Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

How To Succeed In IT Without Really Trying

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the what-would-you-say-ya-do-here dept.

Businesses 283

snydeq writes "Deep End's Paul Venezia discusses the two ways to succeed in IT: through proficiency and hard work, a road that often leads to unending servitude, or the other way; with little effort or proficiency at all. 'I hate to say this, but a number of people in IT positions work harder to make it seem like they're busy as beavers than doing actual work. Quite often this dysfunction starts at the top: When an IT manager doesn't know the technology very well, he or she may hire folks who have no idea what their job is other than to show up every day and answer the occasional email, passing questions along to others with more technical abilities, or to their contacts at the various hardware and software vendors. People like these populate many consulting companies. They rely almost completely on contractors to perform the actual work, serving as remote hands in a real crisis and as part of a phone tree for less pressing issues.'"

cancel ×

283 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Not limited to IT (5, Insightful)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36356948)

I suspect a lot of industries have a similar "hierarchy"

Re:Not limited to IT (3)

alexborges (313924) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357126)

"Cluelessnes" is pervasive.

Yes. That is the law of life.

Re:Not limited to IT (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357658)

Exactly. There is nothing unique [youtube.com] about the claims in this article. It can happen in any occupation or industry because there is an inherent lack of concern when working for a 3rd part employer, especially when that employer doesn't have any clue about what you are supposed to to.

Re:Not limited to IT (5, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358186)

That is the law of life.

The only way to succeed in the game of IT is not to play.

IT is becoming the 21st century version of the 19th century shirtwaist factory. Your income will stagnate, your working conditions will worsen, and you won't have a single day that you will not be worried about your job disappearing. If you are the one in ten that actually climbs what used to be called the "corporate ladder" the best you can hope for is that each year your job will become less fulfilling and more disheartening because you'll constantly be having to let experienced people go because they've gotten a few raises and now make too much, and there are always less-skilled, more desperate workers available. You will become the person you hate most, a shit-eating middle-manager who never gets to do anything creative and makes life miserable for everyone beneath him because management sets unreasonable expectations.

If on your first day you have a 401k plan to which your employer matches 10 percent, plan on having that contribution shrink to 5 percent and then zero percent. Whatever health care you start with will get worse over time with bigger deductibles and lower caps because your employer needs to show constantly-growing profits and can always just move the whole operation to South Carolina (as a temporary stopping-place before South or West Asia.

Find something fulfilling, instead. Maybe the culinary arts or crafting trout flies to sell on the Internet or something. Look at your nearby community for small opportunities. Open a dirty-water hot dog stand. It's cash income and at least you'll be appreciated a little bit. When thinking about your career, it's best to expect the worst as far as the future. Things are going to get a lot, lot worse economically. If you are relying on a company to keep you alive, you will lose.

Good luck.

Re:Not limited to IT (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357218)

Work for a Union company :|

Half of my group is competent and knows their sh*t. The other half sits at their desk and drools on themselves.
The former has to work twice as hard as the latter to make up for the loss. Can't possibly fire em because they
spout the Union Mantra "I haven't been trained" because the company views training of any sort as an expense
instead of a investment. What is infuriating is the pay level is the same. Union = top pay once you exceed five
years. Regardless of your level of knowledge. Head -> Desk

You can easily tell which ones are the Union Members and which ones are not. You can draw the line right down
the middle and separate those who know what they're doing and which ones do not. Competent = non-union. Easy
as that.

Honest truth alert:

One of the last Unionites to get placed in the group did not know what a DOS prompt was. Hath no clue as to what
FTP even IS and their computer skills . . . . well. . . let's just say they are the nightmare that Desktop Support is
afraid of.

Re:Not limited to IT (4, Interesting)

Moryath (553296) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357616)

You can easily tell which ones are the Union Members and which ones are not. You can draw the line right down
the middle and separate those who know what they're doing and which ones do not. Competent = non-union. Easy
as that.

Funny, where I work it's the reverse. Competent = union. Incompetent = hired and fired every 6 months, non-union all the way. Really Fucking Incredibly Incompetent = Indian outsource or H1-B Indian On Visa.

Re:Not limited to IT (2)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357766)

I think a good examlple of the reverse is fedex.

Their express service is fantastic, courteous, and union.

Their ground service constantly fucks up, acts like assholes, and in non-union.

The grround service is specifically kept as a separate company to avoid the union, and it is terrible.

Re:Not limited to IT (5, Informative)

krakass (935403) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358342)

You have that backwards. Express isn't union. Ground is. Mainly because of the Federal Railway Labor Act.

Re:Not limited to IT (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358520)

It depends on the control of the Union.
Unions like every thing in life needs checks and balances.
Large powerful Union vs. A mid sized organization will kill the organization by essentially making human resources department completely useless and ineffective. And will be as you say so many people making excuses not to work, except for coming for reasons to get new and exciting new jobs. Making slowly bleeding the company to its death, or needing life support (AKA Tax Payer funding)

A Week or non-existent untion vs. A large organization (who doesn't have to fear Unionization) will push the employees hard (often too hard) and hurt the employees. Knowing that employees it is hard for them to switch jobs, in this type of market.

We need Unions so Non-Unioned companies know to treat their employees well, just so they don't need to deal with them. But we need the Unions to know when to back off, a LOT OF COMPANIES TREAT THEIR EMPLOYEES FAIR with or without the Unions, as it is part of Good HR. And if a Union is there is needs to be sure it doesn't kill the company.

It is really a balance. It isn't as black and white as Unions are Good/Evil and Corporations are Evil/Good. It is a real mix.

