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15-Year-Old Sells Startup To ActiveState

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the flipping-perlburgers dept.

Cloud 140

jcasman writes "Some entrepreneurs wait a lifetime to experience the thrill of selling their startup companies. Daniil Kulchenko, a Seattle area high school student, accomplished that milestone at the age of 15. Kulchenko today announced that he's sold his startup, a cloud-based computing company known as Phenona, to Vancouver, B.C.-based ActiveState in a deal of undisclosed size."

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Undisclosed size? (0, Troll)

Montezumaa (1674080) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445214)

Are we talking money, or just a large stock of zit cream and porn?

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

xTantrum (919048) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445222)

who cares, it's Perl.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445390)

people still care about Perl?

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445794)

who cares, it's Perl.

Fuck Perl in the ass hole with a big rubber dick then break it off when it's halfway inside. Enough about Perl.

The important take-away from this story is that this businessdude is A) not female and B) not black. I don't have to RTFA to know that. Neither do you.

Just keep tellin' yourself it's all a big coincidence you politically correct tool. Have fun with that!

Re:Undisclosed size? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446096)

who cares, it's Perl.

Fuck Perl in the ass hole with a big rubber dick then break it off when it's halfway inside. Enough about Perl.

The important take-away from this story is that this businessdude is A) not female and B) not black. I don't have to RTFA to know that. Neither do you.

Just keep tellin' yourself it's all a big coincidence you politically correct tool. Have fun with that!

i can't tell if thats a sexist nigger joke or a lament about the way we treat women and "brown people" different in society

they both work. it's like some kind of crazy quantum duality

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

synthesizerpatel (1210598) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445226)

Jealous much? ..

Re:Undisclosed size? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445300)

Nothing pisses off /.'ers more than seeing a kid [luckily] achieve what they never have.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1, Flamebait)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445356)

From the article:

Kulchenkoâ(TM)s father, Paul, is an artificial intelligence and robotics researcher at the University of Washington.

Well shit, how convenient. This would be impressive if he was underprivileged in a working-class family with no home internet connection, spending all his free time defying the odds from the computer lab or coffee shop after school.

Born into being fed with silverspoon, using rich engineer Daddy's academic resources, name, and business connections is not at all impressive.

Re:Undisclosed size? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445396)

Born into being fed with silverspoon, using rich engineer Daddy's academic resources, name, and business connections is not at all impressive.

Correction: it's not as impressive as it otherwise would be. If the dad inspired his kid that much then he is impressive too.

Re:Undisclosed size? (3, Insightful)

deodiaus2 (980169) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445418)

Oh, come on. Many of us have probably have had the same soft of connections he does and never managed to accomplish this.

Re:Undisclosed size? (5, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445438)

I didn't need to read the article to assume that was the case. You hear a lot of stories every year about genius children who discover something fantastic or start a company or a major project that makes them wealthy and/or famous and their parents are almost exclusively professionals in the same field that their child is "excelling" in. The lesson being that it's not some independent kid coming up from scratch doing something amazing - it's almost always a kid (probably smart and ambitious, still) who had a parent get them into the stuff in the first place, then support them, guide them, advise them, help them make contacts, help them find resources, have their friends and colleagues chip in where needed.

It's not to diminish the success, but to point out that the reason THIS kid did this and YOUR kid won't is that YOU probably don't have all the resources and connections to give your child from early on to guide them into this.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445526)

Oh please. Most children of scientists/etc couldn't be less interested in what their parents do (until later years). If the kid's story is diminished then it's only because his father outshines him. One of the rare examples of "proper parenting".

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448478)

However, without a parent in the field with the connections and resources, any interest such a child might show in a particular field would probably not be very fruitful. Take this same kid and take his dad out of the picture, make his mom a nurse or waitress, and put them in a low end two bedroom apartment and this kid's great accomplishment becomes graduating highschool and possibly attending community college against the odds.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 3 years ago | (#36447288)

It's not just that, people with rich parents rarely ever have to do a large number of chores around the house and whatnot, so they have a lot more spare time. Most rich kids squander that gift, this kid didn't. Man what I wouldn't give to have all that time I spent mowing the lawn, washing dishes, cleaning, doing laundry etc. back when I was a kid.....

