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Tom's Hardware Dissects Ubuntu 11.4's Interface and Performance

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the hey-it-takes-a-while-for-all-the-screenshots dept.

GNOME 272

An anonymous reader links to an exhaustive look at the latest Ubuntu, running at Tom's Hardware. "The new Unity interface is broken down into its individual elements and explained ad nauseam. Overall the article is objectively balanced, the author does a good job of pointing out specific design flaws and shortcomings instead of complaining about how Unity doesn't work for him specifically. The walkthrough of the uTouch gesture language is exciting (wish I had multi-touch), though a full listing of keyboard and mouse shortcuts come in handy, too. Towards the end of the article there are benchmarks between Lucid, Natty with Unity, and Natty with the Classic interface. The performance of the Unity interface isn't bad at all, but that kernel power issue does rear its ugly head."

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272 comments

This is a review of a review... (-1, Troll)

UBfusion (1303959) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415712)

and the news is that somebody just discovered unity?

Please have mercy on us.

Re:This is a review of a review... (3, Funny)

jcombel (1557059) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415808)

it is not a "review of a review," it is a direct link to a review, and a brief description of the link by the submitter. this is actually how slashdot works.

the news is the fifteen+ pages of information, tips, and comparative benchmarks on the new interface.

since there was less than two minutes between the story getting posted and you feverishly working for a snarky-first-post to jack up your karma, i'll forgive you for not noticing.

enjoy the mercy. next time, rtfa.

Re:This is a review of a review... (1, Insightful)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415864)

Overall the article is objectively balanced

This is how it starts:

Let's start with the meaning of Natty. Here in the States, Natty is short for Anheuser-Busch's bottom-shelf line of “Natural” beers. If you were ever a struggling student, there's a good chance you subsisted at one point on ramen and Natty Ice. Consequently, it has also come to mean cheap, trashy, or sub-par. How's that for a rough start?
And for that matter, what is a narwhal? I mean, look at that thing.
Apparently, Canonical's name for this release gets worse. The word narwhal dates back to Norse seafarers who explored the Arctic waters where this horned beast lives. Narwhal quite literally means “corpse whale” because its skin resembles a water-logged corpse. Oof. Ubuntu 11.04: Cheap, Drunk, Dead, and Bloated.

The technique of associating a product with negative images is an old one - it's called Poisoning the Well.

This review is anything BUT balanced.

Re:This is a review of a review... (5, Insightful)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415934)

He was complaining about the name, if you were to read the conclusions page you would notice that he didn't exactly roast Ubuntu over hot coals.

15 frigging page review you read the first half a page and determine its not balanced. Don't karma whore for the " I RTFA" karma if you didn't read the fucking article.

Re:This is a review of a review... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416036)

Uuum, you talk nonsense.
Let's exactly define things:

anonymous@cowards ~ $ ghci
> let average xs = sum xs / fromIntegral (length xs)
> let opinionsInRest = 100 :: Int -- Let's just say he ignored 100 statements in those 15 pages.
> let opinionsBias = -1.0 : (replicate opinionsInRest 0.0) -- List of one negative bias, and opinionsInRest neutral ones.
> let isBalanced = average opinionsBias == 0.0
> isBalanced -- See, 15 pages didn't matter
False
>
Leaving GHCi.

And this is assuming, absolute neutrality would be physically possible. Instead of it being neutral to one's own views of reality. (I'm a social engineer, so don't give me that "But there is only one reality." crap. If there is one, none of us will ever see it, or be able to prove it exists. Which makes it by definition an unscientific concept. That's basic physics and neurology. Otherwise my job would be physically impossible.)

Re:This is a review of a review... (1)

UBfusion (1303959) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416082)

No need to defend me, I was righteously modded troll for overreacting. All I wanted to do was to complain about the submission's style and rhetoric that sounded like a blatant slashvertisement to me.

For me, an OS description or review in plain words or even videos and benchmarks (especially from Tom) is more misguiding than informative. The important thing about an OS is its feel and functionality and (call me a troll again, but) I can't get that experience unless I actually install it and try it for myself. To provide an analogy, I have never eaten shark fin soup and no Tom's hardware reviews are ever going to convince me it's good, unless I taste it.

Re:This is a review of a review... (1)

blackest_k (761565) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416258)

I found the Toms Hardware guide Informative and interesting, I have to admit I really disliked unity when the first version appeared and decided it wasn't for me and stuck with Lucid. I liked Lucid's netbook remix very clear and easy to use especially combined with gnomeshell.

The article went through a lot of the changes, the colour coding of the icon states the little tweaks to the launch bar showing which applications are open and the number of windows. The global menu feature makes good use of the screen. looking at my desktop screen as I write this on lucid nearly an inch is wasted on window borders and task bars that I don't need, as my focus is writing this reply.

While unity is the default, It will also allow me the classic desktop mode I am using now. So it seems to me that it will do no harm to at least download the live 11.04 cd and give it a spin.

I wasn't intending to do that prior to reading the article and now i've been walked through the system I don't think it will be as frustrating as my previous experience with unity.

Now obviously I can't get a real feel for it without downloading it and trying it for myself but that article has done enough to convince me to download it and give it a spin.

I can spare time for that, your right it is an advertisement in all but name but adverts are not all there to persuade you to buy lousy products some are actually pretty good once you get them out of the box.

Re:This is a review of a review... (2)

427_ci_505 (1009677) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415938)

Other than this paragraph, the rest of the review seemed pretty fair. I found myself agreeing with the good and the bad.

Re:This is a review of a review... (1, Informative)

theolein (316044) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416772)

Jesus, you Americans are a bunch of insular, retarded fucks on occasion and that goes for the reviewer as well. Using the google search in any browser would have shown you the use of the word Natty [slashdot.org] . It means neat, as in cool or elegant. Mark Shuttleworth is South African, and fortunately, American beer is not available there.

