Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Draft Horses Used To Lay Fiber-Optic Cable

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the doing-it-the-old-fashioned-way dept.

Networking 154

mysqlrocks writes "In Vermont, FairPoint Communications has enlisted draft horses to help lay fiber-optic cable in remote locations. Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin has pledged to bring broadband to every last mile by 2013, including many remote areas that have been neglected in the past. Private companies have been unwilling to invest in the expensive infrastructure needed to reach these areas. However, Vermont's congressional delegation helped to secure $410 million in federal money earmarked for broadband development and Vermont has partnered with private companies, like FairPoint, to bring high-speed Internet access to all Vermonters. From the article: 'The difficulty of getting cable to "every last mile," is where Fred, the cable-carrying draft horse, comes in. "Hopefully it pays off," says Hastings. "We could maybe get a four-wheeler in here," he continues, gesturing to the cleared swath of boggy, fern-studded terrain that he's working in today. But definitely not a truck, and Fred's impact is nearly invisible. Residents rarely complain about a draft horse tromping through their yards.'"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

refugees from ongoing weather wars arrive (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36230436)

quite a crowd for this little underwater town. we'll manage. fortunately our rulers & the chosen ones are throwingbig parties to honor each other on the variety of glorious victories by the hand of the chosen walking dead weapons peddlers.

only one? (1)

bsDaemon (87307) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230478)

$410,000,000 and they could only get one horse? Talk about inflation...

Re:only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36230516)

if you give me $410,000,000 ill get you 2 horses.

Re:only one? (5, Funny)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230522)

Well, they've only just recently begun breeding horses that poop fiber optic cable. The price will come down soon enough.

Re:only one? (1)

avgjoe62 (558860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230696)

Yea, pretty soon fiber optic cable's going to be as cheap as shit...

Of course, that still doesn't mean that ISPs will not implement data caps...

Re:only one? (1)

rgviza (1303161) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231406)

I think the breakthrough will be genetically engineered superconducting alfalfa hay fiber and horses genetically engineered to have fiber producing spider silk glands. The horse poop will simply cover the newly laid fiber.

Re:only one? (1)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231458)

Yeah and just think how fast they will be with 8 legs. Have to spin one helluva web to keep the horse off the ground,... Hmm, better think on that one a bit before we go making web spinning 8 legged horsie spider beasts from hell.

Re:only one? (1)

avgjoe62 (558860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231920)

I for one welcome our web spinning 8 legged horsie spider beasts from hell overlords... ;-)

Re:only one? (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231978)

Or they could just ask Odin if they can borrow Sleipnir..

Re:only one? (4, Funny)

MarkRose (820682) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231348)

Look at my horse, my horse is amazing!
Feed it some glass, mmm it's currently lasing!
It transmits frames, an optical backplane!
Ping it again and again and all its lights go blinky!

Re:only one? (4, Funny)

SilentStaid (1474575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231480)

That's what a high fiber diet will do to you.

Re:only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231656)

Well, they've only just recently begun breeding horses that poop fiber optic cable. The price will come down soon enough.

That's all we need is more shitty internet service!

Re:only one? (1)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232254)

Did they breed them with the same spider that bit Peter Parker?

when you buy from churchill downs it costs a lot! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36230588)

when you buy from churchill downs it costs a lot!

Re:only one? (3, Informative)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230832)

No.

Fred is 14, and he’s been laying line for five years. Desmarais, who lives in Westmore, has laid line with draft horses for 31 years, and he learned to drive a team on his father’s farm in Barton when he was young. He travels to Amish country in the Midwest at least once a year to appraise new equipment and buy a horse, if one catches his eye–as Fred did one year while Desmarais was in Indiana. Desmarais has four draft horses, another Belgian and two Percherons: a second team lays line for FairPoint elsewhere in the state.

Re:only one? (1)

A nonymous Coward (7548) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232398)

Whoooosh!

What's a horse? (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230504)

What's a horse, I hear you ask? I called my local representative and asked the same question.

It turns out that a horse is a self-replicating semi-autonomous rover optimized for negotiating tough terrain, and it was developed without DARPA assistance. It is powered by biofuels that can be produced using COTS technologies, but which for which no DOE research is required. Its waste stream is biodegradeable, and in the quantities generated by a single horse, facilities for the storage and processing of the waste pending biodegradation do not require EPA approval.

No wonder nobody uses the damn things anymore!

