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Google Wallet: the End of Anonymous Shopping

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the if-you-choose-to-accept-it dept.

Google 253

jfruhlinger writes "Google today announced Google Wallet, an NFC-based payment system that will allow people to pay for purchases just by waving their phone across a reader. It's the beginning of a future where commercial transactions are 'frictionless' and convenient — but it's a future where every transaction can be tracked and data-mined, as Dan Tynan points out. Stores can user information about your Doritos purchases to rearrange their wares; Google could push coupons via its new Google Offers service; your health insurance company might be interested in your sodium intake."

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Hyperbole (5, Funny)

Sonny Yatsen (603655) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256140)

C'mon, Google Wallet is the end of anonymous shopping? No, if you don't want to be tracked by Google Wallet, just don't use Google Wallet. If you want to stay anonymous, use cash.

And wear a hat.
And gloves.
And a fake mustache.

Re:Hyperbole (5, Insightful)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256198)

Also, credit cards, debit cards and checks claim prior art.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256242)

Yes. This by itself is no different than a credit card in terms of traceability.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Anon-Admin (443764) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256800)

Oh yes it is! I don't have to show an ID or give my person information out to get a disposable pay as you go phone. This could be great for anonymous shopping, provided you use a pay as you go phone.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256258)

amen... amen

Re:Hyperbole (2, Insightful)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256286)

I was going to mod you Underrated, but instead I'd just like to say that whoever wrote the article is dumb as shit. And not that high grade shit.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256544)

as Dan Tynan points out.

You, sir, are correct.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256402)

Also, credit cards, debit cards and checks claim prior art.

Except that it required cooperation with your financial institution to get at this data, and if you use separate financial insitutions (not unusual), it's hard to correlate all that data into one complete profile.

With Google Wallet, you'll just literally Google the information out in one go. And querying one big entity with information on all of us is much easier than having to gather from multiple companies and reconstruct the trail from there.

Ditto loyalty cards - if someone profiles you, they'll have to go to all the supermarkets you use. If you use several, it's several databases you have to query and correlate.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

nschubach (922175) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256454)

Except, well... Google doesn't just give up your information as freely as you think. It's no different than a credit card company. If you don't like it, continue to use your Visa instead of Google.

It's not like I can Google "nschubach bought ? on Tuesday" and get a full report. What are you thinking?

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256620)

Except, well... Google doesn't just give up your information as freely as you think.

Better turn up your hearing aid, grandpa. This is the age of the internet! We've conclusively proven that the plural of "anecdote" is "data", old man. This means Google will, in fact, give up your information to anyone who asks nicely and gives them chocolates, and for a couple bucks more will join them on a global hunt to rip your very soul through your nose using that information, just for laughs on a slow Thursday. I know it's true, since I once heard about a security breach in their map software ten years ago, and so did this one guy I learned it from who writes a blog.

Re:Hyperbole (5, Interesting)

tftp (111690) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256830)

It's not like I can Google "nschubach bought ? on Tuesday" and get a full report.

Why don't you try that query yourself? I did. Congratulations with your purchase [rx8club.com] of '04 Silver RX8 - G/T Package - 6 Spd. MT in June 2004. It was probably nice weather then in Schaumburg, IL. Is there anything else you'd like to announce to the whole world? Google doesn't need to do a thing here, other than to collect what people willingly reveal about themselves.

With regard to my own username, it is short and common (as in RFC 783). Besides, I don't reuse usernames. The only way one can associate my posts across multiple sites is by writing style.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256870)

The only way one can associate my posts across multiple sites is by writing style.

I suppose, technically, "an undeserved air of smug superiority combined with rampant paranoia" is a "writing style".

Re:Hyperbole (1)

tftp (111690) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256926)

"an undeserved air of smug superiority combined with rampant paranoia" is a "writing style".

That is true. But I do my best to vary the style :-) Besides, wearing the mask of "rampant paranoia" mixes me with the rest of the Internet crowd :-)

Re:Hyperbole (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256534)

Fuck that, they'll just go to Experian.

