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The 8-Bit Computer That's Been Built By Hand

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the just-enough-bits-for-mario dept.

Hardware Hacking 161

nk497 writes "Forget snapping a few components into a motherboard — programming enthusiast Jack Eisenmann has made his own PC from scratch. His Duo Adept, as he's named it, features 64KB of main memory, 256 bytes of RAM and, in total, 263 lines of code for his homemade OS. Sure, it can't run Crysis, but it does run a game he's written himself."

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Old school (4, Interesting)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480766)

I wasn't around for this sort of stuff but wasn't this the sort of thing Radio Shacks customers were doing 25+ years ago?

Re:Old school (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36480820)

It is literally old school. All CS majors at my university were required to build a thing like this as part of the hardware class they all had to take. I saw it as a useless waste of time (I cared about programming and algorithms) so I became a math major instead of dicking around with those TTL chips. I guess if I'd stuck with CS instead, my 8-bit cpu could have made it to Slashdot. Whoopiee.

Re:Old school (2)

barneythebigdog (2279338) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482690)

you are missing the point here...this was done by a kid who just finished high school...i think it is amazing!

Re:Old school (1)

NixieBunny (859050) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480832)

Yes, we were. My brother and I started with a Motorola MEK6800D1 board and took it from there. It's amazing what you can fit in 4K of RAM if you have to.

Re:Old school (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36480906)

This guy built a home-built *CPU* from TTL chips. So, no, it's considerably more impressive that using any kind of dev board with an onboard microprocessor.

(You're starting with RAM already existing - he isn't.)

Re:Old school (3, Funny)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480932)

TTL chips? Luxury! When I was a lad we had to use coconuts and vine to fashion NAND gates.

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481076)

Are you suggesting Coconut solid state?!

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481364)

He could chip it by the husk!

Re:Old school (2)

TrisexualPuppy (976893) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481386)

TTL chips? Luxury! When I was a lad we had to use coconuts and vine to fashion NAND gates.

Gilligan, don't forget the NOT gate that we fashioned out of the two transistors from the radio or the infinite power source that came out of it. Now why couldn't have that satellite flown overhead a few moments after we completed the digital telecommunicator device?

--The Professor

Re:Old school (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480970)

Yup, this isn't just going and getting some old 6502 or Z80 and building a new computer around it. That's been done plenty over the last thirty-odd years. This guy has actually built an 8-bit CPU. Fuck, I'd be impressed if he'd built a 4-bit processor, but this is pretty damned cool.

Re:Old school (1)

JeremyR (6924) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481078)

That's pretty much what we did in a CS/EE class. Designed a CPU from scratch, put the microcode on a FPLA and used a bunch of supporting TTL chips. If I recall correctly, it was 16-bit, but it might have been 8. He has taken it a step further with video output, and that's impressive (at least to me).

Re:Old school (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481560)

Same here, in computer design. Used some PLDs with ridiculous gate limits and at the end of the project, we were playing a counting game via serial

Re:Old school (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481336)

Err, I may have confused this with another story - from here [homebrewcpu.com] . If I have, sorry.

Neverthless, it seems this story is, however, not unique even in the modern day.

Re:Old school (1)

brainboyz (114458) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480848)

Pretty much. I would've been impressed if he had done it from actual transistors not full-blown ICs, but given CompEng students make stuff like this in school (admittedly, with FPGAs, but the concept is the same) it's not as complex as it looks. I'd say the hardest part is probably the output to monitor. The wiring would be tedious, but not unthinkable.

Re:Old school (3, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480976)

The hard part is finding the loose wire.

Re:Old school (1)

HBSLTV (2279218) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482282)

it's worth noting he's in high school, not college... http://youtu.be/qYvr0b8jqbg [youtu.be]

Re:Old school (1)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480854)

Yes. I built a simple CPU+memory system in school around 1979 or so. That's 32 years ago.

Re:Old school (1)

dotwhynot (938895) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480912)

I wasn't around for this sort of stuff but wasn't this the sort of thing Radio Shacks customers were doing 25+ years ago?

Indeed. I built a 6502 machine with the help of an electronics magazine, starting with actually etching my own circuit boards. It had an hexadecimal display and keyboard (thanks to manual Dymo of old), only the imagination was the limitation. And yes, I did write a game for it.

