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Ask Slashdot: Software To Organise a Heterogeneous Mix of Files?

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the stream-of-consciousness dept.

Data Storage 254

BertieBaggio writes "I am a medical student at the end of an academic year trying to get my notes organised. I'm looking for a software document organisation system to organise a mix of text notes, journal articles, diagrams and scans. Ideally such a system would permit full-text and metadata search, multiple categorisations (eg tags), preserve the underlying files and be cross-platform (Linux/Windows/OS X). While I'm not averse to paying for such a complex solution, ideally the software would be FOSS so that extension or migration are possible if necessary. Desktop search (eg Google Desktop) probably does 90% of what I want apart from multiple categorisations, which is the feature I'm most interested in. Searching turned up a similar question over at 43folders which pointed me in the direction of Papers and DevonThink, but these are OS X only and seem to be aimed more at academic paper organisation. What recommendations does the Slashdot community have for categorising and organising a heterogeneous mix of files?"

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254 comments

Quick Answer (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364692)

Zotero - is awesome - Firefox plugin

Re:Quick Answer (1, Funny)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365190)

+1 informative but I have no mod points :(

Re:Quick Answer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365356)

+1 Zotero the best ;)

Evernote! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364716)

Check out www.evernote.com It isn't FOSS but it is extendable and free up to a point. I use it everyday and love it.

Re:Evernote! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364896)

Count me as a second vote for evernote. I'm using it for light-duty stuff, so I can't comment on how well it works with a real load of data to sort through, but I've heard good things.

In The Works (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364766)

This is very similar to something I am actively developing. I'm happy to see that someone else is interested.

Re:In The Works (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364974)

A document management system? You have a lot of competition there.

Re:In The Works (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365538)

In the Open Source world, DSpace is probably the document management system to beat.

Re:In The Works (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365782)

Still, it's a little weird to suggest that this is some brand new type of technology.

Zotero (1)

Lexible (1038928) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364780)

http://zotero.org/ [zotero.org]

Re:Zotero (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364848)

>It lives right where you do your workâ"in the web browser itself.
I do all my work in a whole slew of mysterious and incompatible applications.

Re:Zotero (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365656)

Indeed, I found Zotero extremely valuable to manage papers (especially because you can add them directly from the web site with a single click), but I don't use it for anything else (my LaTeX files are under version control and organized using traditional directories, my notes are mostly in Tomboy [except for those more complex which I do in LaTeX, and of course those I do on paper], my mails are on the mail server [which I don't access through the web interface if I don't need to], any self-written programs are of course also on disk and under version control, data produced by those programs also lives on disk with directory organization [but not under version control; a data file is not supposed to be changed after generation], ...)

From The Atlantic's James Fallows (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364788)

Personal Brain [theatlantic.com] .

Re:From The Atlantic's James Fallows (1)

TheTrooper (85356) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364972)

I'll second Personal Brain - its mind mapping software that allows uploads of files, etc. I find it a bit easier to get my 'stuff' into Brain than into Evernote ... but I do use both...

Re:From The Atlantic's James Fallows (1)

ryscott (1593993) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365686)

PersonalBrain is fantastic but the free version does have limitations - you can only attach URLs to a thought, no file attachments. In order to attach files to a thought you have to buy the program. The Core version ($150) allows you to attach 1 file to each thought, while the Pro version ($250) allows multiple file attachments per thought. Also, a paid version is required to search for keywords within web pages or file attachments.

Gunna hate this BUT (1)

TheRealQuestor (1750940) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364796)

Sharepoint Services

does what you need and then some.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364864)

Sharepoint is utter crap if it cannot understand the file you are putting on it. Which incidentally would be anything not MS Office.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (2)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364942)

What specific file types can't you load? I have used Sharepoint 2007 since it rolled out and you can load any file type you want. There are no restrictions. We have non Office documents loaded in document libraries as well as Office libraries.

