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The Most Common iPhone Passcodes

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the one-two-three-four dept.

Iphone 192

Orome1 writes "The problem of poor passwords is not confined to computer use, and that fact was illustrated by an app developer who has added code to capture user passcodes to one of its applications. 'Because Big Brother's [the app in question] passcode setup screen and lock screen are nearly identical to those of the actual iPhone passcode lock, I figured that the collected information would closely correlate with actual iPhone passcodes,' says Daniel Amitay. It turns out that of the 204,508 recorded passcodes, 15% were one of the most common ten."

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What? (2)

sirboxalot (791959) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444220)

No 4242?

Re:What? (3, Informative)

zonky (1153039) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445084)

Password use is going to be interesting. Bet 99% are the same as their PIN for any cards, and the same as a home alarm.

Re:What? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445232)

Son of a bitch! lol

That is indeed my ipod touch passcode

Nitpick (0)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444234)

TFA says "But the fact that makes Amitay's revelation extremely crucial is that if someone steals or finds a lost iPhone, he has a 15% chance of unlocking the device and accessing the data within before it gets wiped just by trying out the passwords on the aforementioned top 10 list."

Isn't it true that 10 successful wrong guesses causes the phone to brick?

Re:Nitpick (3, Informative)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444394)

15% of iPhones are locked using one of ten codes.

You have ten login attempts before the phone wipes itself.

Thus, if you try each of the top ten codes on a random iPhone, you have a 15% chance of entering the right code before it wipes itself.

Also, I think you meant "successive".

Re:Nitpick (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444574)

The whole thing is flawed. His is a gimmicky free app. Clearly most users downloaded it, tested it with a stupid passcode, like the 2 most common "1234" and the app default "0000" and then quickly forgot about it. Got to give him props for PR though, who knows how many downloads is he going to get out of this story.

Re:Nitpick (3, Informative)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444850)

is that if someone steals or finds a lost iPhone, he has a 15% chance of unlocking the device and accessing the data within before it gets wiped just by trying out the passwords on the aforementioned top 10 list."

I think that might be off -- If someone steals or finds a lost, working iPhone; he probably has a 80 - 90% chance of finding the device not secured with a passcode to begin with.

If he happened to get so unlucky as to find one of the 20% of iPhones with a passcode; he has a 15% chance of unlocking that locked device.

That brings it closer to a 100% chance of gaining access to it; if the found phone works at all -- only an 85% chance of it using an uncommon passcode. Just because it's uncommon doesn't mean unguessable -- it depends on how much the thief knows or can find out about the person. If the thief gets the wallet too, they might try the birthdate on drivers license or do other research about numbers significant to the person (increasing chances of an unlock beyond 15% for fixed common) -- if we include things like phone numbers, anniversary year, 15% might be a real low ball for the amount of passcodes based on such guessable concepts.

Re:Nitpick (1)

xSauronx (608805) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444922)

If someone steals or finds a lost, working iPhone; he probably has a 80 - 90% chance of finding the device not secured with a passcode to begin with.

Jeebus. I lock my android phone, and my nook color which runs android, with the swipe lock. My friends and their ipad? Not so much, and they're nerds who should know better

Re:Nitpick (1)

Toam (1134401) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445134)

I lock my android phone with a pattern which is fairly pointless as you can see streaks on the screen from where I've swiped it in

Yes, I'm aware that I can change it to a password or pin which would be more secure, but to be honest having any sort of "lock" on my phone is less about security and more about not making calls etc while the phone is in my pocket.

Re:Nitpick (3, Insightful)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445078)

It brings it closer to an 83% chance of accessing it, actually. Not 100%. (15% of top passcodes x only 20% of iPhones locked = 3% of total iPhones use one of the top passcodes).

Here's a question... (3, Interesting)

jojoba_oil (1071932) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444252)

...how did an app like "Big Brother" make it onto the App(le) store?

I thought they paid people to test each app before approval; you know, as a first defense against apps that look to imitate the lock screen and steal passcodes...

Re:Here's a question... (4, Informative)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444538)

App in question in action [youtube.com]. Description from the video :

"This is not a prank application! It really works, and takes pictures of anyone trying to access your iPhone. Big Brother is the only iPhone app which sets off an alarm AND takes a photo if the user presses the home button!

Want to know if someone has been sneaking a peak at your iPhone 4?
Turn on Big Brother, LOCK it, turn off your iPhone, and you're set!
Whenever a person enters an incorrect password, the device will take two photos!"

Not duplicating functionality in the iPhone, not actually stealing your passcode (just its own user settable one is sent back).