Re:This is a review of a review... (2)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416302)

and the news is that somebody just discovered unity?

For me, the news about 11.04 is that KDE just works. Call me a happy camper.

Selective Reading (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415730)

from the summary: "The new Unity interface is broken"

Re:Selective Reading (4, Insightful)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415786)

Yes, but which is it: "just gotta fix this and that" broken, or "this thing is a complete mess" broken?

I'll take the latter, as my impression of Unity was pretty much the worst possible; absolutely nothing works as a regular user would expect. It's like they went out of their way to make things as cryptic and unfamiliar as possible. It's nearly unusable. Oh, and Gnome 3? It sucks too. Both are like a goddamn cell phone interface crammed into the desktop -- seems to be a trend now. Well, fuck this shit: it simply does not work!

Re:Selective Reading (5, Insightful)

jojoba_oil (1071932) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415972)

I'll take the latter, as my impression of Unity was pretty much the worst possible; absolutely nothing works as a regular user would expect. It's like they went out of their way to make things as cryptic and unfamiliar as possible. It's nearly unusable.

I think that's what happens when you aim to mimic the Mac's UI conventions: ensure absolutely nothing works as a reasonable user would expect. Unity was an awful mess in 10.10's Netbook edition, and I haven't bothered trying 11.04.

Who ever thought it was a good idea to move the menu bar outside of the window which it controls and relates to? With Unity's approach, there will be one menu up top (maybe) and one menu inside the window (maybe) depending on how much work was put into the software to make it compatible with Unity's API. What problem is solved by this new mac-style menu bar?

It also seems like hiding the menu bar altogether is a growing trend (eg Firefox 4, Unity's menu); because I want computer unsavvy people to have to look harder to find the functionality they want. Sure, I can understand hiding some UI element if the space is absolutely necessary for something else; but in the case of Unity (from videos I've seen on 11.04), it seems like the menu bar is hidden just to hide it. It reminds me of Windows's Aero theme, where they make window borders translucent and gigantic just because they can. Does it help user experience? Does it solve a problem?

</rant>

Re:Selective Reading (4, Insightful)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416098)

Well, I'm a long time Mac fan, and I'd say the problem is not that they aped the Mac, but they did it in a "cargo cult" way: they aped it without understanding why it works, consequently making it NOT work.

They put the menu bar on top, good; then they make the menus hide -- d'oh. The advantage of that single bar on the top is that it's easier to target what you want to click, but they make it so you can't target without the intermediate step of putting the cursor on the damn thing. What's the point, then?

They add a Dock-like launcher, okay; they put it to the side rather than the bottom -- d'oh. They make it auto-hide -- d'oh again, nobody likes that. They make the apps stack in a weird pseudo-3D way -- and d'oh yet again. Cherry on top of the shit-flavored cake: they give you no easy way to customize that. And then you decide that migrating to a different system must be easier than getting used to this madness.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

yarnosh (2055818) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416242)

Also a Mac fan... doesn't the dock on the side make more sense as a default in a world of wide screen displays?

Re:Selective Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416292)

Not a mac user here, but I always put my menu bars on the side in this stupid widescreen world. It makes much more sense.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416334)

Yup, if it's properly designed you should be able to put it wherever you like.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416338)

I always put Dock on the side on my Macs, and taskbar on the side in Win7. It's the only sane way considering that there's more horizontal space to waste.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416456)

Unless you can train yourself to deal with autohide - I wasn't able to until I started using my laptop regularly, and now everything except my HTPC uses it.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

LinuxGrrl (123916) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416438)

Also a longtime mac fan (though admittedly not as longtime as i've had this little-used slashdot id ;-)).

I actually like unity for a lot of its mac-like touches, especially the global menubar, but I agree with this post about the point that they aped OSX in a cargo-cult way. And the autohiding application menu is a big case in point. And no, there is no way to fix that in settings, even hidden ones. It demonstrates painfully the difference between copying a successful user interface but "making it your own" and actually putting in the fundamental usability research, as Apple, to their credit, have done. The menubar behaviour is so clearly a case of making it different for the sake of making it different, and making it worse in the process.

One nice trick of Unity though, that is actually an improvement on OSX, is when you have two (or presumably more) monitors: The menubar (top panel with indicators) appears on both screens, and the menu appears on the menubar on the same screen as its associated window. With OSX the menubar is on the primary screen only and wherever the window is, that's where you have to go to get to the menu.

But I don't like the increasing trend to take user options away that seems to be infecting both Gnome3 and Unity. Unity as seen on Natty isn't *so* bad, but see it in the alpha of Oneiric, or see Gnome3, and there are almost no options to affect the user interface. You can change the background and the screensaver and that's about it. Oh no wait, screensaver settings have gone from system settings too. It's making even OSX seem like a haven of user-customisability. (eg: You can move the dock to the edge you prefer, you can have the primary monitor be on the right...)

And as the complaints both here and other places show, it's not like they're getting it so right that people won't *want* to change usability settings. So it comes across as unearned arrogance, and it's going to cost them users. Not me, *yet*, but I don't like the trend.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

manicb (1633645) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416504)

Mac user here that always pins the dock to the left-hand side *and* sets it to auto-hide. You may be a "long time mac fan", but that doesn't mean you speak for all of us.

I've been playing with Natty and the hidden menus are very pleasant when you aren't using them and infuriating when you want them, so I'll agree on this one. Rather hoping they'll drop it. Is there a preference somewhere?

Re:Selective Reading (1)

LinuxGrrl (123916) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416534)

There is no preference, not even hidden. And it's the one thing I would change. I too also have left the launcher on auto-hide, and have the dock on auto-hide on the mac too.

