skull.

Re:Bring-your-own platform (1)

DogDude (805747) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216920)

Microsoft Security Essentials is free.

Maybe because Macs have real security? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216376)

One reason I personally have seen Macs being deployed is because of the security aspect:

Take a small law firm for instance. All their documents are Word, Excel, or Powerpoint, with nothing really dependent on Windows. Moving to Mac for their day to day use means that the secretary who is browsing the Web isn't going to have her computer bitten by drive-by infections [1], nor the attachment "lastyearsfigures.xlsx.exe" is going to wreak havoc across the whole firm.

However, where the rubber meets the road is risk, pure and simple, regardless of reasons. Like it or not, a company not on Windows will be exposed to far fewer tangible threats from the outside than one that is.

[1]: For now. Windows is so lucrative with so many tools written by blackhats for blackhats that having to try to deal with a platform where developers don't shit where they sleep.

Re:Maybe because Macs have real security? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216440)

Moving to Mac for their day to day use means that the secretary who is browsing the Web isn't going to have her computer bitten by drive-by infections

Still won't stop her from installing MacDefender, and when you call for support Apple tells you to fuck off -

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/19/apple-investigating-macdefender-malware-support-staff-barred-from-assisting-customers/

Re:Maybe because Macs have real security? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216714)

She doesn't know that admin password which MAC Defender requires to install.

Figures (1, Interesting)

Spad (470073) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216252)

I'm not sure where they're getting these numbers from, because the IDC Graph [appleinsider.com] they're re-printing shows business sales going from ~870,000 in Q4 2010 to ~890,000 in Q1 2011. Now I'm no mathematician, but that doesn't look like a 66% increase to me.

Re:Figures (3, Informative)

Spad (470073) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216290)

Looking at it again, maybe they mean 66% in the last *year* as those numbers look more plausible at ~540,000 for Q1 2010.

Re:Figures (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216308)

The comparison is year over year: Q1 2010 to Q1 2011.

Re:Figures (1)

Spad (470073) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216360)

Quoth the article:

Mac sales in the enterprise during Apple's last fiscal quarter grew a whopping 66 percent

Re:Figures (3, Informative)

dwightk (415372) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216522)

That's how financial people do it, they compare last quarter to the same quarter the year previous. That way you don't get terrible reductions after the holiday quarters.

'Three wars, millions suffering not 9/11 justice' (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216258)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGb7Bs1OdtI

female law professor, children's rights advocate. '60's peacenik, seems genuinely concerned?

Re:'Three wars, millions suffering not 9/11 justic (0)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216368)

Bernardine Dohrn lol

Peacenik is an interesting label for someone who expressed admiration for the Manson family and formerly headed a domestic terrorist group.

Not a Surprise (4, Interesting)

TyroneShoe (912878) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216280)

In tech companies, it's still a problem retaining good talent. To a lot of people (including where I work) being given a MacBook as their company laptop is actually a perk. I work for a software company whose products run on all major platforms (OSX, Win, UNIX, Linux, BSD, etc) and a good number of our employees (more than 100) have MacBooks. It makes sense to have some people using the platform that our software runs on also...

Why the ethnic slur? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216306)

"grew a whopping 66 percent"

Why do you have to offend Italians with your terminology?

"Enterprise" Macs. (1)

saintlupus (227599) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216340)

If this keeps up, they might even consider introducing innovations like "maintenance contracts" on their server systems, so you can replace a power supply on a three year old machine without scouring eBay for parts.

Bastards.

Ain't That A Shame (2)

SavoWood (650474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216380)

To borrow a line from Fats Domino, ain't that a shame that /.ers can't find anything better to do than slam Apple's success. Not too long ago, Apple was as doomed as BSD.

Apple Enterprise does exist. It's much smaller than Apple Education, but it's not exactly tiny. Sure, the territories are quite vast, but it appears they're covering it very well. Between channel sales and direct, the numbers being put down by Apple are quite impressive. I'd guess the majority of the bump here is from the channel. That part of the organization is well funded and extremely well supported. The management there is strong and willing to do what it takes. The direct sales organization is newly reorganized as of about a year ago. It appears that reorganization is doing well under the new leadership, and they have been aligned under the VP for channel sales. This was obviously a good move for Apple.