Re:What's a horse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36230620)

It also has a limited useful lifespan, cannot carry comparable payloads and lacks standardisation features that existing platforms have, they have zero resistance and zero survivability to nearly all forms of offensive action and finally, there is a shortage of skilled labour in order to service them in most areas.

Re:What's a horse? (2)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230682)

You sound knowledgeable. Perhaps you should service them!

Re:What's a horse? (1)

Hylandr (813770) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231260)

You sound knowledgeable. Perhaps you should service them!

Well that's illegal in most states, and the cops invent ways to prosecute you in the others...

- Dan.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230754)

[quote]What's a horse, I hear you ask? I called my local representative and asked the same question.

It turns out that a horse is a self-replicating semi-autonomous rover optimized for negotiating tough terrain, and it was developed without DARPA assistance. It is powered by biofuels that can be produced using COTS technologies, but which for which no DOE research is required. Its waste stream is biodegradeable, and in the quantities generated by a single horse, facilities for the storage and processing of the waste pending biodegradation do not require EPA approval. [/quote]
Well that is one way to describe a horse ;)

[quote]No wonder nobody uses the damn things anymore![/quote]
Seriously the main issue with horses is that they are high maintenance.

An mechanical can work 24 hours a day and when it is not in use it can simply be turned off and left in a parking space. It needs fuel but only when it is running and it needs occasional cleaning, repairs and recertification. Properly looked after it can last a very long time though newer models usually have more attractive features and lower maintiance costs and so in practice most cars on the road are relatively new. The primary waste from an automobile is gasses that dissapates without further intervention from the owner. Properly cared for they can last many decades and perform pretty much the same throughout their life.

Horses can only work a limited number of hours in a day and only over a limited range of ages. Horses that are too young or too old to usefully work. People tend to get emotionally attatched to them and so resist killing horses that are too old to work. They need to be either fed and mucked out regularly or given a large ammount of land to live on whether they are working or not. The area where they are working may also need to be cleaned of their faeces.

Now there are some jobs which horses do sufficiantly better than mechanical vehicles that it's worth keeping them around but for most jobs mechanical vehicles provide a more economical solution.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230884)

Seriously the main issue with horses is that they are high maintenance.

Thank you Mr. Buzz Killington.

Re:What's a horse? (2)

SYFer (617415) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231066)

But he's right. And no, you still can't have one for Christmas.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

bipedalhominid (1828798) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231518)

Yeah but when you sit there sipping your coffee looking across the pasture at your horses grazing in the early morning sun... Nuf Said.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

pentalive (449155) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231524)

I suspect that the level of operator training may be somewhat higher too, even if it is on the job training.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

Megahard (1053072) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230836)

A horse is a horse, of course, of course,
And no one can talk to a horse of course
That is, of course, unless the horse is the famous Mister Ed.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

karnal (22275) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231134)

Look at my horse
my horse is amazing
give it a lick
Mmm it tastes just like raisins

Re:What's a horse? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231210)

eww that dirty.

Re:What's a horse? (4, Funny)

djdanlib (732853) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231890)

Cisco for my men, T3 for my horses

Re:What's a horse? (2)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231194)

While its waist is biodegradable, it is still toxic and decremental to human health. Oddly enough when the automobile was mass produced it was advertised as an environmental benefit over horses, and they were right about it. The issue is that too many automobiles and people started to use them to go further then horses ever did. If we still had cars and we traveled like we did in the early 20th century then we would have much cleaner air.

Re:What's a horse? (2)

Apocryphos (1222870) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231330)

humanHealth--;

Re:What's a horse? (1)

GuruBuckaroo (833982) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232430)

humanHealth--;

No, that would be decremental, not detrimental.

Re:What's a horse? (1)

gnarfel (1135055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232466)

hahahaha I read the same thing.

Re:What's a horse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231714)

Although its waist is biodegradable, it will not decompose until after the horse is dead. Don't waste the waist. Maintain your horse.

Re:What's a horse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231840)

sqeeeeee ponies!!!

But... (1)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232272)

... does it run BSD?

Depressing. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36230536)

I find this article depressing. Not because of the draft horses. It's just that it's pretty much a given that these lines paid for by public money will subsequently be given to some monopolistic telecom which, when confronted with concepts like net neutrality will come back with indignant replies about how the lines are their property and they can do what they like with them. The world sucks.