Re:Old school (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481030)

I had a book, back in the long ago, called "How to Build a Microcomputer and Really Understand It". It walked you through building a 6502 based machine. It had PCB printouts that you could photo-resist onto circuit boards. You would build dozens of "nybble cards": circuit boards with edge connectors and a binary pattern of diodes to encode 4 bits of information. By inserting these cards two at a time into edge connector sockets, you could do some simple programming. I loaned it out and never got it back.

Re:Old school (1)

strags (209606) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482128)

To be fair, that's not exactly comparing apples and apples. You didn't actually MAKE the 6502 itself, which is much closer to what he's done here. That said, yes, plenty of others have done this.

Re:Old school (1)

engineerofsorts (692517) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480962)

Circa 1975-76, this was just a design exercise at the tail-end of our logic design class--we just called it a minicomputer then, using SSI and MSI TTL modules--it would have been a bit tricky to come up with 64K of storage then, since 1Kbit to maybe 4Kbit chips was state of the art. If anything, you do have to commend the guy, not for design, but for getting such a large number of proto-boards and all those aggravating wires hooked up and get all of it working. A wire-wrapped version would be more compact/reliable, and just about as "homemade" in my book. No big deal.

Re:Old school (2)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480974)

There are two differences. One, he didn't use a prefab microprocessor - he built one from gates, counters, etc. And two, his website hasn't collapsed from the slashdotting.

Re:Old school (0)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481644)

Hm. Impressive, but when you get down to wiring your own processor, I start to wonder where the line can be drawn before you can declare it "from scratch". Did you draw your own wire? Smelt the copper for it? Mine the cuprite? Well, then.

Re:Old school (1)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481834)

You make a good point. Maybe none of us should be impressed unless the formation of a new universe is somehow involved.

Re:Old school (1)

garyebickford (222422) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482528)

Oblig. XKCD strip [xkcd.com] .
"So if you see a mote of dust vanish from your vision in a little flash or something, I'm sorry, I must have misplaced a rock."

Re:Old school (1)

ckeck (762017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481652)

Survived the Slashdotting because his site is hosted on MobileMe ;)

Re:Old school (1)

ShakaUVM (157947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481802)

Building a functioning 8-bit CPU and writing apps for it was required for graduating from our CS program at UC San Diego... not seeing why this is newsworthy.

Re:Old school (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482178)

I think its the fact that there are still "web rings"... WTF?!?!?

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482790)

it is newsworthy because this kid did this all on his own while he was in High School. With no training. What were you doing in High School?

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482212)

BZZZZT! YOU ARE AN IDIOT.

This guy built his OWN CPU. From SCRATCH. Why don't you read the ARTICLE and LEARN SOMETHING instead of just typing random comments and making yourself look dumb.

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482276)

Yes. I've made several Z80 based ones by hand back when I was a kid. Also, 68000 based and a couple FPGA based. It's fun.

Re:Old school (1)

Pseudonym (62607) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482436)

Not really, no. 25 years ago you could buy a Z80 or 8085 in that kind of store for cheap, so there was no need to build your own CPU from TTL.

Yes, I was there.

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482468)

Yep. Many of us early hobbyists were doing this in the 1970's. I've never tried to build a computer on a breadboard, but I sure did a lot of wire wrapping in my day.

Re:Old school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482534)

Why is everyone's first instinct to detract from this high school kid's accomplishment? Could it be because they are envious?

To bake an apple pie from scratch... (3, Insightful)

John.P.Jones (601028) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480782)

Ever since Cosmos I can't take the phrase 'from scratch' seriously.

Also there is this TED video where a guy tries to build a toaster from raw materials...

Re:To bake an apple pie from scratch... (1)

jawtheshark (198669) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480824)

Obviously, it's easy peasy to create your own universe... I mean, it's as easy as saying "let there be light".... Ooops, damned, I did it again. *sigh*

wow (1)

heptapod (243146) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480794)

holy shit, who knew that web rings still existed in the 21st century!

Re:wow (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480902)

holy shit, who knew that web rings still existed in the 21st century!

Throwback to the 80's computer. Throwback to the 90's webpage.

Re:wow (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480924)

As a web ring, it sucks. I want to open the next site in the ring in a new tab, but it's Javascript controlled. It doesn't allow me to do it.

The mid 1970s called (0)

mother_reincarnated (1099781) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480852)

They want their homebrew computer back.

As an aside: this is obviously someone who uses a Mac to be a hipster...

Re:The mid 1970s called (1)

kwoff (516741) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480996)

The mid 1990s also called, and they want their WebRing back.