I personally think Unions are in great need for reform. Made popular in the early 1900's where the US economy was based on towns and cities having very few career options (1 or 2 factories, and a bunch of Mom and Pop (who usually are self run and do not hire many people outside their families), and the people didn't have many options to travel to an other town. Making the Conservative Motto If you don't like your job then Quit, impractical because if they quit they in essence volunteer to be poor. Today things are different, I just recently switched my job because I didn't think I was getting a fair salary for my work, I had to drive to a different town to do it but it was easier. I didn't like what I was getting so I quit, and got a new job (not in that order) most people are expected to work at a company for 3-5 years before moving to an other job, it is new fact of life. Unions haven't really embraced this concept. Unions need to go away from micromanaging the companies HR and persons pay, and towards other issues, such as insuring the company doesn't move to a new location, that large scale layoffs are well planned in advanced, that when the companies outsources it is due to a real need, not trying to save a few bucks in the short term. As well they need to help the company grow and prosper. Its funding needs to be better then dues from members (making decisions to layoff skilled labor so they can hire twice as many unskilled Union Employees, so the Union will get more money) Without such reform Unions will continue their dying trend, as they keep putting Unioned Companies out of business or making doing business so uncompetive that they just move to a different country.

some other things that are infuriating (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358582)

i really wont go into the full list, but how about the racist, screaming boss who fired the competent, friendly, but mentally challenged worker who had been there for 5 years, because she didnt like 'retards'?

would that happen at a union shop?

Re:Not limited to IT (5, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357408)

The general rule, as I understand it, is that nothing generally hurts your career like being productive.

Consider this hypothetical - let's say you're a really good front-line admin. You're also pretty good at managing people, so you're promoted to manage your team of admins. You put together a good and productive team, but occasionally get back in the saddle to help 'em out and show 'em how it's done (and show 'em that the boss might actually know what he's doing).

And now you have just gotten your last promotion, because the company will think that they can't afford to lose your great technical skills to upper management. It doesn't matter that your senior admin who you've groomed to replace you could do the job, they're used to "there's a problem, that guy can fix it", and they don't want to put you in a position where you can't go fix it.

The Dilbert Principle has its roots in reality.

Re:Not limited to IT (5, Interesting)

Cryacin (657549) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357918)

Well, the funny thing is that those sorts of guys fall into the "Secret Weapon" category. Make yourself absolutely indespensible. Get on the green beret projects, and then get another offer for more money, and watch the counter offers roll in. They don't pay enough? Leave. I've seen plenty of Spandex Wearing, walk on water without getting their damn socks wet, gurus get paid more on contract than the managers that employ them. Plus they get to have much more fun.

Re:Not limited to IT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357950)

I think folks like to think this is why they got passed over last year, but 1) no-one is irreplaceable, 2) any good manager should always be training your replacement, and 3) it doesn't really work this way - at least, not any of the Fortune 500 companies where I've worked. Usually promotion beyond the first or second round is all about how well you play politics - the higher you go, the more folks you are competing with for fewer slots, etc.

Re:Not limited to IT (4, Insightful)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357576)

> I suspect a lot of industries have a similar "hierarchy"

Maybe not, but IT is the perfect niche for that. Bullshitting will work better in IT and less well in buildings or car manufacturing where mere mortals can spot when the end product is falling apart. In IT, you can sell the equivalent of a building falling apart as a fine technology product if you use enough bullshit and buzzwords.

Mod parent up. (4, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357884)

From TFA:

When peers or customers see how quickly someone troubleshoots an infrastructure breakdown or architects a technical solution, they wonder just how hard it could really be. Also, why does this person get paid so much?

If you perform enough miracles when other people NEED them ... pretty soon they think THEY are the ones performing the miracles.

And in IT ... without the risk of death or dismemberment should your design/work crash ... that's just the way things are.

People EXPECT computer systems to crash. Which is the perfect environment for people who know nothing to succeed.

Re:Not limited to IT (1)

Idbar (1034346) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357992)

And here I was thinking that was the way government actually worked. But I guess you can always point and blame it on the IT guys. I suppose that makes it more relevant.

On the other hand, a professor one day told me: "You don't need to know everything, you just need to know where to find the information, even if it's just someone else to ask.", which in summary means that you're not necessarily smarter because you know all the answers (and you're a pretentious ah), but you know the right people that can solve your questions.

Lack of People Skills (2)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358662)

It is not as much as the Bad IT Guy gets promoted but the person with the better people skills does.

There are a lot of actually good successful IT people out there. They know their stuff and keep things going, But they also can put on a Tie, talk to others and explain their ideas better, and they go out of their way to show their success.

A good IT Person who is in the trenches while good at their job, but doesn't talk to management and sees them as the Evil overlord keeping them down, is well going to be kept down. They need to put their head out of the trenches document their success work on plans to reduce failures go to those optional meetings, and be useful in them. Otherwise the Bad IT Guy who spends all his time to write reports explaining why it isn't his fault will get notices just because he has a better set of documentation.

I have seen a lot of Good IT people who I wouldn't put up to promotion, Why?
Things like, Not knowing the status of a project in a timely fashion (You don't know if they going on the right track or where they are in the process, making you worry that things are going to be delayed, and you won't know until the last minute, and when asked about the status you just get a good), or Getting too much detail on what they are doing (The opposite extreme, I do not need to know everything that goes on in your project, you are paid to think for yourself and do what you think is right, You do not need approval for every step... Also you drown out the information making it hard to find real problems because there is too much stuff to handle to see if you are actually following the specs).
Needing to challenge everything, Does the manager really need to fight with you for every job, yea it may be stupid but it needs to get done. As Well just being a Yes Man, hey you are hired to tell me that something doesn't make sense or seems way off.

contractor / consultant (3, Insightful)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36356958)

"Contractor" and "consultant" are euphemisms for don't care and kickback. You want a good job, you hire an employee. You want an excellent job, you take on a (prospective) partner.

