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Anonymous Steals 10,000 Iranian Government Emails

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the must-be-bored-of-sony dept.

Communications 116

Several readers have sent word that Anonymous has hacked servers belonging to Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, making off with over 10,000 emails. "The Ministry’s website is still down as of this writing, and the servers are under Anonymous control. ... The email archive includes approvals and rejections for a variety of visas and passports, among other requests and correspondence. 'It’s near the election’s anniversary. We had to do something,' said one of the Iranian members of Anonymous from #OpIran. He said they take down Iranian government servers on a regular basis for operation days, but that obviously retrieving information required a different approach to the group’s signature DDoS attack. He also indicated an as-yet unannounced attack. 'For the election’s anniversary, we have a complete DDoS attack day' planned, he said.

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first (-1, Troll)

sproketboy (608031) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332734)

post? WO0t. :)

Re:first (5, Funny)

toastar (573882) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332766)

10,000 emails? What is that after you filter out the spam, like 50?

Re:first (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36334052)

So... why do you exist?

A la Gibson (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332742)

I'm happy that Panther Modern basically exists now.

Re:A la Gibson (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332838)

At some point, reality became stranger than fiction. I can't say when, though.

Re:A la Gibson (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332922)

Unfortunately my understanding is that this cache of email is nothing but a bunch of visa applications and status notices. Nothing of any political interest at all.

Re:A la Gibson (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333156)

The fact that it was possible is of political interest, isn't it?

Re:A la Gibson (2)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333782)

Not really. I'm getting tired of Anonymous' childish antics

as opopsed to Team Themis taxpayer funded antics? (2)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36334140)

we were basically paying whats-his-name, head of HB Gary, to go around running script kiddie stuff and fantasize about quitting his job and building an MMO.

  you can read about it in the anonymous dumps.

Not so anonymous (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332758)

Let me see, so that would be CIA, NSA and Airforce cyber-command behind an astroturfed smokescreen of scriptkiddies...

LOLZ

Re:Not so anonymous (5, Insightful)

Nikker (749551) | more than 3 years ago | (#36334136)

I agree this is getting to be a bit much. Every time a wrist watch goes out of sync "Anonymous" gets the blame. It's just too easy for anyone with any motivation to say "ummm Anonymous did it!!". My guess is every country will be getting "hacked" under this guise because it's convenient and because well they want to stay anonymous ;) It will be even easier now to scare Joe Sixpack into going along with stupid laws because the internet is out to get them. Most of these companies get hacked not because of their status as a target but because of their amateur level of security standards. I'm surprised stuxnet didn't get blamed on Anonymous as well there would have been lots of lulz involved in that one.

Re:Not so anonymous (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36335396)

I am pretty sure that if the CIA, the NSA and the cyber command hacked an Iranian website they would not tell anyone about it at all. Why would they advetrise what they could do and what they had gotten their hands on? That's kinda the opposite of what spies are famous for.

Also I don't think you know what astroturf means.

Congratulations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332774)

Good work! Just be careful...do not get yourselves caught!

Re:Congratulations (1)

AHuxley (892839) | more than 3 years ago | (#36335216)

Eurodif in France during the 1980's?

And now the bad news (3, Funny)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332776)

Unfortunately, what they had managed to acquire was just the last year's worth of lunch menus of all Iranian embassies.

Re:And now the bad news (3, Funny)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332876)

Unfortunately, what they had managed to acquire was just the last year's worth of lunch menus of all Iranian embassies.

Even that could be a good propaganda weapon against the regime. Imagine if the menu included bacon and champagne.

Re:And now the bad news (1, Insightful)

ImprovOmega (744717) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333822)

If it didn't before, I'm sure it does now!

Re:And now the bad news (1)

otaku244 (1804244) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332970)

Actually, it's Viagra and Prozak advertisements along with several desperate attempts by the "Prince of Nigeria" to wire money into a "safe account"
-Iranians get all the good emails

Re:And now the bad news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333152)

Would have thought sending out cup cake recipes from the p0wned servers would be better suited for Anonymous than releasing email and stuff...

