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Gran Turismo Gamer Takes Second In Class In World-Renowned Race

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the practice-makes-perfect dept.

PlayStation (Games) 105

dotarray writes "If your parents tell you that playing video games will never get you anywhere, point them in the direction of Lucas Ordoñez. Three years ago, Lucas heard about a competition for racing game fans – the Nissan PlayStation GT Academy. Inspired, Lucas picked up a PlayStation 3 and a copy of Gran Turismo and practiced and practiced and practiced. This week, along with his teammates Franck Mailleux and Soheil Ayari, Lucas could not stop smiling as he stood on the Le Mans 24 Hours podium after taking second in class."

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Er... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36435972)

Second in class can mean sod all.

After all the Top Gear team came 3rd in class....out of 5 total if I remember correctly.

Re:Er... (5, Informative)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437070)

Even finishing the 24 Hours of Le Mans is a huge achievement.

(Completing any 24 hour sports car race is, for that matter, even if it's 3rd out of 5 in the class.)

But, this was 2nd out of 11 in class, 8 classified as completing in class.

And, it was 9th overall out of 56, with 28 classified as completing. All of the first seven places were taken by the faster LMP1 class (and all of the first five places were taken by the remaining diesel cars).

Re:Er... (1)

frosty_tsm (933163) | more than 3 years ago | (#36438238)

+1 for being dead-on. I'd like to see AC do 5 laps at speed on that course. At night.

Re:Er... (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439324)

Can someone please translate all that into NASCAR?

Re:Er... (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439718)

As much as I hate to do this, because it's not right at all... the NASCAR analogy of the 24 Hours of Le Mans would be running a Sprint Cup race, a Nationwide Series race, and a regional-level actual STOCK race (that is, stock unibodies and stock-derived engines and suspension)... all on the same track (and not an oval), all at once, for 24 hours instead of a certain mileage.

In that analogy, this would be the equivalent of placing 2nd in the Nationwide Series race.

Now, excuse me while I go contemplate drinking a few gallons of bleach, for daring to make that analogy...

awesome! what about English? (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441268)

i mean, how many football fields are we talking here? and if i stacked them one on the other, how high would they reach?

Re:Er... (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437108)

UMM the top gear team were in a 24 hour race but I'm pretty sure it WASN'T le-mans. le-mans is probablly the most famous 24 hour race in the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_24_Hours_of_Le_Mans [wikipedia.org]
According to wikipedia this guy's car (note: in 24 hour races there are multiple drivers per car entered) was second in the LMP2 class and ninth overall.

Re:Er... (1)

SniperJoe (1984152) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437114)

Yeah, but the Top Gear team competed in a local endurance race. Ordoñez and his team competed in Le Mans, one of the most celebrated auto races in history. He competed in an incredibly difficult race against a field of 11 different competing teams. Kudos to him.

Re:Er... (1)

Fibe-Piper (1879824) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439236)

Second in class can mean sod all.

After all the Top Gear team came 3rd in class....out of 5 total if I remember correctly.

Spoken like any true fan of top gear. That show is filled with self satisfied pompous a-holes. How exactly would this person's achievement be overshadowed by the likes of a-holes who are paid to review and drive actual cars?

If anything his placement shows that these entitled pricks can't hold a candle to people with true determination and "drive". Sod all. Indeed.

Re:Er... (1)

Cederic (9623) | more than 3 years ago | (#36442488)

You missed the implied criticism of Top Gear. His whole point is that if that bunch of entitled pricks that can't hold a candle to people with true determination and "drive" can get 3rd in class, merely going one better isn't necessarily fantastic.

Other posters have highlighted why the comparison is perhaps unfair, and even managed to do so without slating a very popular TV entertainment show with a minor bias towards motoring.