Re:contractor / consultant (1)

enderjsv (1128541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357042)

That's not fair. There are contractors who care. I've seen one. In fact, let me check something... um... yup, I dvr'd that episode of Ripley's Believe it or not. I'll see if I can find a clip of it on you tube and post it for ya.

Re:contractor / consultant (1)

NewWorldDan (899800) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357590)

Hey, when I first started working as a contractor, I cared. I tried to take on extra tasks because my basic position only took me 20 hours a week max. The client didn't care. As long as my one task was being done, that's all they wanted. I was literally told to read slashdot by my immediate supervisor. I was also advised not to draw attention to the fact that I had extra time as it might make me look expendable to the higher ups. I did get invited to the division xmas party, but I was told I had to pay $30 and it would be unpaid time off (since it was during business hours). Something better came along and I wasted no time in getting out of there.

Re:contractor / consultant (5, Informative)

hamster_nz (656572) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357086)

As a consultant doing contract work, I must disagree with you. I don't receive kickbacks, and I care. I treat all customers as though their systems are my own... After all, if they have a big technical issue, it's me who has to work though the night fixing it!

Consultants and contractors have their place. Small IT shops don't often get the chance to build up the depth of skill and experience required for things like infrastructure upgrades (e.g. SAN Storage upgrades, VMware migrations, Database upgrades...).

Maybe you just a very poor judge of which people bring in to help you with things outside of your core business / skill set?

Re:contractor / consultant (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357448)

receive kickbacks?

No. You're supposed to _offer_ kickbacks to the guy who chooses you.

Money laundering is how you get paid such an inflated amount compared to an employee.

Re:contractor / consultant (4, Interesting)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357130)

Not always true - I once worked for a very large company as a Contractor. This company was populated with PHB types and was very fond of meetings to track the progress, of... the latest reorg or something. Dunno.

Anyhow, while filling out timesheets and painfully aware of my per-hour rate doing "admin" work for a not-quite-deployed system, I felt like I should be doing something. With my "developer" background, I wrote all kinds of tools to make my "operations" work easier... pretty my automating my way out of a job, which was my goal, since I was on a 6 month contract. I also did the onerous task of reviewing vendor support agreements and such, and pretty much saved the company my salary in un-needed maintenance contracts.

Long story, short, they offered me a full time senior position at the end of my contract. Alas, the company was still a PITA to work (more about process, sensitivity classes, and other bs, than working.) The employees were all pretty much clock-punchers with no initiative, which is a toxic place to stay if you have any personal ambition. The point is, in this case, the employees were worse than the "contractors".

But I have to agree on "consultants" ;-)

so America is toxic? (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358614)

what country would you suggest moving to?

Re:contractor / consultant (1)

yarnosh (2055818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357140)

Part of "not caring" though is that you get to bypass a lot of the corporate politics. Remember Office Space? They brought in The Bobs. The Bobs didn't give a shit. They were there to cut the fat. Didn't matter who they fired. Nobody was safe except the very highest of execs. That's what being an IT consultant was like. I go into an office, setup their firewall or whatever, and get the fuck out. I have X number of hours to complete the job because that's what was sold to the client and I was in trouble if I couldn't deliver in that time. There was no pretending to be busy. No sucking up to the boss. I was way more productive than any employee.

That's not to say anyone should replace employees with consultants, of course. It just isn't cost effective in the long run. But I do think consultants get a bad rap. Sometimes you have a one-time project that employees just can't handle on their own.

Re:contractor / consultant (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357146)

In my experience at Microsoft, contractor is code word for "expected to work more than the blue badges, but still gets treated like dog shit for having an orange badge; finally gets asked to interview for a blue badge, but remembers being treated like dog shit and still feels suicidal as a result; decides to stay as contractor to avoid having to BS through the dreaded manhole / gas station interview; then a month later gets let go with all the other orange badges when the entire product group gets axed because all the blue-badges were too busy doing the 'bored? call a meeting!' routine to get any actual work done."

Yes, I am bitter.

Re:contractor / consultant (2)

alexborges (313924) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357148)

This is not true. The sad reality is that any market obeys the Bell Curve: good contractors/consultants are harder to find than mediocre ones.

And then, if your fucking boss thinks that 80 bucks an hour is too much for some very high-end tech work, then your really can't even reach the good ones.

Re:contractor / consultant (2)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357388)

How is this marked insightful? You want a good job, you find a good worker and pay them well. You want an excellent job, you find a great worker and pay then exceptionally well. It sounds insightful, doesn't it? But is it actually based on anything tangible/testable?

The only difference between a contractor and an employee is compensation. Contractors typically make more, employees typically have more benefits (though these rarely add up to the same net value as the difference in compensation). A contractor is financially incentivized to work longer hours, and a salaried employee less hours. When companies hire someone on full time, there's an illusion of stability that goes along with that, but in this economy who is fooled by that anymore? It just comes down to money.

If you want loyalty, make sure however you compensate your employees beats the market, you provide them with a great working environment, and work hard to mitigate job related stress. If you can't bring yourself to do that and still want loyalty, use a quote like the parent's and see if anyone buys your bs. Or get a puppy.

Re:contractor / consultant (3, Funny)

PJ6 (1151747) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357706)

I got a puppy. And gave him a title.

As a business decision, it was AWESOME.

Re:contractor / consultant (1)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357938)

WIN. The company blog will just write itself.

Re:contractor / consultant (2)

bryan1945 (301828) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358030)

Monday- Took a walk
Tuesday- Took a nap in the sunshine
Wednesday- Licked my nether regions
Thursday- Another nap
Friday- Snausages!

Re:contractor / consultant (2)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358450)

If Wednesday's post doesn't secure angel funding I've lost faith in America.

Re:contractor / consultant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357796)

No, you are just plain wrong.

http://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc762.html

Re:contractor / consultant (1)

defaria (741527) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357830)

Excuse me but BULLSHIT. The difference is a contractor you pay simply to shut up do a job. A consultant on the other hand is somebody you pay to not only do the job but to guide you to doing the job correctly. If you want real dead weight - hire an employee!