So this is a horrible, evil thing, (-1, Flamebait)

compucomp2 (1776668) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332778)

Just like the Chinese hack on Google? Oh wait, because it's against Iran, according to Slashdot it's a great stroke for freedom and democracy. Slashdot's Western hypocrisy will quickly show itself once again, and before you say, "but it wasn't America or Israel behind it!!!!!" what proof do you have that the Chinese government was behind the Google hack?

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (5, Insightful)

teslafreak (684543) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332802)

So some Americans are slanted against Iran, and your slanted against Americans. Hardly gives you any room to speak.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (5, Insightful)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332808)

The Google hack targeted, among other things, the accounts of human rights activists which is what made it despicable.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (2)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332834)

True, but who is hit by this hack? Visa and passport applications, amongst various other correspondence? Nothing of importance there, then, else they'd have mentioned it. Only the dealings of ordinary citizens with their government. Great act of resistance there.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (2)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332908)

Maybe. If our State Dept. got hacked, people would freak out even if it was just a bunch of "where are we going for lunch" messages.

With luck, Anonymous will dump the load over to Wikileaks.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (1, Informative)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 3 years ago | (#36334622)

Maybe. If our State Dept. got hacked, people would freak out even if it was just a bunch of "where are we going for lunch" messages.

It would also be considered an act of war by the US, and some assholes will certainly call for retaliation with cruise missiles.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (1, Troll)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333014)

No, what's despicable is that some individuals consider themselves to be above the law, in the name of human rights.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (5, Insightful)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333078)

Bullshit.

Arresting people for holding opinions and saying things that the government doesn't like is despicable. Just because those with guns make it a "law" doesn't make it moral or just.

(And no, I'm not talking about yelling "fire" in a crowded theater type speech.)

Putting people in jail, without formal charges or even notifying anyone outside the jail that they are being held is despicable -- even if it is the law.

Yes, there are laws that EVERYONE should be above -- if they had a brain and a backbone.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (3, Insightful)

robot256 (1635039) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333124)

No, what's despicable is that some individuals consider themselves to be above human rights, in the name of the law.

FTFY.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (1)

MaxEmerika (701730) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333952)

However modded parent Troll completely missed the point.

West vs East difference (2)

Script Cat (832717) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332858)

Having would be kings squabbling to be in charge of your life -> western
Having an uncontested king undoubtedly in charge of your life -> eastern

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (3, Interesting)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332860)

Plenty of Slashdoter's supported the wikileaks cable release. I think you find a general distaste among Slashdoters for big governments doing oppressive things even when its their own. I don't see the "Western Hypocrisy" at least among the main stream Slashdot crowd, which I admit is not exactly main stream.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (1)

Ritmaxer (1536451) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332886)

One hack is very different from the other. If you can not tell the difference, you may want to go back to Freedom 101 or Freedom for Idiots.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332894)

Just like the Chinese hack on Google? Oh wait, because it's against Iran, according to Slashdot it's a great stroke for freedom and democracy. Slashdot's Western hypocrisy will quickly show itself once again, and before you say, "but it wasn't America or Israel behind it!!!!!" what proof do you have that the Chinese government was behind the Google hack?

It isn't just a matter of who did what, but also why they did it. I would say that the China thing is more on par with the worm that attacked Iran that what anon has done here.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (2)

alendit (1454311) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332896)

Is the difference between goverment agencies (as in case of the "Chinese" hacking gMail) and loosly organised individuals really that hard to graps? Basically, it's "induvidual people attracking centrilised organisations = good", "centralised organisation attacking individual people = bad".

Btw, inb4 "goverments are made of people".

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332914)

Who says the Chinese hack on Google was a horrible, evil thing? Google, sure. And the US government, sure. Personally, I couldn't care less either way.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (2)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333260)

So... you think that hacking google, to get the login credentials and email history of human rights activists for the express purpose of identifying them and their associates so that they can be imprisoned or executed for daring to ask that people be treated with some basic human respect isn't evil?

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332940)

Just like the Chinese hack on Google? Oh wait, because it's against Iran, according to Slashdot it's a great stroke for freedom and democracy.

No, no, you misunderstand. It's a great stroke for freedom and democracy because it was done by someone claiming to be from Anonymous (a group which conveniently both exists and doesn't exist, depending on whether Slashdot agrees with their actions or not or if they suddenly need plausible deniability). Big difference.