Sharepoint would do what you are looking for but the advanced features will cost you.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (2)

Shatrat (855151) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365404)

But, it can't search any of those files.
It has a search function, but it's almost completely useless. I can even put the exact file name I'm looking for and it won't even be in the top 10 results.
The only advantage Sharepoint has over a simple shared file directory is some crude revision control and the ability to create calendars.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (2)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365530)

Heh, the only way I've ever been able to tolerate having to use any version of Sharepoint is to open a document library in IE, and then click on some dropdown to change it to explorer view, and then create and right click on a folder and select explore in a new window. Then it opens up in File Explorer, where I bookmark/favorite it so I don't have to deal with the atrocious "information blackhole" Sharepoint web interface, and I can easily drag / drop / delete entire folders using the File Explorer interface, and the URLs I send to coworkers are a lot more sane-looking and consistent. (At least in older versions, Sharepoint URLs would seldom get the user to where they wanted to go (way to break the internet there!), leading to long entertaining prose as people attempted to describe how to "navigate" to some random place in Sharepoint.)

And maybe the search works better now, but I often couldn't find files amidst all the junk that shows up, even if I knew and specified their filenames.

Makes it much easier to use a local revision control thing too, I've lost work a few times trying to use Sharepoint's revision tracker doodad.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365256)

Parent is a FUDster and has never actually used Sharepoint to make such a plainly false statement.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (1)

TheRealQuestor (1750940) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365304)

I'm guessing you have never even used Sharepoint. SP is probably the best package MS has ever made. Way underappreciated.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364876)

I have been using onenote for things like this. It is like postit notes on steroids. Usually bundled with office...

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (1)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364898)

I just threw up a little in my series of tubes.

Re:Gunna hate this BUT (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365558)

Sharepoint is hardly FOSS, though. If you want that kind of solution, DSpace is a more logical starting point.

A blog maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364822)

You can post whatever you want in a blog, you can also search the blog for whatever you need.

I have a wordpress blog, I can post pictures to it, as well as videos.

Wordpress is both free and opensource, you can host it yourself, or get a free blog.

I have it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364826)

I have a heterogeneous mix in my pants...just sayin'...

Re:I have it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365312)

We're on to you GW

OS X - Plain old search (2, Interesting)

FormOfActionBanana (966779) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364850)

I have a Mac and it's not the greatest OS, but I love the search. I search all my old emails and a horde of other documents all the time.

I'm sure other computers can do this just fine, but I was never satisfied with a desktop search implementation until OS X. And I used to be a search index consultant.

Re:OS X - Plain old search (1, Informative)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365288)

I second that. You can add metadata (Spotlight comments) to any file, and that metadata is searchable, so if you're thinking of tagging files, that's easy.

or a homogeneous mix (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364888)

or a homogeneous mix of files for your gay porn

an age old solution (3)

Akatosh (80189) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364892)

Sounds like you're describing a directory tree. Search with grep, or any similar utility. Put files in multiple categories (appropriately named directories) using ln. It's cross platform, timeless, and seems to do what you describe. I feel like I'm missing something though.

Re:an age old solution (4, Insightful)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365014)

Because that's not a proper document management solution. Directories/Folders are not a substitute for documents tagged with meta data. Not too mention you can't create views.

Re:an age old solution (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365110)

personally I use a database to store my nigger jokes.

there are two broad categories. NEWLY ACQUIRED nigger jokes and TO POST TO SLASHDOT nigger jokes.

What do you call a bunch of old niggers in a barn? Antique farm equipment!

What was the only thing missing from the Million Man March? Three miles of chain and an auctioneer!

Obviously those two were pulled from the latter category.

When the hell is Slashdot going to realize that you should only see that irritating "Working..." animation when something is actually processing? If Malda can make money from this site imagine what somebody with skill who's not allergic to reading a fucking book once in a while could make.

Re:an age old solution (1)

c0d3g33k (102699) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365402)

No, but Directories/Folders as low level storage (the files have to exist somewhere) and a layer on top of that which can provide metadata tagging, searching, views etc. is. KDE4 with Nepomuk (http://nepomuk.kde.org/) seems to provide much of what the OP asked for.

Re:an age old solution (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365794)

No, but Directories/Folders as low level storage (the files have to exist somewhere) and a layer on top of that which can provide metadata tagging, searching, views etc. is. KDE4 with Nepomuk (http://nepomuk.kde.org/) seems to provide much of what the OP asked for.

