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Two Elements Added To Periodic Table

CmdrTaco posted more than 2 years ago | from the still-waiting-for-slashdottium dept.

Science 138

smitty777 writes "Two new elements have been added to the periodic table of the elements. Elements 114 and 116 are the weightiest known, with atomic weights of 289 and 292 respectively. The discoverers are proposing flerovium and moscovium as names for these two new discoveries. There are also arguments being made to add in three more as well: 113, 115 and 118." We've noted element 114 in the past, but this is more official.

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138 comments

And the elements... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352208)

...Are the weightiest.
The chemists...
...Are the craziest.

Waaaay, back home.

Weightiest (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352236)

WTF is this?
whats wrong with heaviest

Re:Weightiest (2)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352380)

Stupid word. Especially since we're probably talking about mass anyway.

Re:Weightiest (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352672)

Hint: Atomic weight

Re:Weightiest (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352836)

a misnomer.

Re:Weightiest (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352460)

Knowledge embiggens even the smallest man

Re:Weightiest (3, Insightful)

kimvette (919543) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352520)

I agree, and what's more, the use of the term "weightiest" would be perfectly cromulent had we been discussing weight. However massiest would probably have been even cromulenter.

Re:Weightiest (2)

aix tom (902140) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352734)

The "heavy" is probably all worn out from the old "what's heavier, a ton of flerovium or a ton of moscovium?" joke and needed a day off.

Re:Weightiest (1)

chill (34294) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353008)

It is more fun if you throw gold in the mixture. What is heavier, a ton of gold or a ton of ?

Gold is measured in Troy ounces, where 1 Troy Oz = 1.097 avoirdupois ounce. Thus, the gold is heavier.

Re:Weightiest (4, Funny)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353452)

That only works if you (for some reason) insist on using the currency-based measure for gold, but not on all the other items.

That's retarded. One of the first things you do is ensure your units are consistent.

Re:Weightiest (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353484)

Bzzzt! There are 12 Troy ounces per Troy pound and 16 Avoirdupois ounces per Avoirdupois pound so a ton of anything measured in Avoirdupois is heavier than a ton of gold measure in Troy units.

Re:Weightiest (1)

smelch (1988698) | more than 2 years ago | (#36354930)

Shit! This conversation is damned compelling. I came in here expecting to be bored about properties of new elements, I was not - I repeat not - ready to witness this epic battle of which-unit-is-the-weightiest.

Re:Weightiest (1)

Defenestrar (1773808) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353272)

Nah - it's back to Doc Brown being concerned over the future 80s because of how often Marty McFly talked about something being "heavy."

Element 115 (3, Informative)

jd (1658) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352248)

Should be called Lazarium. After all, it's safe to say nobody has an earlier claim of discovery. :) (Hey, I said nothing about any actual discovery, just a claim of one.)

I'll be most disappointed if.... (3, Interesting)

Brannoncyll (894648) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352306)

element 115 is not given the name Elerium, in honour of the fictional element used to power the spacecraft in the XCOM series. Ununpentium is dull and doesn't really roll off the tongue!

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (2)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352444)

But technically isn't "Elerium-115" mean "Elerium with atomic mass of 115" ? Like "U-235" ?

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352552)

U-235 was a nuclear submarine invented by the Nazis.

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352642)

They didn't have nuclear submarines in those days.

And there's no U 235. There's a U 238 which is both an isotope of Uranium and a U-boot.

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (2)

Brannoncyll (894648) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352808)

Don't know where you got that information from. According to the font of all knowledge [wikipedia.org], U 235 makes up 0.72% of natural uranium and is fissile, whereas U 238 is not.

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352970)

I meant "There was no U-boot 235" not there's no U-235 isotope.

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 2 years ago | (#36354902)

I meant "There was no U-boot 235"

Except that there was. The U-235 was a Type VIIC, commissioned 19 Dec 1942. She never saw combat service and was used as a training boat. Sunk by a US bombing raid on 14 May, 1943, she was successfully raised and put back into service. She was finally sunk for good when a German torpedo boat attacked her by mistake on 14 April, 1945. She went down with all 47 hands.

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352990)

it was SECRET!

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (2)

Brannoncyll (894648) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352748)

That would be the usual convention, yes. However the online UFOpaedia wiki site [ufopaedia.org] (and my vague recollections) suggest that it was also referred to as element 115 in the game. That being said, the wikipedia discussion on ununpentium [wikipedia.org] argues that Elerium-115 should be interpreted as the Elerium isotope of mass 115 rather than element 115, prompting this pop-culture reference's removal from the article.

Re ununpentium!? (1)

scharkalvin (72228) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353724)

ununpentium
Does Intel have nothing not to do with this one? (double negative there).

Re:Re ununpentium!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353960)

I read this as Rumpelstiltskin

Re:I'll be most disappointed if.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36354968)

element 115 is not given the name Elerium, in honour of the fictional element used to power the spacecraft in the XCOM series. Ununpentium is dull and doesn't really roll off the tongue!