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445442)

Born into being fed with silverspoon, using rich engineer Daddy's academic resources, name, and business connections is not at all impressive.

So, let me get this straight: being a researcher at a university == rich, silver spoon, business contacts, etc?

That's just silly, even for a /. comment. Assume much, or is this just the product of pervasive bitterness?

Re:Undisclosed size? (2)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445462)

Who is more likely to get into a tech field early on, have the support and guidance from an adult, early on, and have the encouragement, connections, and resources so early on? The kid with the dad who is a robotics and AI scientist or the kid with the dad who works at a concessions stand at a ballpark?

Re:Undisclosed size? (2)

Capt. Skinny (969540) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445698)

AC's point is about the foolish equation of "researcher at University of Washington" with "rich engineer, silver spoon and business connections". A university researcher is not necessarily an engineer, and both research and engineering positions are well within the bounds of middle class in the western world. The kid may well have advantages in the tech field over the concession-stand dad, but a silver spoon is not one of them.

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446064)

The kid was 13 two years ago, vacationing in Mexico and doing work on a Craigslist aggregator for a client. I've had a fairly solid middle-class upbringing and can't say that we could ever afford to vacation in Mexico. The only places I've ever been in Mexico are certainly not places I'd want to spend my vacation.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1, Insightful)

PNutts (199112) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445564)

Born into being fed with silverspoon, using rich engineer Daddy's academic resources, name, and business connections... is not at all impressive.

Citation please. The fantasy you built typically condems teens to failure. They get money, cars, and cheerleader girlfriends so why do anything else? So... If any of your fantasy of why you haven't done better in life actually turns out to be true then I have even more respect for the kid. From the TFA he was a freelance Linux admin at 11 so he got hooked young, has a knack, and stuck with it.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448516)

I don't think we can make any assumptions about the wealth of the family, but you absolutely can't dismiss the fact that if his dad had a completely different career or wasn't even in the picture, he would not have gone beyond the "expressed an interested in" stage. You see, expressing an interest in something at a very early age doesn't magically provide you with a computer, educational resources for using it and programming with it, internet access, encouragement, guidance, advice, resources, connections and everything else that a parent like his was likely able to help him benefit from. Without those things, he's just another nine year old kid saying "i wanna be an astronaut when I grow up" whose parents respond to him with "that's nice" and a pat on the head.

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445628)

See. When you see someone do something amazing that you could never do. They had something happen to them that would never happen to you. Rich connections and background, tragic something, ripped off money, lie, cheat. Stuff like that. People get to their position for a reason. Most of the time is is not because of skill.
Trust me! I see it ALL THE TIME when I go to my university!

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

daniil.kulchenko (2268236) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446072)

Not sure what you're talking about there. My dad's off doing his thing, and I'm off doing mine; he gives advice at times, but otherwise I'm completely independent. No "connections" to speak of.

Re:Undisclosed size? (2)

gregrah (1605707) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446214)

Hey Daniil,

Don't feel like you need to defend yourself against any of the trolling comments here (and in fact you're better off ignoring them). You're a talented young man - and anyone of any importance in the world is going to recognize that immediately. This guy is not important.

Congrats on your success. If you care to share how much $$ you made on the sale, we would all be interested. :)

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

daniil.kulchenko (2268236) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446344)

Thanks, and I wish I could share, but I'm really not allowed to ;)

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Inda (580031) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448434)

You know, we do have the tools of the AC here ;)

Anyway, well done.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448576)

I don't think any rational person is discounting the accomplishment and the awesomeness, but let's not dismiss the endless stories we've seen over the years about "ten year old does awesome thing in technology" and "fifteen year old makes scientific discovery" and "seventeen year old founds awesome tech darling" where their parents are always established in the same field themselves. Where are all the stories of these kids from single parent families who live in the part of town where you don't go out at night and are elementary teachers or work in retail?

I don't think that pointing out "you almost never hear about these stories where the kid didn't have the benefit of parents in the field and with some resources" is wrong, unfair, or discounting the individual's accomplishment. You'd especially be a fool not to make the most of opportunities and circumstances, if they're beneficial to you.

