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Google Uncovers China-Based Password Collection Campaign

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the all-your-passwords-are-belong-to-us dept.

China 186

D H NG writes "Google announced that it recently uncovered a campaign to collect users' passwords. The campaign, apparently originating from China, affected what seem to be the personal Gmail accounts of hundreds of users including, among others, senior US government officials, Chinese political activists, officials in several Asian countries (predominantly South Korea), military personnel and journalists. Google said it detected and has disrupted this campaign and has notified victims and secured their accounts, as well as notified the relevant government authorities."

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186 comments

Hmm (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313786)

So is this an act of war by china?

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313802)

No, they were just trying to find out passwords.

Re:Hmm (3, Insightful)

Fluffeh (1273756) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313926)

I think this falls under that lovely "espionage" blanket. You know the "other guys" are doing it, they know that you are doing it. But everyone pretends like it isn't going on and no-one bats an eyelid in public. However, behind closed doors, this sort of action is driving yet another wedge into the relationship - but at the same time also driving more funding into your own budgets for doing a similar thing to the "other guys" yet again.

My guess is that the fallout of this will be that there will be a project launched with some funny nondescript name that tries to get similar intel on the Chinese. They will likely get wind of it, but be unable to do anything about it as there will never be undeniable proof of the point of origin.

This sort of thing went on for decades (and still does) with the US/Russians, the middle east and just about every European country. It just (mainly) never sees the light of day. The Chinese seem to be getting caught more of late though - which can mean that either they are pretty poor at it compared to the rest (dubious) or their program is a whole heck of a lot bigger and more ambitious than the other players in the game - which I think is much much more likely.

Re:Hmm (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315026)

There is a far more obvious version of what this means:

West is demonizing China for its population into next cold war opponent, therefore any and all negative news about China in relation to West will be published with reasonably big headlines.
Notably, it's not very different for Chinese either, same seems to be going on on their side as well.

Re:Hmm (1)

infolation (840436) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315786)

either they are pretty poor at it compared to the rest (dubious) or their program is a whole heck of a lot bigger and more ambitious than the other players in the game

...or its an intentional act of provocation.

Re:Hmm (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313832)

It's only an act of war if they can't put up a decent fight.

Re:Hmm (1, Interesting)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314254)

Wrong. It's only an act of war if liberals will stop whining over civilian casualties.

Feel free to say I'm an evil bastard or whatever. But we changed the RoE based on that above statement. And when we did, we ensured that we'd only fight wars where there was a low to no chance of the enemy having a chance of putting up a decent fight.

...Wh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313806)

,,,What ?

Re:...Wh.. (3, Informative)

milkmage (795746) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313860)

where the hell have you been?

"In its first formal cyber strategy, the Pentagon has concluded that computer sabotage by another country could constitute an act of war"

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43224451/ns/us_news-security/t/sources-us-decides-cyber-attack-can-be-act-war/ [msn.com]

Re:...Wh.. (1)

Oxford_Comma_Lover (1679530) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313950)

The question is (1) at what point the origin of a cyber-attack presents presumptive evidence of state action that must be rebutted, (2) whether the absence of a showing that the state was not involved means that the US should be launching reprisal cyber-attacks against China. Also, (3) whether it does so already and we just don't hear about it.

At this point, there is a pattern of cyber-attacks on the US originating in China. If China does not hunt down the perpetrators, it should be considered complicit and the United States should strongly consider response in kind.

Re:...Wh.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314360)

the United States should strongly consider response in kind.

And when China redirects the "response in kind" traffic to a US system?

Re:...Wh.. (2)

rasmusbr (2186518) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315314)

The article says "The officials emphasize, however, that not every attack would lead to retaliation. Such a cyber attack would have to be so serious it would threaten American lives, commerce, infrastructure or worse, and there would have to be indisputable evidence leading to the nation state involved, NBC Pentagon correspondent Jim Miklaszewski said."

What that means in English is something like: If an hostile organization brought down the electric grid, or caused a meltdown in a nuclear plant, or caused airliners to crash, or did something equivalent, then that means that war is an option.

