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Apple Acknowledges MacDefender

Unknown Lamer posted more than 3 years ago | from the but-macs-don't-get-viruses dept.

Security 314

Trailrunner7 writes with an article in threatpost "Apple is planning to release an update specifically designed to protect users against the MacDefender malware that has been circulating for the last couple of weeks. The update for Mac OS X will automatically find and remove the malware on an infected machine and also will warn users if another infection attempt is detected.

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Can't fix that (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238426)

I didn't think anyone could release an update that will fix 'stupid'.

Re:Can't fix that (3, Insightful)

sgbett (739519) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238478)

"Hey you there, you look like you might have STUPAIDS. Quick! Inject yourself with this hypodermic needle who's contents are unknown to you!"

That might work?

Re:Can't fix that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238594)

s/who's/whose/

Re:Can't fix that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238908)

Why? That expands to "...who has contents are unknown to you!"

Sounds like standard Lolcat dialect, which fits Mac users down to the ground. (They're a bit simple, like the interface...)

Re:Can't fix that (1)

bsharp8256 (1372285) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238928)

s/who\'s/whose/

FTFY

Re:Can't fix that (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239112)

I'd suggest that operating system security patches should be delivered via ads that utilize security flaws... except a lot of malware programs do upgrade security patches after infecting.

Re:Can't fix that (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238548)

You can't, but you can release one that tells the user they're stupid if they choose to run this piece of malware.

Re:Can't fix that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238672)

I wonder why they got involved in this. Now they've set the undue expectation to provide support for malfunctioning/malicious third party software.

hurr... (-1, Offtopic)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238428)


from the but-macs-don't-get-viruses dept.

This isn't a virus, retard.

Re:hurr... (2)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238460)

But retards will call it such ("virus", to the layman, is "any software what breaks my computer", regardless of distribution method). And thus, all the retards claiming "macs don't get viruses" will now be countered.

But hey, at least we still have Linux. No viruses (by either definition) on that, right?

Re:hurr... (2)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238484)


There are worms for Linux. Not sure about OSX. Certainly "CLICK HERE!! EMERGENCY!!"-type malware can exist for any platform.

Re:hurr... (1)

Ambassador Kosh (18352) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238732)

1) It encourages users to just get software from the repositories which is very unlikely to have malware in it.

2) It discourages people from using it that are likely to fall for these kinds of things.

So it does not have real protection beyond what osx has other then the culture that goes with it. On Windows and OSX it is FAR more common to download and install software from random locations.

Re:hurr... (1)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238920)

It encourages people to only get software from the repository that The Steve says they should get software from.

But that's not a problem, generally, because Mac users are trained to know they have to pay for every little anything they install on their system.

Eventually some smart malware creator will create a trojan that has some nominal fee the Mac user has to pay to get the malware.

It'll wipe all Macs from the web in short order.

Re:hurr... (1)

plumby (179557) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238796)

The only platforms where this kind of attack would be extremely difficult are the locked-down ecosystems, like (unjailbroken) iOS or most games consoles. Whilst I'm sure that iOS isn't 100% guaranteed malware free (there's always going to be something exploitable somewhere), it's going to be a whole lot more difficult to do that than simply writing a noddy "Run Me" app that wipes all your data.

Re:hurr... (1)

plumby (179557) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238652)

Does Linux do anything (or at least anything more than MacOS) to protect against this type of attack?

Re:hurr... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238766)

And thus, all the retards claiming "macs don't get viruses" will now be countered.

Would OS X have prevented the malware from propagating itself throughout the system? No? Then OS X does get viruses.

semantics. (4, Insightful)

Skarecrow77 (1714214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238784)

Call it an infection then, using the generic term, instead of viral infection if you really want to, but that's just being pedantic. The "but macs don't get viruses" contingent has always truly meant and implied, if not outright stated, that OSX was not subject to the same malicious software infections that windows was. You know it, I know it, everybody knows it. This isn't a presidential impeachment, we're not required to define what "is" means. Everybody knows what "viruses" in this context means.