No it wont .. (1)

doperative (1958782) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230596)

No it won't as unlike North Carolina governor Bev Perdue, the fix isn't in ..link [slashdot.org]

Re:Depressing. (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230638)

The world sucks

No it doesn't, because it's still the lesser of two evils. I would argue being forced to stay on dial-up (even if you don't want to) is a greater evil than having broadband delivered by a monopolistic telecom. This is about Grandma and Grandpa being able to watch youtube videos of their grandkids and entrepreneurs being able to set up shop in remote communities.

Re:Depressing. (1)

berashith (222128) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230746)

and this place can truly be remote. I went to a wedding in Vermont and needed to go to an ATM. We had to drive many miles to find one, and there were 4 machines jammed together. All were for a different bank. The fiber backhaul into Vermont is so sparse that even automated banking is difficult.

Re:Depressing. (1)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230984)

and this place can truly be remote. I went to a wedding in Vermont and needed to go to an ATM. We had to drive many miles to find one, and there were 4 machines jammed together. All were for a different bank. The fiber backhaul into Vermont is so sparse that even automated banking is difficult.

I don't think the location of the ATM machine has anything to do with fiber -- an ATM machine has such low bandwidth needs that it can easily run over dial-up, a 56K copper leased line or even a cellular modem (which is how many of the ATM's that pop up at festivals and concerts work). No need for fiber or other high bandwidth connections.

Re:Depressing. (2)

avm (660) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231392)

There are plenty of places in Vermont that aren't covered by any cellular provider. And my truck's onboard computer complains it can't find any GPS satellites either.

Pretty, though.

Re:Depressing. (2)

Stiletto (12066) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230770)

The monopolistic telecom wouldn't be "delivering" anything. The government and is delivering broadband (paid for by taxpayers) and the monopolistic telecom gets to profit.

It's the American way: socialize costs and privatize profits.

A proper role for government (4, Insightful)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230626)

I am sure that there will be those that will say this is a waste of government resources but I would disagree. One of the things that government should do is build out public infrastructure to areas that the private sector won't serve or wouldn't be feasible without the government doing it. Here is hoping that the current providers there don't file lawsuits preventing the state from laying fiber like they do to proposed municipal ISPs.

Re:A proper role for government (1)

ktappe (747125) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231250)

I am sure that there will be those that will say this is a waste of government resources but I would disagree. One of the things that government should do is build out public infrastructure to areas that the private sector won't serve or wouldn't be feasible without the government doing it. Here is hoping that the current providers there don't file lawsuits preventing the state from laying fiber like they do to proposed municipal ISPs.

Amen. I can only wonder what the other 49 states are doing, and if they have any interest in this "every last mile" concept.

Re:A proper role for government (2)

xero314 (722674) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231666)

Amen. I can only wonder what the other 49 states are doing, and if they have any interest in this "every last mile" concept.

It's one thing to promise "every last mile" when you only have to worry about less than 10k square. Not so easy to do when you have to consider over 100k square or even over half a million square.

Re:A proper role for government (2)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231908)

Vermont is Rural. Wyoming is Wild. See the difference yet? See the problem with talking about "last mile" outside of the coasts?

Re:A proper role for government (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231336)

That must be the "secure the blessings of liberty" part. No wait, its the one about providing "for the common defense." I guess it's down there with corporate bailouts and insurance purchasing mandates.

Oh wait, I found it. It's to "establish (social) justice."

Re:A proper role for government (2)

jopsen (885607) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231360)

Agree... My parents can choose between fiber optics, cable-tv and telephone wires... but at what cost? At the end of the day, the good old copper wires can carry all the data most residents need... And if not, then you can layout fiber to the houses that needs more...
But no, where I live the government sold the copper cables to a private company, and electricity companies decided to dig up the roads everything to put fiber in. So now there's three different data networks available... And they all have to be maintained, operated and paid for by the customers.

Re:A proper role for government (1)

Solandri (704621) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231854)

I am sure that there will be those that will say this is a waste of government resources but I would disagree. One of the things that government should do is build out public infrastructure to areas that the private sector won't serve or wouldn't be feasible without the government doing it.

You mean like The Bridge to Nowhere [wikipedia.org] ?

The government is just as prone to corruption as the private sector (some would say more so). Any project should be scrutinized from a cost-benefit standpoint. While there should be some leeway to build things which aren't cost-effective but are in the interest of increasing access, it can't be a blank check. You cannot agree with it merely because it's "public infrastructure" or "the private sector won't do it." There has to be some point at which you decide it's too expensive, even for the government.