Re:contractor / consultant (4, Interesting)

RobDude (1123541) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357870)

I couldn't disagree more; having been both a consultant and an employee.

Maybe my experiences have been unique; but I've been an employee at a large insurance company (Allstate) and a smaller custom software shop (that I currently work out, so name removed). In both cases, there was little motivation to do much more than the bare minimum. I mean, sure, I showed up and did some stuff; but I found very quickly that expectations where low. I didn't have to work very hard to meet them. If the company had a good year and you were doing good - 3-5% raise. If the company had a bad year then 'salary freeze'.

Many people find they get significant raises by switching companies, and this is why. Once you are employed the company figures, 'Well, he worked for X last year, now we give him more than X - why would he quit?'.

I show up late, leave early and surf the web. I've also been pidgin-holed into maintaining and updating a very defined section of the application. Everyone knows, if you have a problem with Y, you talk to me. That's all I do. I do Y. Five years at the same company and after four months of doing good they gave me project Y. I'm still doing project Y. I'll be doing project Y for as long as I work at the company.

When I was a consultant, it was a world of difference. A consulting firm sells consultants. They want to have REALLY GOOD consultants because selling a good product is a great way to stay in business. My current job, we sell a piece of software. They company wants that software to be really good. It's a subtle difference, but it makes a huge difference. The consulting firm I worked for would intentionally rotate us in and out of projects. If you were a Java guy, they wanted you on a .Net project. If you did desktop apps before, they wanted you to do a website. They wanted you to be highly skilled and diverse because that meant they could throw you on any project that came along. They also knew that, after about a year, as a developer on the same project, the learning curve drops to about zero. You don't learn new stuff doing the same old crap. If you were leading a team, it was different, but as far as being a developer, they wanted you to be really good at it.

And, unlike selling software, where your contributions were pretty abstract and subjective; when I was a consultant my time had a very clear value attached to it. The client was being billed for it. If I worked overtime, two things happened. First, I got paid (and my company did too). Second, the client had to pay more. There was an actual expectation of measurable work being done.

Being a consultant was great. I did, at least 2-3 times more work than I do now. I also learned a lot more from people who were really talented and knowledgeable. It was also really hard. I didn't get to spend an hour every day surfing the web and ducking out at 4pm to get an early start on my WoW raids.

Re:contractor / consultant (2)

billcopc (196330) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358070)

I'm wear both the consultant and contractor hats, and while I'll agree with you that there are many fraudsters abusing those titles, I've been doing my best work since being cut loose from the stability of 9-to-5. Yes, my best work. The fact that my personal standard is the only standard means I just do my thing and GTFO when the job is done. No spacing out and lazing around all day on the company's dime. When my past employers call me back for contract or consulting work, they're getting the best of me, and in the end they're saving a boatload of money by not paying for my lazy time. Then I win, because I'm now motivated to minimize that lazy time and replace it with billable hours.

The author speaks of "IT ninjas", well I'd consider myself one of those. I'm like a specialized tool you bring in when the job is complex or outside your in-house staff's comfort zone. As mentioned, I wear both hats. I do programming work on an almost-full-time basis, with a steady supply of small jobs through an agency. Then on the side, I am often called upon, on a more theoretical/intellectual basis, to weigh in on larger projects where a few hundred dollars worth of my wisdom and cleverness can save the client tens of thousands.

Government contractors on the other hand, that's just a dirty rotten mess of corruption. When working for a big dumb faceless cash cow, it's only human to treat them as such. At least up here in Canada, government orgs hire contractors because it lets them completely sidestep the slow, stupid, and grossly backlogged hiring processes, especially for I.T. staff where they might collect a thousand applications, then spend a year running tests and interviews, and another few months doing god knows what before actually filling the chair with the one sleazy assclown they did choose. A contractor is much easier: you get budget approval, you call the guy, and he shows up. Most of those guys already have a security clearance too, so they're ready to start immediately. Two years vs two weeks, yeah they'll pick the latter option whenever possible, but that is not an accurate representation of the consulting business at large.

I wish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36356974)

I wish I could pass things off and not do them. I have a boss who makes me accountable.

Bottom of the barrel (3, Insightful)

Airdorn (1094879) | more than 3 years ago | (#36356976)

I'm an IT guy -- or at least they tell me I am -- and I have no proficiency to speak of; no certifications at all. Everything I ever need to know I find via Google, review of years of misc. whining on message boards, and trial-and-error. It's amazing what I've done with no actual knowledge of my own.

Re:Bottom of the barrel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358026)

The IT guy at the company I (seasonally) work at seems to be the same way. He's said some ignorant things (I wouldn't correct him out of respect), but since I'm not the IT guy and what he says doesn't really affect what he does, it doesn't really matter. and he pretty much Google's things and figures them out as he goes. He actually does a good job.

Easy! (5, Funny)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 3 years ago | (#36356988)

Work for Sony!

Well, up until about a month or so ago.

You mean there is another management style? (0)

rcamans (252182) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357004)

"with little effort or proficiency at all. 'I hate to say this, but a number of people in IT positions work harder to make it seem like they're busy as beavers than doing actual work. Quite often this dysfunction starts at the top: When an IT manager doesn't know the technology very well, he or she may hire folks who have no idea what their job is other than to show up every day and answer the occasional email, passing questions along to others with more technical abilities, or to their contacts at the various hardware and software vendors. People like these populate many consulting companies. They rely almost completely on contractors to perform the actual work, serving as remote hands in a real crisis and as part of a phone tree for less pressing issues.'"

You mean there is another management style? These must be rare ducks indeed.
Cmdr Taco, for example, fits this description to a T...