Just like with humans, be it a viral infection, a bacterial infection, or even a fungal infection, the general layperson doesn't care what is causing the problem. They just want it fixed. The only person who cares exactly what is causing the problem is the person (doctor for humans, technician for computers) who is trying to fix it. The layperson just knows that they are "sick'. Likewise, the mac user just knows that their computer is "sick" and "this sort of thing isn't supposed to happen to macs".

Re:semantics. (0)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239012)

Is "rm -rf /" a "virus" by your definition?

Oh, great (0)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238432)

I figured I would finally get my mom a computer that even *she* couldn't get infected, so guess what I got her for Mother's Day?

Bloody hell.

Re:Oh, great (0)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238512)

My approach is cheaper: lock down the system. Install Fedora, give my mother a user that has type user_u in SELinux, and breath a little easier now that I know she cannot accidentally run some random program she downloaded. There are still vulnerabilities, but it would take a far more sophisticated attack than what one normally sees.

Re:Oh, great (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238750)

My approach is cheaper: lock down the system. Install Fedora, give my mother a user that has type user_u in SELinux, and breath a little easier now that I know she cannot accidentally run some random program she downloaded. There are still vulnerabilities, but it would take a far more sophisticated attack than what one normally sees.

Kid Proofing a Mac With Parental Controls [gigaom.com]
s/Kid/Parent/

Allows you to limit the applications a user can execute.

Re:Oh, great (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239114)

That is really not what I was referring to. I really just want to stop a particular user from running setuid/setgid programs and from running programs in their home directory. With Fedora that is literally a matter of clicking on 3 things, or equivalently running three commands in a terminal. It is not even clear to me that the Mac parental controls feature actually prevents users from executing programs in their home directories (e.g. a program they downloaded from some website).

In any case, the real point here was that there is no reason to pay the Apple premium if your goal is to protect an unsophisticated user from malware.

Re:Oh, great (2, Insightful)

snookerhog (1835110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238542)

statistics say you still made the right choice.

Re:Oh, great (1)

robinsonne (952701) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238588)

I saw this on a laptop this week, and it was laughably easy to get rid of (under 5 minutes)

Compared with the kind of stuff targeting PCs, this is/was a joke.

top -u
kill -9 [pid#]
Drag to trash

Re:Oh, great (3, Interesting)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238900)

Early PC stuff was a joke too. Give it some time to get going.

Re:Oh, great (3, Funny)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238828)

I would think "Bloody hell" is always a poor choice of gift. But then, I don't know your mother.

Re:Oh, great (1)

LoganDzwon (1170459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239134)

it's cool. If you RTFA Apple is going to patch and remove this crap from your mom's machine soon.

Kudos to Apple (2, Interesting)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238436)

IMHO, Apple is taking the bull by the horns and not only fixing the problem personally but also not charging an annual fee for the privilege of cleaning your system. Well done.

Re:Kudos to Apple (3, Informative)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238474)

Kudos to Apple for doing what Microsoft has been doing for many years: the monthly updated malicious software removal tool included in Windows Update.

If they still do that. I haven't run Windows in a couple years...

Re:Kudos to Apple (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238504)

They do. They also have Windows Defender, which protects against other stuff like spyware.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238606)

And of course Security Essentials.

Re:Kudos to Apple (-1, Flamebait)

Zemplar (764598) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238632)

Windows Defender is add-on software because the OS itself doesn't provide enough defense.

"OSX - Because it was easier to make UNIX user-friendly than to fix Windows. "

Re:Kudos to Apple (5, Informative)

benjymouse (756774) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238790)

Windows Defender is add-on software because the OS itself doesn't provide enough defense.

No. It is add-on because MS cannot bundle such application for anti-trust concerns. Same with security essentials.