Experian? Who are they? Yeah, if you don't know about Experian, you don't understand privacy today.

See, Experian is, to the public, a credit rating agency. So they just so happen to collect all your credit card data, loan information, and so forth. Fancy that!

But it gets better.

See, they also collect all that loyalty card data that you believe is so difficult to acquire... among *many* other things. They then correlate the data up, package it, and sell it to whomever wants it. Traditionally this has been direct mail marketers, among other things.

And the breadth of the metrics available? Astounding. People who purchase that data know if your fucking car lease is about to expire or not.

So trust me when I say, Google Wallet is nothing. The privacy horse ran out of the barn a long long time ago.

Re:Hyperbole (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256916)

No it didn't.
The stores track all the information right now. Your names, what you buy. Every piece of data they can. So if you are not using cash, they already have that information.

They only need to go to financial institutions if they want your bank information.

This is also in conjunction with a financial institution, just like you CC/DC.

How hard to you really think it is to correlate the data currently?

If you are marketing to a large demographic, you need to contact maybe a dozen chain.
If you are looking for a specific person? same thing.
There will be some outliers, but they wont' really be relevant.

If it's to issue out a court order, then the process is already in place to make it trivial.
You've taken a days work and turned it into 4 hours work.

What you, and I, and everyone need t do is constantly put pressure on our Representatives to get basic protection.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

drb226 (1938360) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256598)

Also, WalletMakers claim trademark infringement. WalletMakers claims that "wallet" is not a general term for "money-and-identification-holder", and Google's use of the term violates their self-proclaimed, possibly government-supported, monopoly on it.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

cant_get_a_good_nick (172131) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256648)

but it's a present where every transaction can be tracked and data-mined

FTFY.

Also, discount cards were specifically created for this data mining. Rebates also get your info. Credit Card cash back is to induce you to use credit cards instead of cash so they get their fees and can track you more.

Insurance (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256724)

I don't sell you medical coverage so you can deliberately ruin your health and cost me a fortune.

If you are going to live an unhealthy lifestyle, that is fine. You *should* have to pay more in insurance, because I am sure as hell going to have to shell out more to keep you alive.

You people wonder why insurance companies always try to get cheap and disallow expensive procedures....well....we can't exactly pay our staff if we just spent all our money saving the lives of people who are apparently trying to commit suicide by food.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256202)

As far as I'm concerned, this should be the only comment on this article.

As far as I'm concerned, everybody should care about how far I'm concerned.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256204)

Exactly, there will still be shopping with bills and coins which are actually anonymous.

Even decades after the adoption of the credit card and debt card by retailers the vast majority still take cash too.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256468)

This may be somewhat due to credit and debit companies taking a cut of the payment -- companies keep all of the cash.

Re:Hyperbole (3, Insightful)

Intron (870560) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256206)

Fine until everyone requires some tracked form of payment. Try using cash to buy an airline ticket, for example. See you when you get out.

Re:Hyperbole (3, Informative)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256290)

Um, OK. [ehow.com]

Re:Hyperbole (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256352)

Its just SO wrong that we need a guide on how to buy TRAVEL with cash.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256398)

eHow will have an article on almost anything you Google search on because it's a site for click whoring.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256342)

Try using cash to buy an airline ticket, for example. See you when you get out.

What do you mean "try" using cash? Southwest Airlines [southwest.com] lists it as one of their accepted forms of payment:

Cash: Southwest Airlines accepts cash for payment of purchase at all airport ticket counter locations.

Don't let pesky little things like facts get in the way of a stupid post, though.