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (1)

creat3d (1489345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36334082)

Isn't it great how anyone can be "from Anonymous", even those they target?

Re:So this is a horrible, evil thing, (3, Insightful)

mr1911 (1942298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333368)

Just like the Chinese hack on Google?

Not at all. One was a government attacking a private company. The other is a group of people attacking a government.

You may argue that the Anonymous attack is wrong, but the premise that the Chinese attacking Google is equivalent is incorrect.

If you are against the Western hypocrisy it would be more correct for you to prove China's innocence than for me to prove its guilt.

Yes, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332786)

... did they pick up a Stuxnet infection in the process?

Ironically Enough (4, Informative)

drpimp (900837) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332820)

When I hit the /. story I got the following message below and I was curious if there were links to the email and Iran hacker #1 equal to 1000 hacker was retaliating

Error 503 Service Unavailable Service Unavailable
Guru Meditation: XID: 798461344
Varnish cache server

Re:Ironically Enough (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332882)

When I hit the /. story I got the following message below

Been happening to me, too, since about 11 o'clock central.

Re:Ironically Enough (4, Funny)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332902)

I can also confirm this is happening to me. This is terrible, I've gotten so much work done :(

Re:Ironically Enough (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333102)

Me as well

Re:Ironically Enough (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 3 years ago | (#36334156)

How can I get any work done if I'm hitting refresh every 5 seconds!

Re:Ironically Enough (1)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333134)

Same here. Was getting that on all the stories for a while.

Anyone else seeing a blank space at the top of the main page (running FF 3.6.x on XP)

Re:Ironically Enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333154)

When I hit the /. story I got the following message below and I was curious if there were links to the email and Iran hacker #1 equal to 1000 hacker was retaliating

Error 503 Service Unavailable Service Unavailable
Guru Meditation: XID: 798461344
Varnish cache server

WTF? Are they using Commodore Amiga's?

Re:Ironically Enough (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333264)

See: homage.

Re:Ironically Enough (2)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333376)

Clearly slashdot is just encouraging us to seek a guru, to learn meditation.

encrypted archive (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332822)

These places need to encrypt their archives remotely.

A new open source project, Cyphertite [cyphertite.com] , does just that. They have a beta test.. and so far it works great for me.

Re:encrypted archive (2, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333002)

Epic fail.

Quote the site:

The security of our proprietary process...

Tour data is fully sheltered by our unique encryption process.

Re:encrypted archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333234)

From what I understand, the open sourced client compressions and encrypts on the client side, and stores the encrypted data on their servers. They cannot access my files.

Their storage process is proprietary, which I do not care about... As long as I am the ONLY one that has access to my files, I am happy.

Re:encrypted archive (1)

slackbheep (1420367) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333324)

Get them to prove that without releasing source and we'll talk.

Re:encrypted archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333374)

prove what?

it is an open source client. go read the code!

Re:encrypted archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333518)

by your reasoning elliptic curve crypto is an epic fail. i believe the NSA and most other security services would beg to differ.

take a look at the source code. it uses AES-XTS with a modification that increases the effective key size. AES-XTS takes a 256-bit key and a 256-bit tweak, where the tweak is assumed to be a known quantity e.g. sector number. instead of using a known quantity for the tweak it uses an HMAC SHA1 of the data being encrypted.

Re:encrypted archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333548)

Right, you didn't read the code and have no clue what you are talkin about. Everything is there to see.

Re:encrypted archive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36335434)

I know you think you know everything about security because you sometimes read stuff that Bruce Schneier wrote, but seriously, even if they were using their own encryption algorithm, that wouldn't necessarily mean it was an "epic fail". The levels of assurance provided by even "flawed" algorithms that crypt researchers consider "unsafe" are vastly in excess of what is necessary for security. Seriously, if it's got a big enough key to be safe from brute force attacks, it's probably safe. Security researchers are down to worrying about the risk that, given a billion years and having turned the entire Earth into a quantum computer, a bad guy might be able to figure out the value of one single bit. Frankly I'm more worried about where those angels are going to dance now that you turned their pinhead into a quantum computer.