Re:Here's a question... (1)

qubezz (520511) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444788)

It really works, up to the point that this fake phone lock software actually leaves your phone unlocked, all you have to do is quit the app.

Re:Here's a question... (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444856)

Yeah because the iPhone was never locked in the first place, just running the app. That's why it sounds an alarm when you quit the app.

Re:Here's a question... (1)

Macrat (638047) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445144)

Want to know if someone has been sneaking a peak at your iPhone 4?

Or don't leave you phone out lying around where anyone can grab it.

Evil Developer! (2)

tehniobium (1042240) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444254)

This just in: 15% of developers steal the passwords of 80% of all (stupid) users!

Seriously...isn't this just a tad "evil" behavior? Even if its done to prove a point, surely this guy shouldn't be stealing his users passwords?

Re:Evil Developer! (1)

DMFNR (1986182) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444304)

I doubt it even matters that the login screen looks like the iPhone's anyway. The type of person who is probably using 1234 as his passcode is probably the same kind of person who uses the same passcode/password for everything. I bet if they did a study like this on peoples debit car PIN numbers the results would be pretty similar.

Re:Evil Developer! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444390)

Alternatively, the person that uses 1234 to secure this app (whatever it does) may not care about security *for that data* but could have a more secure PIN for the handset.

Admittedly, I'm giving human nature more credit than it has historically earned, but the developer is making quite a stretch with his inference that his results are a fair analogy for what Apple would see if they dropped similarly evil code in the next iOS update. Do I care if you can guess the PIN to my iPhone? Yep. Do I care if you then also guess my "Big Brother" pin? Maybe.... but you've already got my iPhone, so most of the damage is already done, assuming you're evil.

Final point - the developer also assumes that all users of his app also have a lock-screen PIN enabled on their iPhone. As per Anonymous Coward @08:09PM, this isn't always the case.

Re:Evil Developer! (1)

cgeys (2240696) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444562)

Alternatively, the person that uses 1234 to secure this app (whatever it does) may not care about security *for that data* but could have a more secure PIN for the handset.

Admittedly, I'm giving human nature more credit than it has historically earned, but the developer is making quite a stretch with his inference that his results are a fair analogy for what Apple would see if they dropped similarly evil code in the next iOS update. Do I care if you can guess the PIN to my iPhone? Yep. Do I care if you then also guess my "Big Brother" pin? Maybe.... but you've already got my iPhone, so most of the damage is already done, assuming you're evil.

Final point - the developer also assumes that all users of his app also have a lock-screen PIN enabled on their iPhone. As per Anonymous Coward @08:09PM, this isn't always the case.

Yeah no shit. For my computer and logins I save everything neatly in KeePass, different passwords to every site I use. But I don't really care about my phone. It's paid upfront, so you can't do damage with it. For the pin code I just use my birthdate. Yes, that's right. It's easy to remember so that I don't lock the phone if I happen to forget the pin number. I also want it to be quickly entered when I start my phone. And this is even more true for something like screen-locked pin code. If I lose my phone, I'm more pissed at the fact that I lost hardware and can't use it. I don't really have anything on the phone, nothing that I consider valuable anyway. So I might aswell make my life easier and use an easy pin.

Re:Evil Developer! (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444368)

This just in: 15% of developers steal the passwords of 80% of all (stupid) users!

Seriously...isn't this just a tad "evil" behavior? Even if its done to prove a point, surely this guy shouldn't be stealing his users passwords?

'A tad' evil like smoking 3 packs of cigarettes is 'a tad' bad for you or coke has 'a tad' of sugar. This is spyware plain and simple.

I would not do this myself, but if the data's already out there I have no ethical qualms discussing and analysing it. I find it interesting that 2580 popped up. I would not have guessed that. Lots of users into kittens and ponies I guess?

Re:Evil Developer! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444428)

2580 are the numbers in the middle column on a standard phone keypad, like 147* and 369#. I'm surprised 0852 didn't rank in the top 10

Re:Evil Developer! (1)

urbanheretic (1138845) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444436)

You'll find that 2580 is just the middle column in the passcode view. It's not really that weird when you look at it that way.

Re:Evil Developer! (1)

reason (39714) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444456)

2580 is the only set of 4 digits in a straight line on the keypad (straight down the middle).

Re:Evil Developer! (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444486)

From the developer's web site:

Yesterday I posted an analysis of the Most Common iPhone Passcodes, with passcode data taken from my Big Brother Camera Security app. As of today at 4:58pm EST, Big Brother has been removed from the App Store. I’m certainly not happy about it, but considering the concerns a few people have expressed regarding the transfer of data from app to my server, it is understandable.