The very best thing about Nepomuk is that it can be disabled without having to modify source code.

The very worst thing about Nepomuk is that kdepimlibs won't build without it. Not only do you have to build kdepimlibs with it, you must build kdelibs with it too. So if you don't actually want this, you get to enable support for something you're never going to use. For a while you could disable "semantic desktop" entirely in KDE and still build it, then it got harder and harder to do that. Now it's not really possible unless you want to make your own fork of KDE and maintain it. Thank you, upstream, for all these options!

Here's a tip for all would-be developers. If you want to implement some new idea (actually a rehash of very old "desktop search" ideas that never gained traction for a good reason) and add it to a system lots of people already enjoy as-is, make it completely optional. That way if people want it, they will obtain and use it. If it's popular make it a default even, but make it still optional so people who don't follow the crowd can cleanly remove it.

Forcing someone to support a feature they don't want and can't build the system without anymore is just asinine. Especially when everything else is so minutely configurable. It starts looking like that "We know what's best for you" bullshit that should remain confined to politics.

Re:an age old solution (2)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365418)

Directories/Folders are not a substitute for documents tagged with meta data

Why not? It works for me. It's pretty easy to have a script parse, e.g., your MP3s ID3 tags and link them to the appropriate directory.

Not too mention you can't create views

That's what 'find' is for.

Re:an age old solution (1)

drooling-dog (189103) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365604)

Because that's not a proper document management solution.

Nevertheless, it can work quite well, depending on your needs. I manage large numbers of files that way, with separate index files handling the metadata. Grep is very fast for simple keyword and pattern searches, even on index files with ~100,000 records, so there's no reason even to use a DBMS (I don't need complex queries). Scripting for special purposes is simple and straightforward, and backups are a breeze, using nothing but rsync. No special-purpose software needed, beyond what comes with the OS.

To each their own, of course. I recently talked to a guy who runs a MySQL server just to manage a couple hundred phone numbers. Nothing at all wrong with that, especially if you're learning about databases and SQL that way!

Re:an age old solution (1)

jedidiah (1196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365664)

The file manager may not be great but if it isn't up to the task then that really needs that the file manager needs an update.

All sorts of sometimes mutually exclusive bits of software that try to organize one bit of information or the other really doesn't cut it.

If you have a good "primary key" that's generally useful most of the time, you can "get by" even with just a simple file manger. In truth, most n00bs probably aren't industrious enough to really make a good multi-key approach work. It would require far too much data entry and most users are really lazy.

Re:an age old solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365586)

The problem is indexing. Using "grep", how long is it going to take to find a word buried somewhere in a collection of 1000000 text files, each 1MB in size? Using a proper solution, the answer would probably be on the order of half a second.

Organise? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364902)

Learn how to spell organize

Re:Organise? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365034)

There's nothing wrong with "organise."

Re:Organise? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365372)

There's nothing wrong with "organise."

There's definitely something wrong with "feeding the trolls". Quit doing that, you fucks.

Re:Organise? (1)

quink (141554) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365052)

Learn that spelling varies between different countries, and you may find maturity.

Re:Organise? (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365574)

Learn how to spell in English, not just American.

Evernote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364906)

Try Evernote. They have a free or premium service. You can attach pretty much any document type. Everything is searchable, including hand written notes. You can organize your notes using notebooks and tags.

thebrain dot com (1)

superwiz (655733) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364912)

I love that program. You can get it from www.thebrain.com. It may sound like sarcasm, but it isn't. It's allowed me to organize a myriad of loosely-related information many times. I even bought the full version with my own money ($250).

spectate swap desktop search (SSDS) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364914)

say no more
http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/t/13917.aspx

Re:spectate swap desktop search (SSDS) (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365308)

Oh, yes, this. Brings back fond memories of a troll extraordinaire.

Emacs Org-Mode (3, Interesting)

he-sk (103163) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364916)

Emacs Org-Mode [orgmode.org] . I've learned a little Emacs syntax just to use that package after I've being a Vim user for over 15 years.

Re:Emacs Org-Mode (2)

complex_pi (2030154) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365630)

Emacs Org-Mode [orgmode.org] . I've learned a little Emacs syntax just to use that package after I've being a Vim user for over 15 years.