That makes sense IMHO.

So... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313808)

...air strikes?

Re:So... (1)

The Snowman (116231) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314282)

...air strikes?

Attacking China would destroy our economy.

Re:So... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314784)

...air strikes?

Attacking China would destroy our economy.

I'd be impressed if it could get much worse that it already is.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315408)

Sheesh, what economy?

excellent PR by Google (3, Insightful)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313820)

it isn't a data breach, Google has uncovered a campaign to steal passwords. Well done Google.

Re:excellent PR by Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313854)

Phishing is not a 'data breach'.

Allegedly just phishing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313866)

Well, they say it's a phishing attempt, which I wouldn't lump together with a "data breach".

Re:excellent PR by Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314142)

You are just full of shit. There is no way for Google to prevent that kind of phishing, they don't have the control on the ISP/Wifi network of everybody. The best they can do is try to mitigate it by telling people to verify HTTPS certs and talking about it.
And it's definitely NOT a data breach on Google's system. I mean if you have a keylogger on your computer and somebody use it to steal your bank account, it's nowhere near your bank's fault.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

poptones (653660) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314918)

Well it fucking happened to me and it sure feels like a data breach. This happened just the other day and they used my contacts folder to send spam (ONE PIECE) to everyone in my address book. This means they had access to every piece fo data saved in my account. If that isn't a data breach, what is?

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

RobbieThe1st (1977364) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315204)

Erm, if they have your password, they have everything about you. That's not a data breach though. A data breach would be if Google lost a copy of their Gmail account DB, etc. Not just someone phishing for account passwords.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

rritterson (588983) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314146)

Well, if it is a phishing scheme like google believes, it's not quite the same thing as a data breach like we typically use the term.

Sort of like the difference between me being tricked into giving away my ATM PIN and a hacker breaking into the bank system and taking money from my account.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

Idbar (1034346) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314160)

As a security advice:

Review the security features offered by the Chrome browser. If you donâ(TM)t already use Chrome, consider switching your browser to Chrome.

Nice try Google, nice try! But, I'll keep my Firefox :P

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314272)

it isn't a data breach

Correct, it wasn't, at least not from Google. It relied on fooling users into logging in to counterfeit sites. So if you're implying Google failed to protect users' data, that's not the case. If people give up their passwords, it's their own fault.

Re:excellent PR by Google (2)

praxis (19962) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314782)

I think what you mean is if users give up their passwords to a site that cannot have its identity verified, it's their own fault. Giving up your password to Google is practically a requirement for using their Gmail service. Until we have better browser user-interfaces for authenticating sites, it will be very hard to prevent phishing attacks that look authentic. Getting rid of the address bar is probably not one of those improvements.

Re:excellent PR by Google (0)

Neptunes_Trident (1452997) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314668)

All while Google assists our own governments campaign (patriot act & such). Witness the hand of justice, while the other hand of deceit works behind your back. Dismantling our foundation of liberty by limiting economic freedoms by Google providing information & assistance with corporations and government. Marketing, Statistical information about anyones life, what harm can it do? NO, this information will never paint a target on your back, regardless of your idealogical or political stance. Sure, right. Hide in your cave. Careful what you chisel on the walls. Be a good slave & stay within your debt/credit system and you'll be fine.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315158)

Google only does that because they're completely forced to, and they've historically been very vocal in their resistance. They're NOT happy about it.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315004)

Yes, well, google should have installed antivirus on the several hundred million home PCs you seem to think theyre responsible for.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

tabdelgawad (590061) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315114)

True, but it does highlight the danger of the government and enterprises moving their email service to Google and the 'cloud'. My company requires me to use an RSA token to log in to corporate mail or VPN, so simple phishing won't be successful. I'm aware of the recent RSA hack but in some ways, that's the point of two-factor authentication: you can completely compromise one factor but still have time to fix things before the other factor fails.

Re:excellent PR by Google (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315346)

You're being sarcastic but your comment taken literally is true on all counts. Even the headline. It is good PR: other email providers, like Hotmail or Yahoo, either would have glossed over this internally, or lacked the competence to even discover the systematic attack.