Are you fucking retarded?

and what about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352314)

Unobtanium?

Re:and what about (1)

Defenestrar (1773808) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353412)

Mostly, but more like Notobtaniumforverylongium. It had been predicted that Uuq (element 115) might be one "peak" on the islands of stability [wikipedia.org], but it seems that the actuality is a few elements lower. None of these talked about today should have much of a useful halflife.

I have a name for other new elements... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352320)

I have a name in case we find an element that ends up being the "least weightiest". The "TacoMicroPenisium".

Huh (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352328)

What happened to that un uh um oo ee oo ah ah standardized naming system?

Did they finally realize it sucked the passion and romance right out of the periodic table?

Re:Huh (2)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352386)

passion and romance ... periodic table

That sounds like the plot of a xkcd comic...

Re:Huh (1)

AikonMGB (1013995) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352780)

I believe that naming system was used to fill in spots that either haven't been discovered/created, or that have been discovered but not verified/accepted. Once the corresponding element gets "voted onto the island", they give it an official name.

Aikon-

Re:Huh (5, Funny)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353454)

What happened to that un uh um oo ee oo ah ah standardized naming system?

They gave up when they realized it would have to be extended to include ting tang walla walla bing bang.

How close are we to the island of stability? (5, Insightful)

JoshuaZ (1134087) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352440)

The real issue isn't these elements which are unstable and not that interesting. The real question is whether the island of stability exists and how close we are to it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_of_stability [wikipedia.org] If current theories are correct then there may be a section of elements with atomic numbers near 120 that are much more stable. They might even be stable enough to be used for practical purposes if we can synthesize them on a large scale. Depending on the exact model, they might have half-lives as short as a few seconds (which for elements in this range is comparatively large but not large enough to use for any practical purposes) or it might be as much as 100,000 years (there are more optimistic estimates but they seem extremely unlikely). For comparison, tritium has a half-life of about 12 years and is used in a lot of practical applications. So, if the island exists and we find good ways to synthesize these elements, then we might get some very interesting chemistry.

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (3, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352594)

and even more importantly, how does this magic element relate to mining operations on pandora, and is it the stuff that makes 10 foot tall blue chicks hot?

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (2)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353146)

I'm still waiting on a high numbered inexpensively-manufactured element that has a short half life and quickly decays into non-radioactive gold and silver, chemically, atomically indistinguishable from the stuff we mine :-)

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353258)

Or find out the hard way why our neighboring stars aren't teeming with advanced civilizations.
"Congrats! We just created element 120 and it appears stable! Yay! What do you mean the sensors aren't working anymore? Ok who's messing with the clock and making the hands run backwards? How'd my underwear get on my head and why did Fred just turn into a polar bear?"

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353434)

The chemistry could be interesting but I doubt it would ever be more than a laboratory curiosity. Even if we discovered a super heavy element with a long half life and low energy decay mode of alpha emission you still have the radiological emissions and chemistry of what could be a very long and fast decay chain. Once the element decays it becomes a different element that is unlikely to remain in the hypothesized island of stability and could violently unstable, emitting neutrons, beta particles and gamma photons all along its decay chain. By contrast Tritium decays by beta emission into Helium 3 which is stable and the end of the decay chain. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decay_chain for some details.

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36354026)

Bah thats passe let me know when they get to element 120 in the anti-perodic table

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (1)

Squiffy (242681) | more than 2 years ago | (#36354836)

We're missing the island of stability and we don't know how to hit it yet. As the article you link states, "The manufacturing of nuclei in the island of stability proves to be very difficult, because the nuclei available as starting materials do not deliver the necessary sum of neutrons."

Re:How close are we to the island of stability? (2)

tokul (682258) | more than 2 years ago | (#36355188)

if the island exists and we find good ways to synthesize these elements, then we might get some very interesting chemistry.

I am not atom physicist, but if island of stability exists, then we should be able to find those elements without nuclear synthesis. Those elements would exist as they would be created the usual way by mother universe.

If you have unstable composite with over 250 parts, do you really expect that composite of 300-400 parts will be rock solid.

Elerium 115 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352496)

Oh, Elerium 115 is comiiiing! Now we need to get some Alien Alloys...

Re:Elerium 115 (2)

x6060 (672364) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353040)

I loved X-COM as a kid! All I want is a heavy plasma rifle.... But seriously, I think youre the only other person on earth I have run into that knows about this game.

Re:Elerium 115 (2)

xkuehn (2202854) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353338)

I think youre the only other person on earth I have run into that knows about this game.

Really? My friends and I used to love it.

If you don't know about it, you might want to check out UFO:AI (ufoai.ninex.info, or find it on sourceforge). It's very playable but gets boring late in the game. That should improve as the game matures.

Obviously (2)

nschubach (922175) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352602)

“Element 114 obviously isn’t a very catchy name, especially in a sea of molybdenums and seaborgiums. They have temporary titles — ununquadium and ununhexium — but final names are yet to been decided.

