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Cleaning Up Japan's Radioactive Mess With Blue Goo

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the if-only-it-could-also-bounce dept.

Earth 102

InfiniteZero writes "A clever technology is helping hazmat crews in Japan contain and clean up the contamination caused by the ongoing nuclear disaster there: a blue liquid that hardens into a gel that peels off of surfaces, taking microscopic particles like radiation and other contaminants with it. Known as DeconGel, Japanese authorities are using it inside and outside the exclusion zone on everything from pavement to buildings."

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102 comments

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Wait, what? (5, Funny)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277698)

What? How will Repulsion Gel help us clean up Japan? It hardly worked at ALL for Aperture Labs.

Re:Wait, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277736)

Cave Johnson, thread over, here.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

filthpickle (1199927) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278426)

I don't want your damn lemons...I demand to see your manager!

Re:Wait, what? (5, Funny)

Burdell (228580) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277774)

I would sure hate to be the test case here. Poor guy got a bucket of blue paint; now he glows in the dark. Never has a problem finding his keys though.

Re:Wait, what? (2)

davester666 (731373) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277846)

and everybody can tell where's he has been and what he has been touching...

Re:Wait, what? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277938)

...why is my wife glowing?

Re:Wait, what? (1)

vlueboy (1799360) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278140)

I would sure hate to be the test case here. Poor guy got a bucket of blue paint; now he glows in the dark. Never has a problem finding his keys though.

and everybody can tell where's he has been and what he has been touching...

Sounds like a...PAINT analogy... for how today's social media sites bait and use us afterwards.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

feedayeen (1322473) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278342)

I would sure hate to be the test case here. Poor guy got a bucket of blue paint; now he glows in the dark. Never has a problem finding his keys though.

The uh, control group for the repulsion gel actually got a pair of broken legs, poor bugger.

Re:Wait, what? (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283744)

No. They formed a musical art performance group called Blue Man Group [blueman.com]

That is not Repulsion Gel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278870)

That is Radioactive Cleanup Gel. We sell that too.

Re:Blue Goo, funny about that (1)

Douglas Goodall (992917) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283738)

My kids are all excited about the latest toy from japan. It is a gel that you can paint on things that makes them glow in the dark. They have already painted their bedroom ceilings, and each other with the stuff. And it's cheap. You can depend on the Japanese to know what kids like...

I read it as "Blue Glue" (1)

Obsi (912791) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277702)

Am I the only one who read the subject as "Blue Glue" and thought 3M's adhesive?

Re:I read it as "Blue Glue" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277856)

Yes.

Re:I read it as "Blue Glue" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277894)

I thought of the class of benign and defensive nanotech swarms used against hostile or malfuctioning nanotech systems in the Orion's Arm worldbuilding project!

Re:I read it as "Blue Glue" (1)

ProfMobius (1313701) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278914)

We are lucky we didn't switch to IPv8

Incredibly expensive... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277704)

And who is going to cover EVERYTHING in a few square km with it?
Also, first post.

Re:Incredibly expensive... (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278474)

"Incredibly expensive!"

What? Nuclear accidents expensive?
Who would have thought.

Re:Incredibly expensive... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279298)

Right, I always thought it only costs human lives, not real money?

We've been bullshitted by the nuclear industry again!

Re:Incredibly expensive... (2)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#36280696)

The article might have oversimplified things but the truth is radionuclides tend to happen in macroscopic clusters - kind of "dust particles". Single pieces of material sometimes almost a milimeter size (more frequently a few microns) often several centimeters apart, They may be ash, may be post-explosion dust, solid particles in smoke and so on that were heavily irradiated and settled away from the plant - and they account for great most of radiation sources in contaminated area.

Wow! (1)

steevven1 (1045978) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277712)

I never knew that radiation was a particle!

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277748)

Alpha and beta radiation is particles. OK, not in the sense of what the article said, but if you're going to be a pedant, at least try to be correct.

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277762)

if you're going to be a pedant

Alpha and beta radiation are particles.

There, I fixed that for you.

Re:Wow! (3, Informative)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277912)

Alpha and beta radiation is radiation for as long as it is actually radiating. As soon as it impacts a surface and sticks, it becomes helium and electrons.

Radiation is short lived, and not a contaminate you can simply remove. Isotopes undergoing decay to produce said radiation can be removed.

Re:Wow! (1)

Jaktar (975138) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279168)

I was about to correct this as well!

Contamination contains radiation. Radiation comes from contamination when it decays. You can clean contamination to reduce/eliminate the radiation that the contamination would have caused.

