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Turning Memories On/Off With the Flip of a Switch

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the mice-in-black dept.

Science 86

cylonlover writes "Using electrical probes embedded into the brains of rats, scientists have managed to replicate the brain function associated with long-term behavior and found a way to literally turn memories on and off with the flip of a switch. The scientists hope their research will eventually lead to a neural prosthesis to help people suffering Alzheimer's disease, the effects of stroke or other brain injury to recover long-term memory capability."

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86 comments

Self Inflicted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498532)

I just wish I could remember what the hell happened after the 6th Guinness and 3rd round of shots last saturday night.

Scratch that, the bits and pieces I do remember ... I wish I could forget.

Re:Self Inflicted (1)

torgis (840592) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498646)

I just wish I could remember what the hell happened after the 6th Guinness and 3rd round of shots last saturday night.

Scratch that, the bits and pieces I do remember ... I wish I could forget.

There's a switch for that.

Re:Self Inflicted (0)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498904)

Scratch that, the bits and pieces I do remember ... I wish I could forget.

When I saw you leaving with that RuPaul lookalike, I had a feeling you'd end up with a night for the ages.

And, there's pictures on Facebook (NSFW).

Re:Self Inflicted (2)

taiwanjohn (103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499826)

Maybe the /. editors had the same problem, which is why they forgot that this story already ran [slashdot.org] a few days ago.

Erasure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498534)

Was anyone else's immediate thought ERASING memories rather than preserving them?

Re:Erasure (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498606)

My understanding is that there has been some work in that area as well(inhibiting the formation of, or reducing the affective salience of, memories of a traumatic experience, say, could be much easier and better for patient quality of life than trying to treat their PTSD after the fact); but that most of it was pharmacological. Given that people manage to black out with stuff you can buy over the counter at E-Z-Booze all the time, never mind the punchier anaesthetics and experimental compounds(and head injuries, and degenerative diseases), the demand for forgetting-through-invasive-neurosurgery just isn't all that high...(and, since it is invasive neurosurgery, it isn't all that useful for some kind of "We haf vays of making you forget... scenarios; because scarring and implanted electrodes tend to raise even more questions than do 'unfortunate accidents' which are far easier and more reliable).

Re:Erasure (3, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498612)

Was anyone else's immediate thought ERASING memories rather than preserving them?

Yes, in fact it was used on samzenpus: http://science.slashdot.org/story/11/06/17/2058214/Researchers-Design-Memory-Strengthening-Implant [slashdot.org]

Re:Erasure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498672)

If editors can't be bothered to read their OWN GODDAM FRONT PAGE(a whopping 30 articles a day) then maybe they should code up a slashbox listing all the headlines for the last week for the moderator UI.

Re:Erasure (1)

El Torico (732160) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498874)

Yes, I'd like to erase the memory of what I saw when I clicked on that goatse link.

Re:Erasure (1)

cp.tar (871488) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499838)

Yes, I'd like to erase the memory of what I saw when I clicked on that goatse link.

That would be trolls’ paradise.
They could hit you again and again. Sure, you’d erase it afterwards, so it would be like trolling a goldfish.

Re:Erasure (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499908)

Even without such switch, you can goad the same people again and again.

Re:Erasure (1)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499950)

Yes. Ever since I saw Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind I've been dreaming of a way to erase my memory of that *CRAPTACULAR MOVIE*

Re:Erasure (1)

Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) | more than 3 years ago | (#36502154)

Huh, David Cross was in that? Did he play an analrapist? [youtube.com]

Bah! Wrong experimental subject! (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498540)

Any research on the subject of deactivating and then, at a later time, reactivating memories embedded in the subject should have been done on Manchurian Hamsters [jstor.org] , not rats...

Re:Bah! Wrong experimental subject! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498630)

Ok, I'll bite... Why?

Re:Bah! Wrong experimental subject! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498760)

The Manchurian Candidate, a movie about doing this on a slightly larger scale.

Can't read; already graduated (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498834)

I already graduated from the institution listed on the login page [jstor.org] and therefore have no access to an active JSTOR account with which to read the article that you cited.

Re:Can't read; already graduated (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499486)

Hmm, the page worked just fine from my random residential Verizon IP. Anyway, it was of no serious importance, just a paper demonstrating that I am not, in fact, making up the existence of the "Manchurian hamster". A Manchurian candidate throwaway gag.