Obviously, the elements must roll off the tongue as well as molybdenum.

Re:Obviously (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352756)

> Obviously, the elements must roll off the tongue as well as molybdenum.

The disulfide is pretty slippery but I wouldn't put it on my tongue.

Re:Obviously (1)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352822)

I knew a guy who had difficulty pronouncing a number of words correctly. Molybdenum was one of them. He invariably pronounced it 'mollybendum'. Funny, but a bit sad at the same time.

Re:Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353242)

Hell, there once was a U.S. President who couldn't even pronounce "nuclear."

For two terms.

Funny now, not so much when he was in office.

Re:Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36354322)

I knew a guy who had difficulty pronouncing a number of words correctly. Molybdenum was one of them. He invariably pronounced it 'mollybendum'. Funny, but a bit sad at the same time.

I knew of a guy who had difficulty pronouncing a number of words correctly. Nuclear was one of them. He also had a problem knowing his left hand from his right and how to properly end a "Fool me once..." saying. Funny, but a bit sad at the same time.

- Peder

Re:Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36352856)

Since we're talking weightiest: how about miketysonium? Hulkhoganium? Bethdittonium? Kirstiealleynium?

The perfect name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353074)

George. I will call it George

better names (3, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352616)

almost obligatory whenever these kinds of stories pop up on slashdot:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_elements,_materials,_isotopes_and_atomic_particles [wikipedia.org]

Re:better names (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36354980)

Yes.. they need to name one of them Naquadah.

Moscovium, placenames (2)

aBaldrich (1692238) | more than 2 years ago | (#36352844)

This moscovium made me think of other elements named for places. Europium [wikipedia.org] and Americium for continents. Lutetium [wikipedia.org] for Paris, Californium [wikipedia.org] for California. Dubnium [wikipedia.org] for Dubna, a city in Russia. Francium [wikipedia.org] and Gallium [wikipedia.org] for France, Germanium [wikipedia.org] for Germany, Polonium [wikipedia.org] for Poland), Hafnium [wikipedia.org] for Copenhagen, Holmium [wikipedia.org] for Stockholm (these last 2 from their Latin names). Then Hassium [wikipedia.org] for Hesse (Germany), Rhenium [wikipedia.org] for Eastern France (jk :D), Ruthenium [wikipedia.org] for the old region in Ukraine-Russia, Strontium [wikipedia.org] for a village in Scotland, Berkelium [wikipedia.org] for Berkeley, and Thulium [wikipedia.org] for a mythical island in the north Pole.

A special mention to the lucky sweddish village of Ytterby [wikipedia.org] that has four elements named in its honor: Yttrium [wikipedia.org], Ytterbium [wikipedia.org], Erbium [wikipedia.org], and Terbium [wikipedia.org].

Re:Moscovium, placenames (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36354438)

Dude, you forgot Darmstadtium.

GSI FTW!

Re:Moscovium, placenames (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36355186)

What about Brazilium ? São-Paulium ? Rio-de-Janeirium ? Recifium ? Ronaldinium ?

"Yomamamium" for weightiest element (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353020)

I vote "Yomamamium" to be the name of the weightiest element.

Outdated periodic tables will ruin school district (1)

formfeed (703859) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353036)

I hope they had at least the courtesy to add the new elements at the bottom, so old tables can be updated more easily.

Re:Outdated periodic tables will ruin school distr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353126)

I hope they had at least the courtesy to add the new elements at the bottom, so old tables can be updated more easily.

This reminds me of when I was in junior high science class -- we were taught that electrons ORBITED the nucleus. I didn't find out differently until my college astronomy class.

Re:Outdated periodic tables will ruin school distr (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36355066)

The periodic table is organized in order of atomic number (amongst other things), so I'm sure that wouldn't be a problem.

Dammit and I just ordered the shower curtain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353100)

Now I'll have to wait for ver 1.1 of http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/gear/8a2f/ [thinkgeek.com]

Re:Dammit and I just ordered the shower curtain (2)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353206)

Now I'll have to wait for ver 1.1 of http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/gear/8a2f/ [thinkgeek.com] [thinkgeek.com]

If element discoveries keep going at the current rate, in 20 or 30 years, a shower curtain won't be large enough for all the elements to fit, and still have readable type <G>

Perhaps a linoleum floor version of the table?

Unobtainium (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353116)

Obviously

Those aren't elements... (1)

bodland (522967) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353190)

They are the names of the horses Paul Revere used in his famous "Threaten the British" tour...

Elerium (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36353636)

It should have been called Elerium.

I think we have too little swearwords in science (1)

McNihil (612243) | more than 2 years ago | (#36353926)

how about fatassium and heavyasshitium. No, I am not serious but hey it's Monday.

Lighter (1)

owlstead (636356) | more than 2 years ago | (#36354888)

Wake me up when they find a new element with a *lower* atomic number than the ones we are accustomed to now. Maybe one with zero protons called Hallucinatium (Ha!).

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