So why aren't they beating a path to my door... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357010)

I know my IT stuff--inside and out. And I have a proven track record to back it up. Yet at the company I work for (as well as previous companies), I am not considered for IT management positions. Who do they put in those positions? Folks who don't know how to do things themselves, and rely on contractors, etc.

Re:So why aren't they beating a path to my door... (4, Insightful)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357020)

Well, you see, that's your problem. You know how to do things, so they have you do things. People who know how to get *other* people to do things for them--that's management material!

Re:So why aren't they beating a path to my door... (0)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357024)

Who do they put in those positions?

Folks who -- (perhaps), don't type like, this etc.? Management's more than knowing the arguments to grep.

Re:So why aren't they beating a path to my door... (2)

smash (1351) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357214)

spend time automating the day to day crap so you have basically nothing to do, then you can be promoted to management. if you're busy fixing broken day to day shit, then you can be too valuable doing that, to promote.

Just (2)

zoomshorts (137587) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357014)

Just be the first in the job, make yourself indispensible an Voila! You rule the shop. Not a big deal.
Until someone with more brains shows up.

Take me for example (1)

killmenow (184444) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357016)

I succeed in IT by browsing slashdot and reddit (sorry /.) all day!

Line functions and IT (2)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357028)

Hey, if you're not a genius, figure out something to do with yourself.

A combo I have seen work a lot and I somehow grew into is someone with a Line Job and a Minor in IT. Sure, you leave the weird network stuff to the hotshot, but you can sorta keep the office running answering helpdesk stuff. Then you go back to your regular job.

Accountants end up with this pair a lot because accounting software is some of the trickiest in the business. (You mean Job Cost didn't post because we're more than two accounting months out? Oh. Right. Let's go visit the CFO and hope he doesn't bite my head off!)

Though I am more of a management techinal admin, but the mix is the same. In a small company, being a HelpDesk guy keeps the load off the hotshot IT guy.

Re:Line functions and IT (1)

bane2571 (1024309) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358378)

I would have given you mod points if I had them, instead I'll say I'm in almost exactly that role right now. I'm doing Accounts Receivable and IT support for our accounting package.

The skill threshold is lower and I still get to be the computer "expert". Suprising how well it works.

I work with these people (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357046)

"When an IT manager doesn't know the technology very well, he or she may hire folks who have no idea what their job is other than to show up every day and answer the occasional email, passing questions along to others with more technical abilities, or to their contacts at the various hardware and software vendors."

[question I get daily]
"Hey, how do I...?"
'Lady, you have the worlds greatest information resource literally at your fingertips. I guess I should feel honored that you would ask me instead, but damn. Go look it up for yourself. And after you look it up, figure out how to apply it.'

And yes, I've ratted these people out to management. They are still here.

Re:I work with these people (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357256)

Some times people are looking for how *you* would solve the problem. Other times they genuinely have no idea, but in either case that's not immediately grounds for being a bad employee. To me the way you describe yourself is a typical arrogant prick admin who couldn't be bothered to help anyone but themselves. Probably an equally inaccurate generalization, but also often true.

Re:I work with these people (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357352)

"Some times people are looking for how *you* would solve the problem. Other times they genuinely have no idea, but in either case that's not immediately grounds for being a bad employee. To me the way you describe yourself is a typical arrogant prick admin who couldn't be bothered to help anyone but themselves. Probably an equally inaccurate generalization, but also often true."

When you get that question every single day, from the same people, it is not merely 'looking for a different solution'.
And no, I'm not an 'admin'. And yes, I generally do answer the person. But if I'm doing my job as well as theirs...why are they still there?

Please. (1)

Colourspace (563895) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357062)

Happens in every industry.

Peter Principle (2)

Kikuchi (1709032) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357072)

It's already known as the Peter principle [wikipedia.org] .

Nothing new here, move along.

Re:Peter Principle (1)

bane2571 (1024309) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358428)

Good to know that has a name.

Passing the buck (1)

joeflies (529536) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357084)

I'd say that the whole reason the IT manager has technical staff is because the manager doesn't know everything, not in spite of it. The technical staff is supposed to know how things work, and pretending to look busy while hiring contractors to do the real work makes me believe that it's the staff that's incompetent rather than the manager.

Re:Passing the buck (1)

smash (1351) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357234)

There are different problems to be solved, and they require different approaches. The IT manager needs to work on justifying purchases, dealing with people (both staff, and user facing stuff - complaints/requests from the rest of the management team, etc).

Technical people very often are no good at that stuff.

The IT manager is a buffer between the technical guy(s) and the end user. If your manager has no idea what you're talking about half the time, you'd have no hope dealing with the users/management he/she is dealing with.

This contractor says it's true. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357094)

Once upon a time I had a real job, full-time, salaried job with real, full-time (and overtime) responsibility. After years of hard work, long hours, and being the final go-to guy for everything, my bosses began to make it clear to me that I was their personal slave. (Really, they had always been doing that, I just started to get become cognizant of it near the end of my tenure.) So I gave notice and left.

Sice then I have been doing contract work in major corporations, going on four years now. Once place I worked was in the business of moving packages from one place to another. Another place I worked was a city government. Another was a major hotel chain. And others.

I have been paid more in the contract jobs, have only once been on-call, have never had any meaningful responsibility, and most importantly, have never really had a clearly-defined task. For the most part I've shown up, kept my mouth shut, got paid, and left. The bonus is that has an hourly employee, I got overtime (and it oftentimes it wasn't hard to come up with excuses for overtime).

The full time employees at the places I've worked have had little to zero honest-to-god hard skills. I have worked with people who have had "programmer" in their title who could not touch type. I have worked with "network engineers" who declared they "only knew Cisco" (apparently all the other vendors switch frames and route packets in some bizarre and incomprehensible way, hmm). I have been discouraged, and occasionally punished, for trying to go beyond the call of duty.

