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Chinese Military Admits Existence of Cyberwarfare Unit

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the and-thanks-for-asking dept.

China 153

InfiniteZero writes "China has admitted for the first time that it had poured massive investment into the formation of a 30-strong commando unit of cyberwarriors — a team supposedly trained to protect the People's Liberation Army from outside assault on its networks."

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The best defense is a strong offense (2)

haruchai (17472) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283332)

and I'm positive their cyber-commandos have been very, very offensive for a long time. It wouldn't surprise me if they haven't been working hand-in-glove with the North Korean counterparts as well.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

spyder-implee (864295) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283438)

The only part I don't believe is the number 30. Maybe add a couple 0's.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283482)

I'm sure something was "lost" in translation. Probably those missing zero's, among other things.

Various articles over the past few years have pointed fingers at China, regarding cyber attacks. Some people have tried to claim that the odd rogue "hacker" was responsible. While that might be possible in some minor cases, the persistence of the attacks indicates the concerted efforts of many people - ie, military involvement.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (5, Informative)

wisty (1335733) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284020)

Spoken Chinese is "highly contextual". (Which is a linguist's euphemism for "vague").

"30" means "30 of whatever the logical unit is". 30 people. 30 platoons. 30 wan (= 30 * 10,000).

Whatever.

Point of interest, a very common Chinese phrase is "weishemenibugaosouwo" (I think that's spelled right). It means "Why didn't you tell me?"

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284052)

Very interesting! shame I've got no mod points at the moment. Thanks for sharing.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

spyder-implee (864295) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284072)

I was suspicious about the "30" since that's approximately how many soldiers you'll have in your average platoon. I makes a lot more sense (to me anyway) that they'd be training *teams* of 30, instead of just 30.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284572)

It's customary to use the space bar when using pinyin romanization: "wei shenme ni bu gaosu wo?" does not looklikesuchamouthfull.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

kubitus (927806) | more than 3 years ago | (#36285188)

here should be the Chinese but slashdot does not support the font! ( maybe they should!)

-

Wèishénme ni bù gàosu wo and also ommitts the character with the little v on top!

Even countries like Austria recruit now Cyber-Warriors!

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

breser (16790) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284142)

Some people have tried to claim that the odd rogue "hacker" was responsible. While that might be possible in some minor cases, the persistence of the attacks indicates the concerted efforts of many people - ie, military involvement.

What a load of bull. Persistant bank robberies doesn't imply an organized military operation is behind them. There are bad people, they do bad things. Hacking is even easier to rationalize than robbing a bank, especially if you're not doing anything other than "stealing" information.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (2, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284290)

Continuing to see things as simply a police matter, like robbery of a Bodega, leaves you looking very foolish when airplanes fly into your buildings.

The Chinese have finally admitted what was suspected all along, and yet you arrive hand waiving it away as the act of misbehaving children.

Bank robberies usually net some cash, which is easily spendable, locally, and quickly. You can rest assured there will be money in any given bank.

Hackers breaking into NASA, the Army, Lockheed, General Dynamics, Northrup, Raytheon, and Boeing can never be sure they will get anything at all, or that what they do get will be marketable. Its fairly difficult for your average college hacker to market the plans for an F22 or the communications system of a Predator drone.

It is simply not believable that your average hacker in a locked down country like China would spend that much effort with continued and concerted attacks, focused on military assets and defense contractors just for the fun of it.

Why would they, when they could get paid to do it working for their government?
 

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (2)

rainmouse (1784278) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284752)

Hackers breaking into NASA, the Army, Lockheed, General Dynamics, Northrup, Raytheon, and Boeing can never be sure they will get anything at all, or that what they do get will be marketable.

Yes but because the average US citizen is brainwashed into hating China or anything that remotely resists MacDonalds and Starbucks means that despite the fact that every major nation in the world (including the US) very likely has a cyber 'defence' department of the military, the said brainwashing means that suddenly every cyber attack, twitchy printer and malware infected porn is the direct result of Chinese cyber warfare.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

icebike (68054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284992)

Oh do climb down from there before you hurt yourself.

Brainwashed?. By McDonalds and Starbucks.

Really?. Is that the best you can spew?

