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Lodsys Expands Patent Lawsuit to 10 More Companies

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the sue-you-sue-everybody dept.

Patents 75

An anonymous reader writes "A day after Apple filed a motion to intervene in Lodsys's lawsuit against seven app developers (EFF comments), Lodsys has filed its third lawsuit this year. The latest complaint targets ten companies including Adidas, Best Buy, Best Western, Black and Decker. Lodsys sues them over two patents, one of which it also asserts against app developers in court as well as its now famous letters (an example of which has meanwhile been published as a result of Apple's intervention). The ten new assertions relate to web surveys, feedback-soliciting FAQs, and live interactive chat."

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I patented the tubes! (3, Interesting)

just_another_sean (919159) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412142)

We're going to be rich!

Gah, I am so sick of watching this unfold. I keep thinking, well, at least this will highlight the absurdity of it all. But no, it never does, either the case gets dismissed or the idiots actually win [slashdot.org] , whether through settlement or actual trial victories.

When will it end?

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412244)

I don't know, but I guarantee you I'm emigrating from the U.S. before I release any software that's at all novel; the less-novel stuff I'm willing to risk losing as part of declaring my LLC bankrupt if one of these assholes (i.e., a software patent holder) sues me.

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

Pecisk (688001) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412310)

Please not i4i case in same basket, because it is more complex than that. Microsoft literally stole their tech while working togheter. Yes, software patents are bad, but there are those who tries to use system honesly and those who game the system in the open (patent trolls, offensive pattenting from Amazon, Microsoft).

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412346)

Yes, i4i was definitely the inventor of "custom XML". OMG so novel!

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412738)

Maybe Microsoft did "literally steal their tech", but it shouldn't have been patentable in the first place. What i4i had was like a patent on the wheel: obvious.

Re:I patented the tubes! (2)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412900)

Maybe Microsoft did "literally steal their tech", but it shouldn't have been patentable in the first place. What i4i had was like a patent on the wheel: obvious.

The wheel is obvious now... The first wheel? Not so much.

Re:I patented the tubes! (2)

bug1 (96678) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413898)

The wheel is obvious now... The first wheel? Not so much.

And inventing it without the incentives and legal rights that patents systems provide.

Why would one even bother inventing the wheel if he couldnt even commercial it or license the rights to others ! /saracsm

If intellectual property rights are so important, how did we survive without them.

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 3 years ago | (#36415690)

If intellectual property rights are so important, how did we survive without them.

Good question. Fortunately, we can look back at history. Prior to intellectual property rights, life expectancy was about 35 years. If you made it through childhood, you could expect to live to 45. So, we didn't really survive terribly well.

The industrial revolution, on the other hand, resulted in life expectancies in the 70s and rising. The graph resembles a hockey stick [typepad.com] .

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

donaldm (919619) | more than 3 years ago | (#36416934)

If intellectual property rights are so important, how did we survive without them.

Good question. Fortunately, we can look back at history. Prior to intellectual property rights, life expectancy was about 35 years. If you made it through childhood, you could expect to live to 45. So, we didn't really survive terribly well.

The industrial revolution, on the other hand, resulted in life expectancies in the 70s and rising. The graph resembles a hockey stick [typepad.com] .

Not quite true. People normally have quite long lives if there is adequate clean water and the facilities to dispose of waste properly (this translate to good hygiene), of course a good medical service does go a long way in extending life but the first two are more important. Actually the industrial revolution lowered the average human life expectancy because of pandemics, excessive pollution and unsafe drinking water, but there were profits to make and who cares about the unwashed masses when you live comfortably. Fortunately in society today especially in first world counties there is nothing like a vote looser when your own middle class which normally can be very powerful is suffering health issues.

Actually the graph does not quite tell the whole truth since if you have say 100 people on the planet living to say 5000 years and the rest of the population only living to say 25 years (the graph) then the average age is still 25 years. Ok that was extreme but say you have a civilization that that has clean water and good sanitation and the average life expectancy was say 80 years but the rest of the known world had a life expectancy of say 25 years then the overall live expectancy of the world would still be about 25 years.