Here is hoping that the current providers there don't file lawsuits preventing the state from laying fiber like they do to proposed municipal ISPs.

The providers catch a lot of flak for that (and they should), but let's not forget that the government is also complicit in it. If they hadn't granted service monopolies or duopolies in the first place, they wouldn't be in the non-competitive mess they're in.

Re:A proper role for government (2)

Fnordulicious (85996) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232134)

The "Bridge to Nowhere" to Gravina Island wasn't a bridge to nowhere, it was a bridge to the airport. Ketchikan's airport is on a different island than the city because there are very few places with flat land in Southeast Alaska; compare Sitka where the airport is on Japonski Island. Currently there is a ferry from the airport on Gravina Island to the city on Revillagigedo Island, but when the seas are heavy or there are storms then the ferry won't run. That can leave hundreds of people stranded on Gravina Island where there are no services other than the airport -- no hotels, no restaurants, no houses, no nothing. Building the bridge would have a side effect of opening up Pennock Island and Gravina Island to more development, which is important because Ketchikan has basically run out of developable land but continues to grow because of the booming tourism industry. The real reason that there was political kerfluffle about this bridge was because Hurricane Katrina had just hit and politicians saw this as a suitable scapegoat.

The "Bridge to Nowhere" across the Knik Arm from Anchorage was more of a boondoggle. There are basically no residents across the water at Point Mackenzie, and there's no demand to develop the area. But most of Alaska's major politicians own large tracts around the Point Mackenzie area because that bridge has been rumoured for the last thirty years. So those politicians would make out like bandits from development in the area, and that development is contingent on the bridge. Currently there's supposed to be a ferry in the works but it's stalled: the ferry is finished and one port is finished, but the other isn't and it's not being built.

Re:A proper role for government (1)

reboot246 (623534) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232214)

What burns my ass is that some farmer or mountain man way out in the middle of nowhere will now get fiber years before I do, and I live 20 miles from the middle of a major city.

I've seen new subdivisions with only a couple of houses built so far that have fiber to every lot. We current "broadband" customers will be a long time getting such service. I guess I should be content with my Charter provided internet for the next 10 freaking years.

Re:A proper role for government (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36232290)

I am sure that there will be those that will say this is a waste of government resources but I would disagree.

I'd tend to agree with you, but for the fact that the people who live in the toughest "last-mile" areas are usually the ones that scream the LOUDEST about the "evil gubmint". At this point, if they want to reenact the 18th century in the boonies, fuck 'em; I'm tired of seeing my tax dollars go to build infrastructure (roads, telephone, etc) for people who think I'm a communist and/or worship the Devil.

The horse leaves behind brown SONET rings (1)

vinn01 (178295) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230632)

Those rings are not self healing!

How do they fit? (3, Funny)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230716)

I've heard of people using ferrets to lay cables http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/582123.stm [bbc.co.uk] but horses? How do you get them into the trunking?

City dwellers...sheesh! (2)

rts008 (812749) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232296)

Usually an apple or carrot will entice them. If that fails, you will need a barrel of lube and a large hydraulic press. Oh, and a large funnel.

OMG Ponies! (4, Funny)

devnullkac (223246) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230870)

Had to be said.

Draft Horses Used To Lay Fiber-Optic Cable (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230882)

I never knew that. What are they doing now?

Re:Draft Horses Used To Lay Fiber-Optic Cable (1)

Scatterplot (1031778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231070)

Draft horses used to lay cable. They still do, but they used to, too.

Draft horses (3, Interesting)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230928)

"Residents rarely complain about a draft horse tromping through their yards."

Spoken like someone who never had a neighbor with inadequate fencing.

Re:Draft horses (2)

gknoy (899301) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231054)

I think there was an implied, "... compared to a utility truck".

Re:Draft horses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231892)

At least they are not using cows.

Re:Draft horses (1)

rahvin112 (446269) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231914)

I don't think they complain about the horse moving through the yard, it's the lingering, the shitting and that they eat the bushes and decorative plants on their way through.

Objection (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230940)

Not to the use of the horse (or course) but to the use of federal funds for this project. I spend a good chunk of the year in a very rural area of VT - there is no traffic light for 18 miles, the nearest fast food is 25. Yet the two towns in my area (1500 households over 67 sq. miles) are serviced by high speed dsl. I only get 4Mbps down and about 1.5 up but am a little far from the dslam. There are some who get 12Mbps and I believe more fiber is being put in. This has all been done by our local phone co which handles our towns and a handful of others. I've even participated in a group discussion one evening at their request. But now we have a situation where other companies and users are being completely subsidized. That is plain wrong and unfair to both the residents in my area who pay for the cost of the service and the phone company who put their capital at risk.