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446702)

Posting AC because I modded your post up. Congrats and thanks for coming here to post. Like someone else here said, don't feel you have to defend yourself. Trust me, for every bitter post that whines, "I could have done that! It's not fair", there are many who respect what you did - fathers help or not.

Re:Undisclosed size? (1)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445380)

I am sure, plenty of Slashdot posters at some point promised to host someone else's perl scripts and were paid for it.

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445258)

Not enough for a college education*

Re:Undisclosed size? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445362)

Buy 'im out, boys!

...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (5, Insightful)

Gr33nJ3ll0 (1367543) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445242)

Slashdot's work is done!

Re:...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446000)

Seriously, *YAWN*. I read what this shit did, amazing, 10 years ago. Maybe PERL is really lacking this, in which case, great. PERL guys, welcome to 2001.

For everyone else, move on, nothing to see here.

Re:...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (1)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446280)

Seriously, *YAWN*. I read what this shit did, amazing, 10 years ago. Maybe PERL is really lacking this, in which case, great. PERL guys, welcome to 2001.

Typical developer jealousy and arrogance

Re:...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (1)

MadCat (796) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448404)

Ah, I see we have a Ruby/Rails developer in the house...

Re:...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448588)

Or a disgruntled former PERL developer, is my guess. :P

Re:...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446628)

the cloud is going to fall out of the sky at some point then where do you go when it is all lost Eh! Nah been to the cloud way too wet got off and stayed nice and dry

Re:...and now ActiveState gets mass publicity (1)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 3 years ago | (#36449462)

This is still news for nerds... remember when the 15-20 year olds ran the tech world? Unfortunately for our 15-20 year old readers, they do not remember, because it has been so long.

Heroku (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445248)

So its Heroku for perl devs?

Re:Heroku (4, Informative)

rsborg (111459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445344)

So its Heroku for perl devs?

Apparently that's what it looks like... except it's a 15 year old who dun it. FTFA:

Your app is launched into a securely partitioned environment on a cloud server. All CPAN modules required by your app are installed. MySQL and memcached are automatically set up, and connection information is exposed to you via environmental variables. In front of your app sits a Varnish caching server, quietly improving the performance of your app.

More in the article, but that's already pretty amazing.

Re:Heroku (2)

Cramer (69040) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445992)

Cloning a VM is amazing? The real magic(tm) is in creating the VM the first time. (something my coworkers learned recently when I made them build the windows vms for virtual center, domain controller, etc.)

He appears to have written some scripts / programs to automate a highly complex process. System admins have been doing that for as long as computers have existed. He's managed to get someone to buy his creation -- for an undisclosed amount that isn't likely to be the billions the /. crowd is making it out to be -- and that ain't bad. Me? I tend to get paid for the shit before I write it. (but I'm an old fart... I don't write code for fun.)

Re:Heroku (2)

codepunk (167897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446040)

" I made them build the windows vms"

You heartless bastard!

the story here.... (4, Insightful)

metalmaster (1005171) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445306)

the kid is 15. Another few years and this wouldnt have been newsworthy. It's good to see young people taking initiative though. Not only did he have the business sense to do something, but it was obviously something someone else thought could be worthwhile enough to purchase. kudos indeed. I certainly wasnt thinking like this 8 years ago.

Re:the story here.... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445354)

the kid is 15. Another few years and this wouldnt have been newsworthy.

Wrong. If it was an 18-year-old girl, we'd be proposing to her with haikus and fanfic letters,.

(captcha: pervert)

Re:the story here.... (2)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445382)

I'm impressed. At 15 I was mowing the neighbors' grass and haven't been truly self-employed since.

Re:the story here.... (2, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445444)

Don't be too hard on yourself. Was your dad a robotics and AI researcher with all sorts of resources and connections to help you do something more than mow lawns? Probably not.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445512)

Oh, shut the fuck up. You're just jealous that this kid made more of himself at 15 than you will in your entire life.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445550)

That makes three of us, AC.