There are a lot of ways to say it! I don't think I've heard it put quite like the first line in your post. It's perfect!

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36282264)

Alpha and beta radiation is radiation for as long as it is actually radiating. As soon as it impacts a surface and sticks, it becomes helium and electrons.

Radiation is short lived, and not a contaminate you can simply remove. Isotopes undergoing decay to produce said radiation can be removed.

...not a contaminant... ...and it's obvious that most of the terms used are merely variables symbolizing other values.

"You put your up quark here, you put your up quark there, down quark, left quark, right quark buzzing quark all about and you swing yourself around to the left or to the right or another way, that's what it's all about!"

Re:Wow! (1)

trout007 (975317) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283348)

It was interesting that during this crisis and all of the coverage I didn't see any news stories try to explain radioactivity and radiation. I was watching a news program and they showed the workers,cleaning up wearing particle masks and my father inlay said why are they wearing masks because it won't stop the radiation. I spent about five inutes explaining that the difference between radioactive elements and radiation. I explained the radiation wasn't dangerous because it was begin monitored and skin and clothes would stop most of what they were being exposed to. The threat was radioactive dust that if they got it in their lungs it could radiate inside which is more dangerous so wearing the mask was doing a lot of good. If the news would spend a few minutes explaining it would go a lot further than having talking heads stating matter of factly that all those workers will end up dead.

Re:Wow! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277960)

What do you think emits radiation you tard?

PARTICLES.

Re:Wow! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278024)

Alpha radiation is helium nuclei. Beta radiation is electrons. Both particles. [ignore the wave/particle duality]

Gamma is a wave, x-rays are a wave.

Might want to learn a thing or two.

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278336)

Alpha radiation is helium nuclei. Beta radiation is electrons. Both particles. [ignore the wave/particle duality]

Gamma is a wave, x-rays are a wave.

Might want to learn a thing or two.

Uh, yeah, but you can't just "remove" radiation as if it's something that gets stuck on surfaces. Stationary helium nuclei aren't dangerous, and I can't see free electrons sticking around on surfaces causing cancer, either... Which is pretty much what the quote makes it sound like.

Re:Wow! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278462)

A knowledge of radiation nature you both have is far from being correct. Radiation is not a substance, it,s not a coat of elementary particles on the surface of an object. Radiation isn't just a word, it's really RADIATION, and it's emitted by the specks of radioactive material that is now distributed over the poor Japan. And this mud is supposed to be gathered by that blue liquid.
I suggest reading a school textbook or two to both of you.

Re:Wow! (1)

PwnzerDragoon (2014464) | more than 3 years ago | (#36281280)

I suggest reading the summary, and the rest of this thread. The argument right here is how it was phrased, which states that the gel cleans up radiation, when it actually means radioactive particles. We all know what it is, we're nitpicking pedantics at the moment.

Re:Wow! (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278686)

[ignore the wave/particle duality]

Which we're not going to do because we're super-macho pedants, right? All of the above particles/waves under certain conditions can act like particles or waves.

Re:Wow! (2)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278092)

That's a direct quote from the article, too -- from Popular Science magazine!

Re:Wow! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278116)

Whenever media talks about "radiation" they actually mean "material containing nuclei that are radioactive".

But then of course copyright infringement is piracy. And code hackers are criminals... *sigh*

Originally a dieting aid (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277730)

Said the vendor's president, "we're not banging rocks together down here. We know how to suck radiation out of pavement. We've been testing it out on human subjects for years. Went great. Mostly. The only question we've got for you is, do you want to save the world, or do you want to waste our time with more sissy regulatory paperwork?"

Ghost in the Shell... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277756)

... I do believe that anime got it correct with the "Japan Miracle".

Re:Ghost in the Shell... (1)

Wookie_CD (639534) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277968)

That was my first thought too, though GITS explained the Japanese Miracle to be nanotechnology.

Re:Ghost in the Shell... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278722)

and it removed radiation from the air/atmosphere. Not pavements and buildings.

But clearly this is the BETA version. RC-1 will be nanotech as GITS has it.

Now all they have to do... (2)

SwedishChef (69313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277764)

is find somewhere to dispose of all the zillions of "blue goo" sheets.

Re:Now all they have to do... (2)

Joshua Fan (1733100) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277804)

Easy, just burn it. That's always safe.

Re:Now all they have to do... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279310)

You're joking, but I can actually see that happen. Take the radioactive junk, ship it to some place where people would be happy about it (hey, free heat and guess what, the ashes hold the warmth for days!)...