I think I should clarify exactly what data I was referring to, and how I was obtaining it. First, these passcodes are those that are input into Big Brother, not the actual iPhone lockscreen passcodes. Second, when the app sends this data to my server, it is literally sending only that number (e.g. “1234”) and nothing else. I have no way of identifying any user or device whatsoever.

1-2-3-4-5? (4, Funny)

TheRedDuke (1734262) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444300)

That's amazing! I've got the same combination on my luggage!

Re:1-2-3-4-5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444464)

mod parent UP!

"I said across her nose not up it!"

1998, lol (3, Interesting)

AlienIntelligence (1184493) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444306)

So, the most common age of the user is 13?

Or the most common age of their offspring?

-AI

Re:1998, lol (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444712)

So, the most common age of the user is 13?

Or the most common age of their offspring?

-AI

Or the last year we remember that didn't royally suck. Y2K, 9/11, and the decade of hypercapitalist deception that ensued... yeah, I miss the 90's. The music was better too.

Re:1998, lol (1)

kvvbassboy (2010962) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444796)

Yes to everything else, but the music did suck. Remember backstreet boys, boyzone, nsync, michael jackson etc? :P

If I had a choice between 2000s and1990s I would choose the latter though. IMHO, it was the decade of greatest technological progress since the 60s.

Re:1998, lol (1)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445012)

As a matter of fact I don't remember those bands, aside from recognizing the names. I couldn't name a single song by any of them (with the obvious exception of Jackson, who transcends the 1990s). That's because I had stopped listening to whatever's-in-fashion music by the 90s, and since then I've just followed my own interests and that of people around me (e.g. on community radio). Complaining about crappy pop music is like complaining about crappy fast food: no one's forcing you to eat it.

Re:1998, lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445220)

Yes to everything else, but the music did suck.

For every backstreet boys, there's a Portishead. For every boyzone, there's a Massive Attack. nsync? Underworld. michael jackson? Chemical Brothers. As for rock, there was Pixies, My Bloody Valentine, Polvo, Ride, PJ Harvey. And so on, and so forth, etcetera.
Things were not quite as bad as you seem to remember them.

Why lock it? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444320)

Why lock the iPhone? If you lose it and it is unlocked maybe someone will try to contact someone on your list and return it.

Re:Why lock it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444344)

You're new to this planet, aren't you

Re:Why lock it? (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444376)

Why lock the iPhone? If you lose it and it is unlocked maybe someone will try to contact someone on your list and return it.

Because it's more likely that the kind of person who'll pick up a phone that doesn't belong to them will run up a huge bill calling a foreign country and buy lots of apps if you don't have that locked down?

Re:Why lock it? (1)

Manos_Of_Fate (1092793) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444534)

I'll give you the international calls, but purchasing apps or music requires an iTunes password, every time (well it keeps you logged in for like 10 minutes after you enter it).

Re:Why lock it? (2)

psithurism (1642461) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445052)

it's more likely that the kind of person who'll pick up a phone...

Will be the average guy/gal in your area. I don't know where your from, but in my area I'd say 80% would return it if it was easy and a small fraction of the remaining 20% would be criminal enough to do anything more than attempt to e-bay it.

Your confusing people who will find a dropped phone with people who would steal a phone.

Re:Why lock it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444478)

It is also likely someone will find that they can use it to run up huge charges for the phone and wireless, buy a ton of music, sell the contacts to gangbangers as addresses for their next hits, log onto Facebook and start sending out spam, or random death threats, log onto Exchange and snarf business E-mail, etc.

Instead, I rather have return info as a graphic on the lockscreen, and if someone is kind enough to return the phone, they can call that number for a reward. There are too many thieves, criminals, and psychopaths to risk being naiive and not having decent security.

the iphone makes good passwords hard... (2, Insightful)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444352)

in general the iphone keyboard makes using #$_*! etc and CaPitaLiz3d passwords harder than it should, which tends to lead to bad security. I'd be interested to know how many people use the same iphone 4 digit code as their PIN for their debit. though it looks like the phone lock is more of a 'get me past this lock quickly', which says a lot about how people want to use their phones.

Re:the iphone makes good passwords hard... (1)

The Good Reverend (84440) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444510)

My passcode set to get me past the lock screen quickly - entering a complex code every time I wanted to do/check something on my phone would be absurd. But I've also got it set to wipe after 10 tries, so anyone who finds it is very unlikely to guess the code before getting in and seeing my stuff. Even if they did, Find My iPhone lets me do a remote lock/wipe. No big deal.