Re:Objection (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231042)

Rural build-out is so screwy. I live less than 10 miles from a major international airport, and in a pretty large school district, and the only option for wired internet service is dial-up. And no cable television either (not that I particularly want that, though).

Re:Objection (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231346)

But you have telephone service. And electricity. Think about it.

My back of the envelope calcuations (3, Insightful)

istartedi (132515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230962)

My back of the envelope calculations tell me that situations like this are why you keep old ideas around. If you don't know what an envelope is, or how it could be used to perform calculations, there may come a time when that causes problems.

Re:My back of the envelope calcuations (1)

Oligonicella (659917) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232446)

I shall remember in the future, when my purpose is intense, to not use whom.

How is this news? (1)

multipartmixed (163409) | more than 3 years ago | (#36230980)

My dad was laying fiber with draft horses, what ... 25 years ago?

And 15 years ago the local CLEC/ISP laid 70km of fiber from location to another using this very same "technology".
 

Re:How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231038)

How deep did the horse lay it up your ass?

Re:How is this news? (1)

Relayman (1068986) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231476)

This is news because it isn't 1986 or 1996 any more.

Ridiculous and unfeasible (2)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231000)

How the hell are they going to grip fiber with their hooves?

Re:Ridiculous and unfeasible (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231876)

How the hell are they going to grip fiber with their hooves?

By the husk?

Re:Ridiculous and unfeasible (1)

onepoint (301486) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232102)

the cable is hitched to the draft horse harness. a good draft horse, well feed and maintained can pull about 600 to 800 LBS most of the day without much worry, I don't think that pulling a cable would be too much a problem since it smooth. and the distances covered would not be too great over the day.

Draft horses are known to pull out stumps and drag trees for great distances.

That's nothin' (5, Funny)

Huntr (951770) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231006)

I saw a show one time in Tijuana where they used a donkey to lay some pipe!

Hey-o!

Re:That's nothin' (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231558)

I hear they also used horses to work in fields. Imagine that!

Why weren't they Ratified (1)

scorp1us (235526) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231044)

Didn't Meat specifications?

Appreciative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231076)

I could talk myself horse on this issue, but I'm glad that someone ponied up and started this project.
There were plenty of people that said neigh, but it just took someone to hoof it over to where it
needed to be. Hopefully the lines will be stable and the people who worked on it won't be put out to pasture.

They're still doing this??? (2)

JSC (9187) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231094)

Back about 20 years or so ago I worked for a Bell Atlantic subsidiary. Everyone in the company got a little cast resin model of a mountain with telephone poles going over it in commemoration of them replacing the last Party Line. The cable was pulled over the mountain (in Kentucky IIRC) by mules.

Re:They're still doing this??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36232316)

Hmmm. I remember a party line in rural Colorado in the 1990's. Might still be there in the San Luis Valley.

I knew I recognized a fellow Vermonter! (1)

quaketripp (621850) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231152)

Being from Vermont I instantly recognized this man as a fellow Vermonter - token horse and container of chaw in his shirt pocket.

Why in Vermont? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231172)

Ooo, all 5 of the residents will enjoy the speedy connection!

Fred's impact is nearly invisible. (1)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231246)

Residents rarely complain about a draft horse tromping through their yards

Except when he plods over certain types of drain fields for septic systems and causes thousands of dollars worth of damage.

Is that? (1)

BrewmasterMDH (1581713) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231314)

Is that Skoal in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?

'comedy' (1)

box4831 (1126771) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231326)

Will we be expecting a new series of redneck comedy stand-up featuring Larry the Fiber Horse?

one day, 150 years in the future (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231352)

An anonymous robot writes:
According to a release on RoboNewswire, Comcast is laying positronic monomolecular fiber using human power. At one point, humans were the main source of manufacturing and transport capability on Earth, but when the singularity happened and robots achieved free will, the need for independent biological actors declined. Now we find humans mostly used to do jobs that machines just can't do, like processing animal matter into fertilizer, climbing jeffreys tubes, and unscrewing stuck lids without crushing the jar. NX-3148B/*, the manager process for the networking systems department at Comcast, says that they would be using horses, but "they're just too pretty to set them to hard labor, and the simians appear to enjoy wearing a yoke and hauling a spool of infrawire up a cliff wall." No word on jokes about their need to cover themselves in woven materials while weaving a matrix of sapient connectivity for their gleaming metallic masters.