Happened to My Wife (4, Interesting)

friedmud (512466) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313852)

My wife's Gmail account got caught up in this! Last weekend I received some spam from _her_ gmail account. We immediately logged in and Google said that it had detected suspicious behavior and made her reset her password. It then showed us the connection log... and everything looked normal except one particular connection: FROM CHINA!

We were pissed.... but it doesn't appear that anything else was compromised (she didn't have anything sensitive in her Gmail account luckily).

Things really seem to be escalating on the 'net lately... from PS Network to Lockheed and now to Gmail. I really have to wonder if China is _actively_ participating at this point...

Re:Happened to My Wife (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313910)

ID theft is on the rise too. Peoples credit ratings will be fucked to the point of sending media shockwaves around the US. This will further compound the lack of "faith" into the system upon the already mounting debt. Basically, it's like Fight Club. The whole G-Damn thing is about to implode with many youths already unemployed and adults frustrated in dealing with debt.

My advice. As a geek, now is the time to stock up on food, ammo, and learn to grow your own food. The collapse of civilization is at hand. Total anarchy! The police will not be around to save anyone. YOYO (You're On Your Own)

Re:Happened to My Wife (0)

Amouth (879122) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314002)

if only it would happen - i hate the hurry up and wait game.

Re:Happened to My Wife (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315126)

But enough with the Joker quotes. Heath Ledger's dead, OK? Let's all move on.

Desperate people do desperate things (3, Informative)

currently_awake (1248758) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314106)

The world is currently in the early stages of a great depression. The huge increase in computer crime and the revolts in arab countries are just symptoms of that.

Re:Desperate people do desperate things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314854)

The revolts in the Arab countries have been held on the back burner for years. You need oil to mobilize an army, and an organized Middle East has the capacity to leverage their resource and emerge dominant, should a Big War break out. A divided Middle East can be more easily controlled and consumed; that's why this is happening now. Now that China's upgraded/built their military industrial complex, there are fewer global economic hindrances to the possibility, it's time to get one's energy reserves up to speed.

Re:Desperate people do desperate things (0)

uofitorn (804157) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315112)

Right. And The World Is Going To End On May 21, 2011. Oh wait, that passed. And nothing happened.

Re:Desperate people do desperate things (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315472)

I think there's a big difference in between saying "An guy is going to come on a cloud on a specific date and the faithful shall float off into the sky." and "The economy and world stability are in bad shape and some bad things are likely to happen in the near future.".

Re:Desperate people do desperate things (2)

xyphor (151066) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315610)

Right. And The World Is Going To End On May 21, 2011. Oh wait, that passed. And nothing happened.

If I had mod points, I'd go with off-topic or troll, but since I don't I'll say this:

People who ignore the graveness of the world economy, and especially the USA's, should read up on it. You may think it does not affect you. It will. This isn't a religion or cult, it is mathematics.

Re:Happened to My Wife (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314140)

I kind of wonder how China's great firewall plays into plausible deniability for these things.

For example if China blocks civilian access to x service, and we see hacking attempts to x service originating from China, shouldn't there be a pretty good explanation?

Re:Happened to My Wife (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314178)

I really have to wonder if China is _actively_ participating at this point...

Really? Really?

Re:Happened to My Wife (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314694)

The article says they were trying to steal the passwords of government officials, making it sound like espionage. If the real purpose of this was to send spam, then it's just commercially motivated crime.

Hypocrites (0, Redundant)

clampolo (1159617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313868)

The real reason Google is upset about this is because China isn't paying them to get the information like everyone else. Google is pissed that China is cutting out the middle man.

Re:Hypocrites (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36313890)

The real reason Google is upset about this is because China isn't paying them to get the information like everyone else. Google is pissed that China is cutting out the middle man.