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

Theaetetus (590071) | more than 3 years ago | (#36417338)

Not quite true. People normally have quite long lives if there is adequate clean water and the facilities to dispose of waste properly (this translate to good hygiene), of course a good medical service does go a long way in extending life but the first two are more important.

And they didn't, prior to the industrial revolution. See my linked chart.

Actually the industrial revolution lowered the average human life expectancy because of pandemics, excessive pollution and unsafe drinking water, but there were profits to make and who cares about the unwashed masses when you live comfortably.

[Citation needed]. Your assertion is directly opposite to the chart I linked, so I'm sure you've got some data...?

Actually the graph does not quite tell the whole truth since if you have say 100 people on the planet living to say 5000 years and the rest of the population only living to say 25 years (the graph) then the average age is still 25 years. Ok that was extreme but say you have a civilization that that has clean water and good sanitation and the average life expectancy was say 80 years but the rest of the known world had a life expectancy of say 25 years then the overall live expectancy of the world would still be about 25 years.

And where's this mythical civilization with 80 year life expectancy in the 1500s? Do you have data, or are you just going to wave your hands and say "western civilizations"?

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

salesgeek (263995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36417958)

It would be convenient if you were right, but you've confused correlation with causation. There were a great number of inventions and innovations over the past 400 years that were not in any realm involving intellectual property or we placed in the public domain by their invetors: sanitary sewers, the corporation, scientific method, the modern democratic republic, rotation of crops, pasteurization, immunizations (Salk asked, "Would you patent the sun?" when asked about patenting his Polio vaccine), and penicillin (here's the full stoy [mises.org] ) all have much more to do with today's life expectancy than do intellectual property laws. One could make the case that today's intellectual property laws are reducing lifespans by making the cost of life extending medications for diseases like AIDS, certain cancers or Multiple Sclerosis (1yr supply averages over $50,000) out of reach of all but the wealthy. Of course, that's not convenient when you are trying to justify greed as a way of life, so we'll just ignore it.

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

cshark (673578) | more than 3 years ago | (#36418014)

They're not. All studies have shown that they stifle innovation to the tune of setting us back 20 years or so.
Take touch screens, for example. Innovation in them didn't even start until the initial patents expired. This isn't uncommon.

This whole thing though, is stinks of SCO style tactics... in my opinion.

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412812)

Your post is painful to parse. Cut back on the texting- it's destroying your ability to converse and you are starting to look like an idiot.

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412824)

> When will it end?

That much I can answer you.

Remember the English, the French & others trying to rip off the world claiming their "nobility" was reason enough; nowadays, it's the US and other countries legal systems.

Somehow they expect:

a) that their internal laws cover other countries;
b) that their internal laws are moral.

It's more or less like that: "hey, don't do that, because it's immoral (or inhumane)"... and there comes the answer: "no, it's ok, because it's legal".

But, as you were asking, "when will it end?"... when the world treats those arrogants the way they deserve, like pretentious idiots, just like it happened to nobility. I wonder, though, if it will be possible to sell legal buildings as a tourist attraction just like they did with palaces.

The situation got so bad in the US (and some other countries) because the population has no means to fight back. I suppose on more advanced democracies, human rights will not be stolen so easily -- unless small tyrants have their way and sign up unfair "treaties" for "intelectual ownage".

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

ForgedArtificer (1777038) | more than 3 years ago | (#36414778)

I'm glad to see some countries denying the US patent laws although I worry about where it will lead.. we need to face the fact, though, that every minute patent troll are allowed to keep this up, they are damaging smaller companies, stifling innovation and stomping on the true spirit of capitalism.

I have a friend who constantly comes up with great ideas, but he can't develop them because he can't afford to pay off the patent trolls, who do nothing with their patents... it's disgusting.

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36418106)

I suspect that you don't understand US Patent law. It does not matter what the patent trolls do nor does it matter when you file your patent protection in the US, if ever. Unlike the rest of the world which is controlled by large companies and overbearing governments,the IP is allocated to the first to invent not the first to file. Of course, there are some actions that inventors must take to prove that they actively seek to protect their IP. Other than that, you can hold on to your ideas if properly documented.