A bit more: Org-mode allows to define text documents with smart headings and lists. You can insert links, equations, store file attached to a heading. It is cross-platform and you can export your documents to, among other options, html or latex-pdf. You can flags items as TODO or attribute a "done" time or a "todo" time.

Does a good one actually exist? (2)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364926)

My sister has worked for various doctors over the years, and a doctor's office is a prime candidate for something that will organize information: forms, papers, x-rays (photos), scanned documents, etc.

Many times she has spoken to me of the failures of the information-organization software that they have tried. Some would reach a certain capacity and choke, others had terrible OCR, and so on. In fact she even asked me about building a better application to do that; but I was too busy trying to put food on the table to take on a large project that probably would not pay off for a couple of years at least.

If there is an application that does this well, I would like to know about it too. (One person has already mentioned Evernote, but that's a "cloud-based" application for some unknown reason, and I would have privacy concerns.)

Alfresco (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364930)

Alfresco

Re:Alfresco (1)

burisch_research (1095299) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365370)

[citation-needed]

Google Docs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364944)

I can't access the site from work (to see if metadata tags can be added to a document), but it does support most doc types that you would probably use and searching is crazy fast.

Look at FreeMind for next semester (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364958)

This is not necessarily going to help for this semester, but look at FreeMind - http://freemind.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page.

Project Xanadu ? (0)

alexhs (877055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36364964)

What about Project Xanadu [wikipedia.org] by Ted Nelson ?
Demo here [youtube.com] .

(And in case you wonder, no, you're not supposed to take that advice seriously.)

Re:Project Xanadu ? (1)

jd (1658) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365610)

It's ok to take seriously. It'll be done by 2150, when the Daleks will invade the Earth. (The Daleks are too smart to invade a disorganized planet.)

Org-Mode (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36364968)

People adapt Org-Mode to manage writing papers, running businesses, organizing files, etc., and it has an active user and development community.

Not FOSS, but free (1)

jandersen (462034) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365078)

Have checked out Oracle Text? As I understand it, it is now a standard part of an Oracle database, and it can index text documents - according to rumours, it should be able to index not just words as they occur in the documents, but also their "meaning", whatever that means, and it should understand several doc formats. I haven't used it myself, though.

You can download it for free for development purposes - get the enterprise edition for your OS plus the very, very (VERY!) comprehensive documentation, and install; now you just need a handy front-end :-)

Re:Not FOSS, but free (1)

jandersen (462034) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365150)

now you just need a handy front-end :-)

- unless you enjoy the subtle beauty of the SQLplus command line.

Re:Not FOSS, but free (1)

SocPres (743965) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365362)

- unless you enjoy the subtle beauty of the SQLplus command line.

I do, but for those wierdos who don't, the free-to-use Oracle Application Express ("APEX") works surprisingly very very well.

APEX requires install in an Oracle database. Happily, the free-to-use Oracle Express ("XE") edition is in beta for v11.2 (should be GA any day now), which moves the maximum user storage to 11GB, up from the 4GB restriction in the current 10.2 version.

Oracle XE: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/express-edition/index.html [oracle.com]
Oracle APEX: http://apex.oracle.com/ [oracle.com]

Be productive. Have fun. Drink beer.

Microsoft Sharepoint (1)

oh_my_080980980 (773867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365092)

Hate to say it but it works. I have used it for several years and based on your requirements it would be a perfect fit. It can store several types of documents in document libraries tagged with meta data. You can create views on the meta data with the document libraries. You can perform full text and meta data searches. It has out of box workflows and can create complex workflows with developer tools.

It has alot of what you would need. It also is not cheap. Sharepoint Services or Sharepoint Foundation is free (part of the server software) but the advance features will require licenses.

I second Zotero (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365100)

Zotero will do everything you ask (tags, files, notes both associated with an independent from an item, various item types, files of varying formats associated with a parent item if desired, full-text search, cross-platform) and more- including static snapshots of web pages that can be made live on request (just right-click), easy transfer into a bibliography, producing reports and sharing among collaborators.