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

Hope Thelps (322083) | more than 3 years ago | (#36285142)

The Chinese have finally admitted what was suspected all along

They've "admitted" to having a team trained to protect their networks from attacks. I would hope that most western countries could admit to that too. I can understand (and share) your belief that there's more to it than they've admitted but pretending that they have in fact admitted to something dire is silly.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (2)

high_rolla (1068540) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283626)

It would seem to me that it is in their best interest to make people believe they are not as strong as they really are.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283828)

The only part I don't believe is the number 30. Maybe add a couple 0's.

Well, living space is at a premium in China. So, it was hard to find enough guys whose mothers have a basement for them to live in.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (5, Insightful)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283586)

If the US and China compete militarily, many people in BOTH Military-Industrial Complexes benefit.

Keep it from being a shooting war and it's one fine welfare program for the beneficiaries.

Re:Cold War (2, Insightful)

hoboroadie (1726896) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284154)

I was telling everyone who didn't run away fast enough back in the seventies that the only logical explanation for Nuclear Weapons (I lived in Livermore) was to scam the taxpayer, and when we got into the next war we'd have to start from scratch supplying our boys with tools that they could actually use. Also I said that the Russians were desperately behind, and truly fearful of our imperialist intentions, and the people to watch out for were those inscrutable Chinese. I'm pretty sure we should shut down our offshore military and let the Chinese secure the "stability" of the Mideast. Let them go broke for a change, while we invest the savings into modern energy technology. YMMV (Heck, I hear the Europeans get all that oil, let them subsidise it.)

Re:Cold War (1)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284556)

I don't think it's that simple. China isn't going to go broke. They have more than enough people willing to work for peanuts.

Re:Cold War (2)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284674)

I'm pretty sure we should shut down our offshore military and let the Chinese secure the "stability" of the Mideast.

I don't claim to be an expert on global military strategy, but in the past, every time we've done this and pursued an isolationist policy, the world has come right back knocking on our door with a war that can't be refused. Starting from the war of 1812 (we tried to be neutral, but the British kept capturing our ships), up until WW2.

Add to that, in the lead up to WW2, if someone had put a little expense into stopping Germany right when they were starting out, it would have been nothing. Instead everyone pursued their isolationist policies until it grew into an expensive, deadly, unignorable problem.

Maybe times are different now, but it is clearly a good idea sometimes to pay a small expense now to avoid a bigger pain later (and saying that, I was opposed to the Iraq war from the beginning).

Re:Cold War (1)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | more than 3 years ago | (#36285060)

The US has not been perusing "an isolationist policy", but an imperialist/for profit one. It certainly has never been keeping to itself militarily, if that is what you were implying. Don't take my word for it, one of the most highly decorated Marines (Major General) of his day spelled it out pretty clearly [wikimedia.org] :

"I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902-1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for the American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents."

On WW2:

The book is also interesting historically as Butler points out in 1935 that the US is engaging in military war games in the Pacific that are bound to provoke the Japanese.

"The Japanese, a proud people, of course will be pleased beyond expression to see the United States fleet so close to Nippon's shores. Even as pleased as would be the residents of California were they to dimly discern through the morning mist, the Japanese fleet playing at war games off Los Angeles."

"Butler's particular contribution was his recantation, denouncing war on moral grounds after having been a warrior hero and spending most of his life as a military insider. The theme remained vigorously patriotic and nationalistic, decrying imperialism as a disgrace rooted in the greed of a privileged few."

People die in cyberwars. (1)

elucido (870205) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284538)

Only it looks like suicide, accidents or random.

Just because it's a cold war or not a typical shooting war it doesn't mean it's not a war and that people don't get killed.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283634)

I doubt that anyone officially on payroll for cyberwarfare are actually responsible (at present) for attacks coming out of China. China has too little to gain by doing anything that obviously has their fingerprints on it.

China has a large population of very nationalistically charged young people, some of whom have the computer skills to launch an attack (with some others merely running exploits). This is their Anonymous and rather than their youthful anger being targeted at various authority figures within their culture, it's turned toward the west.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (2)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283976)

China has a large population of very nationalistically charged young people

Are you suggesting that other powerful nations - for the sake of the argument, lets say the USA - lack a certain stock of these "nationalistically charged young people"? I'd say most of USA's population is "nationalistically charged", and pretty much willing to go for a joyride shooting people anywhere in the world... provided their target is week, poor and its counter-attack capabilities are laughable.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284198)

Yes. The young of the USA are too apathetic to care about anything. They are not patriotic or nationalistic.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

Darfeld (1147131) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284656)

willing to go for a joyride shooting people anywhere in the world... provided their target is week, poor and its counter-attack capabilities are laughable.