Re:the story here.... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445728)

Is what he said correct? Is/was his dad a robotics and AI researcher (looking at the article, that seems to be true)? Instantly assuming that he is jealous because he mentioned that (or because he gave criticism) doesn't make sense to me. I don't know whether he is jealous or not, and that's precisely why I wouldn't reach a conclusion about whether he is jealous or not. I have seen quite a few people use the "you're just jealous" argument whenever someone mentions something that could downplay a well-off person's accomplishment(s) or merely gives them criticism. Unless they explicitly state that they are jealous (if they said the opposite, people probably wouldn't believe them), I don't see how you could be sure whether they are or not. Of course, it doesn't matter either way.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445922)

Is what he said correct? Is/was his dad a robotics and AI researcher (looking at the article, that seems to be true)? Instantly assuming that he is jealous because he mentioned that (or because he gave criticism) doesn't make sense to me. I don't know whether he is jealous or not, and that's precisely why I wouldn't reach a conclusion about whether he is jealous or not. I have seen quite a few people use the "you're just jealous" argument whenever someone mentions something that could downplay a well-off person's accomplishment(s) or merely gives them criticism. Unless they explicitly state that they are jealous (if they said the opposite, people probably wouldn't believe them), I don't see how you could be sure whether they are or not. Of course, it doesn't matter either way.

Yes. What you do is crudely referred to as "not being a childish, superficial, arrogant, judgmental little fuck who destroys good conversation everywhere he goes".

What you do is supposed to be the norm. Unfortunately it's the exception. Most so-called "adults" are overgrown two-year-olds. With them it's "me first!" and "you're wrong because I don't like you!"

Of course they feel free to assume jealousy. A feeling of jealousy is the only reason why they would ever have such an opinion, and everyone either is like them or should be like them, so naturally in their minds jealousy is the only reason why *anyone* should ever have such an opinion. That's the emotional non-logic that governs how they feel about everything. The fact they are not mind-readers and might be mistaken doesn't occur to them -- there is no room for it.

They are simpletons. So their thinking process is not difficult to understand once you see how self-centered it is.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36447296)

It's blindingly obvious that he's driven by envy. Just look at all of the similar posts he's made trying to belittle what that kid has done. You don't have to be a mind reader to read between the lines. If you can't see it, then you might want to work on your social skills some more.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445810)

The guy has a four digit UID. The kid doesn't stand a chance (unless he invents a time machine).

Re:the story here.... (2, Interesting)

gregrah (1605707) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446180)

I truly do not understand where you are coming from when you feel the need to repeat this same comment in 3 different places. What is your beef with this kid? What is your point, exactly?

As others have mentioned, you come across as being extremely jealous. And for an adult to make jealous comments about a teenager - well what can I say except that those comments reflect far worse on the adult, and are generally indicative of an adult who has had issues adapting to life as a grown-up.

Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but that's the impression that you are giving off.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446370)

The guy is bitter. He probably failed at whatever he wanted to do and now is bitter at the world for it.

Of course people that know people have it easier! So what? Good for the kid.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36448598)

Hi,

I don't get that impression at all from the GP post. I think he is just pointing out reality. It is great that the kid had this success, but don't think for a moment he would have without the right parents. Maybe he would have had some other success like a lawn-mowing franchise or something.

I like how you read jealousy into his post though, and then go onto to pontificate about what a terrible person it makes him. Who has the "issues"?

Re:the story here.... (1, Informative)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448718)

Right, the only response acceptable is "wow, amazing". It's certainly not worth pushing the point that the kid next door to you with less accomplished and connected parents won't have any such opportunity.

Like this kid, I found an opportunity and exploited it at a young age, which I was able to make into a great and very fulfilling career. I didn't have the parents aspect, but I did benefit from rare fortunate circumstances that do not fall most teenagers who *do* have an interest or even a passion in something like this.

Nobody is discounting accomplishments here and it's ridiculous for you to assume so. Pointing out the obvious (which nobody needed to read the article to even conclude, based on prior history of such stories) does nothing to discount the kid. However, when do we get the stories about the other kids? Where are the stories of kids who somehow accomplish similarly cool things without the same benefits as those in every story I recall reading here and on HN over the years? Do they exist?

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36447752)

I wonder if Dad's involvement was greater than published.
I'm bound by a contract that any software / systems I create belong to the company as are many others.

I've often thought if I created anything on my spare time that's worth selling I'd get the kids involved and let them say they did it.

         

Re:the story here.... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445734)

No offense, but the only thing stopping you is the belief that you can accomplish your goal.

Follow your dreams if you have them, don't wait, life it way too short.