Sometimes I am appreciated for my abilities, but more often than not some no-nothing middle manager is in the way preventing me from being any good at anything so that I don't accidentally expose how little he really does in an average day.

But I don't care. I get paid good money, with overtime, to do nothing, and I get months of time off per year.

Once upon a time I thought I was just doing contracting until a full time offer came. Now I'm more than happy to be a contractor, and I turned down a full time position last week. I've never felt so free.

Hard work does not pay.

Re:This contractor says it's true. (1)

Improbus (1996348) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357370)

Preach, brother! I am thinking of doing the same thing for the same reasons.

Re:This contractor says it's true. (1)

rock_climbing_guy (630276) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358536)

If you don't mind me asking, how do you get months of time off per year? I've been working a position where I actually have to produce something and get about four weeks off (which supposedly is more than most get), but I would like to know how a person would go about getting more.

Quiet you (1)

atari2600a (1892574) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357144)

We have a good thing going here, don't fuck it up!

You described me, I am afraid! (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357154)

'I hate to say this, but a number of people in IT positions work harder to make it seem like they're busy as beavers than doing actual work.

In my case, all serious IT management stuff was outsourced to one of the big IT service companies. My work was to act as a liaison between this IT company and my company....mainly because I understood the 'business logic' of what we were doing.

My boss was afraid of computers. In the late 90s when Linux was becoming a threat to UNIX and Microsoft, he just could not believe one could run Linux legitimately without a license.

The most routine tasks I did involved activating and deactivating user accounts...which I sometimes referred to a buddy at the IT company, who would create or delete these users.

Times were interesting. I quit because of boredom!

Re:You described me, I am afraid! (1)

dullnev (999335) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357990)

..... In the late 90s when Linux was becoming a threat to UNIX and Microsoft, he just could not believe one could run Linux legitimately without a license.

Perhaps that's because you neglected to tell him Linux does have a license, what do you think the 'L' in GPL means?

good sysadmin / IT people have in built laziness (1)

smash (1351) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357196)

You need to be "driven" to make as little work for yourself as possible. Which means figuring out how to do it a limited number of times before automating the process. If it can be automated, time you spend doing a particular task is dead, wasted time that could be spent being more productive doing something else.

The problem is (1)

forgottenusername (1495209) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357216)

Smart people get tired of underachievers and it's pretty easy to recognise.

I think most people want to try to do the right thing, follow best practices / stay professional. Often organisations make it easy to get disgruntled, when there's a perception that the brass don't know/care about what you perceive to be the "real" problems.

That aside, the most miserable places to work are usually where people are just phoning it in. You might have a little less up-front stress, but I'd argue the lack of any sort of job satisfaction or doing anything to take pride in would ultimately lead you to be less happy in life.

We all coast sometimes, or make compromises - but if you solely operate that way in your career you won't be getting too far. Especially in smaller tech communities where there is a small degree of separation.

So true (1)

RackNine (1955398) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357220)

I have worked in companies where those "folks who have no idea what their job is" account for more than 75% of the work-force

Actuall IT Work (1)

Improbus (1996348) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357266)

I am one of those poor sods that actually have to do IT work. I am the MacGyver of the IT department. If no one else can figure something out they give it to me. Guess what, I enjoy the status of unending servitude. My boss though is exactly as described. It is my opinion that he is a waste of perfectly good protoplasm and he just got rid of the one person that could back me up. If go on vacation, quit or get hit by a bus he, and the company, are going to be in a world of hurt.

Re:Actuall IT Work (2)

BoberFett (127537) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357340)

Do you know why he just got rid of your backup? Because you've proven to him that you do enjoy being his slave, so he can cut costs and just pass all the extra work onto you, and probably get a raise out of the deal. You're a sucker.

Re:Actuall IT Work (2)

MadeInUSA (2028028) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357692)

The cemetery is full of irreplaceables - believe me, the world and the company will go on if you are hit by a bus. They will just hire another serf.

Re:Actuall IT Work (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358636)

The cemetery is full of irreplaceables - believe me, the world and the company will go on if you are hit by a bus

Cemetery and prison. [computerworld.com]

Re:Actuall IT Work (2)

mysidia (191772) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358688)

If go on vacation, quit or get hit by a bus he, and the company, are going to be in a world of hurt.

Time for you to push a little, it sounds like. Everyone gets sick sometimes -- next time it happens, call in sick, and let him be in a "world of hurt" for a day or so, don't be a dick about it, just make yourself completely available.

The world will go on a day or two without you, trust me. And if he really is in a world of hurt, perhaps the level of respect for you will increase.

It will help provide some evidence for you to use later to persuade that the company needs a backup plan.

You should take a vacation as well; ultimately, it is essential that you take some sort vacation eventually. His failure to have a backup is a management problem, providing you have taken all efforts to have a backup in place, and any failure to put a plan in place was not slacking on your part.

this what you when there is no job training / hire (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357302)

this what you when there is no job training / hire by cert / only hire people who went to a big collage. while passing over the people who did not go or went to a tech school. Now you can get a good manager maybe even have a MBA but you still need a idea about IT to run IT or have a tech manager under you with you just doing non tech manager work.

Post on Slahdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357336)

Easy post your how to do my job question on slashdot.

Totally Agree (2)

codgur (1518013) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357446)

You've just described the past 10 years of my life. I have been a contractor working non stop for folks who have very good communication skills and can talk the talk but not walk the walk. My phone hasn't stopped ringing. Once you get a reputation for doing good quality work and being technically proficient you become the goto guy. I'm super lazy and do what it takes to make my life easier. Those people with less technical skills than I make my life easy by handling all the other details I don't want to. I actually don't mind those who know what they don't know. It's those who pretend are the worst.