Re:Selective Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416560)

soooo... unity is not mac, and therefore it sucks?
that is fanboiism

Re:Selective Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416696)

The thing is, when I used OS X for the first time, I found it completely intuitive. Unity, not so much. For example, in almost every OS if you want to adjust the properties of something you can right click to bring up some sort of menu. The first thing I wanted to do was adjust the size and the speed of the unity menu autohide. Right click, d'oh! Search in the settings, d'oh! Search the forums, d'oh!

I'm what one would consider a power user, and I honestly haven't had so much trouble with a UI in a long time.

Re:Selective Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416200)

The problem solved by putting the menu bar at the top is that it turns one of the narrowest controls (menu bar) into one of the easiest to access, and what more deserving of the prominent space than the focused application? Putting controls onto the edges and corners of the screens to make them easier to "hit" is a very basic UI principle. While you may disagree with its utility, if you're asking why it's clear you don't study UI design.

It also has the added benefit of saving vertical space without hiding the menu. It does mean that menus are hidden on non-focused applications, but the need to make only one click to access a menu on another application is fairly niche compared to the other needs the top-menu addresses.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

Nikker (749551) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416686)

Your post and your study of UI design hints of a Socialiagist Major telling me it is mathematically impossible for me to like strawberry ice cream.

Re:Selective Reading (0)

kirbysuperstar (1198939) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415986)

I haven't tried Gnome 3 yet, but Unity makes me want to kill myself. It's so bad and it barely works. What a stinker.

Re:Selective Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416272)

You know what? I could have said exactly the same thing, but to the reverse effect. For now, it looks like if you want a full blown desktop, kde - like in opensuse, and not as in "kubuntu" - is your best bet.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

kirbysuperstar (1198939) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416384)

I've used KDE in one of the later versions of Mint. Is that similar to how it is in OpenSUSE? That being said, I have an OpenSUSE disc here, and it's a long weekend.. Hmm.

Re:Selective Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416576)

Sorry, I have no experience with Mint, but I'd guess that's not too far from the Kubuntu "experience", which I personally regard as a gnome-conspiracy to smear the competition.

Otoh, opensuse 11.4 has been great, with some initial tweaking to get rid of some superficial gaudiness/retarded Windows aping (e.g florescenceing blue frames, automatic maximising if you get your mouse pointer too close to the screen edge while moving a window), but once you're done with that, you get a remarkably clean, tidy and reliable environment, IMO.

Re:Selective Reading (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416108)

Yes, but which is it: "just gotta fix this and that" broken, or "this thing is a complete mess" broken?

I'll take the latter, as my impression of Unity was pretty much the worst possible; absolutely nothing works as a regular user would expect. It's like they went out of their way to make things as cryptic and unfamiliar as possible. It's nearly unusable. Oh, and Gnome 3? It sucks too. Both are like a goddamn cell phone interface crammed into the desktop -- seems to be a trend now. Well, fuck this shit: it simply does not work!

My impression of Unity is it's broken but not fundamentally. The Ubuntu dropdown panel needs to be rewritten from scratch, the thing needs prefs to control its position and hide behaviour, it needs more taskbar style apps and that fucking global menu needs to be configurable for people who are not running on netbooks. After that it's just a desktop with a dock. GNOME 3.0 looks a lot slicker but it's not hard to find issues with it too. Both need work.

Re:Selective Reading (3, Insightful)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416142)

The classic complaint of unfamiliarity comes with every single interface change. I heard it with Windows 95, Windows XP, definitely heard it with Windows Vista, and Windows 7. I heard it to a lesser extent with various major versions of Gnome, and KDE. I heard it about the iPhone, I heard it about the Android.

One of two things will happen. Either in 5 years everyone will love it, or in 5 years it will be a forgotten bad past in UI design. Either way right now it's just another case of a very sarcastic, "Unfamiliar? Really? Say it aint so!!!!"

I'm actually banking on the latter given the moves to interfaces such as in Honeycomb, both Gnome and Unity, and from the Windows 8 preview. I hate to break it to you but I think the start menu / window system may be going the way of the console in general purpose computing.

Polish (3, Insightful)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415732)

I still think they released it way too soon. I would never point a new user at 11.04 due to its stability, regardless of its usability. I really expected to see some of the problems fixed by this point too, but the patches seem to be just starting to trickle in. I'm hoping they don't yank out the 'Classic' Gnome interface on 11.10 as planned.

Re:Polish (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415760)

Actually, Linux Torvaldes is Swedish and Mark Shuttleworth is South African (white, not nigger). Neither Linux or Ubunutu is Polish, you racist asshole.

Re:Polish (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415804)

Finland ... not sweden => finnish, not swedish ... if you want to troll, study ...

Re:Polish (2)

scottbomb (1290580) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415924)

Wow. A tad bit over- sensitive, aren't we? And you're the one who used the "N-word". Go take a chill pill.

Re:Polish (0)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416004)

You might want to get the man's name right, along with the factual errors that have been pointed out already. LINUS Torvalds created the LINUX operating system. I don't know, maybe you are referring to some younger man who was named after the Linux kernel?

As for your obsession with ethnic, racial, and national backgrounds - you might want to seek professional help. I'm sorry that you are so filled with insecurities, but there is nothing I can do to help you.

Re:Polish (5, Interesting)

UBfusion (1303959) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415764)

When you have a pre-defined 6-month release cycle, exact deadlines and dozens of bugs pending, any new release is "released too soon".

With every new release new bugs are introduced, the old ones are given less priority and the user experience remains about the same. I hate to tell this, but the situation is the same with every piece of software and hardware (laptops and mobile phone models, anyone?) and reminds me of the saying "technology is something that does not work yet".

Re:Polish (1)

perryizgr8 (1370173) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416676)

With every new release new bugs are introduced, the old ones are given less priority and the user experience remains about the same.

no, there are more bugs in the new version. so the user experience actually degrades. also, i haven't seen this happen anywhere else.