Seriously though, if we've learned anything from looking at the real epic fails over the years (where people have actually been compromised, not just where they've done something that Schneier thinks is silly), what we learn is that the security of your encryption is perhaps the least important thing there is! Using AES won't keep you secure if you have a stupid password, or if you're connecting unpatched Windows 2000 straight to the internet, or if -- like the majority of PHP code I've ever seen -- you're building SQL commands by string concatenation. It's like you're spending hours tuning your car's gearbox to save money on gas, when there's a fucking gaping hole in the gas tank. Lay off the "we need teh 16384-bit encryptions!" kool-aid for a moment and concentrate on the actual problems with your security for once.

It makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332826)

that mainland China would want to do this anonymously.

The conversation goes something like this (5, Insightful)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332832)

U.S.: Anonymous is completely rogue! They attack everyone utterly at random!

Anonymous: Not everyone, just the bad guys.

U.S.: What are you talking about? You've been attacking us, too.

Anonymous: *cocks eyebrow*

Re:The conversation goes something like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36332904)

lmao...

Re:The conversation goes something like this (0)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332936)

of all the times not to have mod points! +1 insightful

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

Simon80 (874052) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333012)

That reminds me of this brilliant comic [geekz.co.uk] . I wish the authors had kept working on it, it was consistently hilarious.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36334914)

That reminds me of this brilliant comic [geekz.co.uk] . I wish the authors had kept working on it, it was consistently hilarious.

i thought the comic sucked ass

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333112)

Yeah, those bastages at the Epilepsy Foundation for America are true villians!

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333394)

humorous and insightful but also serving to underscore the problem. When you trust a group of people to pick and choose your good and bad guys for you, and that group has no accountability... it's like distributing loaded guns in your local preschool then telling the preschoolers to all work together in picking out the bad guys before anyone pulls the trigger. Sometimes, they'll get it right.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (2)

ErikZ (55491) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333704)

I think you've summed up every society that has ever existed in a nutshell.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (3, Interesting)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333772)

humorous and insightful but also serving to underscore the problem. When you trust a group of people to pick and choose your good and bad guys for you, and that group has no accountability...

Ah, a group like say, your own government?

FYI -- Anonymous is the anti-thesis of the "group" of which you speak. They can't choose a bad guy for you, they can't even choose a bad guy for themselves. What they can do is cooperate with each other if&when the individuals' ideas of who the bad guys are happen to be aligned.

The fact that so many individuals attempt to hide behind the name Anonymous in order to make trouble for the traditional groups who decide your bad guys for you is very telling indeed.

it's like distributing loaded guns in your local preschool then telling the preschoolers to all work together in picking out the bad guys before anyone pulls the trigger. Sometimes, they'll get it right.

Yes. Invariably, if you hand them guns they'll shoot the ones that molest and abuse them. A few accidental deaths may occur, because they are too inexperienced -- but the others would quickly take note of the consequences.

Additionally -- this is a bad analogy, because a single member of Anonymous has very little power, much less than a child with a gun. It would be more like giving them small stones and sticks. Alone the child can not truly harm the adult abusers, but in numbers they can -- Hint: the number of children that lash out are proportional to the number of children, friends, and family that have been abused.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36334224)

Ah, a group like say, your own government?

Oh bullshit. Even the corrupt and bloated US government has some degree of accountability, they're called elections. e.g., Watergate.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36335466)

Anonymous is the anti-thesis of the "group" of which you speak. They can't choose a bad guy for you, they can't even choose a bad guy for themselves. What they can do is cooperate with each other if&when the individuals' ideas of who the bad guys are happen to be aligned.

That's an awful lot of words for something that can be summed up with the three-letter word "mob".

Invariably, if you hand them guns they'll shoot the ones that molest and abuse them

Oh my god, you actually believe that, don't you? I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

No, that will not "invariably" happen. It's debatable whether it would ever happen. I'm pretty sure nobody's ever carried out an experiment to see. However, for a more convincing attempt to imagine it than your wingnut "guns make everything better" bullshit, try "Lord of the Flies".

Hint: the number of children that lash out are proportional to the number of children, friends, and family that have been abused.

Actually, children who have been abused tend to be passive and afraid to hurt others. The ones who lash out with sticks and stones are the ones who have been brought up badly, never learned that actions have consequences, and have been taught to dehumanize other people and be selfish rather than empathetic. Hmm, I think we've found a good analogy for Anonymous at last!