The kind of game that runs on it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481448)

And the mid 1980's also called, and they said that in such a game you might get eaten by a Grue.

Re:The mid 1970s called (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481544)

This is one of the best web rings though. Some really cool systems in there. Snag is many of those pages are served by the actual homebrew CPUs themselves, so they could be a bit slow (oh no, they're being slashdotted!).

very cool (1)

pz (113803) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480910)

Reminds me of the Maybe systems that MIT undergraduates build by hand in 6.004 (or used to, when I was involved) that were then programmed to emulate about 3 or 4 different architectures.

Re:very cool (2)

Lord of Hyphens (975895) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480960)

Yeah, there's a upper-level undergraduate course that does single-board computers with a 8088 MPU and some supporting hardware. It's a mess and I personally believe that the course should be changed to give a "interfacing with reality" bent to it, as a single MCU can be tuned to do the same (external memory bus, etc) and you can go beyond the "look I made a light blink" to "Look I can actually do something useful with this thing".

Re:very cool (1)

Lord of Hyphens (975895) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480980)

Yeah, there's a upper-level undergraduate course that does single-board computers with a 8088 MPU and some supporting hardware. It's a mess and I personally believe that the course should be changed to give a "interfacing with reality" bent to it, as a single MCU can be tuned to do the same (external memory bus, etc) and you can go beyond the "look I made a light blink" to "Look I can actually do something useful with this thing".

Upper-level undergraduate course at my university, which is not MIT.

Re:very cool (1)

edmudama (155475) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481458)

6.004 was awesome, both taking it and helping teach and debug other student's projects as a lab assistant. It's was a great introduction to the basic skills required to be a firmware engineer in today's job market, since you really got to figure out, clock by clock, how a CPU operates.

not quite... (1, Insightful)

Sebastopol (189276) | more than 3 years ago | (#36480950)

...He still used a microprocessor in an integrated circuit. In college back in the 1980's some ubernerds built a 4004 with discrete transistors.

But still, i give this person _HUGE_ props, breadboarding a circuit that complex is very, very, VERY time consuming amount of debug. it would drive most people insane, literally, it would break their brains to try and debug this.

Re:not quite... (2)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481002)

He still used a microprocessor in an integrated circuit.

Really? Which one did he use?

Re:not quite... (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481014)

agreed, I have constructed a "computer" around a Z80, and there for a while ... wow. from countless hours tracing to out right fury as I yanked entire sections out with both fists and even in the end it never worked correctly

Re:not quite... (1)

DreamArcher (1690064) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481134)

I was right there with you stabbing my wirewrap tool into the desk yelling "JUST WORK!!!"

No microprocessor there (1)

NixieBunny (859050) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481542)

You appear to be wrong. He built a minicomputer from logic chips. Look at the schematic - why would there be an instruction decoder if he used a microprocessor?
I wonder why he didn't wire-wrap it. This is a crazy way to build a computer - thousands of blue wires, any one of which could fail with a loose connection at any time.

Re:not quite... (3, Insightful)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481572)

It looks like he used actual 74xx series TTL chips to make the CPU. From the parts list he isn't doing microcoding, and isn't even using ALU or bit-slice MSI chips. It's the real thing.

Re:not quite... (1)

CODiNE (27417) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482376)

Oh good, that'll be next on my list of things to try and drive myself insane with.

1) Hinton's cubes
2) breadboarding an 8-bit computer

Please let me know if you think of any other surefire ways to go nuts. Okay, now off to watch Brainstorm again.

2 Memes With One Stone (2, Funny)

Scarletdown (886459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481004)

I have to ask (since at the time I am writing this, no one else has done so yet)...

Does it run Linux?

And if it does, just imagine a Beowulf cluster of these things.

Re:2 Memes With One Stone (1)

CyberSaint (1376273) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481026)

Came for this, left satisfied...

Re:2 Memes With One Stone (1)

Windwraith (932426) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481188)

It'd probably be quite the clumsy cluster. I can't wait for the smell of hot plastic when those wires start overheating.
Correction: It'd probably be quite the smelly cluster. Like a tire factory.

Re:2 Memes With One Stone (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481324)

Now, if he was running his website on this kludge, I'd be even more impressed.

Re:2 Memes With One Stone (1)

atmelinside (1026054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482540)

Frist post of mine it is not.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA (1)

spaceyhackerlady (462530) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482748)

In Soviet Russia computer wirewraps you.