Re:Hyperbole (5, Funny)

Stunning Tard (653417) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256526)

BitCoins! I have no idea what they have to do with the current discussion, just throwing it out there.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256778)

..every time someone mention BitCoins there will be other person pasting his BC address asking for couple of coins. ;)

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Americium (1343605) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256900)

Bitcoins are more worthless than paper.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

LunaticTippy (872397) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256384)

You have to show your ID to buy a ticket, even if you pay with cash. Your name is printed on your ticket. We stopped being able to fly anonymously shortly after 9/11/2001

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256630)

We stopped being able to fly anonymously long before that.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Score Whore (32328) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256660)

Ship yourself via overnight air.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256664)

um try again. You needed to have an ID to fly sometime in the mid 90's. ( I can't remember when but I was always asked for my license while traveling in 1995/6)

Re:Hyperbole (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256736)

Try using cash to buy an airline ticket

No doubt! I was stuck flying back on a redeye from Mexico city. When I pulled out cash to upgrade to first class I had that sudden feeling you get when you pull out $50, in 1's 10's and 5's, in a convenience store on the south side. Lets just say it was the only time I ever felt the temperature drop in Mexico.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256268)

And don't use those store discount cards.*

*Better yet: I came across one in some junk at an estate sale of a deceased person. That was about 10 years ago. The card is still valid.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256388)

I get a new supermarket card (with a ficticious name) every few visits, and always pay in cash.

I don't care if they track my purchases as long as said purchases aren't linked to me as an identified individual. Analysis of shopping patterns might lead to better service, like, maybe, *maybe* they won't run out of tonic water so often in the summer. Maybe.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256652)

I love when the paranoid guy shows up and sheds some light on how the tinfoilers do things.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256404)

Or just don't fill out the form with the discount card. Or if you *have* to fill out the form to get the card, give a fake name and address. The cashier doesn't care.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256338)

If you want to stay anonymous, use cash.

And wear a hat.
And gloves.
And a fake mustache.

As an Anonymous Coward, I support this suggestion.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256362)

If you want to stay anonymous, use cash.

That is why cash will sooner or later be outlawed.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256634)

I doubt that, most small restaurants and many small produce stands don't take cards. Good luck buying that Chinese/Indian/Mexican/? food or fresh produce without cash.

Re:Hyperbole (1)

SealBeater (143912) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256792)

Do you think the powers that be care about some Mom/Pop Vietnamese grocery store?

Re:Hyperbole (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256408)

But, I have a mustache. Does that mean I have to shave it off just to wear a fake one?

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Sechr Nibw (1278786) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256568)

No. You have to wear a fake mustache over your real one. Or you can put it over your eyebrows and make a unibrow. Your choice.

...Actually I changed my mind, it's not your choice. Wear a fake fu manchu mustache over your eyebrows.

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256578)

Meh - this is the same thing that get's posted whenever Google does anything.

News flash people : Google is big but not all powerful nor is it's every movement the end of privacy.

Re:Hyperbole (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256798)

If you want to stay anonymous, use bitcoin.

FTFY

Re:Hyperbole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256874)

[q] but it's a future where every transaction can be tracked and data-mined, as Dan Tynan points ou[/q] ;Well let me tell you Dan, that future has been here for a couple decades.

Did you know that if you used your credit card at merchants specializing in secondhand clothing, retread tires, bail bond services, massages, casino gambling or betting that your credit card company is thinking about raising your interest rates becuase you may be fitting the profile of a having a higher risk of default. Shopping for groceries at Aldi's when your area has a lot of Publix raises a question mark...

American Express has already acknowledged it used information about where customers shopped to lower credit limits. But after Sen. Waters probe into credit card companies and facing a firestorm of criticism has changed that practice.

Every transaction processed by the card networks (Visa and MasterCard) is assigned a merchant category code (MCC), a four-digit number that denotes the type of business providing a service or selling merchandise. The MCC for pawnshops, for example, is 5933. For dating and escort services, it's 7273, and for massage parlors, it's 7297.

Read more: http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/how-shopping-can-affect-credit-1282.php#ixzz1NUxm9E8i
Compare credit cards here - www.CreditCards.com

Federal financial privacy laws (Regulation P) prohibit credit card issuers from sharing your personal and payment information with third parties not affiliated with the issuer (except under court order or when fraud is involved). Banks must send annual copies of their privacy policies to cardholders, but the law does not govern what the issuer does with payment information internally.