That, my good man, is the art of war.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283666)

and I'm positive their cyber-commandos have been very, very offensive for a long time. It wouldn't surprise me if they haven't been working hand-in-glove with the North Korean counterparts as well.

Yes, but have they reached level 80 in Wrath of the Lich King?

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283702)

Whats going on here, I thought slashdot had a +redundant mod?

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283846)

Whats going on here, I thought slashdot had a +redundant mod?

Yeah, sorry, I already posted here. Besides, it doesn't apply to articles.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284806)

It would be quite surprising to see defensive and offensive units being rolled into a one unit, considering the massive difference in their tasks in this case. Defensive people have to work with infrastructure people to make sure it's hack-proof, while offensive guys have to assault infrastructure of other countries and test their own.

It would make sense to make two "units" who compete with one another, one being focused on defense and other on offense. At the same time, force information sharing on methods so that both can learn from each other's mistakes.

And chinese are nothing if not pragmatic to the extreme.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36285200)

It would make sense to make two "units" who compete with one another, one being focused on defense and other on offense. At the same time, force information sharing on methods so that both can learn from each other's mistakes.

And then you publicly admit existence of the defensive side, while keeping the offensive team secret.

Re:The best defense is a strong offense (1)

oztiks (921504) | more than 3 years ago | (#36285320)

When the Chinese do it, its called a special ops team of "cyber warriors" ready to take over the world and reap havoc on the suspecting western world.

When the Yanks do it, its called the NSA.

Sorry but who cares? next story?

Duh (1)

terbo (307578) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283334)

30 units of units..

Squelching the Fear (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283340)

"The internet has no boundaries, so we can't say which country or organisation will be our enemy and who will attack us. The Blue Army's main target is self-defence. We won't initiate an attack on anyone[.]"

Well, I'm glad to hear that! Nothing to worry about.

[side note: Haha, spelling mistakes]

Re:Squelching the Fear (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283776)

"The internet has no boundaries, so we can't say which country or organisation will be our enemy and who will attack us. The Blue Army's main target is self-defence. We won't initiate an attack on anyone[.]"

This commando needs constant training... thus some tactical war-games are OK, I s'pose... they aren't destroying real targets, are they? Just penetrating and make some benign copies of the information they found, but... nobody is hurt... Not like a real attack.

Re:Squelching the Fear (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284024)

[side note: Haha, spelling mistakes]

Haha, ignorant American betrays himself once again.

Protip: In any other English-speaking country other than the US, what you quoted is spelt* 100% correctly.

*No, not "spelled". That's an Americanism and not proper English at all.

Re:Illogical spelling (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284238)

I actually toasted a couple slices of spelt bread this morning, but yeah, for some reason I always have to back up a lot to "correct" my spelling. Stuff like "realise", &c., that we Americans have to spell incorrectly to keep the red underlines away.

Suprise? (1)

cosm (1072588) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283350)

2002 called, they want their news back.

Re:Suprise? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283400)

2002 called, they want their news back.

Did you warn them about Hurricane Katrina, the tsunami in Indonesia, Haiti, and Japan? [xkcd.com] You asshole!

Re:Suprise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283436)

2002 called, they want their news back.

The Nineties called, they want their meme back.

Re:Suprise? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283914)

1667 called. Apparently they just invented the mechanical telephone.

Phase 1 (2)

JackpotMonkey (703880) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283358)

Gain funding by selling virtual game currencies to the online public through farming/hacking game accounts and the like.

Re:Phase 1 (1)

physburn (1095481) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283594)

I think the threat is bit bigger than just world of warcraft. Much as the world would be much happier if all the war was inside computer games. There is a lot of real war out there, and also lot of espionage. I hope they not doing any hacking in to American networks, or businesses.

---

Network Security [feeddistiller.com] Feed @ Feed Distiller [feeddistiller.com]

Re:Phase 1 (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283786)

I hope they not doing any hacking in to American networks, or businesses.

'Course not, who do you think they are?

Re:Phase 1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284540)

They arn't the cia.

Why not? (3, Insightful)

tgeek (941867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283360)

An adversary's Command & Control has always been a prime military target. Why should it be any different in an information age? The only thing that surprises me is the relatively small number of 30 (admitted) members in the unit. I'd bet even money that every single major government in the world has such a cyber unit and probably much larger (*cough* US *cough*) in scale.