Re:the iphone makes good passwords hard... (2)

mlts (1038732) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444512)

Actually, iPhone passwords are easy. If you use an all numeric passcode, instead of pulling up a full keyboard, it pops up a PINpad with the enter button, just like the pad used for entering a SIM pin.

So, entering an 8-12 digit PIN can be done quite quickly.

Re:the iphone makes good passwords hard... (1)

PNutts (199112) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445158)

in general the iphone keyboard makes using #$_*! etc and CaPitaLiz3d passwords harder than it should...

No it doesn't and if you think so why? You press Shift for caps, .?123 for numbers and common special characters, and #+= for less common special characters? What magic keyboard do you have that allows access to all of those at once? Sheesh.

Re:the iphone makes good passwords hard... (1)

EvanED (569694) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445254)

IIRC, my old "moderately secure" password (used for my two university logins) took over 50% more button/screen presses to enter on my N900 than a normal keyboard.

So wait... (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444384)

The guy steals people's passwords, then posts about it?

Re:So wait... (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444596)

The passcode to his app, which is a gimmick app to imitate the real lockscreen and take a picture when the wrong code is entered. Doesn't actually expose any data or anything.

Re:So wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444708)

Doesn't actually expose any data or anything.

Or that's exactly what he wants you to think. There were enough stats to create a graph of the 10 most common passcodes, was there not?

Re:So wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445272)

There were enough stats to create a graph of the 10 most common passcodes, was there not?

This is based on the assumption that people are using their real unlock code for the dummy one in the app. Assuming this app is free (has it been pulled? it's not showing up when I search for it,) most people are probably just installing it as a novelty and entering 1234 or 0000 rather than think of a proper pass code. Plus if you follow the story to the demo video [youtube.com], 0000 is the default code, so people just as well might be entering 0000 0000 0000 to blow through that part of setup.

At worst, it's just some clever social engineering. All that's left is to fly around and steal all those iPhones!

What I find most amazing ... (4, Funny)

slinches (1540051) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444400)

What I find most amazing is that the iphone only allows 4 digit 0-9 passcodes. That's only 5040 unique codes if I remember the math correctly.

Re:What I find most amazing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444450)

> What I find most amazing is that the iphone only allows 4 digit 0-9 passcodes

?! My passcode is 6 digits. What limits you to 4?

Re:What I find most amazing ... (4, Insightful)

drb226 (1938360) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444460)

10^4 = 10000

Re:What I find most amazing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445174)

Woosh, that flew right over your head.

Re:What I find most amazing ... (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444462)

You can use any alphanumeric + symbols code you want. Most people just use the simple numerical code because it's quick, easy, and does the job. If you guess wrong too many times the phone will enforce a timeout between guesses and you can set it to wipe if too many wrong guesses are entered.

And you remembered the math incorrectly. It's 10,000 unique codes. Your value is for the number of codes with no repeated numbers.

Re:What I find most amazing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444466)

0000 - 9999 I would reckon on 10,000 unique codes.

Re:What I find most amazing ... (1)

The Good Reverend (84440) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444482)

The iPhone has had the choice of 4-digit PIN-style codes or longer alpha-numeric codes for quite a while now.

Re:What I find most amazing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444496)

It's actually 10,000 codes -- 10^4. Your math would be right if you weren't allowed to repeat a digit. Still, your point stands -- there are far less possible codes than iPhones.

Re:What I find most amazing ... (1, Redundant)

slinches (1540051) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444500)

Correction, it's only 5040 if it disallowed repeat numbers. I was over-thinking it a bit. It's 10,000 possible numbers 0000-9999.

Well, so what? (2)

Evro (18923) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444418)

I have a trivial code on my iPhone, just there to provide a speedbump. If my phone were to be lost I'd change my personal & work email passwords. So what? Is anyone supposed to assume that the iPhone passcode provides any real security? If the phone auto-locks after 3 minutes, who wants to put in a 20-character passphrase? BTW, the iPhone passcode is not limited to 4 digits, you can use the entire alphanumeric keyboard, up to at least 10 chars.

5683? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444484)

Most of those are not surprising, but what happened on May 6th 1983 that's so significant?

Re:5683? (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444972)

Says so right in TFA: 5683 lines up with the letters L-O-V-E

You know, because chicks use phones too.

What do these screens actually look like? (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444490)

If the application used a "swipe to unlock" type of mechanism to emulate the iPhone's unlocking mechanism, then this violates an Apple patent.

Appetite for patterns (1)

elsurexiste (1758620) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444678)

I did a study on mobile passwords, be them numeric or graphical. The conclusion was the same for each and every password method: people usually choose graphical configurations like crosses, spirals and diagonal lines. They rarely choose the numbers or focal points of the images that were on the background.