Evernote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365102)

Looks like what you're looking for

Software To Organise a Heterogeneous Mix of Files (1)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365124)

There's an app for that. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Software To Organise a Heterogeneous Mix of Fil (1)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365336)

Also, to elaborate on your specific requirement for "multiple categorisations", and so that I might save myself from a "smart-ass" mod, here's a possible suggestion: http://www.tagsistant.net/ [tagsistant.net] It's a tagging file system. You didn't specify which operating system you were on, but this works with Linux/BSD. Not quite mature, but I could see it potentially going places. At the very least, the idea of implementing tags directly in the filesystem might trickle up to extfs or NTFS or hfs+ eventually.

Practical Solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365138)

At the end of every academic year, I discarded all my personal notes, went to the library and spent some weeks studying good old fashion textbooks.

File system (1)

Dynetrekk (1607735) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365176)

It is called a file system. You can put it on Dropbox, Jungledisk, or even better, use unison for synchronization. Use folders to group files together. Use filenames to remind yourself what the content is. Use file suffixes to show the file type. To search, use spotlight or mdfind on OS X, locate on linux, and... go kill yourself on windows (disclaimer: I've only tried the search function on XP and older windozes). Metadata works great with spotlight; I don't know any solutions to that on linux or windows, but someone else probably does.

Alfresco (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365200)

Maybe try Alfresco. It's java based, and you can have the source code if you ever need to make some modifications.

OneNote (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365216)

This is actually what OneNote [wikipedia.org] -- the oft overlooked/maligned offering from MS -- is designed to do, and it does it pretty well believe it or not. Technically it's aimed at collaboration, but there's no reason it can't work equally well for self-organization.

Evernote (2)

dmr001 (103373) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365226)

I use Evernote, and so do a lot of my med students. It is cross platform, the free version is quite functional and stores PDFs, rich text and graphics. It is searchable and shareable.

Re:Evernote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365324)

Evernote gets my vote. I purchased the annual so no worries about space. The Optical Character Recognition (OCR) has been outstanding. I took a photo of a roadside marker, and dang if Evernote didn't have the whole text indexed by the time I got home. Evernote saves to the cloud, no backup worries. You can forward a message with .pdf or .doc file attached and it gets indexed. You can set up folders, share selectively part of your stuff. I send credit card statements to a finance folder. I setup a owners manual folder for the literature on all the gadgets and gizmos I've bought. My budget will include the annual fee (?$45) for the rest of my years and my backup / search worries are over, forever.

Re:Evernote (1)

RickRack (1154195) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365442)

Evernote gets my vote. I purchased the annual so no worries about space. The Optical Character Recognition (OCR) has been outstanding. I took a photo of a roadside marker, and dang if Evernote didn't have the whole text indexed by the time I got home. Evernote saves to the cloud, no backup worries. You can forward a message with .pdf or .doc file attached and it gets indexed. You can set up folders, share selectively part of your stuff. I send credit card statements to a finance folder. I setup a owners manual folder for the literature on all the gadgets and gizmos I've bought. My budget will include the annual fee (?$45) for the rest of my years and my backup / search worries are over, forever.

So I logged in after being tagged 'anonymous coward'. There, That was RickRack talking about Evernote.

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365238)

Before you go and organize all your documents with a management system, look into a spell-checker.

Google had a solution.... (1)

metalmaster (1005171) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365250)

Im not sure what happened to it or why they stopped developing it, but Google Wave was an awesome tool for doing just this. It was on the net, so it was cross compatible. It handled a wide array of file formats. It was searchable and it had a collaboration element that held on to revisions quite nicely. The API was open so others could develop their own solutions. Its a shame it went the way of the buggy

Re:Google had a solution.... (1)

burisch_research (1095299) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365432)

It was ahead of its time. It's gone the way of the personal flying car, not the buggy ...

Homophobe (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365268)

Why does it have to be a heterogeneous mix of files?

Mendeley Desktop (2)

burningcpu (1234256) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365274)

I use Mendeley Desktop for this purpose. It integrates well with Microsoft Word, and provides easy citations and reference organization. It is FOSS, and works under Windows and Linux. http://www.mendeley.com/ [mendeley.com] It also has an Iphone app, but I've never used it, so I can't vouch for its usefullness.