Kroger data mines useing their Kroger card -- they claim that if you register your info and loose your keys they can be returned to you if you keep the keychain swip card attached. Really by you putting in your real zip code they get to create demograpic data on who is shopping at what store and what people of each zip code are buying. Did you know that zip codes are all associated with socio economic data, average wealth of an area, quailty of schools , average family size .... you ge the picture, Kroger can change its marketing practices per area with the help you give by filling out the Kroger card slip. It also tracks what you buy... there is an OLD OLD piece of info that every data miner knows ... if you go to the store to buy diapers and milk you will also most likely buy beer. Thats why they are evenly spaced apart in a store... normally dairy is along an outer aisle, with diapers in the middle of the store and beer in an opposing side. Its not the rule but its most common in practice. Your reciepts are tracked and what you buy in groups all has been coorrelated and supermarkets are set up for you to walk around them and see almost every sale if you are buying those resupply groceries you often need in the middle of the week. it works ...

Data Mining began long long ago, if you think it will just begin tomorrow you live in a galaxy far far away.

How the hell is this different from credit cards? (5, Insightful)

Kuukai (865890) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256172)

Aside from being run by Google?

Re:How the hell is this different from credit card (1)

E IS mC(Square) (721736) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256238)

Has slashdot/online/other media ever let facts get in the way of a nice headline?

That credit cards collect the same information is completely irrelevant to the article - because that fact is simply discarded.

Re:How the hell is this different from credit card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256378)

Credit cards only store that you have a transaction at a certain shop. What you bought exactly isn't known to the credit card company. It depends on what information is shared with Google Wallet.

Re:How the hell is this different from credit card (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256806)

Credit companies and banks are highly regulated. Google is an advertising agency that boasts about its data mining abilities.

Re:How the hell is this different from credit card (2, Insightful)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256494)

Well, you see, when it comes to patents, people are offended that adding but it's online or but with a computer or but in the cloud makes something qualify as a new idea.

When it comes to things that could involve gathering data, adding but now Google is doing it makes it new and outrageous.

Re:How the hell is this different from credit card (3, Interesting)

DogDude (805747) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256708)

It costs the merchant more. It won't be implemented widely in the US, considering that Google's fees are higher than American Express.

No confirmation step (2)

zhiwenchong (155773) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256838)

What puzzles me is that there is no confirmation step required in these contactless payment systems.
When I buy stuff with my chip-based debit or credit card, I'm asked to enter a PIN. Else, I have to physically swipe the card to ensure there is no ambiguity as to whether or not I meant to pay with my card of choice.

With a contactless system, I could be wanting to pay with my credit card, but if I accidentally held my cell phone too close to the reader, it would debit the amount from my phone instead of my card. Why can't there be a screen that pops-up on the phone that says "Touch button to confirm payment"? This seems to me to be a major design flaw.

Re:No confirmation step (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256972)

You can do this, right now, with most CC and DC cards.see: PayPass.

trade-off in not having personal spending records (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256906)

Which can be used to better manage money and grow wealth.

Similar to weather you log into Google or not. You get more efficient searches when you log in.

Re:How the hell is this different from credit card (1)

Requiem18th (742389) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256920)

Only in that banks don't serve you web ads. This helps Google get even better informed about what you thus tailor ads to your psyche.

Because, please, the purpose of stalking and data-mining the hell out of you is not just to sell you wonderful goods that will make your life better but to learn the marketing tricks that better fool you into getting what you don't really need.

Different then a credit card... how? (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256176)

Other then contact-less reading (which can and is done with smart cards already), how does this allow them to track you any differently then a credit card?

Re:Different then a credit card... how? (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256400)

Agreed, shopping stopped being anonymous when people started using credit cards. My main concern with this system is security. Android phones have been rushed to market, and many are infrequently updated. Smartphones in general, and Android in particular are ripe for malware exploits. I don't even trust it with a credit card for Marketplace purchases, let alone for anything else money related.