I didn't wait, because my family wasn't exactly rollin' in the cash and at 13 I mowed lawns, and at 14 I did the early am paper route thing and hated it, so I started 2 businesses while still in middle school (only to be shut down by my school administration through a ban on my products), and in high school I started another business that I ran for 7 years before moving on and starting another business, and another, and another.

I never got rich, but I had a freedom that can't be had in the academic or business world, so I repeat as necessary, and life remains fresh and alive , no midlife crises necessary because I've already been living it for decades, which far more important than money.

Of course, there is nothing wrong with starting a business and selling it for big bucks, I'd love that too, but it's a rare thing, so I don't spend my energy pursuing money, just the semi autonomy being an entrepreneur can bring one.

Re:the story here.... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446288)

No offense, but the only thing stopping you is the belief that you can accomplish your goal.

It's true. I believe I can go out for a walk this afternoon, and now I can't move my legs.

Re:the story here.... (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446394)

> and in high school I started another business that I ran for 7 years before
> moving on and starting another business, and another, and another.

That's great, but many of us do not have the amoral streak needed to rip-off "customers" to make a buck or two.

Re:the story here.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445384)

Good news story, for sure. I would like to see a fifteen year old start a company and turn it into an excellent competitor in the market, rather than being bought up by a bigger fish. Perhaps it is time to accept that a competitive marketplace is no longer desirable, though.

Re:the story here.... (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448792)

Actually, selling it is probably a wise move whether arrived at on his own or by counsel of those advising him. Better to reap what benefits you can, now, rather than try and balance it and all of high school and hope that it all "just works out". Instead, he seems to have parlayed not only a short term success and reward, but an opportunity at ActiveState, which could be more valuable to him in the long run. Especially as they appear considerate of his age and obligations.

Not to mention, this builds a track record for him to refer to in the future. After high school, he'll already have a leg-up with this on his resume.

Good for him! (1)

danbuter (2019760) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445324)

Nice to see a kid be successful. I hope this works out great for him and his family.

Re:Good for him! (-1, Troll)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445450)

Agreed. I'm sure they're really depending on the success of their child to keep the family above water, what with his dad only being a measly AI/Robotics researcher.

Re:Good for him! (1)

whiteboy86 (1930018) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446224)

Most likely some VC has been cheated by the "cloud" related buzzwords into this fad. The problem is that anything involving words like "interner server", "cloud", "Ruby on rails" is too flashi, incomprehensible, uber-smart, and, exactly that irresistible thing, they are in the market for.. (driven by some wet dreams of bumping into Google 2.0)

"Cloud-based" (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445358)

Basically it describes Perl web app hosting service.

Re:"Cloud-based" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445482)

What, CGI for multiple users?

Apache 1.0 phoned - they want their feature back...

Re:"Cloud-based" (4, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445654)

Sounds like a deployment service. From their page:

So what is Phenona?

Imagine this. You've spent hours and hours coding the perfect Catalyst (or Dancer, or Mojolicious, or, hell, CGI) application. You're using DBIx::Class with a MySQL database to store user info, and memcached in front of it for performance.

You now want it out there, for the world to see and use. Here's a deployment scenario for a good web application:

      1. Get a server. These days you might go for some slow shared hosting, or maybe a VPS, or perhaps EC2 or Rackspace.
      2. Install Perl and spend a few hours installing all the dependencies of your project. (Ever installed Catalyst before? It's not for the faint of heart.)
      3. Install and configure MySQL, set up users, permissions, databases.
      4. Install and configure memcached.
      5. Set up a backup, redundancy, and failover solution. What would happen if your server went down, data was lost? You'd need to set up more than one server, do failover between them, and do regular backups to protect valuable user data.
      6. Set up cron jobs and background worker processes to work on long-running jobs.
      7. Set up a caching server, such as Varnish or Squid, to improve performance of your app.
      8. Secure your server, open the necessary ports for outside access.
      9. Deploy and test your code.
    10. Manage system updates, app monitoring, and downtime yourself.

Hours, days, even weeks of time. Potentially hundreds of dollars. Or you could type this:

cpanm Phenona
phenona create MyApp
git push phenona master
phenona deploy production

Yes. Those four commands encompass every one of the bullet points I listed above. The final command inserts your app into the grid.