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36413342)

"When will it end?"

When software development is outsourced to a more friendly country, where you do not have to worry about patent lawyers, health care costs, and high taxation.

You might as well prepare for a lower wage job if you do software development. These lawyers are costing more economic damage to this country than Walmart. Add to OSHA lawsuits and it makes management very warry to the idea of hiring a single westerner to do a job.

Re:I patented the tubes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36414188)

When will it end?

THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE. And may I suggest: Sir Tim Berners-Lee.
 
"Oh yeah, like I forgot to hit submit on the original patent application. My bad. I created the internet, so I own it. All of it. Thanks for playing, please come again!"

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

slashqwerty (1099091) | more than 3 years ago | (#36414986)

When will it end?

When you, and other people like you do the hard work of getting elected to congress and change the law.

Re:I patented the tubes! (1)

ForgedArtificer (1777038) | more than 3 years ago | (#36415250)

Some of us aren't American but disagree with how this is affecting our world. What do you propose we do?

Company will lose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412176)

This is not even as good as SCO.

Attention Rob Malda!!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412186)

Attention Rob Malda!!! I need to inform you that two nights ago after we hooked up at the glory I realized I left a beer bottle and my iPhone 4 up your anus. Can you please contact me at 517-837-5309. Thanks! I hope I can get to suck on that tiny pee pee again sometime soon.

Re:Attention Rob Malda!!! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412628)

I tried calling that number, but apparently your phone is still in my ass. Feels pretty good. Meat me tonight.

--RM

Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412198)

and US companies wants this patent hell in to Europe?

Sharing the joy (read: IP based economy) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412590)

If these companies are smart, they would pool their money and put out contracts on Lodsys' officers and lawyers. But of course that would be illegal...

Re:Sharing the joy (read: IP based economy) (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412694)

Or pay some woman to sue for rape. It's pretty popular these days.

patenting != calling shotgun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412212)

patenting != calling shotgun

Fuck ALL Lawsuits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412234)

Fuck ALL Lawsuits

Re:Fuck ALL Lawsuits (2)

ShakaUVM (157947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412988)

It's great to say "Kill all the lawyers" - until you need one. There's a surprising number of people and companies willing to simply not pay you. Even if you have a contract, and completed the services rendered. My corporation has had to do it 3 times, and has won 100% of the owed money plus legal fees each time. Would we have won if I had self-represented? It's hard to say.

Re:Fuck ALL Lawsuits (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36416596)

The premise was that all lawyers were dead. I.e the people you were suing would have to fend for themselves too. Would they have won a case of not paying, self-represented?

No surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412270)

It wouldn't surprise me if some other competitor of Apple will now fund the lawsuits on behalf of Lodsys in the hopes that they can stop Apple's dominance. Similar to the lameness of Microsoft being implicated in the SCO lawsuits.

Re:No surprise (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412474)

I just wonder which competitor of Apple would have the reason, reasources and lack of morals to secretely fund a lawsuit against them. Ummm...

Re: reason, reasources and lack of morals (3, Funny)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412500)

Oracle?

Re:No surprise (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413050)

More importantly, Google and Microsoft are in the same boat as Apple (one of the lawsuits was over an android app).

Re:No surprise (1)

Noughmad (1044096) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413158)

Because as we know, companies in the mobile phone market never sue eachother when they're already involved in a dozen lawsuits already.

Tweak the tiger by the tail, Only to find a mouse! (0)

rajeevrk (1278022) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412316)

Call it vain hope, but i keep expecting some company to finally get pissed with the army of gnats(i.e. NPE IP Trolls) and throw some serious cash behind reforming the system, making it better for everyone. But i guess they're more like a bunch of crabs, with all of the companies making sure that no-one climbs out of the cooking pot, getting communally boiled!

Seriously, does it need a economics professor to figure out that the patent system has not given any significant incentive to innovate for quite a while, and scrapping the whole system might be just the thing to kickstart the economy. Remember, the intent is to make the *Entire Economy* grow, not protect the future profits of the incumbents. If they want more money, let them innovate and then grow their riches. They're anyway starting with the advantage of piles of cash to spend on researching the Next-Big-Thing(tm).