Re:Polish (2, Funny)

Mr. Mikey (17567) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415852)

I've been using 11.04 with Unity since it became available... and it has become my favorite UI.

I've had zero stability problems, and have found it to be one of the most usable interfaces I've ever had... and I've been using Debian or Debian variants since '98.

Re:Polish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415880)

Can you give one real reason as to why you feel that it is the most usable, as compared to the gnome interface in 10.10? Old time users are not really immune to the "Ooh shiny!" effect.

Re:Polish (5, Interesting)

Mr. Mikey (17567) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415942)

Can you give one real reason as to why you feel that it is the most usable, as compared to the gnome interface in 10.10? Old time users are not really immune to the "Ooh shiny!" effect.

  • I can hit the "Windows" key, type a few letters, and instantly be able to launch the application I want, or open the file I'm looking for
  • At a glance, I can see which applications are open regardless of which desktop I happen to be in
  • I can quickly see an image of, then jump to any of the open instances of a running application
  • I can quickly create custom launchers that "bundle" different applications as needed

You asked for one. There's four off the top of my head. I like the "Ooh shiny!" effect as much as the next geek, but I'm finding Unity to be very usable, and to help me be more productive.

Satisfied?

Re:Polish (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416116)

I can't say either are perfect but Unity is closer to a traditional spatial desktop. It allows you to put icons on the desktop for example. It's one of the biggest annoyances I have with GNOME 3.0 where concessions to spatial work seems to gone out of the window. Though I think GNOME 3.0 does feel better thought through in other ways. At the minute I don't consider either adequate replacements for the old world but given a point release or two that addresses problems they should be.

Re:Polish (1)

DrXym (126579) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416120)

Ouch my brain not parse so good today. Sorry I answered a question which wasn't asked.

Re:Polish (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415936)

Amen, Unity is, by far the best UI.

In fact reading about Unity was the only and ONLY thing after several years of Windows/OS X that got me to try Linux again. Without Unity I would never touch Linux again tbh, these "classic" environments just look and feel totally amateurish. Maybe I've just been spoiled by these modern evil commercial os'es?

Re:Polish (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416524)

I like Unity and I have run into a fairly serious problem. Any window which is opened fullscreen can never be made not-fullscreen. If it was opened non-fullscreen and then made fullscreen it works fine. Hopefully this bug will be resolved in relatively short order... especially since it's a goddamn regression. I'm tired of those, and I'd say they're the #1 problem with Ubuntu in general.

Tom's HARDware (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415784)

I know... let's call our site "Tom's Hardware" and then review software. :-\

TL;DR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36415824)

The quoted part of the summary got it right in the first six words.

Unity (2)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415912)

It would have been better released as a netbook or tablet only DM option.

11.4? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416020)

I also find 11.4 unusable, as I've only been able to download 11.04, myself. ;-)

Been using it for a couple of weeks (1)

Boycott BMG (1147385) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415954)

I actually didn't find unity to be as horrible as other people were making it out to be. Two things I would fix: 1) Turn off the autohide of the left panel. I hated this so much for the first couple of days until I found some settings to turn it off. 2) The universal (c.f. Macintosh) menu bar at the top also autohides the menu until I mouse over it. I still haven't figured out how to fix that.

Imagine a car (5, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 2 years ago | (#36415970)

Yes a car anology, on slashdot, I am that original!

Imagine a car, they replace the brake with a handle on the dashboard. The gas pedal is a set of buttons, one for each 10km/h speed range on the dashboard. To drive you always need your foot on a pedal on the floor. Sound silly? Trains are like that. It works perfectly well. So would you want this arrangement in your car?

The steering wheel you say? The need for the steering wheel in your car would make the train controls unusable?

EX-FUCKING-ACTLY.

That is the entire problem with both Unity and Gnome 3. ALL the controls in your car are not just there because of how they would be best implemented but because they have to work together with the other controls. And that can create some interesting designs. Take the UPS trucks. Where is your stick shift? Why is it not in the same place in cars like that? Because it would get in the way of the driver crossing the center to get out on the other side of the car. Most busses got an entiry set of control on the left hand side of the driver because they can because the door is not there. But this means the driver has to get out through the counter area for the passengers. British double deckers did not have the driver interact with the passengers, and he was in his own cabin, excitting through his own door, making it impossible to put controls like the handbrake in there. Function dictates design.

Changing the interface we are all familiar with can be done, if there is a need but you got to be careful you don't upset all the other needs.

What are my needs in a desktop? To manipulate windows, to arrange them to according to my need to look BETWEEN them. I am a developer, a common need there is to have one window to read data from, another to put data into and a third to test the effect. Normally you do this by having a sufficiently large screen and arranging at least two of them side by side and maybe the third with a shade effect or overlap. Alt-tab in fullscreen mode is often not functional especially if there are other windows active. These windows can typically be quickly accessed from a bar at the bottom or top where all windows have a link side by side.

So, what does Unity and Gnome3 and Windows 7 do? HIDE things behind multiple clicks.

Unity and Gnome3 especially seem aimed at smaller screens operating in full screen for applications. That is great for an author who writes uninterrupted in the same writer. It works when you are watching movies and only have a file browser open in full screen and then launch a single player from that. It is possibly great for the casual user.

But for me? I have a very large screen area, switching the pointer to the top every single time I want to do something, that is NOT efficient. If I have multiple windows over of the same app, I have that for a reason, I do NOT want them treated as one. I do NOT want to click more then is absolutely necessary to get things done.

Unity and Gnome3 feel like they were optimized for a very specific use case, tablets and other small screen setups, that just ain't the norm for PC's especially PC's that are running Linux. And they changed EVERYTHING. Nothing works anymore as it did before. All the apps in your task bar? Gone, especially in unity. Customization? Gone. Stability? Gone!