Re:Er... (1)

rrossman2 (844318) | more than 3 years ago | (#36442284)

You must have missed the episode where Jeremy plays GT4 (I think it was 4) to learn laguna seca... then tries it for real. He couldn't come close to his lap times, and he even says the techniques, while close, on the PS3 don't quite translate to the real world, and in the game you don't get the fear you get on the track. He also mentions how it feels as if the walls are right beside you, and it feels like you are going to smash into one at any point.

Works for all games? (1)

dogmatixpsych (786818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436008)

Great, now all my time playing Madden has not been in vain! Huge NFL contract, here I come.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

mustPushCart (1871520) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436112)

Yep works for all games, completing an FPS will allow you to buy an assault rifle, flightsims will now let you print out your commercial pilot once you beat them, RTS's will have a black limo pull out outside your house and suits escort you to the CnC center of your countries military.

Gaming for live!

Re:Works for all games? (2)

Predius (560344) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436166)

Umm... actually some flight sims at one time DID qualify as flight hours for pilots...

Re:Works for all games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36436474)

X-Plane, pretty much the only surviving flight simulator "game", is the exact same software used for training pilots. The only difference is whether it's licensed for personal or commercial use.

Re:Works for all games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36438888)

Microsoft Flight (Simulator) is still going strong with a new release coming soon.

Re:Works for all games? (3, Interesting)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437342)

Umm... actually some flight sims at one time DID qualify as flight hours for pilots...

Still do actually. The FAA and many others allow use of approved flight training devices to replace some of the hours for flight training.

Of these, X-Plane is about the only commercially available flight sim software that wasn't specifically made for training that's been approved for use with training. Earlier it required a special build of it, but I think the later ones are the same now - you need a special USB unlock key that puts it into "approved' mode though.

Re:Works for all games? (4, Interesting)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436382)

I wrecked my first model airplane.

Then I bought a simulator and practiced for several days. I haven't wrecked a model airplane since. So YES simulators (videogames) can train you for the real thing, as any soldier can attest. It all started back when ATARI was asked by the army to adapt their "Battlezone" game to army tank training.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

Translation Error (1176675) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441022)

Maybe simulators can train you for the real thing, but a case where a video game improved your ability to fly a model airplane does not in any way support your claim, as a model airplane is still just a simulation. So, in short, you merely provided evidence that practice with a simulator can improve your skill with another simulator.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

gknoy (899301) | more than 3 years ago | (#36442180)

Flying the model airplane is a skill in itself -- adjusting for wind, controls without feedback, etc. Practice in a sim can improve that skill. It doesn't improve his skill at flying a 747, but that wasn't the skill he was looking to improve. He basically played a simulation of a simulation, in order to get better at that one.

Similarly, I could imagine a hunting simulator (probably more complex than Deer Hunter 3000) teaching you to recognize and estimate distance/wind, and help you improve that part of your shooting-bullets-accurately skill, even if you still needed range time to practice with a real weapon in order to master breathing and muscle control.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36444820)

Maybe simulators can train you for the real thing, but a case where a video game improved your ability to fly a model airplane does not in any way support your claim, as a model airplane is still just a simulation. So, in short, you merely provided evidence that practice with a simulator can improve your skill with another simulator.

A model airplane is a real physical object you're manipulating. It's a very real skill and considered a sport by some. It is no less real than shooting a rifle at clay targets. The r/c aircraft simulators can do well but aren't perfect at modeling all the variables. I can also attest to them allowing me to fly for years with 1 hard landing and 1 total crash.

aka Brainwashing (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441426)

teaching kids that there is nothing unusual or abnormal about deriving entertainment from killing people, so that they lose the natural 'anti-killing' instinct that platoon leaders had to contend with in WWII.

google killology for more info

Re:aka Brainwashing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36444372)

That would explain the rise in violence among kids! Oh wait... there hasn't been one. Your post seems to be pointless.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

SQLGuru (980662) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437406)

I played all of the Leisure Suit Larry games and now I'm..............well, that didn't quite work out.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

davester666 (731373) | more than 3 years ago | (#36438538)

What's so wrong with being the office fool?