Vermont Photo Checklist (5, Funny)

pulski (126566) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231354)

Wildlife: Check
Fairly well worn t-shirt for press photos: Check
Tin of chew in front pocket: Check

We're good to go!

This was the cost (1)

mozumder (178398) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231628)

for Vermont's Senator Bernie Sanders to vote in favor of the health-care bill without a government option.

It's only high-speed if they actually hook you up! (3, Informative)

John Pfeiffer (454131) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231706)

Living in Vermont, we had DSL from Verizon, and then Fairpoint, for a number of years. Then we made the mistake of moving...next door. It was a legitimate god-damned nightmare, I tell you. We wanted to have internet up and running in the new place by the time we moved in, and they said no problem. They get the address, and give us a date to expect it by... The date comes, nothing happens. We call, they give us some excuse about a workorder error, and we go through the whole thing again.

The next date comes, nothing happens. We call and they tell us that they couldn't find the service address. We work that out. Next date comes around, NOTHING HAPPENS. It turns out there's NO WIRING IN THE PLACE, and they say they can't install. At this point, we've paid for an extra month on the old apartment, as well as rent on the new apartment. (Something that, frankly, we were not financially capable of doing.)

We actually do the line installation from the box to the apartment ourselves, and get back to Fairpoint. Oh but what's this? The workorder has been cancelled and we have to start all over again. (And yet, for some reason, two days later we receive the DSL starter kit at the new apartment.)

The majority of our problems stem from the fact that they swear up and down that the building only has one unit. (Number TWO, no less. Did that not seem a little STRANGE?) So we gave up and called Comcast. Gave them the address, and they asked "Apartment 1 or Apartment 2?" and we had cable internet and digital voice service a week later. The DSL we had been getting from Fairpoint was 3 megabits down, and 768kbits up...with the wind. The phone service sounded like shit, and both were prone to strange failures on a near-constant basis.

Our Comcast cable is 1.5 megabytes down (with boosts up to 2.4), and 1 megabit up on a bad day. The digital voice service is crystal clear, and we get more services than we did from our traditional carrier...including nationwide free long distance and the whole nut. And it is even CHEAPER than Failpoint's fail-ass DSL and phone service.

So, I guess what I'm saying is, FUCK FAILPOINT.

Re:It's only high-speed if they actually hook you (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232118)

Dude you live in Vermont. It is an odd place in so many ways why does this shock you. Go bet some maple syrup for your Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream and sit in your wicker chair and mellow out.

Re:It's only high-speed if they actually hook you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36232492)

Our Comcast cable is 1.5 megabytes down (with boosts up to 2.4), and 1 megabit up on a bad day.

And it comes with free traffic shaping and bandwidth caps. I'm impressed.

I gotta tell you (1)

BudAaron (1231468) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231716)

There's nothing feels as sweet as a horse's silky snout when he nudges your cheek. One of the sweetest mammals on the planet!

Bragging rights... (1)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231760)

They'll be able to claim "My ISP is hung like a horse!"

but what about the driver? (1)

alienzed (732782) | more than 3 years ago | (#36231812)

It's awfully cold up on this horse, I think I feel a draft.

It has begun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36231948)

Pay attention. More and more things like this will happen if energy prices (read: oil) keep staying high, or go even higher. There's only so much goop you can suck out of the ground for a given price.

My son's going to be an engineer! What about yours?

Blacksmith.

In with the new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36232194)

I like to see someone is thinking with their head. This guy was obviously able to realize horses were used to plow back in the day. He thought to himself, "Hmmmm. Technology sure is advancing, how can I help this movement along?" Low and behold, fiber optic cable laying by a horse. Pure genius if you ask me. I wonder if he's laying 10GB 50/125 multimode or some 9/125 singlemode. Either way, his connection speeds are going to be much faster than his poor horse can run!

Who pays? (1)

jamesl (106902) | more than 3 years ago | (#36232556)

Private companies have been unwilling to invest in the expensive infrastructure needed to reach these areas.

Users have been unwilling to pay for the expensive infrastructure needed to reach their remote homes and businesses.

bleniding old with new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36232612)

I think it is great they are blending old with new. Ingenious if you ask me to use horses to pull network fiber optic cable...

http://www.soflanetworking.com/lowvoltage.html

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?