It is like they took your old reliable volvo car interface and replaced it with a new one that you hate with the build quality of a trabant painted in an exciting mix of puss and shit.

Unity and Gnome3 should have been kept as an option for a long time until the kinks had been ironed out, a very clear and fun to watch tutorial had been out to show EVERY single current use case redone in the new style and until it absolutely worked smoothly, stable AND without taking loads of functions away.

Instead Gnome and Ubuntu tried to emulate MS by pulling a Vista. They redesigned things people didn't want redesigned, and removed functionality and replaced it with instability.

Do not WANT.

I tried it, but my needs are not meant by the new design and the stability issues mean I can't afford to play around with it till I get used to it. They should NEVER have released this as part of a standard update. Like Vista, the negativity is now so great that no matter how much they improve it, they can't escape the stench of failure. And Ubuntu did it with the full knowledge of Vista.

It is a worrying sign because at the moment KDE, Gnome and Ubuntu all seem clueless in how to deal with their customer base. I am back to XFCE and gosh, it just fucking works and I can get my work done. Is that so much to ask?

If Ubuntu made cars they would put the blinker behind a three touches interface on the passenger side. In fact, all the Jokes about MS building cars and putting an "Are you sure" dialog on the brake now apply to Canonical.

Does that mean everyone should hate it? No, perhaps YOUR needs are being met by the new interface. Mine aren't. Lucky for you but allow me to be bitter, angry and homicidal because they removed my taskbar and replaced it with something brown.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

drsmack1 (698392) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416054)

Best comment so far. The sad thing is that presumably *developers* were the ones to make these design decisions. I wonder what desktop *they* use where no one can see.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

UBfusion (1303959) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416106)

As the parent post says, probably XFCE. Fast, simple, functional, no useless eye candy. Less is more.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

aztracker1 (702135) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416144)

I actually like Win7's taskbar, also, usually fine grouping the taskbar, not a click, but hover with thumbnails.. as to the start menu, I often hit the win key, type a few characters and enter to launch anythin I haven't docked on the taskbar. On my mac, accessing anything not docked is a pain...Unity/gnome 3 suck on a large screen.

I do have a big complaint about windows though.. with wide screens would love to have the taskbar on the left, but when you do this,the start menu is alien to mouse with... either the button should remain on the bottom, or the order should be reversed.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416300)

..Unity/gnome 3 suck on a large screen.

And a small screen (at least in Unity's case - Gnome 3 isn't too bad on a netbook).

Re:Imagine a car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416658)

On a Mac you can press ctrl+space, type a few characters and enter to launch anything not in the Dock.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416234)

Best comment so far. The sad thing is that presumably *developers* were the ones to make these design decisions. I wonder what desktop *they* use where no one can see.

All of Canonical's UI designers use Macs.

Re:Imagine a car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416068)

I've been using debian since the 90s. When Ubuntu arrived I ditched everything else and jumped to a debian based OS that was actually a usefull desktop OS out of the box. Sure I tweak stuff, but it is basically all there. I tried to understand where they were going with unity, I can't , so I just switched back to the classic interface, got rid of the retarded scroll bars and I am back in my familiar ubuntu world that works. Unity sucks, the rest of Natty is fast and stable for me.

Re:Imagine a car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416174)

Have you tried Debian ever since? It seems to me that they actually copied the gnome 2 interface from Ubuntu, and it works just as well as it used to in Ubuntu.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416080)

With the failure of Vista through its ashes came Windows 7 a success and a great GUI with a great OS.

I do not like this minimalism trend but I have faith Windows 8 can do it well if it does it right and same is true with Unity and Gnome-Shell. Gnome Shell has a huge Javascript extension library and API that applets that imitate the old gnome 2.8 applets and functions can be reimplemented. Too bad I switched back to Windows for me as a result of the GUI, but I am open to give it another shot after a few releases.

I do not mind GUI innovation if it helps the end user. Ribbons are the scorn of many slashdotters but after using them I like them now because you can preview changes and find things without the mouse at all by hiting ALT. It takes a good week or 2 to be as productive is the downside.

Anyway I agree the GUI changes are too radical and band but will forgive if AJAX extensions bring cool new features. Some like minimalism, like the Chrome Browser users, but it drives me crazy personally

Re:Imagine a car (1)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416308)

The Win7 Gui is the Vista gui with a less intuitive, more click requiring taskbar.

The only reason Win7 got the glowing reviews it did, is because by the time it came out, computers finally had the power to run Vista.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416084)

I have been involved with a few user interface development projects over the years. One trend I have noticed is that the product is often influenced by the development tools being used by the developers. One product looked exactly like microsoft visual c++, it had the same panes performing functions analogous to the functions in the development tool. I think these recent UI environments are heavily influenced by IDE software development tools. When working with an IDE the environment decides what information to show you. Rarely does the user set out to open a different window, and doing this is often a clumsy process.

They are both public betas... (1)

nzac (1822298) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416118)

... that we have to opt out of.

Short of all gnome devs using vertical spit screen Emacs or equivalent there is no way that the majority to devs have not encountered the problem you are speaking of and are are equally frustrated by it.

Getting a bug free new DE is a lot of work (understatement) and everyone wants to try it out so they have released this early. I can't see how they will not add the usability later. They don’t have the budget or time for proper usability testing so everyone gets to ague what it needs over the internet.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

zsimic (548446) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416160)

Hold on. You're a developer right? So you can easily choose whichever window manager you damn well want. And can easily switch from one to another at a whim, right? So where's the problem?

Upvote the XFCE recomendation (0)

lanner (107308) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416278)

I was a KDE 3.5 user... and then KDE4 happened, which was, I guess, an attempt to be as successful and awesome as Windows Vista. I tried out XFCE and was very pleasantly surprised at how quickly I was able to migrate over.