Re:"Cloud-based" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446616)

Hours, days, even weeks of time. Potentially hundreds of dollars. Or you could type this:

Or you could just not use a language that's stuck in the 1980s. The most interesting part of this story is that someone under the age of 45 actually thinks using perl for new code is a good idea. Either that or he is very savvy when it comes to identifying fools and parting them from their money.

Re:"Cloud-based" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36447816)

When was the last time you looked at what's new in Perl or read "Modern Perl"? No, didn't think so. Throw-away attitudes are easy. Have you any idea what's in the perldeltas for the last 2 releases? No, thought not. Done anything with Moose? I rest my case.

Re:"Cloud-based" (2)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448980)

Perl remains extremely powerful and one of the most versatile languages, even today. That said, the heavily trafficked and fairly complex 15,000 lines of code service I wrote when I was a kid (well, before drinking age) from scratch in 1998-2000 that powered everything up until 2011 is probably not the choice I would make if I were doing it all over again, today. At least, not if I were still starting out as I mostly was, back then. I made the mistake of choosing it as my first real language that I really did anything of significance with. Bad move for a language that makes it so easy to blow your own foot off with (and yet incredibly robust and flexible if you're experienced and it's just another tool you're adding to your belt). Over those many years, I considered another language a few times, but it always came down to not finding any other community that was as large and active as Perl's nor with the extensive public library of code to solve so many problems.

What surprises me is that someone half my age would have such an interest in Perl, in 2011. It's not sexy and python and ruby and everything else is being pushed non-stop, these days. Hell, Haskell seems more popular if you just go by the number of stories about it on tech news aggregators.

As to this kid "identifying fools and parting them from their money" . . . I don't get where you're coming from. He sold to ActiveState. It sounds more like he identified a possible demand to fulfill for people who use Perl. ActiveState is a Perl shop and their customers are primarily Perl people. It doesn't sound like he suckered anyone, but rather found a niche and filled it. In fact, it's one of the most suggested startup strategies. He didn't invent the wheel, but found a niche where he could apply a slightly modified wheel for a different audience. And it paid off.

Re:"Cloud-based" (1)

hey (83763) | more than 3 years ago | (#36449366)

Or a meta-package.

How about his parents (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445370)

His parents can be worried now, becasue all of the kids with monis in my school had problems with drugs, smokes, games and alk. I hope someone will manage his monis before he can understand how success corrupts the mind.

On the positive side. It is cool that someone takes a 15 year old boy seriously enough to buy a company from him.

Kudos from http://epSos.de

Re:How about his parents (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36448410)

u are such a gay.

Not sure I understand... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445400)

How can this be? Does he have a bachelor's degree? I've been told university is a noble institution, not profit-based at all, that teaches essential things that can only be taught in a a classroom with a bearded windbag sleeping at the front?

Name things better (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445412)

Tools from the "What is Phenona" page: Catalyst, Heroku, Dancer, Mojolicious, DBIx::Class, Varnish, Squid, beanstalkd, TheSchwartz, Redis.

Seriously, web developers, can the names of your shit please give some sort of superficial indication of what the hell they do?

Re:Name things better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445472)

What? No Voodoo?

Re:Name things better (3, Funny)

Seumas (6865) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445478)

It seems kind of obvious what DBIx::Class does.

Re:Name things better (2)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445534)

What? No props to JizzMop, CumRag, and SpermBurp?!!?!?

Re:Name things better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446240)

Is that your real name? Or some sort of homophone or anagram for something dirty?

Re:Name things better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446262)

You left out Perl, Ruby, Python, Java, Mexico, IIS, MySQL, EC2, CPAN, SMS, and Phenona.

Wait, some of those might not be such a good example.

Re:Name things better (1)

makomk (752139) | more than 3 years ago | (#36447698)

Well, I think TheSchwartz's name was basically Brad Fitzgerald's idea of a joke back when he worked at Livejournal. (He has a blog post about it somewhere.) No idea about the rest of them though...

Re:Name things better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36448266)

If marketing your product was not more important than any other consideration descriptive names would be the norm.

Stereotype threat detected (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445448)

Slavic Mafia has their eyes all over this punk^Wkid.