Re:Works for all games? (3, Funny)

captainpanic (1173915) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436176)

Worms Armageddon... I'm an expert at throwing sheep. It's only a matter of time until I need that in real life... I just know it.

Re:Works for all games? (1)

Captain Centropyge (1245886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436960)

Holy Hand Grenade! *choir....Ahhhhhh!* *KABOOOOM!*

Re:Works for all games? (1)

Flyerman (1728812) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436206)

I keep playing the Harry Potter games but never get my invitation to Hogwarts!

Re:Works for all games? (1)

SilentStaid (1474575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436454)

To compensate, you could just follow me around following Hermione around all day, everyday. I've got a nice little love nest in the bushes outside of her house. You keep an eye on where she goes to make sure you don't miss Hogwarts and I'll keep an eye on her to make sure I don't miss a thing...

And after writing that, I must go wash my hands.

Re:Works for all games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36439250)

you typed all that with one hand? Bravo, good sir, bravo!

Re:Works for all games? (1)

GFLPraxis (745118) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437370)

There's a very big difference between a simulator (Gran Turismo) and arcade-style games. Madden is about halfway in between, but not exactly known for quality.

Re:Works for all games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36437908)

I've been playing Pitfall! all my life and all I've gotten are snake and scorpion bites when I went into the real jungle. It's probably because I didn't use the underground tunnels to move through the Amazon quicker.

Racing games work particularly well (1)

DG (989) | more than 3 years ago | (#36442170)

Back when I was doing the whole pro race driver thing, I'd spend several hours a week on a PS/2 and several different driving games.

It's not *exactly* the same - in particular, a lot of feedback about where the tires are relative to the grip level comes through your ass - but there's enough overlap to make the exercise worthwhile.

And especially for road courses like LeMans, the game (which duplicates the track pretty faithfully) can be a real help trying to memorize where the course goes. Much of road racing is knowing which turn follows which an where the racing line is.

Jacques Villeneuve used to do the same thing.

On the military side of things, AFV simulators like Steel Beasts Pro (which uses the real-life FCS and realistic ballistics) is great turret training. I had to be shown where the various controls were in the real turret, but once my face was in the sight, it was exactly the same. Shocked the hell out of the IG when the "newbie" was putting rounds on target and making the right corrections on his very first live fire.

So yes, for certain skills, simulation games can make a huge difference in Real Life.

DG

road to nowhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36436038)

and he still didn't get anywhere!

I would be amazed . . . (0)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436040)

. . . if he was second overall, not just second in class.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (3, Informative)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436084)

Finishing a Le Mans is impressive enough.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (5, Informative)

chronosan (1109639) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436118)

Yes, of 56 Teams, only 28 finished. The Signatech Nissan team came in 2nd of 11 in class, seems 9th overall.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (3, Insightful)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436402)

Unfortunately a lot of people will read this and not understand how grueling Le Mans is. Its a 24 hour endurance race. Its designed to be hard just to compete in, never mind winning.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36436704)

This year's race in particular was crazy: for LMP1, Audi beat Peugeot by fourteen seconds. In a 24-hour race.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (2)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436926)

And, with there being multiple classes on the track... nasty incidents (usually between the prototypes (LMP1 and LMP2) and the GT Endurance cars) can and do occur.

There were three Audis at the start of the race, after 1 hour, one was completely DESTROYED.

At the halfway point, another was even worse off.

Both drivers got out of their own cars, and one even returned to the track the next day after being checked out at the hospital.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36442416)

More so the ability of the car/designer/engineer/mechanic. While it does take a major toll on your body and mind as well, they never listed how many laps *he* drove...

Re:I would be amazed . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36436094)

Just second in class at the Le Mans 24 hour is an incredible achievement.