I still have one desktop that is KDE 4, but I am not really happy with it. They keep screwing with things for eye-candy only that reduce functionality and break stuff. It's just a play thing for them. They don't really care what their users thing.

And if you complain about it on the KDE message boards, they will delete your post or just ban you.

Re:Imagine a car (2)

mabinogi (74033) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416296)

Unity and Gnome3 especially seem aimed at smaller screens operating in full screen for applications

The worst thing is that if you actually try it on a small screen, it becomes clear that the developers have never actually used a computer with a resolution lower than 1680x1050. That screen hogging side panel hurts your brain when it starts collapsing and you find yourself having to chase icons around.

For small screens the old Ubuntu Netbook launcher was perfect - I even use it on a desktop (1366x768 - so still fairly low res), and it was touch friendly too. I don't know why they abandoned it so quickly

Re:Imagine a car (2)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416304)

Unity and Gnome3 especially seem aimed at smaller screens operating in full screen for applications

Blame tablets for the new fangled obsession with going back to full screen apps, which has seen much needed progress in windowed multitasking take a step backwards. In fact lets just blame dumbed down tablets, and one incumbent tablet monopoly, by setting computing progress back into reverse by over simplifying user input and forcing the user back to one task at a time.

This is fine for idle content consumption, which seems to be the unfortunate future of mainstream computing. But I can't help feeling this is a job for television, computers are meant to be tools not appliances.

It is a worrying sign because at the moment KDE, Gnome and Ubuntu all seem clueless in how to deal with their customer base.

Your use of the word "customer" implies these projects are in anyway "customer-focused" or even give a flying damn. If a million users they've shafted up and switch to something else what difference would it make? That would put a proprietary company out of business, maybe put Mozilla and Canonical on hard times, but a group of volunteers? They don't really answer to anyone.

Mod me down for saying it open source projects can at times be elitist outright toxic, despite best intentions. We know it. User feedback can fall on deaf ears, that is if there is even any attempt to get feedback and study it, or if there is even any meaningful general public user base outside enthusiasts and developers.

Re:Imagine a car (1)

Tranzistors (1180307) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416350)

Disclaimer, I use Gnome shell and since your criticism is about both, I think this is relevant.
1. Computer shell is NOT like car controls. Mistakes are not deadly. I could easily make analogy with mobile phones or any other consumer device and it becomes quite apparent, that people can adapt to new stuff (maybe not all developers, but progress by funerals is fine by me).
2. Meta key is your friend. Use it and there is no need to move the mouse all the way.
3. So, you claim they ruined it all, and should just leave it the way it was, and on the other hand say that maybe it's just you. To make matters worse, you already have a working solution. And your problem is what exactly?

Wanting to like it (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416018)

I swapped form a mac to the last version of ubuntu, added Docky on the side, and loved it, started to convert friends.

Unity i feel is a step backwards, in my experience as an average user I can see what they are trying to do, and quite like it, but am beset with issues and bugs that prevent it working properly.I agree its been released to early.

For those who can be bothered reading here are the issues I have encountered.

My experience as a non linux guru is this:
Support for native ATI drivers seems flaky, had to regress to unity 2D. Sorry ATi are a major video card manufacturer.
I run two screens, (one slightly lower width than the other) I have to reset the screen screen position every time I boot, it insist on right justifying meaning I lose the dinky menu. Surely it could remember the screen position?

The Dinky menu does not reliable pop up, and is often quite delayed or slow in its arrival (bring back Docky)
It insists on opening applications in the lower screen full screen, and often removed the window frame as it does so. Forcing you to use alt space to find the un-maximise option. Some applications (such as chrome for example) do not respond to alt-space and you need to shut them down via the dinky menu.

Often if a window is not full screen it does not correctly interpret the mouse position correctly, being offset by the amount the application sits within the window.
The mouse can be erratic in its movement, jumping suddenly between screens when when trying to make small movements.

Now I am sure if I searched forums I could find fixes for a lot of these issues, but this is not really the 'use out of the box' experience I had come to expect from ubuntu, and hence I feel its a step backwards. I installed gnome 3 today, easier.

Re:Wanting to like it (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416090)

I have an ATI 5750 in my AMD phenom II system. It ran fine with it, even though the link showed an unhappy user with it. I do have 3d effects with that and Fedora 15 with Gnome 3 shell. I admit I did not test it as I freaked out and wiped it with a fresh install of Windows 7. ... sorry I needed Office and prefered a single platform that had a better gui that wasn't so limited.

But I planned to switch back to Windows when I bought this computer with Windows 7. I had bad luck with Nvidia stability with previous drivers regardless of OS.

Why is Tom's HARDWARE... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416050)

...talking about SOFTWARE?!?!?

Lamerz (0)

Grindalf (1089511) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416056)

I'm an experienced C programmer, I can help out. Some people have invaded linux and UNIX who cannot program. Do I get a medal?

I like Unity, I'm keeping it. (1)

musmax (1029830) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416138)

I've been using Unity now at home for the last month or so. Its Gnome 2 at work on the Fedora 13 development machines. Unity excels as a "consumerist" interface. The traditional windows paradigm that wastes screen space irks me no end - when I wanna code I want Netbeans/Eclipse to use every pixel. The test app can be switched in and out as needed - the docs are on the other screen. I've tried using Ubuntu 11.04 at home for coding but Netbeans hates the default look and feel and does not seem to completely honor look & feel settings, and why TF should I change my whole env just to please NB ? I guess you get what you pay for - and Ubuntu is one hell of a bargain, but I would like Canonical to spend a bit of time on dev workflow and make sure the popular modern dev tools (Eclipse & Netbeans) works well in Ubuntu - I understand its not their beef. But at the same time: Developers, Developers, Developers ! All in all I like Unity, I'm keeping it. And haters please keep the entertaining hate'n on - all progress depends on the unreasonable man. But keep it real - you can't be a l33t libertarian unfettered atheist and weep into to your designer microbrew every time somebody moves a close button and be taken seriously at the same time.

