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World IPv6 Day: Most-watched Tech Event Since Y2K

CmdrTaco posted more than 2 years ago | from the omg-so-huge-huge-huge dept.

The Internet 243

alphadogg wrote in with a fairly extreme bit of hyperbole saying "The nation's largest telecom carriers, content providers, hardware suppliers and software vendors will be on the edge of their seats today for World IPv6 Day, which is the most-anticipated 24 hours the tech industry has seen since fears of the Y2K bug dominated New Year's Eve in 1999. More than 400 organizations are participating in World IPv6 Day, a large-scale experiment aimed at identifying problems associated with IPv6, an upgrade to the Internet's main communications protocol, IPv4. Sponsored by the Internet Society, World IPv6 Day runs from 8 p.m. EST Tuesday until 7:59 p.m. EST Wednesday. The IT departments in the participating organizations have spent the last five months preparing their websites for an anticipated rise in IPv6-based traffic, more tech support calls and possible hacking attacks prompted by this largest-ever trial of IPv6."

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243 comments

Fingers crossed (4, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#36373978)

I haven't gotten much use my well-stocked bomb shelter since Y2K. Sure, religious types keep predicting the end of the world, and guessing wrong every time. And bad predictions aren't going to justify the money I've put into this goddamn thing. Did you know that a generator's gaskets will dry-rot over time, even if you don't use it? Well guess what, they will--and that shit is expensive to fix too.

Man, if only we could have one nuclear war. Then the neighbors might finally stop laughing at me.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374318)

Did you know that a generator's gaskets will dry-rot over time, even if you don't use it? Well guess what, they will--and that shit is expensive to fix too.

You joke, but those (possibly fictional but still representative) gaskets were designed to rot. There exist compounds which do that job, which cost very slightly more money, which will last longer than you will. In this particular case, the problem could be solved with all metal gaskets. In other cases, substituting silicone, nylon, or viton (depending on the application) for neoprene is what is needed.

One of the selling points of my motherboard (GA-MA770-UD3P 1.0, I.I.R. all the little letters C.) was that it had Japanese solid capacitors which are supposed to last longer than the usual kind in or out of normal use. Hopefully the other components match.

There are jillions of other examples, such as automakers using silicone-filled rubber (dunno what kind of "rubber") bushings instead of air-filled polyurethane, even though these will typically wear out during the lifetime of the vehicle. Anyone know of any product lines (of any kind) designed specifically for durability? How about a unifying resource for finding them?

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374414)

Anyone know of any product lines (of any kind) designed specifically for durability?

Pyramids? Maybe not an ideal design, but that's certainly what the engineers of the time were shooting for. You know, durability and difficulty to assemble.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374558)

The problem is, I can't exactly call up the local contractor and have one put in. Maybe Halliburton would come out and pour me some shitty concrete.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374896)

OK, LOCAL contractor I'll grant you. But with sufficient real estate and a sufficient supply of indentured laborers, I don't see the hurdle. However be warned, the folks that have opted to use these for vacation homes have taken severely extended vacations. In the words of the prophets, "You can check out any time you'd like, but you can never leave."

Re:Fingers crossed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374530)


Anyone know of any product lines (of any kind) designed specifically for durability?

Lemmy.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375010)

Yep, Lemmys are able to withstand decades of incredible amounts of abuse, and still keep going.

Re:Fingers crossed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374632)

Polyurethane bushings squeak a lot, and automotive consumers care way too much about reductions in noise, vibration, and harshness, to the point where every car carries around hundreds of pounds of needless sound-deadening material.

Re:Fingers crossed (2, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374802)

Polyurethane bushings squeak a lot, and automotive consumers care way too much about reductions in noise, vibration, and harshness, to the point where every car carries around hundreds of pounds of needless sound-deadening material.

Polyurethane bushings greased with the proper kind of grease really do not squeak. Further, when the bushing is permanently affixed to a sleeve as are the polyurethane bushings I installed at the pivots of the Dana 50 TTB in the front of my 1992 F250 7.3 4x4, that connection will squeak even less. I ripped most of the asphalt (except from the toe pan, but yes from the floor) and all of the interior out of my 1989 Nissan 240SX — yes, it got hot in there — and I couldn't hear the poly bushings at all even with the silencer in the "fancy" (cheap on eBay, though) exhaust, which brought it down pretty much to stock levels since I had no header. But then, they came with the proper grease and I used it.