Re:Why not? (1)

M0j0_j0j0 (1250800) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283388)

Only 30 you say??? For your informaton sir each has a special power, Unit 1 Can Fly Unit 2 Can see thru walls Unit 3 Can ear you toughts , yep now i got ya you didnt believe right ...... .... ..... Unit 30 Has a large blue penis The Blue Command present sir!!!

Re:Why not? (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283490)

What surprises me is anyone who puts Command and Control functions in the internet.

Anyone who orders that be done should get the Chinese-style penalty of being shot in public.

Re:Why not? (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283632)

What surprises me is anyone who puts Command and Control functions in the internet.

facepalm.
Do you really think this type of intrusion/espionage/hacking is limited to 'the internet'?

Re:Why not? (2)

Wolfling1 (1808594) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283996)

double facepalm.

Why do you think the Internet was built in the first place?

Re:Why not? (2)

sco08y (615665) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283732)

An adversary's Command & Control has always been a prime military target. Why should it be any different in an information age? The only thing that surprises me is the relatively small number of 30 (admitted) members in the unit. I'd bet even money that every single major government in the world has such a cyber unit and probably much larger (*cough* US *cough*) in scale.

They're not exactly a secret. I visited one when I got done with active duty to talk about signing up with them as a reservist.

Re:Why not? (2)

quickgold192 (1014925) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284250)

The US isn't as coy about its cyber warfare as you are - the Navy has a designation titled "Information Warfare," the Air Force Information Warfare Center lists "offensive and defensive counter information and information operations" as its main goal, and the US Cyber Command hopes to "recruit, train and retain highly qualified cyber-warfare combatants"

http://www.navy.com/careers/information-and-technology/information-warfare.html [navy.com]
http://www.fas.org/irp/agency/aia/cyberspokesman/97aug/afiwc.htm [fas.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Cyber_Command [wikipedia.org]

Re:Why not? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284732)

it's easy to make up such a group. what's not easy is to make them do something worthwhile - there's already enough companies in china that they can't just try to steal tech plans and give them to a company without it being corruption(for favoring one company, one local government, one local county, over another) . basically the biggest use for a real unit like this would be to hack chinese companies which are dodging taxes.

and this must be the n:th such group publicised, they don't probably last very long. the whole wording is stupid it's made entirely for pr for stupid people(it's propaganda aimed at the citizens of china - "don't hack us, hack for us").

and greets to the cyber warriors! YOU'RE ON WELFARE, SUCK IT!

Pfffft, so what? We've got... (1)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283380)

...David Lightman, so nuuh!!!

What is this, Tron 3? (2)

MakinBacon (1476701) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283386)

Anybody else find it hilarious when governments try to make their "cyberwarfare" divisions sound badass with phrases like "30-strong commando unit of cyberwarriors"?

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (1)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283434)

But only 30? They must be utterly shit hot at everything if there are so few of them. Even Bletchley Park had hundreds of geeks working for them in WWII.

I mean seriously, if I was putting together a 'cyber warfare' team, it would be the most Badass Dirty Dozen unconventionally styled team based on experience, knowledge and skillsets. If they've done something daft like stuck these 30-odd people on a 'cyber warfarepresuming course', they've already failed.

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (2)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283496)

The thirty they admit to are actually high ranking officers, each in command of hundreds of junior officers and senior technicians. And, that doesn't even count the support echelons associated with them.

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284770)

The thirty they admit to are actually high ranking officers, each in command of hundreds of junior officers and senior technicians. And, that doesn't even count the support echelons associated with them.

Maybe they outsourced everybody outside of management, uh I mean, high ranking officers...

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283620)

But only 30? They must be utterly shit hot at everything if there are so few of them.

Yes, yes, such as small number if they are meant to "defend" anything. It would be ludicrous to think that such a small team "trained to protect the People's Liberation Army from outside assault on its networks" could be effective. However, a small team of highly skilled hackers might be effective in a targeted attacks to penetrate the outside networks of others.

They were already found out, it makes no sense to hide it, and so now it's public information. Now at least the Chinese people can be proud, "Oh, our government is not taking the threat of cyberwarfare lying down."

Personally, I blame Sony. If only they had better security they wouldn't have made such a good training ground for these 30...

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (2)

haruchai (17472) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283978)

China takes a different attitude towards admittance - you can still find officials who'll say that noone died at the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (1)

Wolfling1 (1808594) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284012)

Personally, I blame Sony. If only they had better security they wouldn't have made such a good training ground for these 30...