Re:I like Unity, I'm keeping it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416218)

to musmax: I'm affraid we seem to be in the minority on this.

I really like the Unity. I used compiz+xfce before, but on xfce I had disabled all panels and disabled all desktop icons and simply used right click on desktop to get my launcher menu. In Unity I can go one step further and just hit windows -key and type what I want and it's much faster than browsing through some menus.

It seems many don't like the Unity bar. In xfce I didn't have any bar, but I think it's kind of nice to have in the end especially with the autohide feature and Windows 7 -type ability to pin a software to it. Also many people complain that you can't disable the autohide of the bar, but then I can either hold windows key down to see it and not just see, but I will have keyboard shortcuts I can use (windows + 1-0 and windows+ s,a,f,t) to switch between applications. Also I have configured from compiz the scale and expo plugins to have active bindings in some screen corners, where I can just move the mouse and choose a different window or workspace.

I agree that some configuration options have been hidden too well, like workspace switcher (in compiz settings, general options, desktop page). But that's something which needs more polish and tweaking but doesn't make Unity a failure like you could assume after reading all these negative comments.

Re:I like Unity, I'm keeping it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416598)

No, you're not in the minority. Unity will take off for exactly the reasons it gets flamed here on /.: It's not for geeks. I've been testing Ubuntu One and their music store to see if I can finally migrate my parents of their Windows box and onto something usable which isn't a Mac, and this looks like it's going to be it. I'll have to rearrange some of the items on the 'dock' but other than that, it looks very nice atm. It's leaps and bounds better than GNOME3 and I like it better than KDE4.

Re:I like Unity, I'm keeping it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416478)

Kind of agree. It works really well, on my $150 netbook. However, as soon as you try to be productive it falls apart completely.

"The new Unity interface is broken..." (2)

Trogre (513942) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416188)

"The new Unity interface is broken..."

Well they're off to a good start. Honestly why anyone would want to use such an interface on anything larger than a netbook is beyond me.

My impression: UI for phones/pads (3, Insightful)

Loopy (41728) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416204)

The UI has everything hidden behind searches or submenus or whatever to free up screen real estate on smaller screens. On my dual-26" monitor setup, I don't want buried and simple. I want the 10-15 main apps/scripts I use on the front page and the start menu to show me all the admin/config options in a standard menu the way I've had it everywhere else.

Maybe I'm getting old and fuddy-duddy but I found this interface a clunky and unusable attempt to look like a mix of Windows 7, iOS, Android and Mac OSX. The search box in Windows 7's start menu still shows me all the control panel/admin task items just like the start menu. The Unity search box could not find my network config, my updater app or a bunch of other apps I'd been happily using before switching.

I'll be honest and say I read no documentation or tutorials on how to use Unity but I can't remember the last time I had to read a book on how to use a flippin' menu system.

Broken By Design. (4, Informative)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416214)

Any developer of an operating system, regardless of proprietary or open licence, would do well to pay attention to what power users do to tweak the OS immediately after installing, and what tools developers create to make it easy to tweak. Consider the nice little app Ubuntu Tweak - it's a worry when a third party add-on gives superior fast access to common things you need to fix, it demonstrates how broken-by-design the original OS is.

Interesting, Linux Mint, Pinguy and other Ubuntu derived have not embraced Unity, and as always their versions of 11.04 fix quite a list of broken things.

Microsoft paid a lot of attention with Windows 7, after Vista. A lot of the defaults, such as services, were similar to what power users would do to tweak some speed out of Vista.

Canoncial are you listening?

For me it's the last of the Ubuntus. (3, Interesting)

dutchd00d (823703) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416252)

I recently decided to put Ubuntu 11.04 on a spare machine, just to see what all the fuss was about. I hated it, for the same reasons that others have given above. It seemed to be different for the sake of being different. The clincher was when I tried to open a second text terminal. It wouldn't let me, presumably because I already had that application open, and why on earth would I need two of them?

So then, just for kicks, I decided to install the latest Debian. When the desktop came up it felt like coming home. In fact, I was a little shocked to see how much it looked like the Ubuntu I was used to. There was a Debian logo in the upper left corner instead of an Ubuntu one, but that seemed to be the only difference. The same applications, the same themes, the same everything. I never realised how little Ubuntu added to its Debian base.

So I've made up my mind. The next big reinstall is going to be Debian instead of Ubuntu. Best of luck to Ubuntu with its Unity, its Wayland, its Ubuntu Software Center and its Ubuntu One, but as far as I'm concerned it's time for something else.

Re:For me it's the last of the Ubuntus. (1, Redundant)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416410)

Yeah Debian is ok if you don't mind an OS thats made by people who don't understand sarcasm or irony and are obsessive about sticking to 'policy' even when it leaves things in a horribly broken state, because thats their 'philosophy'.

Re:For me it's the last of the Ubuntus. (1)

jgrahn (181062) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416452)

Yeah Debian is ok if you don't mind an OS thats made by people who don't understand sarcasm or irony and are obsessive about sticking to 'policy' even when it leaves things in a horribly broken state, because thats their 'philosophy'.

That reads as "I had a run-in with the Debian people which left me embittered, but the details are too emarassing to me, so I won't give any details."