As for Enterprise Support, it also exists. I don't know a lot about the structure of it, but I do know whenever I called for support, it was very good. I've had changes made to software, replacement hardware, and always a friendly and knowledgeable person on the phone instead of just a screen reader. Apple's support is impressive. You have to pay for it, but most good things are that way.

Re:Ain't That A Shame (0)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216824)

/.ers can't find anything better to do than slam Apple's success.

You might forgive some for being skeptical of a headline reading "Corporate Mac sales surge 66%". A more informative headline would be "Corporate Mac sales rise from 2% to 3% of the market". The first implies a huge shift, the second a modest blip.

Besides, most of the posts I've read offer ecstatically glowing praise of Apple's imminent domination of the business market. Not that I agree with those posts, but it hardly constitutes a universal /. victimization of Apple.

Re:Ain't That A Shame (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216980)

To borrow a line from Fats Domino, ain't that a shame that /.ers can't find anything better to do than slam Apple's success. Not too long ago, Apple was as doomed as BSD.

Some of us were happy about that, too. I was a Mac user when they promised us Copland. I was using BeOS when they suggested they would use that. And now we (well, you) are stuck with a bastardized, bloated version of NeXTStep which ruined everything good about its interface.

collateral (3, Insightful)

datapharmer (1099455) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216392)

More like collateral damage (at least in the enterprise). With no rack mountable servers and no licenses for non-apple hardware based virtualization it is pretty much impossible to fully integrate macs into enterprise without 3rd party solutions, and since Apple clearly isn't interested in enterprise why would enterprise want to bother with macs? I love my apple laptop, but integrating macs in an AD environment is hellish. It should be as simple as click join domain, but I can tell you from experience that is only theory. Reality is that unless you are building the domain from the ground up with macs in mind it is a PITA involving screwing with bonjour services, disabling signing, and trying to figure out why a handful of the macs won't renew their kerberos tickets when all the others in the same OU will. Using a mac server solves most of these headaches and gives some level of access control, but without allowing virtualization or having a rackmount option (that can be purchased without the bookkeeper having a heart attack) many businesses are back to square one trying to make due with basic binding or using expensive third party options like likewise or centrify. Xserve was only unpopular because it was ungodly expensive for what it did and most admins only needed something that fit in a rack and could provide active directory and group policy, which doesn't require 50 cores and a TB of ram nonsense. So Mr. Jobs, do you plan on replacing it with a rack mountable mini with redundant power supplies or can I slap a sticker on my poweredge and call it a mac? The alternative is the fancy imacs everyone loves get tossed to ebay come the next refresh cycle, and I'm not the only one with a headache from this [appleopenletter.org] .

Re:collateral (2)

dwightk (415372) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216554)

So Mr. Jobs, do you plan on replacing it with a rack mountable mini with redundant power supplies or can I slap a sticker on my poweredge and call it a mac? The alternative is the fancy imacs everyone loves get tossed to ebay come the next refresh cycle, and I'm not the only one with a headache from this [appleopenletter.org] .

I don't think y'all understand that Steve don't care.

I've seen it (1)

headhot (137860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216406)

I know of a very very large cable company in the US that is allowing its managers and engineers a choice between PCs and Macs. The Macs are doing very well in the company, especially among the engineers.

I think Google also has this option between Mac,Windos, and Linux.

As for enterprise support, what does that mean for desktops/laptops? What does Dell or HP offer in that area that Apple doesn't. If it breaks, send it to them after IT looks at it. The only difference I think is that with Apple, if you have a store nearby you can take it there. Sounds like a win to me.

Re:I've seen it (1)

datapharmer (1099455) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216480)

I can call Dell and have them send me out a replacement part under warranty same day without having to sit through an 18 year old drop out read me a script asking me to turn it off and back on again and check the power cord. Dell and HP also offer servers with redundant power supplies, so when there is a power supply failure my company's infrastructure doesn't go down with it. Apple is great on the desktop, but in the server room it sucks balls (right now). So what's apple installing in that fancy datacenter they are building? Stacks of mac minis?