If vehicles are designed to take a poly bush with a metal sleeve then this is a non-issue. And using hollow poly bushings provides superior ride to silicone-filled rubber in every way as they are more consistent. This actually has the effect of improving ride quality under the hands of competent engineers, because they may tighten up the suspension design and do the damping in the shock absorbers where it belongs. Then all you have to do is drop the typical OE Tokico crap for some Bilsteins or similar...

Re:Fingers crossed (2)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374370)

If we really went to all out nuclear war, you might be better off just biting the bullet. What would happen afterwards is a massive temperature drop, worse than the last ice age.

A global average surface cooling of -7C to -8C persists for years, and after a decade the cooling is still -4C (Fig. 2). Considering that the global average cooling at the depth of the last ice age 18,000 yr ago was about -5C, this would be a climate change unprecedented in speed and amplitude in the history of the human race. The temperature changes are largest over land ... Cooling of more than -20C occurs over large areas of North America and of more than -30C over much of Eurasia, including all agricultural regions.

-20C is enough to turn Florida into Alaska, one thing is that people can live in Alaska temperatures but the world's food supply would utterly collapse. Billions would likely die of starvation or freeze to death, not war.

Re:Fingers crossed (3, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374492)

I don't think you appreciate the vast amount of canned peaches I have at my disposal.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374726)

-20C is enough to turn Florida into Alaska, one thing is that people can live in Alaska temperatures but the world's food supply would utterly collapse. Billions would likely die of starvation or freeze to death, not war.

The hard part for the prepared is not being discovered and eaten (out of house and home, if not literally) by the unprepared. So the question is, how many years. It's not that difficult or expensive to stock three or even five years' worth of food if you're willing to be very bored with your meals. Better to be bored than hungry, however.

Incidentally, anybody not stockpiling food right now is going to either be hungry or poorer by next year. Fuel costs are projected to rise, and crop failures are currently ongoing and massive. There will be shortages. There will be price hikes. Food has gone up hugely in the last few months already and the shortages haven't even hit yet, this is just on spec and due to rising fuel costs.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375084)

Incidentally, anybody not stockpiling food right now is going to either be hungry or poorer by next year.

On the upside, those of you looking for that little extra incentive to finally go on that diet you've been meaning to go on are in luck.

Re:Fingers crossed (2)

Eunuchswear (210685) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375294)

Incidentally, anybody not stockpiling food right now is going to either be hungry or poorer by next year.

Start the hoarding now to bring on the collapse earlier.

Let the panic buying commence!

Re:Fingers crossed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374884)

One mans 'bomb shelter' is another's 'Nag-Proof Man Cave'. If properly stocked, well provisioned and buried deep enough. Well, you get the idea.

Now about the neighbors, get one of those page sized 'foreclosure' window stickers. The ones with the red background and the word FORECLOSURE in big bold lettering. Wait till they are all away and post one of them up in a large picture window over looking the street. It won't stop them from being dickish about your hole in the ground, CORRECTION Your Man Cave, but it'll open up new topics for all to talk about.

Guess who's not taking part? (5, Insightful)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374000)

Big names like Google are:

$ host www.google.com
www.google.com is an alias for www.l.google.com.
www.l.google.com has address 74.125.45.147
www.l.google.com has address 74.125.45.104
www.l.google.com has address 74.125.45.99
www.l.google.com has address 74.125.45.105
www.l.google.com has address 74.125.45.103
www.l.google.com has address 74.125.45.106
www.l.google.com has IPv6 address 2001:4860:800a::6a
$

But one tech website you'd expect to want to dabble in the new and good for some reason isn't:

$ host slashdot.org
slashdot.org has address 216.34.181.45
slashdot.org mail is handled by 10 mx.sourceforge.net.
$

Well, of course!

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374082)

They'll get around to it when they get to adding Unicode support. To be fair, Unicode is only 20 years old and IPv6 only 13 years old, so they aren't much later with these technologies than they are with their stories.

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (3, Insightful)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374440)

In fairness, Unicode requires quite a bit of testing to make sure it works, even if you're using tools that, out of the box, should support Unicode transparently. In Slashdot's case, a legacy of building the site on what was considered top of the line in the 1990s has left them with a lot of things that can go wrong.