Re:Kudos to Apple (3, Funny)

amliebsch (724858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238794)

That's kind of like saying that training wheels are bicycle add-ons because the bike itself doesn't provide enough balance.

True, for some users.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238552)

Kudos to Apple for doing what Microsoft has been doing for many years: the monthly updated malicious software removal tool included in Windows Update.

In Apple's defense, it's not like they had a reason for doing this until now.

Re:Kudos to Apple (3, Informative)

tgd (2822) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238640)

Windows Security Essentials covers both virus and spyware scanning, and is free. And as you said, Microsoft pushes out updates fairly regularly to their malware removal tools.

As long as you're on an up-to-date validly-licensed copy of Windows 7, and you don't do some asshat thing like shut off automatic updates, Win7 is pretty solid out of the box. MSE isn't there by default, but I believe if Windows detects you don't have some other virus scanner installed, it will list it as an important update in Windows Update.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

onefriedrice (1171917) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238706)

Kudos to Apple for doing what Microsoft has been doing for many years: the monthly updated malicious software removal tool included in Windows Update.

Only because it's been a problem on Windows for much longer, and considerably longer even than Microsoft has been releasing such "tools." In comparison, it's only the first modern, semi-widespread malware available for OS X, and apparently Apple is choosing to get involved.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238832)

I'll admit that I don't know how it works on the Windows 7 side. XP is still pretty porous. But I'm forced to ask: if Microsoft is so good at it, why are there products like Norton, McAfee, and those annoying ads for DoubleMySpeed.com? "My computer was on it's last legs. Now it's like new again!" *facepalm*

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238896)

User installed malware is the bigger problem on Windows too.

There are still issues with remote exploits and autoruns and whatnot, but most malware is still installed by users.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238938)

What makes you think Apple is any better at it? I had XP going for years with no viruses or virus scanners, no need to reboot aside from updates and driver issues, and none of that extraneous reformatting so many dweebs talk about doing. The brand new Mac I use at work doesn't have any trouble with viruses either, but for some reason I can't use it for more than a week without needing to reboot because it becomes unusably slow. I don't know what the culprit is exactly, but my wife's Apple laptop has similar behavior and I'm inclined to think it's the operating system itself.

What I can say for sure is that XP never caused me so many problems and even when my current favorite OS (Arch Linux) has its occasional issues, they can be permanently fixed either by waiting a few days for an update or tweaking some config file.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239218)

The brand new Mac I use at work doesn't have any trouble with viruses either, but for some reason I can't use it for more than a week without needing to reboot because it becomes unusably slow. I don't know what the culprit is exactly, but my wife's Apple laptop has similar behavior and I'm inclined to think it's the operating system itself.

Make sure that the maintence scripts [thexlab.com] are running. (Yeah, yeah, it just works ....)

Re:Kudos to Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36239004)

95% market share mainly.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

rockman_x_2002 (1791612) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239212)

Because for whatever reason, some people seem to think that free software is inferior to paid software, and that a product is only good if you have to shell out money for it. And the more money you shell out, the better it is, because you have to pay for it! At least, that's their thinking. Thus you have products like Norton, McAfee, and websites like DoubleMySpeed and FixMyPcFree (gag) that are actually making money on the same principle, and they do nothing more than a typical end user can do with free software and just a little bit of ingenuity and knowhow, and a cursory glance at Google for directions.

re: Microsoft monthly updates .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238878)

I have some doubts as to the effectiveness of that Microsoft monthly "malicious software removal tool" they send via Windows Updates though?

They *do* still send it out, but I've actually had infected machines where that ran and didn't appear to accomplish anything useful. (I'm not sure if it actually reports back a status by way of any dialog boxes if it succeeds in finding/clearing anything? It seems like normally, it just runs silently in the background when Windows Update downloads and runs it along with any other updates it grabbed and applied?)