I wouldn't exactly call that training. From what I've been reading, a four year old with an iPad could have hacked Sony.

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (1)

sco08y (615665) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283812)

Anybody else find it hilarious when governments try to make their "cyberwarfare" divisions sound badass with phrases like "30-strong commando unit of cyberwarriors"?

If it's not something a PR flack dreamt up and is actually known by regular soldiers, it's going to turn into a term of derision instantly, much like the US Army has keyboard commandos and chairborne rangers.

Re:What is this, Tron 3? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284002)

Well, the pictures of them scooting around with their semi-automatic pea shooters on Segway-like devices was pretty cool. At least they could defend themselves against our cyber-warriors in hand-to-hand combat.

It's a decoy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283396)

It's to distract attention from the CONNECTION RESET BY PEER

"Cyber Warriors" (1, Interesting)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283420)

Does this include drone pilots, like the ones the US has, dropping bombs from the basement of a Las Vegas casino? I mean, what could be more 'cyber' than that?

"Cyber Wizards" (5, Funny)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283574)

what could be more 'cyber' than that?

I put on my robe and wizard hat.
I cast Lvl. 3 Eroticism. You turn into a real beautiful woman.
I meditate to regain my mana, before casting Lvl. 8 chicken of the Infinite.

Frippen in the jim jam, Frappen in the krotz! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283896)

Frippen in the jim jam, Frappen in the krotz!

- The wizard of id -

Re:Frippen in the jim jam, Frappen in the krotz! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284284)

Frammin at the jim jam, frippin in the krotz?

Re:"Cyber Wizards" (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284470)

You are the worst cyber partner ever...
Don't ever message me again you piece of ****.

Re:"Cyber Warriors" (1)

LongearedBat (1665481) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284006)

Yeah, I agree.

what could be more 'cyber' than that?

Well, soldiers with cybernetic implants, and I think we're not many years away from that.

People waging war using the internet should be called "internet soldiers".
People waging war using using drones should be called "drone soldiers" or "remote soldiers".
People waging war using using cybernetic implants can/will be called "cyber(netic) soldiers".

Otherwise, when cybernetics do become part of soldiering, what are we going to call them?
Okay, sure, we'd invent another word. But why twist words out of their proper meanings?

Call it it for what it is and avoid confusion.

Makes sense (2)

orkysoft (93727) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283454)

An army needs supplies;
Organizing supplies (logistics) gets very complicated, and needs IT infrastructure;
Disabling an opposing army's supply lines is a proved war strategy;
Enemies could damage the IT infrastructure, thereby endangering the supply lines;
In a conflict, enemies will try to damage the army's IT infrastructure;
An army needs people who can protect its IT infrastructure and damage the enemy's.

one good thing (1)

dlt074 (548126) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283880)

is that the US army is used to not having IT infrastructure even on a good day. our IT people are so inept and incompetent that we train as if they are not there, cause most of the time they are not. the mission goes on. we can still march and supply without IT infrastructure.

we have our own cyber warfare unit and they probably suck as much as the people in charge of the army networks. now, the contractors the government hires are probably pretty good. but the army... not so much.

Re:one good thing (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284380)

For future reference all of the military branches use outside contractors for specialized systems development. The people who like to hack computers are unlikely in the extreme to enlist into the service and likewise the military doesn't sit around hoping some computer genius might turn up at the recruiting office. Your accusation of ineptness and incompetent IT is just you having an internal confidence deficit conflict and self-esteem issues.

public disclosure (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283460)

So if they're revealing 30, that means there's at least 3x somewhere else...

any gay leakers/moles? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283530)

i wunner how many gay leakers/moles their cyber army has?
i wunner how much freedom these specialists have in their private lives? does not sound like an appealing job to me, i'd rather be a WoWer farming gold.

Quarter Master get odd requisitions (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283554)

Cyberwarriors run on Clearasil, Red Bull and porn.

What for? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283570)

I've always wondered: what, exactly, are the things that a "cyberwarfare unit" would actually *do*? I can see the need for, say, communications blocking / tampering in offensive and defensive situations (US in Afganistan blocking local communications). If there was a group of militery pen-testers, which I'm sure there are in almost any countries military, I could sort of see why they'd be called "cyberwarfare warriors". But, I'd have thought that there were already network engineers / security auditors, and the like, for individual national organizations and military sectors. Is that all that these units do? Besides DDoS'ing / hacking other countries military / civil infrastructure?