Re:For me it's the last of the Ubuntus. (1)

kliklik (322798) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416730)

I've done the exact same thing. After using Unity for a couple of days and hating it I've installed Gnome 3. I've expected it to be great, it was a great disappointment. Thought about installing Mint but decided to give Debian a try instead. After several hours of tweaking to make it just right (mostly upgrading to wheezy (testing), font tweaks and theme) I'm in love. I don't think I'll ever use anything else.

give Canonical a chance for trying new things (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36416260)

I consider myself to be a power user ( been running Ubuntu since dapper, installed and run it on many desktops, laptops, netbooks and even a few servers ), and am a developer by trade. I was highly skeptical at first, ready to switch to Mint when I first heard that Unity was going to be the default, but just like the "window buttons on the left-gate" of the previous version I was willing to give Canonical a chance. I'll admit the first hours were an exercise in frustration, mostly due to having to unlearn many old habits. The one thing I did to alleviate that frustration was to prevent the launcher from auto-hiding. After a couple of days of daily use I realised that it had clicked for me, and now I wouldn't go back. Looking forward to see more possibilities of customisation in the future, but as is, I find that Unity really works.

give Canonical a chance for changing things up (1)

ExKoopaTroopa (671002) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416270)

( sorry for repeat, did not mean to post as anon ) I consider myself to be a power user ( been running Ubuntu since dapper, installed and run it on many desktops, laptops, netbooks and even a few servers ), and am a developer by trade. I was highly skeptical at first, ready to switch to Mint when I first heard that Unity was going to be the default, but just like the "window buttons on the left-gate" of the previous version I was willing to give Canonical a chance. I'll admit the first hours were an exercise in frustration, mostly due to having to unlearn many old habits. The one thing I did to alleviate that frustration was to prevent the launcher from auto-hiding. After a couple of days of daily use I realised that it had clicked for me, and now I wouldn't go back. Looking forward to see more possibilities of customisation in the future, but as is, I find that Unity really works.

The power consumption issue (1)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416288)

Yeah, I'm seeing this. Running 11.04 with classic interface on a Dell Mini 9. I thought the battery was finally dying of old age - no, it's terrible power consumption.

Is there anything that can be done about this? Old kernel version?

Re:The power consumption issue (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416528)

The funny thing is that I just put natty on a Dell Vostro 1500 with a C2D and it runs quieter, cooler, and longer now than it did running XP... On the other hand, I got a GPU overheat warning yesterday evening for the first time (at 140) and cleaned my vents to see it come down to 120... So partly dust, but my vents have been that dusty before.

Re:The power consumption issue (1)

David Gerard (12369) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416636)

I've spent the past five or so years being delighted at how much better Ubuntu has consistently done than XP doing the same jobs (Firefox with a zillion tabs/windows open, and a music player) on the same hardware. This is most disconcerting.

I've always preferred a global menu bar (1)

GauteL (29207) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416372)

I know opinion is exceptionally polarised on this subject, but my personal favourite was always the global menu bar.

However, there are many reasons why it was never properly implemented on Linux desktop systems and it was available for years in KDE, but hardly ever used by anyone. Why?

1. It can not be used in conjunction with focus-follows-mouse, a favourite of some UNIX oldies. These are, however, becoming relatively fewer as Linux desktop usage has spread among people that have never seen a system using focus-follows-mouse.
2. Not a single existing Linux application was ever designed for the global menu bar. In most cases this just means they seem a bit awkward with the menu, even after patches to enable the menu have been applied. For other cases (i.e. LibreOffice) it is very hard to make it work at all with a global menu.
3. Linux users just aren't familiar with it, the way Mac users have always been.

Now, if Canonical had introduced the global menu bar 6 years ago, it may have been worth it (arguable), but it most definitely isn't now. The reason is that the menu bar is going away anyway. Hardly any Windows application these days show the menu bar by default, and some new applications have started getting rid of it altogether. I.e. Chrome, which just has the one menu from its wrench button. Introducing the global menu bar now was simply a waste of time and effort for something which will be gone in the next two or three years.

For those of you who do not like Unity (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416440)

It takes about 0.2 seconds to turn it off and switch back to the legacy interface. Every time an article about Ubuntu shows up, I see hundreds of comments complaining about Unity.

Just turn it off. You don't have to use it. You can do it right from the login screen in a couple of clicks.

Re:For those of you who do not like Unity (1)

perryizgr8 (1370173) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416702)

the problem is that you can turn it off and go back to gnome NOW. from the next release they might remove support for gnome altogether, and linux's shining pearl will be reduced to a brown turd.

The irony (0)

bregmata (1749266) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416574)

I hear a lot about how bad Unity is.

The irony is that every argument I hear is that it doesn't work like Windows. The bigger the Linux fanboi the complainer is, the more he complains it doesn't work like his beloved Windows.

Here's the news: Windows is not the best UI out there. It was crap when it first came out, it morphed into something (mostly) usable but so ubiquitous that formerly computer-illiterate people learned it out of necessity. It still, in all of its incarnations, has many usability flaws and is in fact lacking in discoverability and presentation. I know this, because i have from time to time had to use the Windows interface to accomplish a task, and inevitably have to find a gutu somewhere who can tell which command-line or odd keyboard+mouse combination I need to do something useful.

I use Unity every day for my work. It has a couple of flaws I would like to see addressed, but by and large it works just fine. It gives me more precious screen real estate (and even with a dual-monitor setup that is a precious commodity) but by-and-large it just gets out of the way and leaves me to do what I want to do, not what the OS UI designers want.

So, Linux fanboids, work against nature and try to open your minds a bit.

File copy speed (2)

fa2k (881632) | more than 2 years ago | (#36416742)

When copying from a hard drive to another location on the same disk, the new Ubuntu is a few seconds slower than the previous LTS, both with Unity and using the old GNOME 2 shell of Ubuntu Classic. Ubuntu 11.04 Classic finishes a fraction of a second before Unity.

Desktop users don't care about +/- a few percent in file copy speed. What they should have tested was: does the desktop grind to a slow, unusable halt when copying files? I know 10.10 did, and also Windows to some extent, but not as bad. This would be a huge win if it worked better on the new Ubuntu.

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