When can I get ... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481018)

... the portable version?

Re:When can I get ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481328)

... the portable version?

Right here [wikipedia.org] .

Can it store bitcoins? (1)

turkeyfeathers (843622) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481032)

This computer is of no use if it can't store my bitcoin wallet.

Homebrew CPU runs Minix (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481066)

Here's one that running Minix: http://www.homebrewcpu.com/

printer memory (1)

e3m4n (947977) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481096)

dont forget to scavenge that printer memory from old dot matrix printers like the old days ;-)

So its cool again? (1)

Cute Fuzzy Bunny (2234232) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481112)

I used to do this sort of thing 30-35 years ago. I remember building some of the first altair machines and hacking some cp/m code with Neil Colvin in his basement. I got together with a couple of guys to wire wrap one of the first (if not THE first) S100 bus graphics boards. We used to cobble up single board computers like this all the time, but they cost thousands of dollars to build. Good times, good times. Glad its the 'in' thing now, I feel like I know something ahead of the curve.

Re:So its cool again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481602)

Same here. The main problem was that we couldn't find an infinitely long piece of tape to write to, so we had to settle for about 800m worth to feed through our Turing machine. I effectively doubled our RAM one day by twisting the tape into a Mobius strip. Many high fives were given that day.

Minecraft (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481132)

If this was Minecraft someone would wander by, grab and handful of those pretty blue wires and rip them out.

Obviously not real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481142)

He claims to be from Massachusetts. That's in America. Everybody knows that American teenagers only care about sitting on their fat asses and playing games, talking on their phones while driving, getting drunk, and that they are too stupid to find the earth on a globe. Plainly this is a hoax from China.

Re:Obviously not real (1)

turkeyfeathers (843622) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481154)

He could be a Chinese exchange student living in Massachusetts.

Bad summary (1)

ZyBex (793975) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481152)

263 lines of code? Really ??? How can you mix lines of code with video scanlines on your head?

Those would have to be some long lines, anyway...

Scratch? (1)

rjhubs (929158) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481296)

If you wish to make a computer from scratch, you must first invent the universe.

Reminds me of the one (4, Interesting)

Jim Buzbee (517) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481300)

Reminds me of the one my brother built here [homebrewcpu.com] except my brother's computer runs Minux.

Re:Reminds me of the one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481748)

And is all-round more functional and more hand-built. Hence way cooler - thanks for the link.

Re:Reminds me of the one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482048)

This is one of the coolest things I have seen in a long time. Massive props to your brother. His computer shits all over the one in TFA.

Orac (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481306)

Any computer that looks like a Blake's 7 prop is fine with me.

What? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481312)

Are you fucking kidding me? This has to be the stupidest posting ever.

Have fun troubleshooting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481358)

All blue wires... have fun troubleshooting that!

Wrong direction (2)

iamacat (583406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481362)

Everyone has right to their own hobbies, but think what can be accomplished with the same amount of labor and modern parts. Instead of making a CPU from hundreds of TTL gates, build a personal supercomputer from hundreds of ARM processors and custom operating system to effectively use that power for virtual reality or physics simulations. Hobbyists who has done this decades ago were futuristic not retro, creating devices that were not widely available, at least to private individuals.

Right direction (2)

jabberw0k (62554) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481460)

It's the right direction for demonstrating that computers are based on discrete logical components, no matter how tiny and embedded in a chip; and the right direction for demonstrating that, given enough time and information, it would be possible to truly understand any digital device.

Hmm, I wonder how many TTL chips I would need for a nice little PDP-11...

Re:Right direction (1)

not-my-real-name (193518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482278)

Years ago, I had some youngsters ask what microprocessor our schools PDP-11/34 used. They had a tough time grasping that it didn't use a microprocessor at all and that the CPU was actually a couple of circuit boards. I think that they thought that a microprocessor was some sort of magical thing that couldn't be implemented in another fashion.

Hmm, I wonder how many TTL chips I would need for a nice little PDP-11...

I used to own a PDP-11/10. The CPU was two fairly large circuit boards. I also got a set of schematics when I got the computer. Sadly, they and the computer parted company with me a few moves back. I still miss it :-(

Anyway, the number of TTL chips needed would depend on which PDP-11 you wanted to build and what level of integration you were willing to use. A few bit slice ALU chips could replace quite a few gate level chips.