All in all, most of the big companies appear so scared to take a stand on such lawsuits, they actually look like elephants running like mice :)

P.S. : It should tell you how crazy the situation has gotten when i can use such outlandish language, and still have it fit reality perfectly ;)

RkR

Re:Tweak the tiger by the tail, Only to find a mou (2)

Scarletdown (886459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412374)

When the USDA Grade A Bullshit like this gets this thick, I shamefully find myself wishing someone with the means and with the same morals that the execs and lawyers of these corporations who instigate these lawsuits have would engage in some selective assassinations on said execs and lawyers.

Re:Tweak the tiger by the tail, Only to find a mou (1)

mickwd (196449) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412832)

Says something about the state of the US today, that someone's "vain hope" is that a large company will spend lots of money to change the law the way that company wants it to be, just because that might coincide with that person's interests.

Re:Tweak the tiger by the tail, Only to find a mou (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36415274)

Says something about the state of the US today, that someone's "vain hope" is that a large company will spend lots of money to change the law the way that company wants it to be, just because that might coincide with that person's interests.

Yeah, that's what he said in the P.S. of his post.

Re:Tweak the tiger by the tail, Only to find a mou (3, Interesting)

speedplane (552872) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413148)

The reason why we don't have substantive patent reform is because of pharmaceutical companies. The big tech companies, with some exceptions, want weaker patent laws because they're under constant attack by trolls and competitors. Big-pharma on the other hand makes all of its money from patents and will fight tooth and nail against any weakening. As long as big-pharma is dependent on the patent system, I would not expect much change.

Re:Tweak the tiger by the tail, Only to find a mou (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413400)

These same pharma companies then gouge the tax payers and bankrupt the country by charging $120 for $10 aspirin equivilents. Ironic these same senators blame Obama sayinh we didn't create this problem when letting these drug companies gouge and write the health insurance bill that forces people to pay agaisnt their will.

So, they are expanding their ... (1, Informative)

Jerry (6400) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412364)

attempt to gain control over the Internet and put a tollbooth on everyone's driveway.

The only questions left to ask are: "Did they pay enough congressmen?", and, "have they given enough trips to judges?"

Without those cash payments and "rewards" they can't win. With them they can't lose.

Re:So, they are expanding their ... (2, Insightful)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412528)

The patent statutes have been changed relatively little since 1952. There have been updates since then to accommodate a few treaties that the US has since ratified, but those updates didn't really affect patent validity and infringement. In fact, the biggest change in that regard was the gradual elimination of submarine patents by changing the patent term from 17 years after issuance to 20 years after effective filing date. In other words, payments to congresspeople would have had little effect on Lodsys's lawsuits.

In terms of judges, everything is appealable, and the Supreme Court is under enough watchful eyes that it probably wouldn't be possible to buy them off with gifts (trips, money, or otherwise).

On the other hand, moving forward, patent reform could be significantly affected by special interest lobbying. There's a patent reform bill that has passed the Senate and is awaiting action in the House, and the general perception of its biggest change (first inventor to file) is that it would favor large corporations over small inventors.

Re:So, they are expanding their ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36413338)

In terms of judges, everything is appealable, and the Supreme Court is under enough watchful eyes that it probably wouldn't be possible to buy them off with gifts (trips, money, or otherwise).

$500,000 is all it takes

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/09/us/politics/09thomas.html

Re:control over the Internet (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412530)

And who exactly is "lodsys" anyway? So when they're done suing everyone via secret funding... then they'll sell their lock over the internet to the highest bidder!

We have no invention to surpass the net anywhere on the horizon for the next 10 years.

Re:control over the Internet (1)

TRRosen (720617) | more than 3 years ago | (#36414650)

As far as anyone can tell Lodsys is one patent attorney and thats it.

My theory... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412372)

Wanting money from so many different companies for some dubious claim. Are we sure this isn't just a reincarnation of SCO?

justifiable murder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412440)

start killing the patent trolls like you would any other parasite

Re:justifiable murder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412502)

"Professional assassination. It's the highest form of public service." - Chuin, Remo Williams.