Nice pretext (1)

klingens (147173) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498554)

We all know it will be used by governments when they revoke ultra-secret clearance, companies when they want to keep R&D for themselves, dictatorships when they want to neutralize dissidents.

Re:Nice pretext (2)

zwei2stein (782480) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498572)

but you end up getting nice Paycheck ...or not.

Re:Nice pretext (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36499896)

Heh, I read that as 'neuralize'. Guess I shouldn't have watched MIB2 this weekend.

Dollhouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498576)

Welcome to the dollhouse.

For everyone looking at the FedEx arrow: (1)

Yoozer (1055188) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498604)

What has been seen, can now finally be unseen!

Re:For everyone looking at the FedEx arrow: (1)

Toam (1134401) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498642)

And you can stop losing the game.

Re:For everyone looking at the FedEx arrow: (1)

healyp (1260440) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498708)

I've lost the game on account of /. more times than I can count. I don't keep account records of course because that would involve losing the game.

Re:For everyone looking at the FedEx arrow: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498740)

A strange game. The only way to win is not to play

Re:For everyone looking at the FedEx arrow: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36499024)

What has been seen, can now finally be unseen!

I can finally visit /b!

Neuralyzer (1)

Toam (1134401) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498624)

MIB standard issue.

Re:Neuralyzer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498706)

The Medical Information Bureau [mib.com] ?

They don't want you to forget. They want to discourage you from making any health insurance claims or even trying to get health insurance because of all of your "pre-existing" conditions.

"Sick? NO INSURANCE FOR YOU!"

"But, but, but, I had health insurance at my last job, they laid me off, I was on COBRA but I couldn't afford it anymore, and I then got a new job that doesn't have any medical insurance so I have to get my own - and I can't get it because I have a "pre-existing" condition?! I'm sick!"

"Sorry for the inconvenience."

The Free Market working as it should!

So the meme is wrong? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498660)

What has been seen can now be unseen?

The government will hate this (1)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498690)

You can't easily prove the existence of criminal intent when the criminal doesn't even remember committing the crime.

Re:The government will hate this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498758)

The prisons are full of convicts who to this day claim to not remember committing a crime. I fail to see the distinction.

Re:The government will hate this (1)

El Torico (732160) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498948)

Intent - what bullshit. It doesn't matter what the intent was, it's the end result that should be punished. Evil, crazy, stupid, or just clumsy, they should be sent to a cold islands and not bother civilization any more. Evil or crazy on one island; stupid or clumsy on the other.

Re:The government will hate this (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499930)

Intent - what bullshit. It doesn't matter what the intent was, it's the end result that should be punished. Evil, crazy, stupid, or just clumsy, they should be sent to a cold islands and not bother civilization any more. Evil or crazy on one island; stupid or clumsy on the other.

Where do the unlucky go?

Re:The government will hate this (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498888)

Ah yes, the Alberto Gonzales Defense.

Re:The government will hate this (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499980)

Ah yes, the Alberto Gonzales Defense.

Just about when I was gonna say that tactic doesn't work, you preempt me with how it does . . .

Re:The government will hate this (1)

boarder8925 (714555) | more than 3 years ago | (#36500370)

Don't worry, they'll force a false confession anyway.

Re:The government will hate this (1)

DriedClexler (814907) | more than 3 years ago | (#36502338)

I thought they had some way of solving this problem in the Harry Potter books. Like, if you obliviate yourself, that increases the presumption of guilt for actions taken immediately preceding?

Maybe they had a better procedure in one of the fanfics...?

In all seriousness (3, Interesting)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498692)

I'd be interested to know how this could be applied to turning off traumatic or unpleasant memories, and the socio-psycholigical effects such widespread use would have. Aren't there memories we all have that we have thought it would be better to forget? Disregarding the use by governments for a second, let's contemplate how it could be used by an individual to shape their own consciousness. You could remove the images of your battle buddies being killed in combat, or your parents being killed in that car accident you survived. As a hack to short circuit the processing and digestion of unpleasant memories, this is an interesting (although perhaps disturbing and dangerous) technology, but it could be found that the negative effects could be mitigated with a combination of memory forgetting treatment and therapy.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Toam (1134401) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498716)

Yeah, but if I deleted "The Hangover" from my memory there is a chance that I'd eventually watch it again only to be horrifically dissappointed again.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 3 years ago | (#36501190)

Wow, that sounds like the plot-line for a new uber-meta Michel Gondry indie film. People turn off their memories of watching the Hangover 2 (you're referring to the second one, right? they were both underwhelming), only to end up watching it again. Call it "Be kind. Switch off all memories of or related to the movie Hangover 2." It's gold.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Toam (1134401) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508276)

I'll not be seeing the second one for reasons of "Fool me once, shame on you..."