Re:Now all they have to do... (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284346)

He might have been joking been if you noticed the +5, Informative post a bit down from here on the page the used goo can actually be burned. The radioactive particles don't become gaseous but instead remain behind in the ash left behind, so you can just drum and store the much smaller volume of ash instead.

Re:Now all they have to do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277878)

is find somewhere to dispose of all the zillions of "blue goo" sheets.

radioactive blue goo sheets!

Re:Now all they have to do... (3)

taiwanjohn (103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277958)

We'll find something
new to do now.
Here is lots of
new blue goo now.
New goo. Blue goo.
Gooey. Goeey.
Blue goo, New goo.
Gluey. Gluey.

Gooey goo
for chewy chewing!
That's what that
Goo-Goose is doing
Do you choose to
chew goo, too, sir?
If, sir, you, sir,
choose to chew, sir,
with the Goo-Goose,
chew, sir. Do, sir.

Mr. Fox, sir,
I won't do it.
I can't say it.
I won't chew it.

Re:Now all they have to do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278008)

No you don't; instead you reclaim the radioactive material from them. Then all you have to do is dispose of a few hundred pounds of nuclear waste which is a trivial problem.

Re:Now all they have to do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278028)

A trivial *technology* problem. Not a trivial social problem. In other words, I'm glad the problem of putting it in your backyard is trivial, because it's sure as hell not going in my mine. Signed, Mr Nimby.

Re:Now all they have to do... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278126)

It would go where it would normally have gone had this accident not happened. If that was your back yard or not is irrelevant as it has been decided well before you ever made that comment.

There is absolutely not reason to find a new storage home for it.

Re:Now all they have to do... (1)

guttentag (313541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279320)

is find somewhere to dispose of all the zillions of "blue goo" sheets.

Weave them into blankets [wikipedia.org] and give them to the people of North Korea as aid? Wait... never mind. Kim Jong-il would consider it an endorsement of his nuclear ambitions: "They aided us in our quest to collect radioactive materials, which we took as encouragement to seek more-fissionable materials."

Re:Now all they have to do... (1)

Artemis3 (85734) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279932)

Hmm, didn't Japan announced their new radioactive disposal facility [slashdot.org] : Fukushima Daichi?

The Nuclear Forest Recovery Zone Myco-remediation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277816)

http://coalitionforpositivechange.com/stamets-fallout-mycoremediation.pdf

Re:The Nuclear Forest Recovery Zone Myco-remediati (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277922)

I knew there is a magical remedy for anything.

Ecch... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277830)

Blue Goo is Soylent Green.

Liquid sticky tape (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277838)

Similar to removing cat hair from clothes. Sounds like a good plan. Too bad it can't be removed from soil as easily but it sounds like a great option for solid surfaces.

Re:Liquid sticky tape (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277864)

Sounds like BAU at the site -- TEPCO is throwing the kitchen sink at the minor visible issues for PR purposes. Which is kind of pointless, considering that the molten cores have already contaminated the soil 100 meters below the surface. We just have to wait for another 3-4 months to get the "official" confirmation.

"microscopic particles like radiation " (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277942)

...wat

Color (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36277946)

Good thing it's blue not amber.

Re:Color (1)

hawkinspeter (831501) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278496)

I thought the protocol was for amber, not blue

hmm... (3, Funny)

DSS11Q13 (1853164) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277950)

there's a Japanese pornography joke in there somewhere...

Re:hmm... (2)

dintech (998802) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278406)

You probably can't figure out the joke because of the pixelation.

Re:hmm... (2)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278422)

I guarantee that within a few weeks, someone will make actual Japanese porn with girls being covered in DeconGel and having it peeled off. Probably by an octopus.

Useful, but they're going to need a lot of it. (5, Informative)

Animats (122034) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277976)

DeconGel [decongel.com] is a useful material, typically used for little lab-sized spill cleanup jobs. They're going to need tank truck loads of this stuff.

This material concentrates contamination, rather than spreading it across wipes, water, and other cleaning agents. The blue gel can even be incinerated in special high-temperature hazardous-waste incinerators; the radioactives end up in the ash, not the gases. So you end up with a modest number of drums of low-level radioactive dirt.

Perhaps with the need for large quantities of this stuff, the price will come down. If it were cheap, this would be a useful material for routine tough cleaning jobs. It can clean grouted tile, for example. People who have to clean foreclosed houses might find this useful.

Price? (1)

chazchaz101 (871891) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278478)

Does anyone know how much this stuff currently costs? Everything I can find says call for quote, which probably isn't a good sign.

Re:Price? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278636)

Call for quote usually means that they want to adjust the price depending on who you are. For a high profile thing like this they might want to sell it dirt cheap to get good publicity. (Or increase the price if they know that there aren't any options and the money comes from taxes.)