OpenKM (2)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365286)

OpenKM will do most of what you want. We've deployed it for clients who have been happy with it. It does not preserve the underlying filesystem, but you can upload a ZIP file of documents.

It's a tomcat app - that used to be heavy-duty - if it is today depends on what kind of machine you're using.

What about the (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365302)

trash can?

A system to organize files (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365316)

Would be a file system. Run something like Beagle for full text/metadata search. Use hard links to keep a single file under multiple folders.

T-Ball Anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365320)

Seems like the individual who posted the question and the first poster are orchestrating a marketing coup on Slashdot for Zotero

Re:T-Ball Anyone? (2)

mspohr (589790) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365512)

Zotero is free. Where is the profit in marketing that?

Google Desktop and full-text indexing (1)

gstr (2007386) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365338)

Hello, As far as I know Google Desktop doesn't allow full-text indexing of files. Is there a desktop search engine that would allow doing full-indexing of file?

Knowledge Tree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365350)

I used it for my business a while back. Should have most of what you need. However, as this is medical data, have you checked on HIPAA compliancy requirements for whoever does that for your organization?

http://www.knowledgetree.org/Main_Page

Google Docs doesn't suck (1)

dnut (657446) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365352)

Google Docs works OK for something like this. Can add as many categories as you like to each docs for easy sorting. Can add descriptions, etc for metadata search ...and of course content search works well for known file types.

EndNote (1)

multimediavt (965608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365398)

Check out EndNote (http://www.endnote.com/eninfo.asp), also. Your school may already have a site license like mine where it is free to all students.

Wiki (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365448)

The general problem of how to organize arbitrary information for convenient retrieval is fairly hard. Ask any library scientist. All approaches require you to either impose some organizing principle on the information or be prepared to exhaustively search it.

(1) If the information is inherently hierarchical, you can develop a taxonomy for it and organize it according to that taxonomy. (2) If it's classifiable but not uniquely classifiable, you can tag it. (3) If it can be meaningfully interrelated in a mesh, then you can hyperlink it. A Wiki does all three, plus it can search.

Bibdesk (1)

qvatch (576224) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365486)

OSX only again, but does what you want, including handling all files.

Tim Berners Lee... (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365506)

invented the web for this didn't he? How about putting your files on a webserver with something like a Lucene index?

Hide-ads on slashdot no longer there? (0)

burisch_research (1095299) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365522)

[Off topic] (ok so not really so off-topic, because this is slashdot)

As a long-time user of slashdot (shaddap you 6-digit UID freaks), I've become accustomed to the 'disable ads' checkbox. Now that's suddenly disappeared. Why? Also, these days I have to enable ALL scripts (FireFox 4, NoScript) in order to make comments or perform moderation. Why?! What's going on, slashdot? What happened to the promise that no existing functionality would ever be taken away to be then given to subscribers only?

What's going on, slashdot?

Re:Hide-ads on slashdot no longer there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365702)

your karma went down?

Re:Hide-ads on slashdot no longer there? (1)

burisch_research (1095299) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365800)

No actually it went from 'good' to 'excellent'.

KTDMS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365536)

Opensource/pay version available

http://www.knowledgetree.com/

a good one does exist... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365616)

Emacs: org-mode is the best choice, and if emacs' control-key powers give you pause, don't forget there is a menu-bar and org mode utilizes it heavily... so you don't need to remember every command key combination, you just pull down the ORG menu list and there it is, baby... YEAH!

Sounds like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365670)

...Google Docs might do the trick for you? I use Docs to organize notes/diagrams/scans/... with multiple tags in a group (the entire Computer Sciences class contributes). This can potentially save a lot of time if you distribute the effort across multiple people; nudge, nudge, wink, wink.

They used to be (1)

NEDHead (1651195) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365716)

called secretaries, now they want to be known as administrative assistants.....

I'm old school. (1)

gregarican (694358) | more than 3 years ago | (#36365726)

I use VisiCalc because I'm down like that...

Springpad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36365790)

Springpad [springpadit.com] is also an option. I use it on PC, Mac, and Android phones.

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