Breathing patent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412456)

"A method of breathing involving both nostrils simultaneously."

Profit.

Re:Breathing patent (1)

Idbar (1034346) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412498)

"A method of breathing involving at least one nostril or the mouth."
Now pay me!

Re:Breathing patent (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412704)

"A method of breathing involving at least one nostril and/or the mouth."

Now you pay me!

Are these real patents? (1)

eL-gring0 (1950736) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412524)

-A survey.
-A remote survey on a computer. Oh, oops. A "two-way interaction".

Damn. Are these real patents?

They're just...vague ideas. I'll admit I'm new to reading patents, but I guess I was under the impression you needed an actual implementation of something to get a patent. Why not just dream everything you could ever think of, and lie in wait for someone to actually do it, then pounce?

Oh. It seems that's exactly what they did, nevermind.

Re:Are these real patents? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412618)

Most of Lodsys's patents appear to be invalid due to prior art, especially teletext, which was fielded commercially in Florida (at least) by Viewdata Corp of America in the early 1980's.

Re:Are these real patents? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36412770)

-A survey.
-A remote survey on a computer. Oh, oops. A "two-way interaction".

checkbox and radio input elements in HTML, both existed way before the web in green screen land in data entry terminals from the 60s.

Unisys? (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412700)

Seriously, is this company related to Unisys in any way?

Frivolous. (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36412702)

I feel like there should be a statute of limitations on this crap. Obviously this guy made no/little efforts prior to this to enforce his "intellectual" property. It's like waiting until they feel like cashing out that they start these kind of lawsuits.

Re:Frivolous. (4, Informative)

speedplane (552872) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413194)

The defense of laches, sometimes called equitable estoppel, does provide the type of relief you're talking about. I have no doubt that it will be raised in the lawsuit. You can read about it here: http://www.patentlyo.com/patent/2008/10/laches-and-equi.html?cid=136550545 [patentlyo.com]

Who is Lodsys? This is Lodsys. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36413280)

http://www.lodsys.com

I'll just make that my homepage (1)

roguegramma (982660) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413720)

I'll just make that my homepage to put load on their servers instead of ecosia and never ever using ecosia anymore ;-)

Seriously, there is probably some merit to the patents in some of the claims, but the practice of filing a broad claim 1 that basically describes not an implementation, but a wish list, makes me throw up.

Interesting? Surveys? (3, Interesting)

clifyt (11768) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413456)

I wonder when they consider their earliest creation, because my team most likely has prior art.

I managed a small programming office at Indiana University where we had been using computer based testing since the early 80s. Unfortunately, it meant having to send discs via campus mail or driving across several regional campuses and...I'm lazy. About the time gopher was still popular (preweb) I was writing software to do gopher based tests / surveys without a lot of luck because the medium wasn't great for it...which led to client server apps that worked, but weren't as plastic as I'd like...the web was barely being shown and I readapted my code (err...along with my nerds) to do 'cgi' work (sadly it was an entire web server we wrote that had HyperCard on the backend for storage of tests and surveys).

We demonstrated this at a time few people knew what the web was, and at the time it was generally considered the first test / survey software for the web. Again, mostly because I was lazy. Pretty sure we beat all prior art for this.

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36414254)

Pretty sure we beat all prior art for this.

No no no, you misunderstand the game.
 
You patent everything you can think of in the absolute, most general terms possible. Then you wait for someone to actually do it, then you wait some more for it to become popular, then you come along and blow them all out of the water. (But do it too early and you ain't got nutin' to show for all of your hard work.)

You actually created something though?!!? How the hell did you do THAT?

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (1)

clifyt (11768) | more than 3 years ago | (#36415748)

At the time, I refused to patent anything...the university technology transfer team use to come to me regularly to ask about licensing the apps, and I pretty much said they were public domain except the content...anyone could take the code and do whatever they wanted, except copyright it and claim it was there's (none of this GPL bullshit...if something is free, it isnt free if you have to make demands on it)...a lot was developed on my own time, and I made certain things that were my own time were not developed / refined on anyone else's purposely.