Not a Bug - That's a Feature (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357540)

People who have no idea what their job is other than to show up every day and answer the occasional email, passing questions along to others with more technical abilities, or to their contacts at the various hardware and software vendors. People like these populate many consulting companies. They rely almost completely on contractors to perform the actual work, serving as remote hands in a real crisis and as part of a phone tree for less pressing issues.'"

That is not a problem, it is a crucial function. Speaking from experience as a consultant who billed at lawyer-level hourly rates (I'm retired now at a young age, fired my last client a couple of years ago), except for the "have no idea what their job is" part, that is exactly what I did. And it was an immense value add for my clients.

It is precisely my contacts at various vendors and my personal domain knowledge that enables me to translate from client-speak to engineer speak and act as a very intelligent set of "remote hands" that makes it worthwhile for my clients to pay the, frankly outrageous, fees that I charge.

Basically they can pay me beau-coup bucks to facilitate fixing problems in days or they can muddle along for weeks or months trying to handle the situation on their own.

I make no secret about my methodology either - I always hit google first. But I am really damn good with google. I am always ready to train client employees to do what I do with google, but they almost always lack the patience and the domain experience to sort the wheat from the chaff on the net.

Then if google proves fruitless I move on to documenting the problem in as precise a manner as possible and passing it along to the people I know at the vendors involved. Sometimes I go through the official support channels, sometimes I skip them and go directly to the engineers.

Either way, I got results for my clients. Results that they were very happy with and which made it worthwhile for them to keep me around twiddling my thumbs, essentially on "retainer" to be available whenever they needed me.

Re:Not a Bug - That's a Feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357908)

You were an insulated scapegoat. They could have talked to the engineers directly, but then if something went wrong it was their fault. They paid you stupid amounts of money so if something went wrong they could blame it on you to their bosses, and you could leave. Everybody wins.

Re:Not a Bug - That's a Feature (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358104)

You were an insulated scapegoat. They could have talked to the engineers directly, but then if something went wrong it was their fault. They paid you stupid amounts of money so if something went wrong they could blame it on you to their bosses, and you could leave. Everybody wins.

While the companies most in need of my services tended to be the ones with excessive PHBism, I'm pretty sure that being the designated scapegoat was not particularly high up the list on the reasons they hired me.

One reason being that most were populated with deadwood - other than timecard fraud it was practically impossible for their employees to get fired. Another reason was that in well over a decade of working those gigs, I never even came close to being scapegoated.

Re:Not a Bug - That's a Feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358118)

You're the very worst kind of person -- a phony expert who bedazzles the clueless clients but is really just a smooth-talking idiot with no real intelligence.

Re:Not a Bug - That's a Feature (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358556)

That really depends upon the amount of "personal domain knowledge" the above poster has and how much it saves time.

This one I couldn't understand... and still can't (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357668)

Agree, but it gets worse...

Unfortunately the IT place I worked for (for over 6 years) ruined a perfectly good IT consulting company by hiring a middle age travel agent (somehow personal acquaintance of one of the partners) to manage its highly experienced and educated IT consultants. She had NO experience with IT, nor was she even a slightly decent manager. Talk about spending the company's money on BS, she was the queen of spending money.

Within 1 year the company was all but dissolved, none of the original highly experienced IT consultants were left... Instead they had a bunch of morons which were the consultants trained, apparently to replace themselves for cheaper pay.

Add another year to that and 90% of their client base has moved on to a different company that doesn't have its head up its own a$$.

I know, it happened to me. I was the last original consultant to go.

Succeed? (1)

Guido69 (513067) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357716)

TFA doesn't have any definition of "success". Every shop I've worked in has various examples of staff with "what you know" and "who you know". But in the end it tends to work itself out in the "right" way.

"It's very hard for those outside the technology inner circle to determine who has mad skills and who's slacking, until it becomes obvious that certain IT ninjas are the ones who step in to solve the problems again and again."

Those ninjas are usually the ones that find themselves on the short list to stay on when the economy turns south. That sounds like success to me. As a Sr. PHB myself whose technical skills have dwindled now down to still being able to spell EssQueElle and vaguely understanding that data can Hibernate but in a slightly different way than polar bears, it can be very difficult at times to hire qualified technical staff. Personally, I utilize some of my ninjas to help with that process but every once in a while someone makes it in that truly can't cut it. And now that funding is tight, I don't seem to have any of them.

Re:Succeed? (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357958)

The ninja analogy is probably more apt than the author intended. The ninja is a warrior who relies on stealth, and often the ones that do the real work in IT don't have time to be "visible" to the boss. So after the "ninja" sneaks into the rival daimyos house at night and kills all his samurai, you can bet there will be someone who hears about this and goes to the master and claims credit for it before the ninja can. And of course when the ninja fails, the same guy will be the screaming and demanding that the ninja commit seppuku(*yes I know seppuku wasn't really a ninja ritual...)

Good IT managers will see these empire builders for what they are, but bad managers(who were probably like that before getting promoted) won't see that. The empire builders don't do any actual work, so they have a lot more time to sit around and scheme ways to take credit and pass blame for the actions of others.

I call BS (1)

dakkon1024 (691790) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357744)

I have to completely disagree. People who are less motivated and/or talented (which is what’s really being defined here) survive by, answering phones, gathering information, filtering up, dealing w/ easy problems, acting as hands for the more inclined and motivated, etc. Every doctor needs a nurse and every guru needs need subordinates (who updates their own firmware anyway?) Those in “unending servitude” are just awful at demanding what they are worth. This does not reflect the reality I live in, this reflects a person who is confused on how to extract momentary compensation for knowledge.

Re:I call BS (1)

dakkon1024 (691790) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357768)

monetary.... I mean monetary :) Though momentary is way more fitting of the IT field lol.