Many teams enter with the goal of simply finishing.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (0)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436136)

Second in class is nothing to scoff at.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (2)

Rmalmberg (1784084) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436272)

Considering the differences in power, weight, and aerodynamics of LMP1 and LMP2 cars, you have to separate by class. Finishing second in his class is finishing second; only chance a LMP2 car has of finishing second out of the entire course would be mechanical failures on each LMP1 car.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (2)

chaos.squirrel (1085995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436310)

they seem to have gotten 9th overall (out of 56 who started) , which is even more impressive... according to http://www.lemans.org/en/races/24h-du-mans/live-2011/live-timing.html [lemans.org] here

Re:I would be amazed . . . (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437266)

Commenting on where they finished overall shows a lack of understanding of multi-class races.

Multiple classes of cars race on the same track together, adding a lot of moving speed bumps for the fast cars and strategy for the slower cars. You aren't competing against the faster cars in the slower cars, you're competing against your own class.

Imagine formula 1 and stock cars simultaneously on big oval at Daytona. There's no contest between the classes, but it adds a lot to the experience.

Re:I would be amazed . . . (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437386)

Well, back before LMP2 was neutered, it tended to compete with LMP1 for the overall win in American Le Mans Series races (which pissed Audi off quite a lot, because they'd be the LMP1 winner, which is what matters for championships, but they didn't get the bragging rights for the overall win),

I Can't Wait... (1)

SplicerNYC (1782242) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436212)

To get in the pilot's seat of an Airbus A380. All those flying lessons in my den will pay off big time.

Now you know! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36436214)

Being familiar with the course is a huge advantage. Now you know. And knowing is half the battle. G.III.JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOE --www.awkwardengineer.com [awkwardengineer.com]

They missed the part about having rich parents. (4, Insightful)

KPexEA (1030982) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436452)

Be born rich, don't be poor. How do you make a small fortune in auto racing? Start with a large one.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (4, Insightful)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437132)

What does having rich parents have to do with being good at a video game, being invited to a racing academy on your performance in the game, and then being drafted by racing teams, and then actually performing well enough to compete in one of the three most prestigious racing events in the world? Since when does buying a TV and a playstation qualify as rich?

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36438410)

Because having money means you can spend all your time on whatever it is you're trying to do without worrying about having something to eat, or heat, etc. It also means you can afford the proper/best equipment to train with.

If you can practice 60+ hours a week you can pretty much do anything.

Then when it comes time to put your skills to use money allows you to have the proper equipment to do it (ie. the cars, mechanics, tires, gas, track time, etc).

Money is not required to succeed but it makes it a hell of a lot easier.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (2)

DeadboltX (751907) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440680)

Life is about opportunity. Being born into opportunity puts you that many steps ahead of everyone else. If you have rich parents and you can spend your entire day playing video games then of course you are getting more training than someone who has to work 2 jobs and only has 1 hour a night to play. Of course skill and will power are factors as well, but there is a serious advantage to being born into opportunity.

This applies to almost everything in life.

Why wealth matters (2)

Burning1 (204959) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440852)

Spoken like someone who's never raced.

The short version: Opportunity cost. If you're working 9-5, it's very hard to sit down on the console for hours on end to play racing games. It's very hard to take several days a month off to go drive real cars at your local track. If someone else is paying for your track time, meals, and roof, you have a huge edge over the guys who fund their racing budget with a 9-5 job.

I say this as a person who's done it. My first exposure to Infineon raceway was playing Tourist Trophy on a PS2. I learned the layout of the track thanks to the game. I took a few days away from work to ride the track. I raced 3 events there, finally taking a 3rd place trophy home with me.

Holding a job and racing is very very very difficult. Even if you can afford the track time, do you have a job that permits you to take a day off every few weeks to practice? Will your job tolerate you missing work to recover from injury? Do you really think you can compete with the people who spend their lives trackside, or who have been driving/riding since they were 5?

Re:Why wealth matters (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440954)

Like any pro sport, its called sponsorship. If you're good enough, you get paid to do it, and it becomes your job.