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498768)

It has casual uses too - imagine being able to forget all of your favourite books/games/films and being able to re-live them again as if for the first time.

Re:In all seriousness (2)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499690)

It has casual uses too - imagine being able to forget all of your favourite books/games/films and being able to re-live them again as if for the first time.

My music, movie, and book collections probably aren't as good as they look through the nostalgia filter but half the fun is and was imagining different scenarios based on what I was given in those mediums; erasing all that and starting over from scratch doesn't really appeal to me. Honestly, I probably wouldn't erase the bad stuff either because knowing what you don't like is just as important as knowing what you do like.

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498772)

How happy is the blameless vestal's lot!
The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind!
Each pray'r accepted, and each wish resign'd;

Re:In all seriousness (4, Informative)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498782)

The producers of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind called. They want their plot back.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498940)

The producers of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind called. They want their plot back.

I was wondering how long it was going to take before this was brought up : ) Besides being a good movie; I wonder how this will all translate into "real-life" scenarios. For instance, just because a technology comes up, sometimes our own thoughts (no pun intended) are worse than what actually results from the technology --but, sometimes not--. I'm 50/50 on this, because I think sometimes our bad experiences shape us into stronger people, but sometimes in extreme circumstances (e.g. your entire family being killed in car wreck) these things might be better "wiped." It's hard to say. Additionally, I think our mind and let's say "mother nature" are smarter then we give them credit for. Sometimes when we try to alter the natural progression of things, we get quite unexpected results --good and bad--.

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507344)

from 40 years ago,

science fiction

post-apocalpse

Oz was dominate and had a memory wipe tech. They used it on criminals to be rehabilitated, but whose crimes were so horrible that the memories and experiences of their crimes precluded healing. The plot was the kidnapping and wiping of the pakistan scientist who managed to create fusion reactor tech. This story should remind us of a lot of greenie related geopolitics we need to crush. Or perhaps embrace. Between education system dysfunction and mass media and culture, we ourselves have mostly been wiped. :-) But the parent's reference to the unexpected is these days critically relevant. Great fun.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 3 years ago | (#36501130)

My first thought was Johnny Mnemonic (information couriers that don't know what they're transporting). Then sleeper agents (took awhile to associate to the series "My Own Worst Enemy"). Then Men In Black and the neuralizer.

I think I need to rewatch Eternal Sunshine....

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 3 years ago | (#36502466)

And the hundreds of Sci-fi books that used this device decades before that movie as well...

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498864)

"Damn it, Bones, you're a doctor. You know that pain and guilt can't be taken away with a wave of a magic wand. They're the things we carry with us, the things that make us who we are. If we lose them, we lose ourselves. I don't want my pain taken away! I need my pain!" -- James T. Kirk, "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier"

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498882)

This is an interesting question. I see both good and bad here. I know I have at least a few bad memories that creep up under certain circumstances and make it hard to function.
But my troubles look like small things when placed beside those who are the victims of violent crime or suffer from PTSD.
When you can make people forget how horrible something like war is, will they be more willing to resort to it? Imagine a military that can easily recondition solders to keep them on the battlefield and possible with a lot less fear as they don't remember the trauma.
Somewhere, there has to be a sci-fi story where all this has already been explored.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

jfmonte (1336577) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499068)

And what about... If you can erase a bad crime from the victim's memory, does that make the criminal less prone to get harsh punishment? Can it be used to slightly reduce the jail-time? Can someone use this together with the "jails are full" argument? It's creepy, if you ask me... --no, no sig, why? shoul i have one?

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Inda (580031) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499402)

There was a drug on trial that did exactly this. I probably heard about it 5 years ago and I haven't heard anything since.

The idea was that we strengthen our memories by repeating them in our mind's eye. The chemical bonds, that make memories, are strengthened the more they are used. The drug stopped these bonds becoming stronger.

I have memories that haunt me. It could be OCD, and that would tie-in with the other mental health issues I have, but I refuse to have more 'tests'. If I could wipe these half-dozen memories, I'd sacrifice _everything_ I have.