[Citation Needed]

Re:Hypocrites (1)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314634)

Wrong. Google is not pissed about revenue loss. If they were worried about revenue loss they would have stayed in China, collected the advertising dollars in the growing market, and not given a sh!t about compromised users. Instead, they spurned the money on principle and withdrew from that market when the Chinese Government gave them crap conditions to operate under. Google's Sergei is particularly sensitive to repressive totalitarian governments like China because he grew up in the Soviet Union - and understands how bad such governments are to their own people (even if the people are brainwashed into believing it is good for them, and the government presents a happy face to the world while having a corrupt and brutal face internally). One the Chinese Government was implicated in the breaches of Google accounts Sergei was able to convince Larry to ignore the money and pull out on principle. This is actually a case of a big company doing something ethical (better late than never). But don't let me rain on your little conspiracy theory that Google is somehow more evil than the Chinese Government (something becoming fashionable to believe in the West, despite being a patent falsehood).

Re:Hypocrites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315348)

google collected personal wi-fi data, and when this was uncovered, claims it wasn't aware the equipment it was using was doing so.
google == "Ethical"? I think not.

Re:Hypocrites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315506)

1. Uncovered by Google you mean.
2. Because the "equipment" actually does work that way (it's no surprise that a hacker-oriented software company like Google fucks up the impl).
3. Corporations cannot be ethical or unethical.
4. Sub-divisions, the people inside them, even higher-ups are often unaware how something is implemented on the details level.
5. Public wifi data isn't private.
6. Google had legitimate reason for sampling traffic (certainly not by that amount).
7. While you're complaining, other people (and probably organizations) ARE logging traffic, unbeknownst to you, likely for nefarious purposes.
8. Users who had private data affected were simply collateral damage of the router companies.
9. The risk:reward value just isn't there for Google; what is this, a conspiracy?

There, did I cover all the pro-Google talking points?

Re:Hypocrites (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315402)

You might think it's stupid for a big company to take a principled stand like that, and generally it is, but that decision lined up with Google's future potential in Europe/America: Google is nearly unique (meaning doomed to fail) in the tech world in that it relies almost entirely on the amount of trust users place with Google. Other corporations can survive overwhelming bad publicity; Google can't, and it hasn't had to.

Gmail passwords collected so far.. (4, Funny)

Megahard (1053072) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313900)

Password
passw0rd
123456
hunter2

Re:Gmail passwords collected so far.. (0)

rritterson (588983) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314218)

How did you see my password? I thought it only came up as ***s?

Oh, I get it, to you it shows up as ***s but to me it shows up as hunter2

Re:Gmail passwords collected so far.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314442)

Hey I got the same combination on my luggage.

Re:Gmail passwords collected so far.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314558)

That's the same as the combination on my luggage!

Re:Gmail passwords collected so far.. (1)

moniker127 (1290002) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315690)

I has a 12 digit password with random characters, letters, and numbers interspersed throughout it, and I'm a victim of this, so it isn't a matter of the passwords being simple, its probably a cross-site exploit of some sort.

Maybe it's time anonymous... (1)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313936)

I'm just sayin, maybe turn the LOIC on China for a bit?

I think Sony may have learned at least a partial lesson now.

-AI

Re:Maybe it's time anonymous... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314028)

Not your personal army...

Re:Maybe it's time anonymous... (1)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314714)

Not your personal army...

Never claimed it was... but instead of JUST being
outraged that a corporation is going after 1 individual.

Or narrow-minded churches, et al.

I'm saying that placing some anger on an entire country
trying to hack our citizens seems like a good outlet
for their 'creative energy'.

-AI

Re:Maybe it's time anonymous... (1)

bbecker23 (1917560) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315354)

I'm saying that placing some anger on an entire country trying to hack our citizens seems like a good outlet for their 'creative energy'.

Anonymous doesn't have citizens.

Re:Maybe it's time anonymous... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314764)

Sony didn't learn anything from that. The LOIC attack was utterly ineffective.

as well as notified... (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#36313982)

"as well as notified the relevant government authorities.""

"Yeah, we know.... Uh.. I mean really? Collecting passwords, you say?"

Act of war? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314020)

So with the recent US policy stating any hack done by a foreign body onto critical systems will be considered an act of war. Will this constitute an act of war? Also are politicians gmail accounts critical?