Huh? (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256188)

What anonymous shopping? You can be traced with enough effort using cash, let alone the ease of tracking the vast majority of people using credit cards, debit cards or checks for purchases. What a fucking stupid headline and summary.

Corrections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256216)

2 glaring errors in the summary: "NFC-base" should be "NFC-based" and "Stores can user information" should be "Stores can use information"

Re:Corrections (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256790)

STores are already storing user information.

My industry keeps every transaction logged you have made with us for 10 years and we have been doing it for the last 20-30 years.

While it helps with purchasing (stock refilling), and inventory management, the real purpose is so that when the customer walks up to us and says. Remember that "thing" I bought for this" job" "3 years" ago, I need another one. We can look it up.

I did it yesterday for a guy. He wanted the exact same thing he just used. When did he buy the last one? 13 months ago.

The only difference between us and google is that your information stays on our servers period. We use it. Not third party ad companies. I will never put my credit card data on an NFC device ever. I might put a couple of promo cards on there just so I don't have to carry them. but i only have three of those anyways.

Re:Corrections (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256924)

2 glaring errors in the summary: "NFC-base" should be "NFC-based" and "Stores can user information" should be "Stores can use information"

Actually, I was rather hoping that the Stores would can the user information.

Fucking retarded (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256240)

Yea, even for Slashdot, this article is fucking retarded. How is this different from credit cards, debit cards, paypal, amazon order history, any form of payment other than cash? Is this random new form of payment somehow suddenly mandatory?

mark of the beast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256246)

closer and closer...

BitCoin (2, Informative)

Scottingham (2036128) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256282)

There's always BitCoin.....

Re:BitCoin (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256316)

Yeah if don't want to be able to purchase things from 99.9% of stores out there.

Re:BitCoin (1)

cdibbs (1979044) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256604)

Same could have been said of credit cards in their early days.

Re:BitCoin (1)

Saerko (1174897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256616)

There's always Amazon [amazon.com] . This guy is an intermediary, sure, but a good portion of Amazon's product is now handled through 3rd parties too, so it's really not a big deal.

The real thing that will make BitCoin take off is increasing market capitalization of the currency, which is already happening. [bitcoinwatch.com] I mean, over $50 million dollars of Bitcoins in circulation, with $135,000.00 worth of BitCoins exchanged per hour? Shit man, that's an economy already.

I'm not a futurist, and there are certainly threats to BitCoin from other established internet exchangers, but I think it's got potential, especially for anyone who'd like to see the internet really achieve its true potential as a free medium.

Re:BitCoin (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256636)

...or a digital cash system that is backed by something. You know, if we are going to use computers to issue payments at stores, we might as well use a digital cash protocol, and if we are going to continue relying on banks and large corporations to underwrite these transactions, then we should use a digital cash system that is backed by $country's currency. You go to the bank, pay them dollars for digital cash tokens, and then use your phone to make the payments. Bitcoin's effort to revolutionize the global economic system is not really relevant here, we just need a method of payment using computers that does not allow people to raid our bank accounts or steal our identities.

FTFY... (1)

pedantic bore (740196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256292)

... your health insurance company might be interested in your sodium intake.

s/be interested in/change your premium based on/

FTFY.

Gotta love it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256368)

"Stores can user information about your Doritos purchases to..."

I'm starting to think you all do this on purposes.

Tin foil hat or just dumb? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256444)

I can't decide.

Nothing else does that! (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256460)

but it's a future where every transaction can be tracked and data-mined

Thank God they can't do that with credit cards!

My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid (1)

BLToday (1777712) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256502)

My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid because I use cash just about everywhere except at Costco and online. The less "they" know about me the less likely they are to put in "nerd re-education camp." Or because "they" have so little information on me, I'm sticking out. hmmm... tough position.