Re:I've seen it (1)

Bigbutt (65939) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216688)

Right now I'm dealing with an HP Script Monkey. It's taken me almost a week of back and forth. The last update I got from them indicates the SM ignored or failed to understand the update I made to the ticket the day before.

Script Monkeys are everywhere.

[John]

Re:I've seen it (1)

EastCoastSurfer (310758) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216922)

In general business I think what you're seeing is mac desktops then Windows/*nix in the server room.

As for Apple themselves they have likely developed their own server for their datacenter. I wouldn't be surprised to see something like what Google uses, a custom board, DC power supply etc... since Apple already has the experience in designing hardware.

Re:I've seen it (1)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216942)

and for that you have to have a corporate contract, buy the expensive corporate brand computers and the warranties. same $$$ as a Mac in the end

BYOC - virtualised desktops (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216420)

With desktop virtualization BYOC schemes are becoming more prevalent. My company gives us a $3,000 cheque to buy our own pc. Originally when they told me you need to use a virtualized desktop i was like "WTF? what is this crap?!...". When i actually started using it, and having my desktop run from the DC while at work, then run locally from my laptop when i took it home. Then sync back up when at work. I though - damn - this really IS awesome. I mean if i loose my laptop, its not a big deal anymore - no one who finds it can get my data (encrypted) and i can get up and running with a new one, with ALL my files and stuff withing an hour. Crazy good.

Mandatory ACLs (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216428)

Where do we find mandatory ACLs or MLS policies in Mac OS X? Or are these systems not being deployed in security sensitive environments?

Re:Mandatory ACLs (4, Informative)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216598)

Is that a troll question, as in rhetorically expecting an answer in the negative?

Mac OS X has ACL built in:
          http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=2005050120073947 [macworld.com]

          -dZ.

Re:Mandatory ACLs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216690)

Where do we find mandatory ACLs or MLS policies in Mac OS X? Or are these systems not being deployed in security sensitive environments?

Oh look, a sniping Microsoft admin. Unix is regularly deployed in security sensitive environments without ACLs because it already has a sane and proven security model.

Swings and roundabouts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216448)

In other news, they're about to lose the NLE market with iMovie HD [youtube.com]

Web development (1)

softWare3ngineer (2007302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216450)

I have not data to back this up with, but it seems macs have taken off in the last few years in web development shops. not just for front-end graphic designers, but for back end coders too.

asd (1)

manitee (2974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216468)

Growth percentage means very little. Look at market share.

Android sales (0)

IsoRashi (556454) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216484)

The year the first Android phone was released, sales for it were up infinite percent from the prior year! Amazing!!

Re:Android sales (1)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216686)

True, but Mac OS X has been around for over 10 years, and Apple computers for much longer. This marks real growth, not initial market seed.

            -dZ.

Capital Equipment Limits (1)

AstroMatt (1594081) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216492)

At my university, computer purchases over $1500 are capital equipment, and so not subject to overhead charges. Under $1500, the grant gets charged 44% for indirect costs. So, purchase a $1k PC or a $1500 Mac - same cost to the researcher's grant.

Lie, damned lie, statistics. (1)

Andtalath (1074376) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216516)

Without knowing the specifics, I'll still explain why this study is a folly.

Let's say that 95% of all computers that where sold to businesses last comparable period where PCs (conservative guess).
Let's say, just for example that a total of 100 million computers where sold last comparable period.
That would mean 95 million PCs, 5 million macs.
If we apply the above percentages, this would mean that 99.275 million PCs where sold.
This would mean that 8.3 million macs where sold.
This would mean a total of 107.575 million computers where sold.

Not saying that these numbers are correct, just pointing out that PCs are in fact still selling more according to them, by far.
And, a single fiscal period is irrelevant for showing a trend.

re Apple and Business Market (1)

freddieb (537771) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216518)

I wonder if these are laptops? The recent changes to the imac (hard drive replacement - requires Apple part and special cable) would make the imac very expensive to use in a business.

So many people bashing apple.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36216532)

I see movement in business for mac. Go back 10 years and people rarely considered it. I have seen about a quater of small-medium sized business owners over that time using macs - and integrateing themselves in.