(I didn't RTFA and I didn't check my spelling)

Re:In all seriousness (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499758)

In all seriousness, removing memories of battle will only lead to more battles. I'm sure there are cases where it could be used beneficially... but you know what they say, out of sight, out of mind. What about when it's just out of mind? Will this technology simply be used to ignore problems? Answer, it will overwhelmingly be used for evil.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

domatic (1128127) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499874)

If possible I think it would make for some very strange behaviour and outlook. An old traumatic memory is going to shape one's attitude and choices in myriad ways. The memory can be removed but all of the consequences that came about because of that memory are still present. For instance, one may have very pro law and order attitudes and even became a cop because a loved one was a victim. Take away that memory and context for the shape life took because of it is gone. And the more memories are adjusted, the less context one has. Force of habit and long career still leaves a pro law and order policeman but perhaps some of the fierce conviction is gone now.....

Re:In all seriousness (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#36524774)

The problem is when there is a more immediate wipe. Policeman sees a poorly executed no-knock on flimsy evidence and is traumatized by the site of the 2 pre-schoolers police gunned down. Gets memory wiped and cheerfully participates in exactly the same sort of raid the next day...

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36501266)

Without the memory of his parents being gunned down at that movie theatre there would be no Batman. I for one am pro-Batman.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

Abstrackt (609015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36502552)

I was in a car accident a long time ago and can't imagine waking up with no knowledge of why I have all these scars. I think it would more traumatic to see the results of multiple surgeries, burns and cuts with no explanation than it would be to remember what little of the incident I do. Aside from that, I think a person is the complete sum of their experiences. As you take or add experiences, good or bad, you change the person. You could argue there are cases where that's a good thing but I'm still stuck on that accident.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

black soap (2201626) | more than 3 years ago | (#36504400)

We could act with no remorse, knowing we would have no regrets once we removed the bad stuff. The only thing limiting our actions might be fear of getting caught external punishement - which we could promptly erase all memory of.

We could all be sociopaths. Brilliant!

Maybe we should be turned off by ghastly things. Maybe we should abhor violence, once we've seen it close-up.

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36520742)

Ah yes, Facebook for the brain. We can hide in the nice parts of who we are and never have to call ourselves into account on our less considered choices. Cometh the hour, we'll be able to run like bunnies from the "horror" which proves our worth. Meanwhile governments will make us forget what they don't want us to remember and make us "remember" whatever suits them. Time for the Butlerian Jihad.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

KingBenny (1301797) | more than 3 years ago | (#36524316)

i don't know, from what i understand any memory you have is 'coloured' by other memories and past experiences. Simply turning off or erasing one memory would only change so much if all memories were generated on the fly, starting with the oldest ones. If memories are just stored as they are , 'coloured' and all, it would do nothing to change the perception you have of things in general. I don't know, if any expert could point me to some comprehensible reading on the matter i'd be much obliged.

Eternal Sunshine... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498764)

... of the Spotless Mind

Big Bang (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498776)

"I'd like to erase Ben Affleck as Daredevil!"

Re:Big Bang (1)

Kreeben (995363) | more than 3 years ago | (#36500352)

Traumatic experiences in the degree of "Affleck as Daredevil" would probably be impossible to erase without causing brain damage. Worst... movie... EVAR!

Nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498788)

Bill Clinton invented this years ago. Move on.

This Stinks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36498846)

The very concept here is flawed horribly. An alzheimers patient's memory fails due to circuit distruction. This is equivalent to hoping that you could fix with software the failure of a CPU or a wiped hard drive. Not likely to work. Such experiments have only one outcome. They will be used to destroy political opposition. It is the goal for a police state to remove even the memories of the opposition.

Re:This Stinks (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 3 years ago | (#36501392)

This is equivalent to hoping that you could fix with software the failure of a CPU.... Not likely to work.

That would depend on the nature of the failure. Have you heard of the Pentium F00F bug [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:This Stinks (1)

npsimons (32752) | more than 3 years ago | (#36514314)

This is equivalent to hoping that you could fix with software the failure of a CPU.... Not likely to work.

That would depend on the nature of the failure. Have you heard of the Pentium F00F bug?