Re:My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid (1)

jschmitz (607083) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256538)

you ARE paranoid - who is they??? geezuz

Re:My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid (2)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256964)

You are. Either that or your a "them", which might be worse ;)

Re:My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256618)

I call shenanigans. I don't think you actually have a girlfriend.

Re:My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256974)

She's one of their agents actually.

Re:My girlfriend thinks I'm paranoid (1)

earls (1367951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256766)

BLToday (1777712)

Gotcha.

Rogue group announces alternative to Google wallet (2)

billlava (1270394) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256514)

Certain renegade elements of the consumer sector are considering switching to alternate methods of payment in retaliation against Google's proprietary monetary transaction system. "Basically the plan is to exchange small rectangular pieces of green paper in exchange for all debts, public and private," said one proponent of this new monetary system. When asked how his purchasing history would be tracked, indexed, and made available to advertisers in order to better serve him, he responded, "That's kind of the point."

More on this story, and new developments that indicate water may be wetter than once thought, at 11.

Big scary summary! (1)

emuls (1926384) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256536)

"Google today announced Google Wallet [...] Google could push coupons via its new Google Offers service; your health insurance company might be interested in your sodium intake."

And I won't have to use it or be affected by it at all.

Somehow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256566)

I don't think people who don't want their transactions recorded will be using Google wallet to pay for their recreational substances, or their hookers...

A Good Thing (1)

earls (1367951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256570)

While this is nothing new explained 16 times above, this this a good thing. In any scenario where large amounts of data are being collected, and that data is consider the infallible truth, the truth can be poisoned before being passed on to be consumed. As long as you know what information they're collecting, you can give them any information you want within those parameters.

Doomed to Fail (1)

billlava (1270394) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256572)

I just realized this will never take off. Look at their logo. [google.com]
Look familiar? [wikimedia.org]

The next generation of spam-attack (1)

Fractal Dice (696349) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256596)

I need to set up a whole lot of billing booths at random places along streets that read "walk past me to make a $1 donation to my personal wellbeing!"

Person who knows the most (1)

jwaynemedia (2202914) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256602)

If you want to really learn whats going on about google wallet go to www.terrencebrejla.net

Can you say Hack Me Please? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256614)

Sounds like a new age of digital pick-pockets that steal your wallet without even touching you. And also, Google knows which ads you click on, but now they'll know which ads lead you to spend more money. And they'll know what you're buying in real life, too, not just on the webs. I'm gonna start using the barter system again. -www.awkwardengineer.com [awkwardengineer.com]

Bitcoin (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256628)

Bitcoin? I want a bitcoin option.

Ok, I completely understand why this wouldn't be practical (from google's or a govt.'s standpoint) or even wanted or allowed, but it would be cool.

It's final: "New" isn't necessarily "better" (1)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256706)

I don't know about anybody else, but I've been considering going back to paying cash for most everything for a while now. I read much more like this and I'll be doing it.

Re:It's final: "New" isn't necessarily "better" (2)

CaseCrash (1120869) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256858)

Don't wait, switch to cash. They won't be able to track you as easily (not that you probably matter or that they care) and also it'll mean you can't get into debt. Credit is the devil. Never had a credit card, never will. Can't afford it, don't buy it. It's worked great for me for years.

Sure (1)

Exitar (809068) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256718)

And Google Buzz was the end of Facebook.

Make me more relevant ads (1)

aplusjimages (939458) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256720)

If Google wants to track my buying habits then use that info to push ads relevant to me, then by all means do so. I'm Vegan, so I don't need ads on steaks or Burger King. And if they've got some online coupons, then hook a brother up because being Vegan ain't cheap.

Shit Slashdot, OK, I guess I'll explain... (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256742)

How is this different from credit cards?

Simple:
A traditional credit card has raised digits and other information on the card itself -- It is not very secure. When you hand your credit card over to the waiter/waitress they can easily snap a pic with their camera phone and sell that data for $2 (wholesale) online.