With some of the malware for Windows I've encountered recently, it's far more complicated than simply stopping a few processes and deleting some .DLL files. Some of them actually seem to plant "dummy" files out on the drive that anti-virus packages can detect as "bad" and remove, but they seem to act only as "triggers" that tell other parts of the malware to activate and do more damaging things to the OS and/or data. It's sort of a retaliation mechanism against people who make an effort to clean the thing off ....

Re:Kudos to Apple (2)

ArcCoyote (634356) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238884)

Not only that, MS provides free, excellent AV in the form of MS Security Essentials.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239154)

Kudos to Apple for doing what Microsoft has been doing for many years: the monthly updated malicious software removal tool included in Windows Update.

OMG. Patch Tuesday comes to OS X! NO!!!!!

Re:Kudos to Apple (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238526)

You're an idiot and you make me sick.

What else would they have done? (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238554)

When your entire marketing approach is, "Everything we make JUST WORKS!" you really cannot have these kinds of malware floating around, and you certainly cannot try to charge people to fix things. It is not that I am criticizing Apple here, I am just saying that in their position, the only thing they could do is to erase the malware at no cost to their customers, or risk damage to their entire marketing machine.

Re:What else would they have done? (4, Insightful)

Bill Hayden (649193) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238868)

Apple is a very safe platform, but the safest software in the world can't protect against Stupid.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238566)

Apple treating this like what it is, a very minor security update. Won't stop the trolls trolling trolls though.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238664)

What they should have done since Safari 2 is to uncheck by default the "Open safe files" preference in Safari. That option enabled by default is almost like they are begging for malware to happen since it auto mounts program distribution disk images.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238844)

There probably isn't such a thing as a "safe file." Well, they've still got time to change the defaults in Lion.

Re:Kudos to Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36239216)

Won't stop the trolls trolling trolls though.

I'll bet I can troll better than you can!

Windows rocks!
Evolution is bunk and creation is proven!
Obama's an idiot!
Ford's better than Chevy!
ATI sucks and NVidia rocks!
Republicans are morons!
Democrats are idiots!
Linux is worthless!
Glenn Beck is a prophet!

Do I win?

Re:Kudos to Apple (2, Insightful)

Teckla (630646) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238646)

IMHO, Apple is taking the bull by the horns and not only fixing the problem personally but also not charging an annual fee for the privilege of cleaning your system. Well done.

Unless and until Apple disables the setting on Safari that causes the MacDefender Trojan to be automatically downloaded and executed just by visiting a malicious web page, Apple has not done a good job, in my opinion.

Until then, malware authors can continue to abuse the "download safe content" feature in Safari. Hopefully, recent events will help educate users that they should immediately quit any installers that get automatically downloaded and executed that they did not ask for.

Re:Kudos to Apple (4, Insightful)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238826)

The software downloads and opens the installer if you agree to 'scan' your computer, but it certainly doesn't install. You have to agree to install it and then put in your admin password. Unless you do that, it won't go anywhere. You can always just cancel the install and drop it in the trash. Pretty convincing hack though except that it crashes most of the time.

I agree though that they should disable the option to automatically open 'safe' attachments. It's a common vector of infections on a Windows PC and never a good idea. Some times making things too easy for an end use is just begging for trouble. It's the first thing I turn off whenever I setup a Mac for someone.

Re:Kudos to Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238936)

Please keep your misinformation to yourself. You have to click a link to download the software, THEN you have to launch it yourself, THEN you have to authorize it with an admin password.

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

Shrike82 (1471633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238960)

Nah, they're clearly being impartial and delivering on their commitments: providing a mechanism that ensures that infecting peoples' Macs "Just Works"!

Re:Kudos to Apple (1)

Skuld-Chan (302449) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238926)

Ever since the dawn of MSRT (the malicious software removal tool) which has been around for the last 6 years Microsoft has been doing exactly this.

Macs don't need anti-malware software! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238462)

This specific patch should work just fine and dandy against Mac Defender, until new malware shows up. All they have to do is release a patch each time new malware appears. Again, and again, and again...