Not to mention things like Google, where their whole operation runs on HW that isn't anywhere near "enterprise grade", but commodity off the shelf desktops (basically). How do they handle the inevitable failures? They design the software to deal with it.

simpsons did it (1)

callmebill (1917294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498854)

well... not the simpsons. but http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_Sunshine_of_the_Spotless_Mind [wikipedia.org]

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (1)

scubamage (727538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36498870)

How happy is the blameless Vestal's lot
The world forgetting by the world forgot
Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind
Each pray'r accepted and each wish resign'd?

What utter balderdash!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36499426)

Uhhhh ... What were we talking about?

ignoring other uses? (1)

Sprouticus (1503545) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499804)

Why is it that researchers are always saying that their research is for helping those with medical conditions. Even if this is true (and it probably is), that is NOT the only reason and to imply that it would not be used for other functions is a lie by omission.

If this ever gets developed to the point where it could be used on people with brain damage or to remove trauma, it could also be used for memory wipes, selective memory cleanup, and other less pleasent actions.

I am not saying that we should not develop it, Im saying that how can we have discussions around the proper use of technology if we wont admit to what it can actually be used to accomplish.

Re:ignoring other uses? (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499944)

I am not saying that we should not develop it, Im saying that how can we have discussions around the proper use of technology if we wont admit to what it can actually be used to accomplish.

That's ok, when the technology is perfected they will go ahead and make you forget you ever had such a silly objection in the first place. See, problem solved!

Re:ignoring other uses? (1)

black soap (2201626) | more than 3 years ago | (#36504796)

Or what about adding on accessories, with pre-recorded memories? If we know the structure of how a memory is stored, down the road we have external memory devices...

Re:ignoring other uses? (1)

Francofille (1864714) | more than 3 years ago | (#36505708)

I am not saying that we should not develop it,

It's all about funding. When you say "we", the underlying implication is that someone will pay for this research and development. The medical condition charities and drug company conglomerates have deep pockets and vast future potential earning. Also when people tighten their belts and make personal budget cuts, healthcare is often not an optional expense.

NASA was one R&D driver that wasn't related to medical conditions. Whether or not it was worth the price, a lot of technology came out of all that work.

Three Wishes Story (1)

BurningTyger (626316) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499814)

Reminds me of the three wishes story from "Planescape Torment".

An elderly man was sitting alone on a dark path. He wasn't certain of which direction to go, and he'd forgotten both where he was traveling to and who he was. He'd sat down for a moment to rest his weary legs, and suddenly looked up to see an elderly woman before him. She grinned toothlessly and with a cackle, spoke: "Now your *third* wish. What will it be?"

"Third wish?" The man was baffled. "How can it be a third wish if I haven't had a first and second wish?"

"You've had two wishes already," the hag said, "but your second wish was for me to return everything to the way it was before you had made your first wish. That's why you remember nothing; because everything is the way it was before you made any wishes." She cackled at the poor man. "So it is that you have one wish left."

"All right," he said, "I don't believe this, but there's no harm in wishing. I wish to know who I am."

"Funny," said the old woman as she granted his wish and disappeared forever. "That was your first wish."

Also, polygraphs... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36499902)

At some point this will be the final nail in the coffin of polygraphs.

What the world needs is an un-see-er (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36499920)

The scientists hope their research will eventually lead to a neural prosthesis to help people suffering Alzheimer's disease, the effects of stroke or other brain injury to recover long-term memory capability.

Yeah yeah, thats all well and good. How long before there is an app that one can use to un-see certain things that, well, should not have been seen...

Holly (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 3 years ago | (#36500030)

This kind of reminded me of the episode of Red Dwarf where Holly had gone computer senile and the toaster reconfigured her to increase her intelligence at the expense of her operational lifetime. Intelligence != memory, obviously, but I wonder if there is any of the same effect here... not that it really matters - I bet there wouldn't be a person in the world diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease who still had some presence of mind who wouldn't trade quantity for quality

Help me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36500036)

I would like to forget my first wife.
Thank you.

Re:Help me (1)

black soap (2201626) | more than 3 years ago | (#36504882)

And make the mistakes all over again?

Repost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36502950)

Interesting how the much the summary can change the tone of the research in question. This was posted Friday with a much more positive outlook on the research for the summary and an in depth story attached.

http://science.slashdot.org/story/11/06/17/2058214/Researchers-Design-Memory-Strengthening-Implant

Why a switch? (1)

mbstone (457308) | more than 3 years ago | (#36505560)

Just use a rat-protect tab.

Someone finally solved tubgirl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36505638)

My nightmares can finally end.

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"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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