Re:Right direction (1)

garyebickford (222422) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482552)

I don't recall very well, but wasn't the 11/34 the first PDP-11 using the Western Digital mpu chips? The ones that DEC tried to run WD out of business for, so they could buy the company cheaper than the chips?

Re:Right direction (1)

garyebickford (222422) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482572)

(replying to self) - according to Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] , the LSI-11 was first used in the 11/03, which was on the Qbus architecture, not the Unibus used by the 11/34. I stand corrected. :)

Not "from scratch"... (1)

rthille (8526) | more than 3 years ago | (#36481472)

He wired up a bunch of ICs. For "From Scratch", google 'toaster from scratch...

Re:Not "from scratch"... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481870)

He wired up a bunch of discrete logic gates. That's a far cry from just using a pre-canned microprocessor.

What were you expecting? That he mined and processed his own silicon?

what does from scratch mean (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481554)

I assume he went out and mined the ore for his solder, and drilled an oilwell to make plastic for the circuit board

Re:what does from scratch mean (1)

atmelinside (1026054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482580)

Well, I assume he also went out to mine the ore for iron, and made his the shovel for the rest.

How about a home built Apollo Guidence Computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36481626)

Guy built this a few years back out of TTL as well.

http://www.galaxiki.org/web/main/_blog/all/build-your-own-nasa-apollo-landing-computer-no-kidding.shtml

relay computer (2)

mbreeze (766358) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482024)

Another interesting computer [pdx.edu] built from electrical relays.

A few decades too late (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482200)

in the old days doing things 'by hand' was the only way it got done. But i guess ill give him credit for the patience that it requires to do this sort of stuff. ( does bring back old memories however.. sore fingers, smell of burnt solder in the air.. )

It's me, the creator. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482238)

Yes, Jack Eisenmann. Some of you guys are overly critical/speculative of the project. I didn't make this machine to make money or make a "superior computer"; I did it just for fun. Also, I have just graduated from highschool, so it is kindof miraculous that I can do this at all. So just appreciate it as a crazy mess of wires that actually works. :)

No, there is no microprocessor. The most complex chips in the machine are SRAM chips. You can see from the list on my site.

Thanks to the supportive comments!

Re:It's me, the creator. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482474)

Are you kidding? you just finished High School...this is amazing! what a bunch of idiot comments people have made above..Congrats on this incredible project! Epic!

Re:It's me, the creator. (1)

barneythebigdog (2279338) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482592)

WOW...who would believe a high school kid could do this...way to go!

Re:It's me, the creator. (2)

Boxtracod (2279322) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482598)

I made an account just to emphasize the point: I, Jack Eisenmann, built the DUO Adept in highschool, and I have no formal education in electronics. I learned everything by experimenting with breadboards, getting tips from online users, and poking around Google.

Fun with ICs (2)

tftp (111690) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482512)

He certainly had some fun building this. The wires are used probably because he wasn't sure that everything works right; it's much easier to rework a wire connection than an inner PCB trace.

I suspect he is a strong amateur, but not a professional. A professional would design the whole thing in a simulator first, and once that works he'd implement it on a PCB (if not an FPGA.)

I personally haven't built processors, but I built a few peripherals for PDP11/LSI11, all from discrete logic. And I serviced IBM 360/370 systems [long time ago] - they were built exactly this way, but were a bit more modular.

Re:Fun with ICs (1)

barneythebigdog (2279338) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482624)

check the link to his You Tube page...he just finished high school...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYvr0b8jqbg

EHEM -From the creator. (2)

Boxtracod (2279322) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482636)

I somewhat dislike the Slashdot commenting system. So for the 3rd time, since I want to stand up for myself, to avoid having a "hidden" comment I am going to restate: I, Jack Eisenmann, built the DUO Adept in highschool, and I have no formal education in electronics. I learned everything by experimenting with breadboards, getting tips from online users, and poking around Google. I don't feel that the blurb does justice for my accomplishments.

Re:EHEM -From the creator. (1)

thatskinnyguy (1129515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36482822)

As someone who had the same thing happen, let it go man. In 5 years you will be wondering how you had your head that far up your ass commenting on this and identifying yourself.

Here come the super geeks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36482648)

Que the dickheads that give us the good ol' "I don't see why this is newsworthy.....blah"

We all realize you're the biggest brain in the world. You're smarter than everyone, you win. We give up. Now let us lowly troglodytes enjoy the fucking article please.

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