Re:Macs don't need anti-malware software! (2)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239032)

Being that it took 11 years for one to come for OS X. That method just might work.

Re:Macs don't need anti-malware software! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36239146)

they cannot patch the user to avoid him providing admin password to random things.

defence against MacDefender (3, Insightful)

doperative (1958782) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238482)

"Apple is planning to release an update specifically designed to protect users against the MacDefender malware that has been circulating for the last couple of weeks. The update for Mac OS X will automatically find and remove the malware on an infected machine and also will warn users if another infection attempt is detected"

What defence is there against the end users downloading and running MacDefender and giving up the Admin password?

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238494)

A simple check against known signatures at the same time when OS X says "This app was downloaded from the Internet, are you sure you want to run it?"

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

discord5 (798235) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238710)

A simple check against known signatures

Mr Mouse, let me introduce Mr Cat. I'm sure you will be enjoying many games together.

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238734)

I think he was the cat, actually.

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238822)

I didn't say it was a good idea. It is however, exactly how every other basic anti-virus application works.

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238846)

Actually you get a different message for known 'bad' executables like the hacked Adobe installers. It will actually warn them that the package is malicious.

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

Teckla (630646) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238592)

What defence is there against the end users downloading and running MacDefender and giving up the Admin password?

A big part of the problem is Safari's default settings. Safari will automatically download and run the MacDefender installer. This, in itself, is harmless (you can quit the installer), but that default behavior in Safari makes it that much easier for malware authors.

Apple needs to acknowledge that Safari's default setting to automatically download "safe content" needs to be disabled.

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

discord5 (798235) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238636)

What defence is there against the end users downloading and running MacDefender and giving up the Admin password?

Bricking the macbook? I don't mean fuck it up with some firmware update, but taking a brick to it and smashing it. You can't run MacDefender that way.

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238638)

Read it more literally than that - they will blacklist MacDefender (probably, as the other poster suggests, via hash or another signature check) but not really expand it into a proper malware checker.

Cue MacProtector....

Re:defence against MacDefender (1)

Verunks (1000826) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238838)

"Apple is planning to release an update specifically designed to protect users against the MacDefender malware that has been circulating for the last couple of weeks. The update for Mac OS X will automatically find and remove the malware on an infected machine and also will warn users if another infection attempt is detected"

What defence is there against the end users downloading and running MacDefender and giving up the Admin password?

quite easy, to protect the end user apple will remove the admin account, every time an application will require admin access a pray wil be sent to steve jobs himself and he'll decide to allow or deny it

What What (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238486)

What happen to my perfect magical immortal box? All god Steve help me.

Re:What What (1)

headhot (137860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238522)

No magic box is protected from stupid. This wasn't a drive by install, the users had to choose to install it.

Re:What What (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238626)

No magic box is protected from stupid. This wasn't a drive by install, the users had to choose to install it.

A lot of places do not allow users to run programs in their home directories, to help mitigate this exact problem. This is not necessarily the best approach for home users, but it certainly is possible to provide some protection from user stupidity in certain contexts.

Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (3, Informative)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238510)

My wife supports a lot of Mac users who literally say stuff like "I don't have to worry about security because I have a Mac." In their minds, they can literally just wash their hands of all security considerations because Apple will do everything for them like a bodyguard from Blackwater. Apple has ridden a wave of anti-Microsoft sentiment in no small part by creating or at least encouraging the impression that if you buy a Mac, you'll never have to think again about taking care of your computer except maybe once a blue moon.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

Relayman (1068986) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238618)

Actually, people who really believe that Macs can't get viruses are the ones least likely to download MacDefender. The ones who are likely to download it are the ones who have heard the constant drumbeat of people with infected Windows computers. So MacDefender installs malware by playing on the terrible security record of Windows.

And now Apple is going to protect the users who are stupid enough to fall for MacDefender's social engineering. What's there not to like?