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

suomynonAyletamitlU (1618513) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333794)

When you trust a group of people to pick and choose your good and bad guys for you, and that group has no accountability...

The problem is, history has shown that given enough time, people will stop being held accountable even if their position is supposed to be. Presidents, congress, military, press, police, various kinds of management, etc. Unless an outside force or event (including a halfway decent person getting elected to the position and starting a legacy, though that doesn't necessarily stick) forces a new spate of being held accountable, it can go seriously downhill from there.

It is to be feared that otherwise decent nations, states, etc may be on this path.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (5, Insightful)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333798)

There's a reason being a vigilante is often illegal. While we revere our comic book super heroes acting this way, the total lack of supervision and accountability makes even the nicest vigilante dangerous to human rights and civil liberties.

Yes, the police often ignore those too, but they actually have someone keeping records, and if they don't, those people have someone keeping records too. When you go to the polls, you don't get to vote out Anonymous. No matter how much they may attack something you actually value personally, Anonymous and other vigilante groups aren't about democracy. They're about their own form of totalitarianism.

That's right, when you decide your way is right and other should suffer for not agreeing with you, you've just become yet another totalitarian regime like Al Qaeda or the Taliban. Anonymous has no *right* to attack people, and we shouldn't celebrate them doing it outside the law even if they get the results you like. Some day it might be you they're coming after.

To rip off a famous poem:
When they came for the corporate overlords, I didn't stand up because I wasn't one.
When they came for the foreign governments I didn't say anything either, because I wasn't one.
When they came for me ... *muffled scream*

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

TFAFalcon (1839122) | more than 3 years ago | (#36334324)

Aren't you using the poem incorrectly? It's originally about people not protesting about mistreatment/killing of individuals by the all-powerful government, when this case is about the actions of individuals against powerful organizations/governments.

The direct harm this hack will to the government of Iran can be compared to neighborhood kids breaking one of your basement windows - annoying but not exactly life wrecking ---- unless of course that broken window reveals your daughter/sex slave that you were keeping prisoner in there. If that happens you deserve everything you get.

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#36335160)

Government is little more than a formalized vigilante group.

I have a better chance of voting Anonymous out than I do the U.S. government. Go ahead, just try to get a referendum to secede on the ballot in your state.

If it passes, good luck carrying it out.

That said, I don't prefer vigilante action. I prefer appropriate civil action, but in it's absence, perhaps vigilantes are better than nothing.

This is getting grotesque. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36335682)

To rip off a famous poem:

[...]

Do you notice that many of you are comparing DDOSing servers and getting (copies of) password files to killing people or putting them into concentration camps?

The next act of terrorism is what: sitting in front of a store and blocking the entrance?

By all means: argue in terms of civil law. Talk about the (financial, reputational) harm those DDOSers do.

But don't fucking compare that to violence against people.

It's not. Get a grip.

(Hint: civil disobedience traditionally entails breaking some laws -- but refrains from harming humans directly)

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

dontbgay (682790) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333932)

Who says they're picking our good and bad guys for us? Just because Iran's not on my BFF list doesn't mean Anon is speaking for me. Maybe the people involved are there voluntarily, which means they are complicit in the selection of a target. If that were not the case, there wouldn't be a story in the first place.

But I can't say this isn't even a little bit entertaining. Maybe they'll declare a jihad on computers next?

Re:The conversation goes something like this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333778)

Evil PBS?

Re:The conversation goes something like this (1)

surveyork (1505897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36335462)

I see what you did there... and I like it. :)

I'd like to participate in a DDOS, but... (2)

t33jster (1239616) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332848)

I'm not sure about the consequences. We've seen/heard of FBI raids against DDOS participants when the target is Western financial services, but does law enforcement care at all when Anons mess with Iranian or other rogue states' sites? I'd imagine that the legality is the same in either instance, so it's really the response that I'm concerned with.

Re:I'd like to participate in a DDOS, but... (1)

Renraku (518261) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333168)

The government will likely only get involved if there are diplomatic problems that will come from it. Most likely they'll just hand wave like China and promise that they aren't groups sponsored by the government with specific targets and goals and training, and Iran will hem and haw and threaten but in the end we have them by the balls anyway.