Why? Because as I found out later...one of my tests was sold by the university for quite a lot of money and they even removed my credits from it (I think the copyright states 'regents of Indiana university' and I've had lawyers come after me twice for having the software listed in my online vita). Sadly, that one had a grant that was administered under the university...so they decided that they owned everything.

I hate web patents in general...I know a few things I've worked on that I think might should have been patented, but I didn't...but appending 'on the web' to a common practice should be obvious to anyone and thus nonpatentable.

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36415800)

What I did was deliberately link to a GPLed library I didn't really need. Was a command line argument one from memory...

Anyway what it meant is I 'unfortunately' was forced to provide the source code as GPL. Nobody looked at it closely enough to realise the library could be removed with about five minutes work.

Might work for you :)

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36414456)

Either 1992 or 1994, depending on whether the continuation in part has support for the claimed invention.

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (2)

sunzoomspark (1960660) | more than 3 years ago | (#36415106)

If you really have prior art, let EFF know: https://w2.eff.org/patent/ [eff.org]

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36416710)

But did you publish it? If not, it doesn't matter. It was your trade secret, and now you lost it to the real feudal lords^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Howners.

This is what happens when you don't share your inventions with the world. You should be grateful you can pay lordsys back for your violations in retrospect.

Re:Interesting? Surveys? (1)

clifyt (11768) | more than 3 years ago | (#36419556)

I dont get comments like this.

WTF?

Did you not read my post? I specifically said I did quite a few conferences where we showed this off. Beyond that, I actually gave code away to anyone that asked. I taught people how to do this...it was something I found to be pretty simple...other than the TCPIP stack and interfacing to the hypercard (it communicated via AppleEvents and it was a new thing to me trying to learn how to do this under C++) it was actually a dead simple idea.

So did I publish it? Yes. I said that already. Was it a trade secret? Couldn't be given what I had previously stated.

And if it was a trade secret and someone else patented it? I'd be a stupid motherfucker to complain...I shared what I did with the public. Sounds like you are one of these knee jerk idiots that think unless someone is screaming GPL...INTELLECTUAL PROPERTIES SUCK AND IS NONREAL...that I get what I deserve. I don't believe in GPL...I believe in the public domain and / or BSD. I also believe that things should be able to be copyrighted if I so choose, and even patented if it were a novel idea. I think appending "on the web' does not make anything new...

lodsys the day is coming for real change !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36413470)

It really is time to change the patent laws , produce things and prove they work would be nice, also things that are common sense cant be patented .then the patent trolls the one who buys a patent no idea what it is and tries to strong arm the people into paying ransom to use their products.
and patents that are so general that no way could you use it .

I don't understand (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36413828)

Why can't Microsoft, Google, and others take their considerable lobbying dollars and try to compel their congressmen and congresswomen to introduce some legislation in reforming broken software patent law? I've haven't heard any representative even take up the issue, much less see any sort of patent reform legislation come through any chamber in Congress.

Wouldn't the $300 million alone Microsoft now has to pay go a long way towards lobbying dollars and campaign contributions?

Not to mention Google wouldn't have to drop $900 million on Nortel's portfolio for a defensive patent arsenal.

Is the financial sector spending more than that to get their lobbying efforts passed?

LOLSYS (1)

Grindalf (1089511) | more than 3 years ago | (#36413844)

Isn't LOD sys the original trade name of the hacker unit "The Legion of Doom" from the days of Phrack magazine? Do I get a medal for that?

The Internet (0)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 3 years ago | (#36414548)

Screw Al Gore, apparently *these guys* invented the internet. Or perhaps Al Gore himself could be considered to be prior art.

Black and Decker is 1 company (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36414784)

"The latest complaint targets ten companies including Adidas, Best Buy, Best Western, along with Black and Decker."

There, fixed it for you.

Oh well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36416046)

I guess these guys just aren't as noble as the actual "inventor" of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Berners-Lee)

Yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36423584)

I like their understanding of copyrights.

Especially how they use a YAML web design (under CC-A license) on their homepage without any attribution.

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