A magnetic strip bearing credit card has the above insecurities, plus a convenient stripe that can be used to input the information into a computer -- Fake "clone" cards can be created that have the same magnetic signature as your card, and actually, the mag stripe lessens security by giving the clerk a false sense that the card is legit. The clerks don't care anyhow, it's not their money -- As a test I actually use a cloned card printed with the name "Sir Thievey Thiefterson III" and always sign my name as: "This card is Stolen" on all receipts; It's been four years, and still only eight times has my ID been asked for -- at which time I tip the cashier and use my real card.

A near field credit card works via RFID. RFID is not secure. It has no concept of a secret internal state and a challenge response system to authenticate that single (and only that single) transaction. It simply responds to query, any query, with your card info. Once again, we're putting the insecure data that's printed on the outside of the card into a more conveniently readable format, but this time it can also easily be scanned by malicious persons from several hundred feet away by using a Pringles can to shape their antenna's emissions.

None of these data exchange formats have the concept of a secret internal state and a challenge response system to authenticate that single (and only that single) transaction. It takes a computation capable device to provide public key encryption. We solved the problem a long time ago with public / private key pairs -- Google Wallet is a technology that finally uses the solution to the problem of identity theft via "public" card information dissemination. The device and/or application containing the private key (the key itself, even) can itself be locked/unlocked with a pass-phrase.

Note that this is not absolutely secure -- nothing is -- however, it is leaps and bounds more secure than the current dumb "hey here's a plain-text number to get my money" credit card system.

As for traceability -- It's no more traceable than the credit card system, true. It could be made more private by using something in the vein of Bitcoin (there I said it), since it has over a hundred unique account tokens for a given wallet. However, you would need an intermediary to process the transactions on your behalf, and trust them with your identity -- I'm looking at you Google.

In short: The Current Bullshit CC system is Broken as Hell! This is a step in the right direction, get on board or have your identity stolen like a dumbass.

P.S. In 2001 my wallet was stolen from my locker while I was clearing a jam from a trash compactor. I canceled my cards & entire bank account, got new checks & cards, and STILL was fraudulently charged $557.00 via the old canceled bank card three weeks later -- Wells Fargo doesn't care if I followed their security guidelines to the letter and have written proof of such -- they don't care if their agents were the ones that fucked up and didn't take the stolen card off of my name, and it ended up linked to my new account: It's not their money, they don't care (I still "owe" them this money since I refuse to pay for others' mistakes, also, credit reporting companies don't care either).

P.P.S. Cash is still the most secure, but carrying a lot of it is arguably not (Yes, I have been robbed at gunpoint after cashing a large check -- if I had digitally transferred the funds, I would not have lost the money).

Your's truly,
A FOSS Hacker that grew up in the ghettos of H-Town.

The summary has it backwards (1)

Mysteray (713473) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256808)

The summary has it backwards: Your health insurance company is interested in your calorie intake and the police are ones interested in your Doritos intake. Nobody cares about the soduim.

How this differs from a credit card (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256848)

Credit card companies only get the total amount spent at a retailer. They don't get the list of items purchased as that information stayed with the merchant.

If Google Wallet or any other NFC implementation allows the transmission of transaction details (i.e. list of items purchased) to the credit card companies then this is can indeed become a new way of invading people's privacy.

cash not purely anonymous (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256862)

I remember stories that FBI would record the serial numbers of robbery cash, usually $100s. They they'd wait for the numbers to show up at Reserve Banks which often scan the serial numbers. Then the FBI would home in sub-banks and merchants to identify usage locations.

Old News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36256902)

I saw this when I went to Japan in 2005, it's called osaifu-keitai [wikipedia.org] .

America, welcome to the rest of the world. (1)

digitig (1056110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256904)

In Switzerland and elsewhere I can already pay for vending machine purchases with my phone. In Hong Kong I can use my Octopus card.

This is old news (1)

gmpassos (1193401) | more than 3 years ago | (#36256928)

You talk like if no one is tracking your credit card!
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