Re:Why wealth matters (2)

Burning1 (204959) | more than 3 years ago | (#36443436)

Sponsorship does make someone into a professional racer*, but for the vast majority of riders the sponsorship money simply offsets the cost of racing; the most of the costs are still paid out of pocket, and the sponsorship will not cover living expenses. Even in the televised leagues, there are a lot of privateers paying out of pocket (e.g. the AMA national motorcycle series is primarily small teams and privateers, even though it's nationally televised.)

The number of racers who make a net profit on the sport is vanishingly small, especially compared to other televised sports. A few of them pay the bills by training other riders, or providing services. The rest pay out of pocket.

* Sponsorship has some major downsides as well... Racing is a hobby to a lot of us, and having real sponsors usually means real work. It's no longer acceptable to skip a race because you want to go on vacation, or because funds are tight... You are out there to market your sponsor, and you have obligations... So, it can be a bit of a double edged sword.

Re:Why wealth matters (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441208)

Where does it even say he was supported by his parents? In the 2009 article it says he was studying for an MBA and during the week when he wasn't studying he was training. During the weekends he participated in races. Perhaps you're forgetting that he is still young enough that he doesn't/didn't have a full-time job.

Re:Why wealth matters (1)

Burning1 (204959) | more than 3 years ago | (#36443454)

Basing my response on the parent poster and grandparent poster's comments. Someone asked why it would be relevant whether or not a driver was funded by his family. I answered. No idea if it's actually the case for this kid.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36440998)

Because this guy was go-karting since he was a kid, but had to stop due to lack of money. All good racers have go-karted as kids. It's the only way to get any good at the sport.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (1)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36443020)

Since when does buying a TV and a playstation qualify as rich?

About late 2008, by my reckoning.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (1)

Rasperin (1034758) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437556)

Hey I read that book too! Want to start IT racing so badddd.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36437810)

You missed this: http://games.slashdot.org/story/09/12/04/1516204/Gran-Turismo-Gamer-Becomes-Pro-Race-Driver

Dude had no money for racing AT ALL. It was all in his MBA.

Re:They missed the part about having rich parents. (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440288)

How do you make a small fortune in auto racing? Start with a large one.

You make a small fortune in auto racing by having sponsors.
You should read about "start and park" racing to see what happens at the bottom of the racing food chain.
The difference in the payout for the bottom 10~20 racers is almost nothing, whether they race 25 laps or 250.

being born rich (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441478)

rich people have a lot of their own problems. emotional, psychological, etc.

Shock! (1, Insightful)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436516)

Guy who is good at driving also plays video games about driving.

Re:Shock! (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440966)

Guy who is good at driving never would have been discovered without game that simulates race car driving accurately enough to pick up on the fact that he's actually good at driving.

Take your red herrings elsewhere.

Re:Shock! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36441058)

Guy who posted on slashdot also didn't read article.

Re:Shock! (1)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441282)

Shock! Slashdot poster who didn't RTFA makes comment making it blatantly obvious that he didn't RTFA!

Re:Shock! (1)

Huckabees (1929306) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441524)

I heard Kobe Bryant learned all he knows about basketball from the Wii. "So realistic."

Re:Shock! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36441704)

well the story is that the guy got *found* because of his video gaming.

Basic math (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36436962)

""If your parents tell you that playing video games will never get you anywhere, point them in the direction of Lucas Ordoñez."

Basic math: You can't draw a curve through a single point.

Not to mention that if you don't have the far-side-of-the-bell-curve combination of high eye/hand coordination, fine motors skills, and cognitive abilities (each pretty far over on their own bell curves too), it doesn't matter how many video games you play.

Re:Basic math (1)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437160)

Also, there are physical limits - racing drivers have to be extremely fit, both for weight reasons, and to handle the forces involved in controlling a race car through corners. Simulators expose none of that.

See the iRacing champion's experience with driving a real race car: http://www.topgear.com/uk/photos/geek-rebooted-2010-11-26 [topgear.com]

Re:Basic math (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440006)

Also, there are physical limits - racing drivers have to be extremely fit, both for weight reasons, and to handle the forces involved in controlling a race car through corners. Simulators expose none of that.