IPv6, on the other hand... well, if you're using virtual hosting (and /. is), all that it takes is to turn on IPv6 on the front facing server, give it an IP address (which could just be a 6to4 address), update DNS, and, well, it either works or it doesn't. A half competent sysadmin should be able to do all that in less than ten minutes. I say that, because I am a half competent sysadmin, and adding IPv6 to the websites I host (on a third party VPS no less) took just that. I enabled 6to4 on the VPS itself, assigned the 6to4 address, and added the DNS record. And everything "just worked". Took me less than 15 minutes.

I'd be very interested to know why CT hasn't done this.

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374674)

To me the sad thing about slashdot is that it doesn't do that much. All the hard stuff is in scalability. The interface hardly does ANYTHING. Well, there is a really really bad interface that does some stuff, but anyone serious has disabled big chunks of it because it blows chunks. Why haven't we seen a complete rewrite by now? Answer, because people are actually paying for this crap! You subscribers are the problem.

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (2)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374114)

Dabble in the new? Slashdot can't even deploy Ajax correctly.
Slashdot still has its place, but it's definitely a 'legacy' website.

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375402)

Dabble in the new? Slashdot can't even deploy Ajax correctly.
Slashdot still has its place, but it's definitely a 'legacy' website.

<getoffmylawn>And that's the way we like it!</getoffmylawn>

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374170)

This may be true but CmdrTaco can still write one hell of a comic book movie review. That's got to count for something. Doesn't it?
 
Slashdot hasn't been a real tech site for over half its life.

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374378)

And yet they've posted four IPv6 stories in the past month (and dozens before) where EVERYONE brings this up too.

You'd think they'd have bothered to do it by now. Shows you how "with the geeks" this site really is.

Slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374740)

Slashdot is more interested in adding javascript for the sake of adding javascript, working towards the final goal of making the site completely useless without javascript, as well as completely useless WITH javascript since it now requires a small cluster to render within the hour.

(You may be laughing, but I'm certainly not. Slashdot jumped the shark somewhere around 2005 IMHO.)

Re:Guess who's not taking part? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36375168)

Slashdot doesn't even have https, what are you expecting?

And... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374026)

And even less is going to happen.

Re:And... (2)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374096)

The only reason why Y2K /wasn't/ a disaster was because people worked their asses off for it to not happen.

Idiots everywhere...

--
BMO

Re:And... (1)

Marillion (33728) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374258)

I agree a lot of people worked very hard. But another very important factor that I feel is under-appreciated is that problem wasn't really as dire as the mainstream was lead to believe it was.

At the time, I was working for an air carrier. Passengers can book a flight 330 days in advance and past flights are kept for 30 days. The interface with the reservation system uses month and day. This led to my mantra, "You can't have a Y2K problem if you don't have a Y."

Re:And... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374350)

Let me guess - you were a baggage handler.

Hardly the most-anticipated 24 hours (2)

Ruvim (889012) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374042)

This event had been very unpublicized for this to be the most-anticipated 24 hours in tech industry for the last 10 years.

Re:Hardly the most-anticipated 24 hours (1)

gnick (1211984) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374514)

It doesn't need to be - Very few people need to know to avoid it affecting their normal routine. My ISP (f'n Comcast) isn't helping me out with IPv6 and neither is my employer (a major national lab), but I expect zero effect. I suspect that I'm just a typical example of the vast majority of the population.

Re:Hardly the most-anticipated 24 hours (1)

FST777 (913657) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374754)

Not for lack of trying, but with the vast majority of the people, even the tech-aware ones, the typical reaction to anything "IPv6" is: "Wha..?", leading to lack of interest at first mention.

Which 24 hours sine Y2K were more anticipated? The launch of the iDevices? Is that really the tech industry? I work in networking (at a large web-based content-provider), and in "the field", this is a very, very important day (which we all hope shall pass relatively silently).

Slashdot has no AAAA address (5, Interesting)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374066)

I was happy to see xkcd, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, and Plurk turn on their IPv6 capabilities, but I was quite sad that Slashdot didn't take part in the World IPv6 Day.

Re:Slashdot has no AAAA address (1, Funny)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374148)

I was quite sad that Slashdot didn't take part in the World IPv6 Day.

That's on the list right after getting UNICODE to work.

Re:Slashdot has no AAAA address (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374628)

xkcd has had ipv6 for a long time, and has been running in dual stack.

I only know this because I screwed up my ipv6 configuration a long time ago and forgot about it. I then was unable to reach xkcd for a long time, until I remembered.