Teenaged terms (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445602)

He thought the subscription to Playboy and an iPod was a fair price.

Huh (1)

IoanaF (2265896) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445664)

Lucky bastard.

Re:Huh (4, Insightful)

capnkr (1153623) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445808)

Doesn't seem like 'luck' had much to do with it, unless you are referring to the definition of luck which says "Luck is what happens when Preparation meets Opportunity..."

Would be it that *I* had been as knowledgeable and motivated at his age... :)

Something fishy here... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36445860)

A 15 year old can't even sign binding contracts, let alone form or sell a company. This smells like a slashvertisement.

Re:Something fishy here... (1)

akeeneye (1788292) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446060)

I was just going to post something about that (contracts). Did he have to get a note from his parents? It could be that someone over 18, the parents perhaps, were the C-level execs and he was just the majority shareholder.

Re:Something fishy here... (1)

jimmypw (895344) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446634)

I don't believe he was 15 either. FTFA:

I was working on a client project back in 2009, a Craigslist aggregator which I wrote in Catalyst, and spent a large portion of my vacation in Mexico trying to get it to work on the client's IIS server. It was a nightmare....

That would have made him about 13 at the time. What company employ's a 13 year old to work on expensive company servers. Regardless if he is a prodigy.

Re:Something fishy here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446888)

Well, you can't even use an apostrophe correctly and you're employed. It is a mystery.

Re:Something fishy here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36447298)

He is that much better than you. You have to realise that you are to him, as an ant is to to you... But because you are an ant, you can't even grasp just how much he is superior to you...

You're envious.

Re:Something fishy here... (1)

haxwk (2268722) | more than 3 years ago | (#36448446)

I had the same feeling when I read this. I just don't understand how any kid could even find the time to become so fluent in so many technical areas. Unless of course his parents force fed him source code since he was an infant; which is probably the case if he is a real person. But this whole thing does seem like it's some sort of advertising conspiracy for ActiveState and their new program (which they probably developed). I checked out the kids twitter account and it does seem like it's written by a 35 year old senior programmer working for some large company. Perhaps this is just an internet personality created by some basement dwelling code monkey seeking attention. I wonder if any reporters have actually done an interview with him on video or at least audio.

Re:Something fishy here... (1)

InsertWittyNameHere (1438813) | more than 3 years ago | (#36450376)

Meet Daniil Kulchenko. He was an HTML programmer at age six. He was a freelance Linux systems administrator at 11. And at 15, he founded his first business: Phenona, a platform-as-a-service for building and hosting Perl applications.

There's a pic of him in there.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/06/14/activestate_buys_teen_programmer/ [theregister.co.uk]

I suck (5, Funny)

beckyshaw (2268102) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445888)

I can't even sell a piece of junk on Ebay

Good effort no matter what age (2)

ferrisoxide.com (1935296) | more than 3 years ago | (#36445976)

This is kinda neat. I know it's a copy of what Heroku and co have already done, and I've no love of PERL, but give the guy some cred. 15 year old or no, if this all works as stated it's a nice piece of hackery.

Salesman (1)

codepunk (167897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446056)

This kid would certainly have a bright future as a salesman.

Cloud == Bubble (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36446104)

Kids are selling "cloud-based" tech for undisclosed sums of money? The next bubble is upon us.

Here we go again... (1)

BobSutan (467781) | more than 3 years ago | (#36446640)

This is the 21st century version of the shoe-shine boy giving stock advice. It's clear now we're in for another tech bubble fiasco.

Perl is still alive! (1)

drolli (522659) | more than 3 years ago | (#36447476)

Hey, i programmed perl when this guy was born.....

nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36447876)

Any clown can have a successful startup. This was chosen merely because big governent loves the cloud- control of all your data.

It means nothing. Bram Cohen - the inventor of bit torrent - something infinitely more impressive than clown perl thingy - got no startup requests. He did it all himeslft, because bit torrent is a decentralized protocol, and big governemtn hates that. Nothing to see here. Cloud minion, move along. This 15 yea old kid will wonder why he worshipped the cloud when he finds himself powerless with thin client OS that's dead in the water without the cloud, and then the big claw comes out of the sky, steals his warm milk and cookies, and the cloud is turned off forever, and ..nothing..

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