Why South Korea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314022)

Why target South Korean officials?
I'd be very disappointed if China was feeding this information to support North Korea. At the least, I would hope China knows that Kim Jong Il is a dirtbag and would only be doing things to appease them, but not directly support them.

Re:Why South Korea? (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314210)

South Korea has a pivotal role in the whole North Korea issue. China is sort of like a "big brother" to North Korea and makes sure that no one is dealing unreasonably with it.

Re:Why South Korea? (1)

bigpet (1695756) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314216)

Well I think China quite likes the idea of a communist country with a huge army as a buffer between them and the US-allied south.
But they are well-advised to not support them officially, since they don't want to get drawn in into a war with America currently as it supplies them with consumers for their products. Also in case they do supply North Korea with Intel they better do so under the condition that they not start a nuclear war since atomic mushrooms in your neighboring countries are never a good thing.

So imo their best bet right now is to officially distance themselves but secretly support them under certain conditions. But having information about the nearest country with US Troops stationed sounds like something they could use themselves.

China is in a cold war, but .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314072)

looking to take it hot one day. We in the west are way to complacent. It is time for western citizens to re-think what is happening.

I'm confused... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314082)

... is this an act of war [bbc.co.uk] on China's part or not?

We are at War (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314086)

The masses - and the majority of our elected leaders and small business owners across the country - just don't know it.

It's a "soft" war(e) I suppose. No muskets involved.

credit cards have a feature (2)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314088)

where they won't let you use your credit card account abroad unless you phone ahead and tell them you will abroad and its ok if they start getting charges from bangkok or antigua

maybe it's time for email providers to do the same: "no logging into my account from foreign ip blocks unless i tell you its ok"

and the default for this protection should be "on". your average user won't take the time to hunt for this menu item and enable it

Re:credit cards have a feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314168)

intellectual property law is philosophically incoherent. it is your moral duty to ignore it

Absolutely nothing is philosophically coherent.

Re:credit cards have a feature (1)

hguorbray (967940) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314390)

Sounds like it would stop the most direct attacks, but unlike credit card transactions, which can't be anonomized or proxied, a slighly more sophisticated attacker could just use a pwnd machine or proxy and they could appear to be coming from a nominally local block.

However, if this is state-sponsored, the PRC may be reluctant to allow use of those tools lest they become widespread enough to allow massive evasion of the Great Firewall...

I think eventually some combination of biometrics (hello Big Brother!), one time pad generating crypto-keys or smartFOBS with some RFID-based authentication will end up becoming the norm as most people's password usage is too insecure.

-I'm just sayin'

google in my pants (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314098)

I have google in my pants.

damn chinks (0)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314124)

They also posted crotch pics of Anthony Wiener. Did you want to see or even think about his cock? Too bad motherfucker, it's all over the news. I think I'm going to throw up.

Re:damn chinks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314250)

The gentleman will sit. ;D

google doing deep packet inspection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314138)

Or how does it know what type of transaction certain users accounts are undergoing..
I'm not sure I want Sergey and Larry to record that I deal with fattyBDSM websites.

Happened to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314232)

I got an email from my own gmail account one day last week telling me to buy fake ipads in bad english. logged into my gmail account, whaddya know? The same email had been sent to everyone on my contacts list. I immediately changed my password and sent everyone an apology. A few days later i received a notice from google saying that they suspect something weird is going on because someone has logged into my account from china. I'm like, yeah, i figured that out. They didn't force me to change my password, perhaps because i'd already done it.

The actual message:

Dear:
I have good news for you . Last week.
I have Order china Quantity:26 Products New Apple 32GB IPAD2
I have completed bank payment. I have received the product New Apple 32GB
IPAD2!
w e b: www.eoaroo.com
It's amazing! The item is original, brand new and has high quality,
but it's muc cheaper. I'm pleased to share this good news with you!
I believe you will find what you want there and have an good experience
on shopping from them
Thank you!

Social engineering attack? (1)

Platinum Dragon (34829) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314376)

Have any details been released? This sounds curiously like an e-mail-based phishing campaign, if the passwords weren't obtained from Gmail's own systems and they weren't exploiting a software vulnerability.