I don't think that xkcd is participating, same with heise.de

Re:Slashdot has no AAAA address (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36375436)

I am happy to see Slashdot not using IPv6 as it is one of the few sites that I am not having problems trying to connect to. Wikipedia also seems to work ok. Google has been almost impossible to use today.

Legacy devices (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374174)

Some people with legacy devices, which may be so because of legacy softwate, are stuck with IPv4 for some time to come.

Did Skype participate? (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374198)

I had calls getting dropped every 5 minutes or so last night. Then again, Skype's entire network seems to go down on occasion, so perhaps an IPv6 test is an unlikely cause.

But, I'm safely small enough that my ISP is just starting to talk about offering an IPv6 trial in a city far far away. I'm signed up for them to let me know in 4 years that IPv6 is available for testing...

Whatever happened... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374236)

to IPv5?

Re:Whatever happened... (2)

lxs (131946) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374438)

Wiki [wikipedia.org] is your friend.

tl;dr;
They skipped 5 to avoid confusion with the Internet Stream Protocol.

So whatever happened to IPv5? (2, Funny)

SpryGuy (206254) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374248)

That's my question.

Re:So whatever happened to IPv5? (4, Funny)

RazzleFrog (537054) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374298)

Odd numbers are development releases - duh. Only even numbers are for stable releases.

Re:So whatever happened to IPv5? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374680)

If I hadn't already posted, you'd get a +1 for that. I love it.

AC 'cuz I hate people that say that people deserve mod points instead of just letting moderators mod. And because I hate when people explain why they're posting AC. And because I hate people who sign AC comments with their actual user name after taking the time to go AC.

-gnick

Re:So whatever happened to IPv5? (3, Funny)

Laser_47 (234412) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374362)

IPv5 was originally designed as a streaming protocol, but they abandoned it now that everything is encapsulated in HTTP.

Re:So whatever happened to IPv5? (1)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374366)

It was strictly conjecture from when IPv4 was just released. The realities of how the internet was actually used defined IPv6 instead.

Funny/interesting addresses (5, Interesting)

Sinus0idal (546109) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374252)

I've seen a few already today!

www.facebook.com has IPv6 address 2620:0:1c18:0:face:b00c::
cisco.v6day.akadns.net has IPv6 address 2001:420:80:1:c:15c0:d06:f00d
www.luns.net.uk has IPv6 address 2a01:8900:0:1::b00b:1e5
www.bbc.net.uk has IPv6 address 2001:4b10:bbc::1

Does v6 kick off 'IP addresses as a marketing tool'? :)

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (1)

elPetak (2016752) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374404)

IP addresses in IPv6 are ugly so I doubt they can be used that way.
OTOH, saying some site is "IPv6 certified" or some other BS like that may be used as marketing tool, and people would buy it just like they buy anything in a green package thinking it's healthy.

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (0)

joeytmann (664434) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374420)

I find it rather funny that www.facebook.com has face in part of the address.

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374504)

It's "faceb00c", if you read the next part. Or "facebook", when you account for a bit of 1337 spelling and pronounce it phonetically.

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374508)

And, if you're paying slightly better attention, b00c is an approximation of "book".

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (1)

xMrFishx (1956084) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374592)

it actually says "face:booc", as there's no K in hex. Luns.net says boobies though, which is more important.

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (1)

ceced (582790) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374624)

Actually it has "Facebook" (face:b00c), Cisco has "Cisco Dog Food" (c:15c0:d06:f00d), lunk.net.uk has "Boobies" (b00b:1e5) and BBC has "bbc" :)

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374694)

Don't forget dog food.

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (1)

IAmGarethAdams (990037) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374732)

Yes, that was the point of the parent post. Hence the CISCO/"cisco dog food", LUNS/"boobies" and BBC/"bbc1" examples too

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (1)

mykdavies (1369) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374792)

Nicely spotted. In case anyone else missed the full thing as I did the first time round, Cisco's address ends c:15c0:d06:f00d = cisco dog food, very clever.

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36375408)

I like the BBC's effort too.

Little pressed to explain what b00bs have to do with LUNS though...

Re:Funny/interesting addresses (1)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375124)

Yeah, surprised Google didn't manage to get anything with "8008" in it. Maybe in IPv4space they already spent too much money buying 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 from L3 that they didn't want to spring extra for 8.0.0.8 as well.