Re:Price? (3, Informative)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278770)

From http://money.cnn.com/2011/05/25/technology/toxic_waste_cleanup_goo/index.htm [cnn.com]

"One gallon of DeconGel nuclear decontaminant sells for $160 and covers between 50 to 100 square feet. "

Re:Price? (1)

Rufty (37223) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279346)

30km exclusion zone. 30,000m=98425ft So the area is 30434239700ft^2 The plant's on the coast, so call half as land, and say average coverage of 75ft^2 for a gallon. So 202894931 gallons. At $160 dollars a pop, with no discount for bulk purchase, that's about $32.5billion.

Re:Price? (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#36280738)

The plant is on the coast, on a narrow strip of flat land next to mountains. Most of the terrain in the mountains is uninhabited. The strip of land in the exclusion zone is roughly triangular, 10km at one end, narrowing near to nothing at the other, so count about 30km^2 as the affected inhabited area.

Re:Price? (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279632)

"One gallon of DeconGel nuclear decontaminant sells for $160 and covers between 50 to 100 square feet. "

Speed, quality, cost.
Pick two.

The Japanese are obviously choosing speed and quality over cost.
And rightly so, as the economic damage from the nuclear meltdowns will vastly exceeds the price tag of industrial quantites of DeconGel.

Silly Putty (3, Funny)

Mathinker (909784) | more than 3 years ago | (#36277992)

Is this kind of like Silly Putty [flickr.com] but the pictures glow in the dark?

Half measures (2)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278018)

They should use grey goo instead. That would clean things up even better, and they'd only need to apply a little bit of it.

Happy Fun Ball (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278162)

This sounds ominously like the stuff the Happy Fun Ball is made of.

        Warning: Pregnant women, the elderly, and children under 10 should avoid prolonged exposure to Happy Fun Ball.
        Caution: Happy Fun Ball may suddenly accelerate to dangerous speeds.
        Happy Fun Ball contains a liquid core, which, if exposed due to rupture, should not be touched, inhaled, or looked at.
        Do not use Happy Fun Ball on concrete.
        Discontinue use of Happy Fun Ball if any of the following occurs:
                itching
                vertigo
                dizziness
                tingling in extremities
                loss of balance or coordination
                slurred speech
                temporary blindness
                profuse sweating
                heart palpitations
        If Happy Fun Ball begins to smoke, get away immediately. Seek shelter and cover head.
        Happy Fun Ball may stick to certain types of skin.
        When not in use, Happy Fun Ball should be returned to its special container and kept under refrigeration. Failure to do so relieves the makers of Happy Fun Ball, Wacky Products Incorporated, and its parent company, Global Chemical Unlimited, of any and all liability.
        Ingredients of Happy Fun Ball include an unknown glowing substance which fell to Earth, presumably from outer space.
        Happy Fun Ball has been shipped to our troops in Saudi Arabia and is also being dropped by our warplanes on Iraq.
        Do not taunt Happy Fun Ball.
        Happy Fun Ball comes with a lifetime guarantee.

Re:Happy Fun Ball (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36279556)

Also: Happy Fun Ball contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer.

Re:Happy Fun Ball (2)

kimvette (919543) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279884)

Hydrogen Hydroxide is probabily also known to the State of California to cause cancer. When that warning is plastered on everything it ceases to have any meaning to anyone except for comedians.

Quarantine (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278182)

They should develop the amber like on Fringe... that's what you call a quarantine.

Radiation is a particle now? (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278272)

Come on, this is supposed to be a site for smart people....

Re:Radiation is a particle now? (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278590)

No but to my understanding there are particles that are radioactive as a result. If I recall Chernobyl has a huge issue with radio active particulates getting distributed in the air and people breathing them.

Re:Radiation is a particle now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36281272)

No. You got that backwards. The radiation exists because of radioactive particles decaying, not the other way around.

Re:Radiation is a particle now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36279020)

Took a long time for anyone to catch that, and neither you nor the guy above actually caught it right. It's not that radiation doesn't happen in particles, but that radiation consists of subatomic particles that could never be "removed from surfaces", rather than microscopic particles of radioactive material as they meant to refer to. Slashdot is so far downhill... (+1 for trying to help though!)

Re:Radiation is a particle now? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36280212)

Woosh.

Yes, it is supposed to be a site for smart people. Please leave.

The main problem with radioactive contamination is radioactive material such as dust, water and smoke. We're not trying to pick up stray alpha-particles resting on surfaces here.