Re:What for? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283902)

I've always wondered: what, exactly, are the things that a "cyberwarfare unit" would actually *do*?

Stuxnet [wikipedia.org] for one.

Ok.Ok... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283582)

It's like "The 's military admits that water can be wet." thingy. Right?

Report of "Chinese" employee downloading entire servers worth of data oversee were already old and proven 15 years ago.

Now corporation think of IT security as an over valued expanse that can be compensated with DRM.

The rest is news at 11h. Barely.

A Cyber Ninja is better... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283660)

They should hire a cyber ninja instead.
They only need to hire 1 and he will pwn the rest of the world.

total b.s. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283672)

They have had for at least a decade a brigade-sized training element for this, and yet only 30 people *total* serving the role..... yeah right.

Similar in appearance to .... (2)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283688)

... their regular commandos. Except they have tape wrapped around the bridge of their night vision goggles.

We'd like to have our own ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283696)

America would like to start their own but Disney trademarked the name "Blue Unit" and Facebook patented the method of communicating with other computers via Internet. Guess that's the end of that.

Something wrong here (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283722)

In a recent test of its powers, reported the PLA Daily, the Blue Army was thrust into a simulated cyberbattle against an attacking force four times its size and left to defend China's military networks against a bombardment of virus attacks, massive barrages of junk mail and stealth missions into the inner sanctums of military planning to steal secret information on troop deployment. The Blue Army, predictably, triumphed.

It sounds like they just connected their test network to the internet.

Warriors??? (1)

tyrione (134248) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283726)

``Warriors, come out and play yay!'' Beer bottle clinking in alternating patterns.

Nah, it's probably just like the USAA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36283762)

30 enlisted personnel and 300,000 contractors.

In other news... (0, Offtopic)

creat3d (1489345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283772)

... the sky is blue and my ex-wife is a cunt.

Winning, duh (1)

Airborne-ng (1391105) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283830)

China's population - 1.3 Billion, 30 strong commando unit = 0.000002253% of population using real pop. #'s. In America, as a CISSP working security for govt. where there are FAR more of us than that....I must say in the numbers game...we got this one in the bag, for once...just sayin.

Re:Winning, duh (1)

creat3d (1489345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283842)

Right, because there's no way they'd lie about their numbers...?

Re:Winning, duh (2)

Airborne-ng (1391105) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283870)

True...and we'd never lie about how Patriot Act usurps basic constitutional rights. Ever nation's politics has its gray areas, no denying.

Cyberwelfare (1)

HelioWalton (1821492) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283916)

30 strong? Forget cyberwarfare, this is more like cyberwelfare!

Hmm (1)

Cheney (1547621) | more than 3 years ago | (#36283940)

It makes me wonder if they finally admitted this in timing with the whole Lockheed Martin story. My first initial thought was "Damn, that commando unit of cyberwarriors got Lockheed!"

-Shrug-

need to slip nice stashes of Chinese porn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284078)

on the DoD firewall machines... mmmm.... wouldn't you like some of this?

Helli (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284224)

I'm from Germany but I can Read it. You can visit my Side: www.miniriff.cms4people.de

Cyberwarriors (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284350)

Oh shit, they are going to upgrade all of humanity. Where is the Doctor when you need him?

cyberwarriors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284388)

Very nice term...Cyberwarriors

So that explains it! (1)

gearloos (816828) | more than 3 years ago | (#36284632)

Everytime I boot my linux box I get a fortune cookie under my desk... Was wondering.

So that's who hacked Lockheed Martin. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36284888)

The attack on RSA, then Lockheed Martin was too long term and risky for any of the Organized Crime hacking groups. It was definitely a government. The only ones that can capitalize on the return are the Chinese. Well, I suppose the French might be an extremely unlikely 2nd place.

So, they hacked Lockheed, so they could make better attack aircraft, so they could protect the PLA from outside assault on its networks. Like hell. About the same time the attack on Lockheed went down, I noticed they were scanning for BGP. First time I've seen BGP scanning in years. It all looks offensive to me.

Priorities (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36285028)

Biggest, richest, and scariest country in the world has cyber-war division - 90 comments

Game simulators removed from app store - 130 comments

Glad to see people have their fucking priorities straight.

C&C Generals anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36285340)

No surprises there. The Chinese Hackers were an effective unit in C&C Generals.

*ttp://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100226184557/cnc/images/5/5b/Generals_Hacker.jpg
*ttp://cnc.wikia.com/wiki/Hacker

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