Indeed. When I was in the Navy, I worked on/trained in a variety of high- and low- fidelity simulators. A video screen doesn't even come close.

Re:Basic math (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437444)

Actually these realistic driving games are good for in some ways for parents. Because it is cheaper to buy these games and find out whether your kid has a chance than to actually fork out many kilobux or more for a "conventional racing career start" (karting, training, racing, equipment, crashes, etc).

If your kid can't even get close to the top racers' game lap times, it's unlikely he/she can beat the real life top racers' lap times either. So the parents can say, "sorry kid, for you it's a hobby and not a career path".

Whereas if your kid does beat and get close to those scores consistently, then your kid might really be racer material (especially if he/she seems to do it "naturally"). In which case good luck and I don't envy you ;).

Re:Basic math (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439198)

I know many people who are good at one and suck at the other, so I don't know if the skills translate across, at least when it comes to vehicle control.

Re:Basic math (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439660)

Sure, if you're good in the game, it doesn't mean you'll be good in racing since it takes physical fitness, strength, courage, and also you can't be nearly as heavy as the car ;).

BUT if you suck in Grand Turismo even when using a steering wheel controller, though you are good in "real world" driving, you're likely to not be good enough to turn pro (so no point wasting time and resources on that path).

AFAIK the great racers can drive a lot of vehicles well - race cars, normal cars, karts, and virtual cars.

Re:Basic math (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440082)

Actually these realistic driving games are good for in some ways for parents. Because it is cheaper to buy these games and find out whether your kid has a chance than to actually fork out many kilobux or more for a "conventional racing career start" (karting, training, racing, equipment, crashes, etc).

Sure. In the same way that buying your kid a microwave pizza and having him reheat it is a cheap and useful way to see if he has a chance at culinary school.
 
In other words - no, it's not useful at all. The differences are simply too great.

frogger (2)

itchythebear (2198688) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437032)

I suppose I should have picked a game besides frogger to get good at.

Re:frogger (1)

MikeBabcock (65886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437284)

I bet you haven't been hit by a car lately lol

Frogger? All is not lost for you. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36437358)

You still have a fine career as a coyote running illegals across the Rio Grande.

Better options out there (1)

fafaforza (248976) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437376)

Good for him but I don't know that I'd pick Gran Turismo as my top choice for a sim. Plenty of stuff on the PC, like anything from Papyrus, iRacing. I think Forza is even better. But good on him, nonetheless.

Re:Better options out there (2)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 3 years ago | (#36437474)

Except Sony ran a promotion with Nissan, for Gran Turismo players who did exceptionally well to get a spot in a Nissan 350Z GT4 car. Papyrus couldn't offer that, their last game having been NASCAR Racing 2003, iRacing didn't offer that, and Microsoft didn't offer that, either.

So, if you wanted to win a chance to be a real racing driver based purely on your skill, Gran Turismo was the way to go. And, in this case, it paid off for Nissan extremely well - Ordonez was good enough for them to put him in a customer's LMP2 car.

Re:Better options out there (1)

fafaforza (248976) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439018)

True, but the insinuation of the title/summary/article is that the game prepares you somehow, where in reality, it was more the involvement with a real race promotion.

Re:Better options out there (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439020)

Good for him but I don't know that I'd pick Gran Turismo as my top choice for a sim. Plenty of stuff on the PC, like anything from Papyrus, iRacing. I think Forza is even better. But good on him, nonetheless.

I'd have to say Forza is a step below GT still, at least in the actual driving department. That might change with 4, but right now I'd have to say GT still has a clear lead in the driving physics department.

I haven't actually tried iRacing, but there have definitely been sims on PC that offer better driving physics than GT (especially some of the Papyrus sims). I still prefer GT for the overall experience, though (yes, even the flawed GT5).