Kind of like China having us by the balls. They know we can't do anything to make them stop, and Iran knows they can't do anything to make us stop.

Re:I'd like to participate in a DDOS, but... (1)

Zalbik (308903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333626)

I'd imagine that the legality is the same in either instance, so it's really the response that I'm concerned with.

Well, just imagine that the response was the same and you would have nothing to be concerned about.

The legality is not the same.

Re:I'd like to participate in a DDOS, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333716)

Considering that there are no treaties in place between the US and Iran, and that Iranian law enforcement is not likely to cooperate anyway, it is probably impossible for the FBI to do anything about people hacking Iran.

And what does... (2, Funny)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332864)

And what does the postmaster say about the amount of emails stolen?
"It's over NINE THOUSAAAAAAND!"
"WHAT?! NINE THOUSAND?"

Re:And what does... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333436)

And what does the postmaster say about the amount of emails stolen?

"It's over NINE THOUSAAAAAAND!"

"WHAT?! NINE THOUSAND?"

Nappa! that can't be possible!

Torrent. (5, Informative)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332866)

Here. [thepiratebay.org]

Besides the obvious political angles, releases like these are probably a boon to academics doing work with text mining and the like. Public releases of email data sets have been hard to come by, something about "privacy". Of course, they're probably unlikely to all be in English, so your mileage may vary...

Re:Torrent. (1)

schlachter (862210) | more than 3 years ago | (#36332968)

we data/text mining researchers are mostly funded by government grants...we're not likely to access, let alone use, stolen data in any traceable way.

Re:Torrent. (1)

Weaselgrease (2050100) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333022)

we data/text mining researchers are mostly funded by government grants...we're not likely to access, let alone use, stolen data in any traceable way.

Emphasis on those last four words, there.

Re:Torrent. (1)

LoganDzwon (1170459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333166)

privacy? whats that? when did they invent that?

Re:Torrent. (1)

mistiry (1845474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333450)

I think Al Gore did, a few years back...

Photoshop anybody? (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333164)

I think that a variant of the trollface, with a turban, "the Ayahtrollah", would be a suitable mascot for such activities.

War.... (2)

steppin_razor_LA (236684) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333292)

Spats between hackers and international corporations is one thing. When you attack a foreign government, that starts to get awfully close to war which is a matter for governments and not their citizens.

It is also easy to imagine military and intelligence agencies behind these sorts of attacks and hiding behind their citizenry as an excuse.

This sort of thing is going to continue to escalate and I predict that lives will eventually be lost..

Re:War.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333512)

Yea, Iranian lives...

Re:War.... (1)

ErikZ (55491) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333666)

Bold prediction!

Unlike a future where no lives will be lost whatsoever?

Re:War.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333816)

If you believe that hacking will become part of warfare, then it stands to reason that in the future a group of citizens in one country would be able to initiate an act of war on a foreign nation without the involvement of their government or the people. That should concern you.

Re:War.... (1)

Skidborg (1585365) | more than 3 years ago | (#36333988)

You act as if such a thing hasn't happened regularly throughout history. Things aren't new just because they take place on the internet.

Re:War.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333696)

This sort of thing is going to continue to escalate and I predict that cyberlives will eventually be lost..

FTFY

Re:War.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36334576)

close to war which is a matter for governments and not their citizens

I would say that war is very much a matter for citizens given that they are the ones who have to fight them.

Welcome Back Package (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333572)

I wonder if they'll offer a welcome back package when they come back up.

Shouldn't the... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36333688)

Shouldn't the title of the article say something like "Anonymous steals over 9,000 Iranian emails"?

Finally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36334152)

Finally those faggots attack people that deserve it.

How many beheadings, mass killings, and homicide bombings did it take before you queers decided to kick an islamic republic in the nuts?

Anon keeps 'winning' (1)

Cito (1725214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36335134)

You'd think Charlie Sheen has taken over as much Win anon has been producing lately. Now if they'll just go after Nigeria next :P I hate to say it, but anon has really started becoming a patriot group and one at least in part I can support. Hopefully they stay like this and leave the camwhores like Jessi Slaughter alone or for Ebaum to deal with.
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