Re:Appetite for patterns (1)

CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444802)

Sounds about right. My girlfriend has the ability to instantly memorize anyone's pincode for years (people don't believe it and so they're dumb enough to tell her), she doesn't actually remember the numbers but seems to remember the pattern on a grid. She could have a great career as a shoulder-surfer.

Re:Appetite for patterns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445068)

Of course! How else do you remember strings of digits that you type into a keypad? Phone numbers and PINs are easily memorable by remembering the path on the standard 10-digit keypad.

Interesting trend. (1)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444754)

I'm suprised 1998 is a common passcode, is this a birthdate? It's in amongst obvious 1234, 2222, 0000. But it correspondes to a age of approximately 13. Many 13 year olds with a iPhone? Or this age group least security aware?

Top ten PIN codes:

1234
0000
2580
1111
5555
5683
0852
2222
1212
1998


This interesting. 5683, 2580, 0852 don't seem to have any special significance, they aren't even a particular pattern on the keypad, nor especially natural to punch in, ie right handed, using your thumb.

Is this some odd human cognitive bias revealing itself?

Re:Interesting trend. (1)

w0mprat (1317953) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444816)

FAIL. I was looking at the numpad on a keyboard. Different when looking at actual phone and considering alphanumeric. There's the cognitive bias I was talking about.

Re:Interesting trend. (1)

AresTheImpaler (570208) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444852)

2580 is a straight line down.
0852 is a straight line up
I dunno about 5683, I find that one little bit weird

Re:Interesting trend. (2)

NewWorldDan (899800) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444952)

RTFA.

5683, with letter substitutions, spells LOVE.

I'm pleased to see that none of the 4 number codes I use in daily life made the top 10 list. If someone wants to steal my bike, they'll have to work at it a bit longer.

Re:Interesting trend. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445072)

L-O-V-E on a phone keypad

Re:Interesting trend. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444890)

Vertical, horizontal, etc. lines.

The article says that 5683 reads "love". In that same logic, I'd have used 3825. Puzzles me the 1998 as *relevant* year. But here's the list of the top 10000 passwords for iPhone:

for (i=0; i10000; i++) { printf("%04d\n",i); }

Re:Interesting trend. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444956)

5683 = love

Re:Interesting trend. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36444962)

I think 5683 is related to teenage girls spelling out silly words on the keypad.

2, 5, 8, and 0 are the center column, reducing "memorize a sequence of 4 digits" (or locations on-screen, if you memorize it spacially) to "memorize a permutation of the only 4 digits in a straight line" (or a traveling-salesman route) -- reducing both the symbol space and the fundamental difficulty of the problem (since e.g. remembering any 3 digits tells you the 4th). If you have a brain the size of a very small walnut, this could be the breakthrough that spares you writing your passcode down and referring to it for a few days until you can remember it yourself. And if you have the aforementioned very-small-walnut-sized brain, the fact that you just reduced the attacker's search space the same amount won't occur to you.

And it's "Class of 1998" -- the center of the iPhone demographic would be about 30, wouldn't you think? That or their old phone used a 3-digit code, they used 999, and doubled it to fill 4 digits, zero having not yet been invented.

Re:Interesting trend. (1)

TheDormouse (614641) | more than 2 years ago | (#36444992)

I'm suprised 1998 is a common passcode, is this a birthdate?

I think it must be that the age bracket that has the greatest number of iPhone users also had significant life events in 1998. 30-31 year-olds graduated high school in 1998. Lots of 30-40 year-olds got married or had their first kid in 1998.

Re:Interesting trend. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445262)

5683 = LOVE

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iPhone strong passphrase irrelevant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36445014)

I had changed my iPhone from a passcode to a strong passphrase but I realized that all it did was bug me. The passcode keeps the casual user out, but even with a strong passphrase, a tool like Cellubrite can dump all data despite your efforts. So you inconvenience yourself and don't increase real security with anything other than a 4-digit code...

Um, no. (1)

webdog314 (960286) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445050)

All this says is that 15% were one of the top 10 FOR HIS APP. This makes the very large assumption that people who were paranoid enough to buy his app are going to be fooled and use the same password that they do to lock the phone. They very well might, but his app doesn't prove that.

The Plague (1)

MoldySpore (1280634) | more than 2 years ago | (#36445256)

"Someone didn't bother reading my carefully prepared memo on commonly-used passwords. Now, then, as I so meticulously pointed out, the four most-used passwords are: love, sex, secret, and...god. So, would your holiness care to change her password?" -Fisher Stevens; Hackers [imdb.com] (1995)
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