The second half of this story. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36438368)

Sony eventually learned that Lucas used a PIRATED copy of GT to practice, and was immediately sanctioned to the tune of hundreds of thousands of dollars. For recompense Lucas will now have to spend the rest of his life working in the quick lube stall at Sony's fleet maintenance. Goodbye MBA.

Re:The second half of this story. (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439460)

Lucas will now have to spend the rest of his life working in the quick lube stall at Sony's fleet maintenance

Ha, he WISHES! For an offense like that, it's off to Sony's silicon mines. He'll dig right next to GeoHot.

Driving is easy - whats the big deal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36438440)

Whats the big deal? Most of the drivers on the road are already better than all the other drivers, so how hard can driving be?

hmmmm (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#36438726)

What's interesting about racing is the pool of people able to pursue it as a career is so small that the chances of you getting the most talented natural racers into the sport are astronomically low. With soccer, track, football, baseball, etc., you have a way to work your way up from schools or the streets; if you're truly great at the sport chances are good you'll be found out and put in a position to compete. With racing you have a tiny pool of people connected enough to the sport (frequently through family members), wealthy or driven enough (drive does not necessarily imply talent) to do whatever it takes to get behind the wheel.

Re:hmmmm (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439340)

Well you can start in karting, AutoX or RallyX and work your way up (if a "talent scout" sees you beating the crap out of the competition - about as likely as a street basketball/soccer player getting picked up, but it has happened), still a lot more expensive than other sports but it isn't impossible for someone who isn't ultra-rich or well-connected to work their way in.

Re:hmmmm (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439914)

and it doesn't have to be that expensive - sure when you start talking track days it can be - but if you focus more on driving than on goodies in the car.. you can do very well.

Been AutoXing for years and plan on karting in a few years with my son, but you have to approach it like other "sports" there are a lot of people out there to that want to do it and only a select few get the chance to do it for a living.. that doesn't mean give up on the idea - but it does mean you need to treat it as a hobby with something else as a planned career path.

He already had prior racing experience (1)

Weedhopper (168515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36438936)

Lucas Ordonez was already well on the way to becoming a racing driver.

This guy wasn't a regular gamer. He karted as a kid until he was sixteen, when his family couldn't afford it anymore. Karting is where anyone with any racing aspirations starts before they move up to the junior formulas. Lucas Ordonez just had a delay in his career development and got his FIA racing licenses through a very unorthodox channel - Sony's GT Academy.

Racing success is all about the size of your bankroll and essentially, Sony paid for Lucas Ordonez.

Re:He already had prior racing experience (1)

fafaforza (248976) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439056)

Robert Kubica and his pop were pretty piss poor and made it to F1 so money isn't the single factor, though it does play a large role.

Three years ago? (1)

UbuntuniX (1126607) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439110)

Gran Turismo 5 hasn't been out even one year yet.

Re:Three years ago? (1)

UnNerved (651409) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439676)

No, But GT5 Prologue has.

Does this remind you of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36439292)

The Last Starfighter?

Expert Race Car Driver Used to Play Video Games (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439294)

How is this different from any other young race car driver? I'm not seeing the story here.

Re:Expert Race Car Driver Used to Play Video Games (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439568)

It was because of his performance in the videogames that he had a shot to do the real thing. Sure, a lot of guys will practice on the games, but it's quite rare that someone will get a seat without proving themselves in the real world first.

Re:Expert Race Car Driver Used to Play Video Games (1)

Weedhopper (168515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36439810)

He was already a racing driver with plenty of kart experience until he was sixteen. He already had more seat time in competitive driving than the lower 99% of GT players combined before he every picked up the GT controller.

exactly. Obama ued to play 'im the president' (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36441516)

great game. i love the part where unemployment is stuck at 9% for 4 years in a row and you cant do a damn thing.

Formula 1 (1)

bodland (522967) | more than 3 years ago | (#36440200)

I drank formula...I was one. It got me where I needed to be.
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