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238758)

Actually, people who really believe that Macs can't get viruses are the ones least likely to download MacDefender.

Yeah, that's ironic. But there's also no real reason that the social vector had to play on that particular fear; it could have as easily been anything else (i.e. porn).

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238622)

On the other hand, If those Mac users never really cared about their Mac's security, they would not have been infected by MacDefender at all ;)

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (5, Insightful)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238656)

I see a lot of people who say this like they know for a fact that they are correct and it's just sheeple who believe lies who think any differently. But have you ever owned a Mac? I remember when I moved from PC to Mac I did the typical installation of antivirus/firewall/antispyware programs. The fact that many of these were shitty ports from PC versions should have tipped me off but I soon realized these served no purpose on my machine unlike my old XP machine where I wouldn't even think about plugging in an ethernet cable without my security suite all up and running to make sure nothing gets in and nothing gets run and the things that do get taken care of.

This simply does not happen on Mac. I am sorry, but it is true. Yes, someone can make a trojan horse and generate a lot of media hype but that boils to someone tricking people into giving the malicious software a chance to run. There is only one way to handle that and that is by teaching people not to believe everything and be wary of what they download. Then you could have two equally informed users on a Mac and a PC who both avoid trojans but guess what. If the Windows users doesn't also have firewalls, antivirus, spybot, etc and a strong knowledge of how to use them (most users don't and these are loads more complicated than explaining to people not everything you here is true which is analogous to the real world) they are going to end up infected anyway. Not to mention that on a Mac, I didn't end up needing to run 2 bloated background programs to monitor security.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238776)

Then you could have two equally informed users on a Mac and a PC who both avoid trojans but guess what. If the Windows users doesn't also have firewalls, antivirus, spybot, etc and a strong knowledge of how to use them (most users don't and these are loads more complicated than explaining to people not everything you here is true which is analogous to the real world) they are going to end up infected anyway.

I'd contest your last statement; I'd say if the two users are equally informed the PC user isn't really all that more likely to end up infected, provided they run the Windows updates. Security Essentials wouldn't hurt, of course; and it's really not that hard to use either.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

RetroRichie (259581) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239144)

My wife is a good control for your contest. She has both a Mac and a PC and she is about as uninformed as it gets when it comes to security. Her Mac has no preventative utilities, and is virus and malware-free. Her PC has every matter of preventative security running at all times, and I am still cleaning viruses and malware off that bastard every single month. Granted the PC is running XP and not Windows 7, but still... this is an ongoing 2-year experiment, and her Mac is clean as a whistle. I have had to actually reinstall XP twice, her PC was so jacked up.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239194)

I don't think by "equally informed" he also meant equally uninformed. He clarified that both avoid trojans.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238888)

tl;dr version:
Believe hype concerning Windows and Microsoft, disbelieve when it concerns Apple and Mac.

Don't be a FOOL, man: It's ALL about marketshare! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36239206)

The moment any platform gains more usage/mindshare/marketshare (whatever you want to call it, i.e.-> More people using it), the more it will be attacked for exploits. What else exemplifies this? ANDROID OS, a Linux variant.

Why do you think that mobile phones are being so widely attacked now? They're SO big, they made Carlos Slim & others hugely wealthy... how?? Lots of folks bought into them is how - & the malware makers KNOW it, so they attack them!

All the b.s. Apple spouted in the past of "PC's are virus ridden horrors, Macs are not" is only being illustrated by this attack in MacDefender as well.

(Wake up, & "abres los ojos")

APK

P.S.=> Once a platform gets a decent % of the overall market utilizing it? It will be MORE attacked, period... *NIX variants like ANDROID/Linux &/or MacOS X notwithstanding! Histories shown us ALL this, & very recently too as well (as soon as ANDROID & MacOS X usage went up, so did the exploits on them & they are NOT INVULNERABLE, period)... apk

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

sloth jr (88200) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238760)

Notwithstanding Apple's market posturing - it seems like a reasonable goal for people to want: to not have to take care of your computer except in rare exceptions. I can understand folks largely buying into the belief that the Mac is generally a more care-free environment than Windows or Linux. Sure, things do go wrong on it - but in this case, PEBKAC (I agree with the above posters that identify Safari's auto-install functionality is a serious liability).