How do they know it's from China? (2)

voidness (1900074) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314412)

If I were hacker, I wouldn't let you track and always pretend to be an easy target to blame, like China. Only fool can tell exactly where the hacker is.

Re:How do they know it's from China? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314516)

One of the largest collectors of data on the face of the planet and you wonder how they figured it out? Are you serious?

Re:How do they know it's from China? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315050)

They have special packet sniffing dogs they release into the tubes.

WW3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36314576)

First we thought World War 3 would be between NATO and the Warsaw Pact. After the fall of the wall, we thought that it would be war between the US and China (or maybe NATO and the SCO).

But we now can see the truth: World War 3 will be a war between Google and China.

My god have mercy on our souls.

Re:WW3 (1)

arisvega (1414195) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314780)

There cannot be a WW3 yet, because WW2 has not really finished- just diffused here and there. Like so, more or less [wikipedia.org] .

Let's hope it is going to be over soon, though I hardly think so- unless a world war is defined as a war between superpowers.

Steps to nuclear pwnage (1)

Datamonstar (845886) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314690)

1. Declare "cyber-crime" against the government officially a war crime.
2. Release details on a not-so-friendly foreign nation's shady online behavior.
3. Boom???
4. Profit!!

This happened to me (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314858)

This happened to me but it was about a year ago. I went to check my gmail and it said it had recently been accessed from China. I immediately reset my password on every account that I had everywhere. Not that my passwords are the same, but with access to my gmail the attacker could change or find out my password for almost every site I visit. I have no idea how they figured out my password, I didn't use it elsewhere, it was a made up word, 9 digits long, with 2 numbers and a symbol in it. If they could guess that... well, I just dunno.

Re:This happened to me (1)

Laser Dan (707106) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315512)

This happened to me but it was about a year ago. I went to check my gmail and it said it had recently been accessed from China. I immediately reset my password on every account that I had everywhere.

I had heard that gmail started notifying people if the account was accessed from china, so I was interested to see what would happen when I went to china for a conference a few weeks ago.

Nothing.

There were no notifications or anything when I got back. I changed my passwords anyway because access to gmail from within china was suspiciously intermittant (monitoring?) while other non-blocked sites were normal.

They need advice, not security: Don't use webmail! (1)

guanxi (216397) | more than 2 years ago | (#36314962)

These people need professional advice, or common sense: Don't store highly valuable (i.e., dangerous to people's lives), confidential information on a free public webmail service!

Really, how hard is that to figure out? How many very well-publicized successful attacks has Google experienced, and they still haven't figured it out?

Re:They need advice, not security: Don't use webma (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315582)

These are the same people responsible for the war on drugs, and the war on terror. Yeah, we're gonna have a war on an idea.

Thoughtcrime.

Two factor authentication (1)

shmurfect (723759) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315212)

Do it! [google.com]

Re:Two factor authentication (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315514)

I would if it didn't involve a cell-phone. My cell phone battery dies far too frequently to rely on it. Honestly, if Google let me buy one of the key-fob authenticators like Blizzard sells I'd attach one of those, as the battery lasts plenty long enough.

Since it has to be said... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315260)

Who Wanta some Wang!!!?!!?!?!!?!

Why Gmail (1)

He who knows (1376995) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315310)

why do chinese political aktivists use gmail there are far more secure email systems they can use and why would miltiary and political officials use it when they have acces to government email systems except when they dont want their emails to be read and archived for the public intrest. Also why is it only Gmail that keeps on getting attacked by the chinese are they the only ones who mention it?

Re:Why Gmail (1)

recrudescence (1383489) | more than 2 years ago | (#36315730)

I've witnessed hacked hotmail accounts sending spam to their contacts regarding chinese electronics shops for years now. Maybe Gmail just cares enough to point out it's a problem.

your mailman is reading your mail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36315404)

So google is reading people's email, in order to warn people that the Chinese is trying to read their email?

I like to politely suggest google to fuck off.

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