Re:Radiation is a particle now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36281204)

First of all, the quote marks indicate that this entire summary was taken directly from the article, no the submitter (which a click on the link would verify). So, blame popsci.com for bad writing / editing / scientific knowledge. The popular press can never seem to distinguish between radioactive nuclei (that emit radiation when they decay) and the radiation (which does the actual damage).

Now, if you want to be pedantic, "radiation" in this context typically refers to either electromagnetic radiation (photons) or He-4 nuclei (alpha particles). So, it isn't technically wrong to refer to particulate radiation. That said, the radiation clearly isn't what is being picked up by the "blue goo"...

Repultion Gel? (3, Informative)

lattyware (934246) | more than 3 years ago | (#36278504)

You're not part of the control group, by the way. You get the gel. Chernobyl got blue paint. Hahaha. All joking aside, that did happen - lots of people died. Tragic. But informative. Or so I'm told.

Silly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278642)

Putty is all it's going to take. Nice.

What about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36278970)

Blue smoke?

They should use Blue pork (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279366)

they should use blue pork [huffingtonpost.com] , solving two problems at once.

A blue slime draws near!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36279412)

I for one, welcome our blue slime overlords.

can it be used as a disinfectant (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279434)

I wonder if it could be painted on the surface of a room that needs to be decontaminated instead of relying on temperature or an antibacterial agent. The size of a bacteria might be too small though.

Re:can it be used as a disinfectant (1)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 3 years ago | (#36280820)

Yes, it could. For $160/gal, normal disinfectants are considerably cheaper and since they actually kill bacteria, the problem of disposal is not nearly as bad.

Re:can it be used as a disinfectant (2)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36282148)

I don't think disinfectants do a very good job. Not to mention bacteria build up resistances to disinfectants and become more dangerous. Tossing them into a super heated furnace sounds like it would be much more difficult for them to adapt.

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2011/03/04/hospital-bacteria-strain-killing-patients/ [cbslocal.com]

http://www.sacbee.com/2011/05/29/3661803/deadly-bacteria-lurk-inside-hospital.html [sacbee.com]

http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/08/10/us-bacteria-hospital-idUSTRE5795AN20090810 [reuters.com]

Blue Goo (1)

346984 (977559) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279492)

Its got electrolytes. It's what radiation craves.

What is that Goo-Goose doing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36279568)

Here is lots of
new blue goo now.
New goo. Blue goo.
Gooey. Gooey.
Blue goo. New goo.
Gluey. Gluey.

    -- Fox in Socks

Predator tech ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36279642)

It reminds me the "blue goo" the predator used in alien vs predator 2 for cleanup the mess

Reminds me of "Fringe" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36279688)

Where they use a gas that turns into a kind of hard gel.

Re:Reminds me of "Fringe" (2)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | more than 3 years ago | (#36279726)

The chemical was called Amber 31422. :)

Like Fringe's Amber? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36280012)

Walternet developed Amber Protocol for things like these ...

From Fox In Socks? :) (2)

lnx_daemon (451339) | more than 3 years ago | (#36280536)

Here is lots of new blue goo now.
New goo. Blue goo.
Gooey. Gooey.
Blue goo. New goo.
Gluey. Gluey.

Gooey goo for chewy chewing!
That's what that Goo-Goose is doing.
Do you choose to chew goo, too, sir?
If, sir, you, sir, choose to chew, sir,
with the Goo-Goose, chew, sir.
Do, sir.

My favorite Dr. Seuess book.

DIY alternative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36280712)

Of course, in a pinch, good old-fashioned duct tape can do the same job almost as well. Just use the extra-humungous wide roll. Might require a helper or two;

Grey Goo II (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36280886)

Grey or blue-grey goo nanites might "weigh" nearby atoms to check if they're unstable isotopes. Probably with e-m screening of some sort. If they are, they extract and convey to "collection centers", bucket-brigade style. They might also form sub-gamma Faraday-shield nets. Stopping physical alpha and beta on the zing might be a problem - and discriminating from standard brownian stable atoms in liquids and the atmospfere.

Cleaning up rogue nanites after the cleanup, however ....

You mean Star Trek: Enterprise had it right? (1)

Anaerin (905998) | more than 3 years ago | (#36281008)

They seemed to spend an inordinate amount of time semi-clothed in blue-lit rooms spreading "Decon Gel" on each other...

err... (1)

munozdj (1787326) | more than 3 years ago | (#36286114)

It looks like this place needs a cleanup! Fortunately, there's a blue thing clinging from every surfacee... Look! A new species of Goo!

Signed,
The annoyngly vague sign painter
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