So what (2)

synapse7 (1075571) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374278)

So all this proves is these sites are capable of running both protocols simultaneously and while there is a DNS record that resolves to an ipv6 address, is anybody able to browse to these sites using ipv6 all the way through?

Re:So what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374644)

One major concern is/was that returning IPv6 addresses during DNS lookup could break functionality for devices that can't handle IPv6.

I personally can't access anything via IPv6 on my school's connection. Will try again at home, see if Verizon turned on IPv6 for the day.

Re:So what (2)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374676)

Why not enable IPv6 and find out?

If you have a modern router, the chances are it already allows you to use IPv6 irrespective of your ISP's support for it. Check the IPv6 settings.

  1. Enable "stateless configuration" for the network part (as opposed to DHCPv6 - you don't want that)
  2. Enable 6to4 tunneling. If the system asks for a gateway IP address, leave it blank (Linksys routers do for some reason, but they route properly if it's absent.)
  3. Enable IPv6 on your operating system. Wait until your computer shows that it has an IP address starting with "2002:", and then try to connect to "ipv6.google.com". If that works, start browsing! You'll use the IPv6 version of the sites you browse today because AAAA is generally routed first, and if there is a problem, you'll notice it with either timeouts/host-cannot-be-reached type errors, or huge delays loading pages.
  4. If it didn't work, go to tunnelbroker.net, register for an IPv6 tunnel, and repeat from step 3, substituting using a tunnel instead of 6to4, and waiting until your computer has an IP address beginning with the prefix you get from HE.

Either 6to4, or the tunnel broker, should get you live, real, honest to goodness, IPv6 connectivity. Every computer on your network that has IPv6 enabled will suddenly have a real IP address, and a direct connection to the Internet. For those services that support it, there'll be no stupid tricks involving DMZs and port forwarding you have to do to get SIP, Bittorrent, online video games, or anything else working.

Re:So what (1)

synapse7 (1075571) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374766)

I did, I can't, that is why I asked.

Re:So what (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375086)

Interesting. I have two 6to4 networks, and neither are having problems this morning. Here's a traceroute:

$ traceroute6 www.google.com
traceroute to www.google.com (2001:4860:b009::67), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
1 2002:XXXX:XXXX::2 (2002:XXXX:XXXX::2) 4.888 ms 4.860 ms 4.849 ms
2 2002:c058:6301:: (2002:c058:6301::) 37.760 ms 38.721 ms 38.727 ms
3 ge-7-2-ur02.s3ndigital.ga.atlanta.comcast.net (2001:558:fe12:1::1) 38.756 ms * *
4 * * *
5 * * *
6 * * *
7 * pos-0-0-0-0-pe01.56marietta.ga.ibone.comcast.net (2001:558:0:f594::2) 60.528 ms *
8 2001:559::38e (2001:559::38e) 142.054 ms * 136.804 ms
9 * 2001:4860::1:0:489 (2001:4860::1:0:489) 124.818 ms *
10 2001:4860::1:0:613 (2001:4860::1:0:613) 48.391 ms 54.988 ms 55.037 ms
11 2001:4860::2:0:617 (2001:4860::2:0:617) 54.064 ms 55.936 ms *
12 * * *
13 qy-in-x67.1e100.net (2001:4860:b009::67) 47.046 ms 52.048 ms 47.097 ms

Telneting to port 80 works too. I just spoofed an HTTP request without problems.

What kinds of problems are you getting?

Re:So what (1)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374958)

Yes ... no problems at all here (I have a native IPv6 connection, not tunnelled). This isn't really very surprising - these sites have mostly been resolvable and accessible via IPv6 for a long time through alternate domains (e.g. ipv6.google.com, www.v6.facebook.com). All that changed is that they have now published AAAA records for the ~main~ domains as well.

Re:So what (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375074)

is anybody able to browse to these sites using ipv6 all the way through?

Yes. Those of us who have free IPv6 tunnels from sixxs.net or he.net, among others.

It works! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374280)

So far it works gre... [carrier lost]

meh (2)

Combatso (1793216) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374334)

4,294,967,296 should be enough addresses for any internet

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374520)

using NAT technology, only 4,294,967,296 ip addresses are used - but we can have more than 72,057,594,037,927,936 devices connected to the internet.