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

Alarash (746254) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238778)

I can see how that kind of marketing could go wrong.

In a sense, it's good that people start realizing that appart for the high quality hardware, Macs are just regular computers that were not high profile enough to be targeted by attackers. I'm not talking about targeted attacks, but large-scale trojans like this that rely on the stupidity (I should rather say "lack of understanding") of the users. In the past it probably wasn't worth it. Now that Apple is very widely used, it makes sense it's targeted by fake anti-virus-type attacks.

Linux is next, however long that takes.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238856)

I had a worm back in 1994. :-) Nothing since. Not that there might be something truly substantial in the future. Agree that those most fearful are going to fall for this.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (4, Informative)

King_TJ (85913) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239020)

Honestly, as another commenter already said, the Mac users like the ones your wife supports are by and large correct in that statement....

The truth is, your typical computer user who believes they're "aware of computer security issues" will tell you he/she takes steps to avoid getting virus infections. They'll tell you they do such things as "never opening emails when I don't know who they're from", and "not giving out my credit card over the Internet". Sometimes, they'll even brag about going to their favorite local computer store and asking someone what the "best antivirus software is" and buying / installing a copy of it.

Guess what? I get paid by the hour to clean nasty virus and malware problems off such peoples' Windows machines ALL the time!

On the flip-side? In the 5+ years I've had my business doing on-site computer service (not to mention years doing it for other people in the past), I've still NEVER had a SINGLE call from a Mac user needing such services! Not ONCE - despite clearly displaying the Apple logo on my business cards and mentioning in all of my advertising that I take care of both Mac and PC issues!

I'd go so far as to say that if you use a Mac, you should TRY to infect yourself sometime. Visit all the "bad" web sites you can think of to click on.... Follow the links on those sites that promise they'll locate the latest pirated software or key codes for you, or all the oddball porn sites you can locate... whatever. Watch how often something tries to send you a self-extracting .EXE file or download a script (.scr extension) file to your browser to run, or tries to give you some Active-X plug-in that's not compatible with your Mac's browser in the first place..... It's somewhat enlightening actually.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (1)

TechHawk (570290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239060)

...if you buy a Mac, you'll never have to think again about taking care of your computer except maybe once a blue moon.

Right. That's what the majority of people want. Just like they don't want to think about the maintenance of their car. They want it to just work. And like it or not, Apple delivers on that.

Re:Apple and its fanboys helped make this happen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36239198)

Ironic...

This thing popped up on my MacBook (under Chrome I think) telling me, in it's weird iTunes way, that my machine was full of viruses and malware...

I thought "Not likely.. I've got a Mac! This is all bunk" and just closed the window and forgot all about it... a coupla days later I saw this story...

So... if I'd believed Apple's "hype" that my machine is invulnerable and ignored the warning (clearly not from Apple but made to look Applesque) I'd b fine... and I was.

Yeah... I feel glib today.

Jobs just needed time... (0, Flamebait)

Scragglykat (1185337) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238528)

...to figure out how to spin this around on Android and Google ;o)

Good luck with that... (0)

Yaddoshi (997885) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238670)

Dear Apple security team,

They're just gonna make another variation of this software that will foil the detection routines.

While I'm on the subject, any Mac user who is foolish enough to grant a program they did not install their administrator password deserves whatever happens to their precious Mac.

Re:Good luck with that... (1)

TrancePhreak (576593) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239040)

Supposedly this doesn't require the password. It just installs to the user directory. It pops up a image that says click here to disinfect, the user clicks and it runs in the background.

hey, they made the big time! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238694)

We're finally a big enough target to steal from!
We're relevant! We're relevant!