I see more and more businesses growing with people that bring in their own devices (laptop/tablet/phone) and expect it to work. They also require remote connections to work from home and offsite. Linux and the open source movement has provided a lot of support in all of these aspects. Apple has come a long way in that respect as well - mainly due to the BSD base.

I have mentioned this few times to friends and been laughed down. However I cannot help but see a constant increase in programming, populer/useful software, support, and public view of quality vs price. With linux gaining enterpise support, and PHB's wanting work done on iPads and trying to cut all costs, this movement could indeed be a threat to microsoft if it continues to gain momentum.

Government... (4, Insightful)

Third Position (1725934) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216536)

More interesting is the figure for growth in the government segment - 155.6% isn't shabby growth there, either...

Look at the other players out there... (0)

Afell001 (961697) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216580)

Let's see...

1) Dell: I know several business owners who have been so burned by Dell in the past that it would take a miracle for them to go back. Sure, they have made good machines in the past, but I think we can all remember the whole GX270 bursting capacitors issue? One such business owner was stuck with 2 pallets of computers he had to eventually write off because Dell refused to support them any further.

2) Hewlett-Packard: Nearly the same boat as Dell. Sure, their corporate support is pretty good, but with most of the companies I have dealt with over the years (150-200 employees), these folks barely show up as a blip on their radars. So when one customer gets one bad server after another, and has to go through phone support from someone with a very heavy Mumbai accent each time, they begin to feel like the integrator really just doesn't care.

3) Local PC Shop: Yeah, don't go there. Sometimes, they are perfect for the job. More often than not, you end up with a guy who slaps one piece of hardware together with another, loads the OS and drivers and looks the other way when everything goes belly up because the configuration isn't a tested, proven environment. Not something I would trust for running mission-critical applications like your SQL server, etc.

The one company that actually followed my recommendation and went with Apple desktops backed up by FreeBSD servers absolutely loves the setup. Their network admin, who used to manage AIX servers years before, loved FreeBSD and was right at home getting everything set up, and even though he was new to OS X, he found them very easy to configure, especially since all he had to do to feel comfortable making changes to each system was to launch the terminal (or remote from his own desktop) and use the more familiar bash commands to diagnose problems and/or set up new configurations. To add to the mix, all the desktop hardware and software support was backed up by Apple. Granted, the servers were still supported by a local shop, but once you get past the hardware and driver issues, FreeBSD is rock-solid.

Apple doesn't need to dominate the server room to make an impact on business. There are other, much more suitable Posix operating systems that do that job much better. Nope, their strength is entirely based on interoperability with those servers as well as ease-of-use for both admins and the end users. Add to that a plethora of applications that are designed to make businesses work.

I can see it now (1)

degeneratemonkey (1405019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216672)

In five years, hip trendy douche guy ["I'm a PC! ;-)"] stands next to square dull office guy ["I'm a Mac :-/"].

IT hates apple (5, Interesting)

EreIamJH (180023) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216700)

My comany's new CTO (a total MS drone) came in 18 months ago and the first thing he did was launch a jihad against all the Linux boxen that had been quietly sitting there doing their thing for years. Massive IT pain resulted followed by a major blow out in the IT budget as he busily wrote cheques to MS and Dell. He thought he'd won. Then along came the iPad. First the Board of Directors started asking why they couldn't read the board papers on their iPads, then the CEO wanted one and asked why he couldn't get his email working, then all the executives wanted one. Now iPads have spread down four levels of management. Then people started asking about integrating iPhone because they didn't like having to carry a blackberry just for work. The CTO kept talking about how insecure apples were compared to MS and that it'll take months of careful study to integrate. Last week the CEO sacked him.

That's great! (1, Funny)

hartba (715804) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216808)

So you're saying they sold 5 macs instead of their usual 3? Go Apple!

Macs at John Deere (1)

jonescb (1888008) | more than 3 years ago | (#36216898)

My mom is in IT at John Deere and just this year she's having to learn how to support Macs now. As I understand it, it's only being used by some of the employees and not any of the servers. Deere is a pretty big international corporation, and they're taking Macs more seriously.

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