4.3B IP's should be enough... (1)

jcurran (307641) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374586)

7 Billion people on the planet... While many today do not have Internet connectivity, that's changing rapidly where some regions are skipping the copper deployment for end users and going directly to deployment of wireless infrastructure. In more established economies, it is not uncommon to have 1 IP address in use at home for broadband, one in the office, one on your mobile device, etc. 4 or 5 IP's per person, 7 Billion people = 40 or 50 Bill IP addresses would be helpful, and this doesn't even count servers in data centers, virtual machines, clouds, etc. 4.3 billion is looking very tight even with just today's applications.

It is EDT not EST (1)

grink (116056) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374374)

Get your timezone right, it is currently EDT.

Re:It is EDT not EST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374736)

Not all regions of the USA follow Daylight Savings Time.

Re:It is EDT not EST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36375148)

But then the interval should read 7pm-7pm EST, not 8pm-8pm. By the way not all such regions are in the USA. E.g. Coral Harbour [wikipedia.org] .

hah..what (1)

Sase (311326) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374436)

Im not sure about this because i havent been keeping tab... but i thought widespread nat'ing pushed ipv6 the way ofnthe dodo

I think arin needs to be a little less lax about their assignments btw.. you can get a /20 with two linksys routers and an ipad these days..

Re:hah..what (1)

jcurran (307641) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374650)

I think arin needs to be a little less lax about their assignments btw.. you can get a /20 with two linksys routers and an ipad these days..

Sase - anyone may submit proposals to change ARIN's policies... Go to www.arin.net/policy for details on doing so.

Re:hah..what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374798)

why would i do that when i could just complain on /. :-)

Re:hah..what (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375232)

Im not sure about this because i havent been keeping tab...

This is clear.

but i thought widespread nat'ing pushed ipv6 the way ofnthe dodo

Fortunately, you are quite wrong. The horrific kludge that is LSNAT is such a PITA for ISPs that they will go to DS-Lite to avoid it, and nothing but IPv6 can handle the coming mobile explosion.

Next Internet Land Grab (1)

SloWave (52801) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374478)

is already started. Look at Facebooks IPV6 address closely...

snark@toluene:~$ host www.facebook.com
www.facebook.com has address 69.171.224.39
www.facebook.com has IPv6 address 2620:0:1c00:0:face:b00c::

Re:Next Internet Land Grab (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374836)

It's great but not a land grab. It might have been had the address been face:b00c::1.

The first part of the address is the prefix. This is the part that's assigned by your ISP or ARIN. It's a 64 bit number, and is used to route packets over the public (ie ISP/trunked/etc) Internet. In the above, it's 2620:0:1c00:0:.

The other part of the address (the "face:b00c::" bit above), is a 64 bit number that's used to route packets within the part of the Internet owned by the person running the host (ie Facebook's Ethernet network.) These numbers are assigned by the network admin.

And that's what happened here. Usually the latter part of the IP address is based on the host's MAC address, but for some cases, specific services etc, they're often assigned manually, and Facebook has done this to assign an appropriate address to their server cluster. When you get your own network prefix (which you will when you get IPv6 on your DSL connection) you'll be able to do the same thing, even creating something that's {your prefix}:face:b00c if you want.

Re:Next Internet Land Grab (1)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374988)

The last 64 bits of the address can be whatever you want, as the entire /64 space is allocated to you. So it can't really be a land-grab ... it's only the ~first~ 64 bits of the address that are unique and assignable.

Re:Next Internet Land Grab (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375106)

You too can get enough IPv6 addresses to make silly vanity addresses that noone other than a few geeks will see. Hardly a land grab.

dnshat participating (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374482)

smcdonald@mcdesktop:~$ host www.dnshat.com
www.dnshat.com is an alias for www.dnsfailover.info.
www.dnsfailover.info has address 173.230.158.14
www.dnsfailover.info has IPv6 address 2600:3c01::f03c:91ff:fe93:b4b3

But can anyone with IPv6 tell me if its actually working lol ?