For god's sake! (1)

evilgraham (1020325) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357750)

I guess that you people are talking about IT, not software. I suppose that that's a modern idea - when I started out in the business it was just computers - big things with IBM on the side, and they were pretty much of a piece. You really had to inhabit that world to understand it; users, such as they were, were pretty much at the mercy of the same things as the so called expert; some were keen and took pains to understand what they were doing, others blew in the wind. But like anything else with an intellectual twist to it, taking the time to understand how the environment one is working in works is a worthwhile exercise. I don't think that I am the smartest person in the world, but it took me about 2 weeks to figure out that the best way to approach things was to learn stuff that a) walks out the door with you when you leave and b) other people want. If you want a career in, or involving, computers, best be prepared to sit on your arse and spend lots of time getting to know what you are doing. If you can, and are good at getting things done, this whole discussion is moot. Make your own luck and ignore this horseshit.

I guess I'm a consultant.... (1)

SwedishChef (69313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357806)

because I do the IT work for several small companies and a couple of municipalities. I'm not sure where the notion that consultants are incompetent comes from; if we all were lncompetent we wouldn't keep our clients. The only time I see a functioning network is usually when I've just fixed it. Often I get a call from a new client and have to fix their network when I've *never* seen it work. Many times these networks were set up by someone's cousin or nephew who *really knows computers good". As far as qualifications go I'm a EE from back in the days when vacuum tube theory was all the rage. I became a computer guy when we started using Intel 4004 chips as controller for the heavy equipment the company I worked for was building and just kept on learning new tricks.

My problem is usually with incompetent staff who have been hired on as clerical help and simply promoted up some invisible ladder. As an example, I handled the Internet connections for a local hospital in return for a closet where I could put my ISP servers (in one rack). A new IT boss sent me a letter dated the 15th ( which I got the 20th) telling me I had to have my bear out by the first of the next month (but telling me I had "30 days". I had to find a new location, arrange a feed, and set up a parallel system (with a second router) until everything could be moved so it took me until the 2nd of the next month to finally wheel my Cisco 7004 router out the door. That night the moron called me to see why his Internet connection went down. It turned out he hadn't made arrangements for his new feed yet.

Re:I guess I'm a consultant.... (1)

scot4875 (542869) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358050)

The only time I see a functioning network is usually when I've just fixed it.

Why would someone call you in to fix a functioning network?

Let me guess, you always find things in the last place you look, too?

--Jeremy

Re:I guess I'm a consultant.... (1)

SwedishChef (69313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358366)

"Let me guess, you always find things in the last place you look, too?"

Yeah... do you keep looking?

It's both sides (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36357882)

I have only encountered 1 in 10 IT professionals that actually can fix anything and have been in the business professionally since 1996.

It really is sad.

In the words of Ghandi (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 3 years ago | (#36357960)

(paraphrased) "There are two kinds of people in this world, those that do the work and those that take the credit. Try to be in the first group, there is less competition"

Re:In the words of Ghandi (1)

s2v16 (2169120) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358034)

There is less competition because there are fewer rewards (at least low-hanging-fruit-wise).

Scott Adams just called (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358236)

He wants his twenty years of observations [dilbert.com] back.

Head Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358306)

For those of you too young to remember, go find and watch Head Office. I love this business.

Clueless people know they are (2)

munky99999 (781012) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358308)

This one woman who got the job I had applied for... she was utterly clueless. Instead I found a job as netadmin for an ISP. She was calling the level 1 techs constantly for help with problems... but they are clueless as her and eventually they'd shift her onto me. Our responsibility goes up to the modem and her problems were always 100% beyond the modem. So I just stood my ground... and she would rage. "Im regretting going with your ISP." id be like "well unfortunately im not allowed to help with customer's networks, my boss charges $95/hour for that help." she'd reply... "Ive already spent way too much money on tech help. Im going to get help again but if I find out it was your problem you are paying the bill." Which is what they do. They make a big stink until you fix their problem for them.

I oftenwondered if I should have become a plumber (1)

NotSoHeavyD3 (1400425) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358310)

then I remind myself plumbers have to work with shit. Not figurative shit but literal excrement when they snake the main drain. Man I was happy to pay the plumber to do that about a year ago since I wouldn't have wanted to do that.

Re:I oftenwondered if I should have become a plumb (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358412)

Being a plumber would be better. Sure, they work with shit. But in IT, we work in shit!

SLA is King (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358448)

I am an employee of a very large company that outsources to a very large contract Firm. There is a few local staff to take care of backups and network hardware. So what happens in our case is there is a SLA that is agreed upon. We are one group that gets these services without any say in the SLA. ( I imagine this is some sweetheart deal for Someone )
          If there is any "Extra" projects the company wants to undertake there is of course "Extra Charge" So the large contract firm says here is what we are going to do and gives management a price. Which they accept without any questioning of the resources and time it is going to take for the project.

So their project managers seem to be incompetent and they always doesn’t take in to consideration something. Resources, time, and equipment they always mess it up somehow. They fall behind schedule and the local guys are told to pick up the slack.
Recent example we were moving some webservers that nobody has touched in 4 years and they didn't budget for someone that knew IIS scripting. They fall behind schedule and the local guys are told to pick up the slack.

I personally feel like this is just how it is for the next 5 years (duration of the contract) .... but hey I make 100+ get a 401K and a pension I will deal.

I walked out of the office one day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36358500)

... about a week after I looked at an overview page of the project management software we were using, only to see that my name was attached to 80% of all of the completed tasks in an office of 4 other people.

I set up a packet sniffer to see what was going on - 2 of the 4 were looking at porn, 1 was in a chat room for world of warcraft, and the other was reading a blog about programming.

The one who was reading the blog about programming chastised me about a single line of redundant code, and I almost flipped out and stabbed her in the neck with a #2 pencil. I chose to walk out peacefully, instead. There's a part of me that regrets it.

How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36358550)

There. Fixed it for you.

There's nothing unique about IT.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?