I liked them better when their motto was "proudly going out of business for twenty years"...

whars the saying (1)

chronoss2010 (1825454) | more than 3 years ago | (#36238752)

if at first you dont suceed try , try try try try try try try again. IF someone did remove it once they have the skill to do it again, your pwned. and to think most of the morons that use macs are friends a hollywood.....

When it reports home (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36238862)

Ding... dong. The high-pitched ringing of the electro-mechanical chime is telling: it announces that you have a special guest at your door. You walk away from posting on 4chan^H^H^H^H^HSlashdot to answer it. As you unlatch the door and open it, a 6'4" African-american in a suit stands before you with a slight smirk on his face.

"I've brought you a big gift," he says, glancing down at his hand. You look down and notice that his hand is empty, but like a magician, he uses the opportunity of misdirection to pull out his real gift. His other hand is out and pressed into your chest; it contains a stun-gun, and you hear a slight hum as the current pulses into you.

When you regain your senses, you notice that you are lying in your own bed. But something is wrong -- you have a gag in your mouth, and your hands are bound. There's also an erect black cock dangling in front of your face.

"What a fine piece of meat," he states simply. "Well worth the hundred mile drive. That's also why you have this giant dick hanging in front of you -- so you can see the piece of meat that'll be fucking you now."

Without wasting another moment, he tears off your panties and places them in the pocket of his pants, which he has neatly left on your bed frame. He then moves into a missionary position over top of you, spreading your legs as he drives his hips forward, his prick plunging into your cunt^H^H^H^Hanus.

"You whore... do you like that?" he asks, like a line out of a porno. He grabs at your arms, pinching and squeezing them roughly, trying to see how much pressure it'll take to leave a bruise.

His hips thrust as he moans out, enjoying every violating movement. His hand wanders up to your throat, and he wastes no time in closing it over your fragile neck. He squeezes tight and says, "You little slut. You like rape, do you? Maybe this'll be your last time." But then he lets up, and brings his hands down to molest your tits.

He pinches you, squeezing your breasts like they're his own playthings. He increases the speed of his thrusts, obviously closing in on the final stretch; he puts more force into each one, the entire bed squeaking with each impact.

Eventually he pulls out, and moves into a position straddling your face. "Looks like I'm about done with you, whore. Hope you had fun; here comes the ending." His hand slides up and down his shaft, and you can see the head of his cock briefly enlarge as the first spurt of cum flies out. It lands across your eyes, and he spreads each subsequent one out across the rest of your face.

Then he unceremoniously puts his pants back on and leaves.

And the problem is? (1)

TechHawk (570290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239014)

Lets see: Apple learns about problem, researches possible fixes, determines best fix, and then releases said fix. No histrionics, no stupid hand flailing. I'm failing to see the problem. Hell, I wish other companies did it this well.

Safari? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36239118)

Who the fuck uses Safari?

Fix for stupid (1)

Beer_Smurf (700116) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239162)

When you have a stupid user, you don't give them the admin password.
Problem solved

Can't fix stupid (2)

mr100percent (57156) | more than 3 years ago | (#36239238)

From The Customer is Not Always Right [notalwaysright.com] :

Me: “Good afternoon, [Software Company] Tech Support. How can I help you?”

Customer: “I have a complaint about your software. My employees keep exiting the files without saving. I need you to fix that problem with your software.”

Me: “Sir, when you pick to exit the application, it asks you if you are sure you want to exit without saving.”

Customer: “I know. I think they are just hitting enter at the question.”

Me: “Sir, the default is no.”

Customer: “Well, they must be answering yes.”

Me: “Im not sure how we can change the software to make it easier for your employees to understand.”

Customer: “Can you add a second box after the first box, asking if they are really sure they want to lose what they just entered?”

Me: “I can put that request in, sir. But I doubt that development will change the software.”

Customer: “Why not?! Its a bug in your software! I want it fixed!”

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