Re:dnshat participating (1)

mab (17941) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374630)

marvin:~ mbradbury$ host www.ibm.com
www.ibm.com is an alias for www.ibm.com.cs186.net.
www.ibm.com.cs186.net has address 129.42.58.216

Re:dnshat participating (1)

mab (17941) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374660)

marvin:~ mab$ ping6 www.dnsfailover.info
PING6(56=40+8+8 bytes) 2001:44b8:7871:7f0:72cd:60ff:fef2:dd04 --> 2600:3c01::f03c:91ff:fe93:b4b3
16 bytes from 2600:3c01::f03c:91ff:fe93:b4b3, icmp_seq=0 hlim=246 time=279.777 ms
16 bytes from 2600:3c01::f03c:91ff:fe93:b4b3, icmp_seq=1 hlim=246 time=279.627 ms
16 bytes from 2600:3c01::f03c:91ff:fe93:b4b3, icmp_seq=2 hlim=246 time=279.547 ms
16 bytes from 2600:3c01::f03c:91ff:fe93:b4b3, icmp_seq=3 hlim=246 time=278.873 ms
^C
--- www.dnsfailover.info ping6 statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0.0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/std-dev = 278.873/279.456/279.777/0.347 ms

Nobody cares! Except maybe you. (5, Interesting)

GreggBz (777373) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374512)

I work at a sort of small ISP and we've done testing, implementation, published our website with an AAAA record and put some information on the site for everyone to see.

We've gotten exactly one call (this morning) on IPv6 that I can remember. We published information and started doing some obvious IPv6 things, but no one cares. The group of dual-stack test accounts is pretty small, but they have not even seemed to care or notice. I'd put anyone that asks on a list for testing so they can use IPv6 at home. No one has asked. I guess I could put a big(er) banner on the page.. but really I don't think it would matter much.. and probably scare people.

All in all I will say the experience has been pretty anti-climatic. It was not that difficult to implement. There were bugs of course, (Fedora 13+14 blocking DHCPv6 client traffic, and other NetworkManager bugs) the Cisco CMTS and it's weird detection of static IPv4 only clients... duplicate address detection madness, incomplete support of DHCPv6 + SLAAC in routers (D-Link DIR-615..) but it was just me working on it and I did not have that difficult a time getting our network to route, connect and answer to IPv6. Most of the problems I dealt with were incomparable hardware. Routers and DOCSIS 2.0 + IPv6 modems which are pretty much non existent with the exception of one EMTA I've tested. You have to shell out the bucks for a DOCSIS 3.0 modem evidentially.

Of the D-Link routers I've tested the DIR-825 is the star. It was dead easy to configure. DD-WRT and Open-WRT are not easy and probably there is no build for your router if it only has 4Mb of flash.

Re:Nobody cares! Except maybe you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36374920)

I just bought a DOCSIS 2.0 modem. I thought about going 3.0, but realized that wide adoption of IPv6 was a ways a way and felt like saving a 30-40 bucks for the immediate. I figure in a couple of years when it becomes a pressing concern is when I will buy a new modem anyway. I know its not the most technologically conscious thing to do, but I only need the internet for slashdot and email.

People like me are part of the problem.

Re:Nobody cares! Except maybe you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36375044)

All in all I will say the experience has been pretty anti-climatic.

I agree. It really contributes to global warming.

Re:Nobody cares! Except maybe you. (2)

foksoft (848194) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375430)

It is not necessary to have all users switched to IPv6. What we need is to have websites available over IPv6 so users who don't have access to IPv4 can access them. Then we can slowly start migrating end-users to IPv6 without worrying about loosing functionality. And this is where today's experiment is aimed. It is test if transition can be done without hacks like naming website ipv6.example.com instead of www.example.com as we are used to with IPv4.

What you tell to your users to be interested in IPv6?
Do you tell them here it is and if you want, you can run it? Or you tell them that when using IPv6, they will get public IP and their skype connection will be better as it will not need to use public relays?
Yes it also depends on the fact whether you actualy give your users public IP address or not. Those who are already behind NAT know what I am talking about.

Poor business reported at hotels in the area... (1)

cardpuncher (713057) | more than 2 years ago | (#36374906)

... owing to the test site being accessible only by means of a long and winding tunnel housing an 8ft gauge railway on which massively long engines haul tiny carriages.

Eastern Standard Time? (1)

xquercus (801916) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375082)

Sponsored by the Internet Society, World IPv6 Day runs from 8 p.m. EST Tuesday until 7:59 p.m. EST Wednesday.

Hrm. Why note the start and end times in Eastern Standard Time when the entirety of the eastern time zone is using Eastern Daylight time?

Re:Eastern Standard Time? (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 2 years ago | (#36375220)

And the entire world outside of East Coast USA would probably be more comfortable working out what it is in local time from 1:00am GMT Wednesday until 0:59am Thursday.
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