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Analog Designer Bob Pease Dies In Car Crash

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the condolences-to-the-pease-family dept.

Hardware 187

EdwinFreed writes "It's being widely reported that Bob Pease, well known analog circuit designer and author of Pease Porridge, has died in a car accident. He reportedly was driving alone in his 1969 Beetle and failed to negotiate a turn."

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Beginning of the Digital War (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507792)

This is the first shot.

Who? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507798)

Does every nerd who wrote a book and died stupidly get a write up on slashdot?

Re:Who? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507844)

Yes. Most of us rarely get credit beyond our nerdy circle.

Re:Who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507932)

My professor in undergrad (3 years back) told me that there were only 100s of you in my country Extrapolating it, I would make a guess that there only a couple of thousands of Analog Engineers spread across IBM, Intel and the likes. Is that true?

Re:Who? (4, Interesting)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508074)

We don't know if he died "stupidly", whatever that may mean. For all I know he had stroke/heart attack and was unconscious when it was time to turn the steering wheel.

By the way, Bob was coming back from a memorial service for Jim Williams, another of analog circuit design great minds. He missed the end of the service by half an hour.

I'm getting drunk tonight in their memory. All I know in analog circuit design I've learned from my dad and them, I'd say they all share equal influence on me. Bob and Jim were great teachers, seriously down-to-Earth, no-bullshit guys.

Re:Who? (1)

tuxicle (996538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508610)

What? Jim Williams too??? Who will write our humorous app notes with the doodles on the last page? :( A dark day indeed. Williams' application notes (and his tales of learning from fixing broken test equipment) are one of the reasons I'm a EE today.

Re:Who? (1)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36509398)

I'm raising my glass with you, brother. We lost two of the great old men of our craft.

Re:Who? (2)

HotNeedleOfInquiry (598897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36509392)

Bob Pease was a living God in the field of analog circuit design. He designed a metric shit-ton of chips for National Semiconductor, wrote a regular column in Electronic Design magazine, and on top of all that, he was a damn fine individual, willing to talk to the most junior tech. He will be sorely missed by those of us that knew him and his work.

No seatbelt (4, Informative)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507826)

I'm sorry he died, but he wasn't wearing a seat belt. He presumably understood the risk that entailed.

Re:No seatbelt (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507930)

Are you serious? First, seatbelts weren't standard in 1969 Beetles. Second, if you did have them, using them was probably more of a risk than not. Third, the article states he wasn't wearing his seatbelt because in this nanny-state day and age, they are almost obligated to state stupid useless facts to coax the rest of us lemmings into following statistically good practices -- but it does not say if it was a factor in his death. He hit a tree dead on in a tiny lightweight 42-ish year old car with a rear mounted engine. A 1969 Beetle has you sitting sharply upright beneath a huge steering wheel with your nose in the windshield. It's far far more likely that he was crushed rather than ejected. I doubt a seatbelt have prevented that.

The risk was driving, or enjoying antique/classic automobiles, or perhaps driving too fast. Sure, seatbelts are a good idea, but don't be a friggin nanny.

Re:No seatbelt (0)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507958)

LOL AC trolls... they be funny.

Re:No seatbelt (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508468)

The core component of the seatbelt reminder system:

http://www.national.com/rap/files/datasheet.pdf [national.com]

Re:No seatbelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508488)

kill yourself you piece of shit. the troll is the not the AC.

Re:No seatbelt (2, Informative)

sonamchauhan (587356) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508022)

Are you serious? Its good you stayed Anonymous, coward. Seatbelts not only save you from ejection, they prevent the steering wheel smashing your head on impact.

Re:No seatbelt (2)

kcbnac (854015) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508048)

Unless the front bumper and storage area comes back to you (rear-mounted engine)...then you have more concerns than JUST the steering wheel smashing your head...oh, and in this case...the tree.

Re:No seatbelt (1)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508116)

Unless the front bumper and storage area comes back to you (rear-mounted engine)...then you have more concerns than JUST the steering wheel smashing your head...oh, and in this case...the tree.

There's a gas tank up there too...

Re:No seatbelt (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508098)

All true, but there's a reason he didn't make the turn, and I think that seatbelts had nothing to do with the outcome.

Re:No seatbelt (5, Insightful)

c41rn (880778) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508292)

Indeed. Pease crashed on Pierce Rd. in Saratoga and I had a very close call myself several years back near the intersection of Pierce Rd. and Hwy 9 in my 1967 VW Karmann Ghia, so I have some experience here. The early VWs (up to 1969 for the Ghia, and I think '70 for the Beetles) had swing axle rear ends that jack up the rear end in turns so that the tires are riding on their edges. Since the engines are in the back, this causes the car to lose control very quickly on tight turns like those on Pierce Rd. and Hwy 9. After '69/70 or so, VW put IRS in their vehicles to fix this problem, keeping the wheels relatively perpendicular to the road in turns.

IIRC, it was the swing axle rear ends in the Corvairs that led to Nader's "Unsafe at any speed" suit.

This is a bit off topic, but having a technical discussion about the cause of the crash is probably what Pease would do too ;) Rest in peace.

Re:No seatbelt (1)

macs4all (973270) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508428)

IIRC, it was the swing axle rear ends in the Corvairs that led to Nader's "Unsafe at any speed" suit.

You are correct. Chevrolet fixed the problem in 1964 (IIRC); but by then, the damage to the Corvair's reputation was done, and sales never recovered.

Re:No seatbelt (3, Informative)

quietlikeachurch (984657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508776)

Corvair nerd here. For '64 Chevy added an anti-roll/sway bar up front and a transverse leaf spring to the swing-axle at the rear which in combination made the handling waaay closer to neutral. Full IRS (non swing-axle) was standard from '65 on.

Re:No seatbelt (1)

macs4all (973270) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508976)

I tip my hat to your greater knowledge. Apparently, IDRC (I Didn't Recall Correctly)!!!

I knew there was something about '64 and '65, but I couldn't remember the details, thanx!

Re:No seatbelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36509290)

Oh that's interesting. If you Google street view that area, you see a motorcycle headed towards the curve just west of the intersection. It's a bit overcast looking. If you step west a few increments, it's a different session of the Google camera. Not only is the MC gone, but it's also a sunny day. RIP.

Was the accident west or east of the intersection. I'm assuming he left Hwy 9. That curve is signed with a recommended speed of 20 mph.

Re:No seatbelt (1)

deesine (722173) | more than 3 years ago | (#36509292)

Some '68 Beetles had IRS, and all '69 Beetles had it.

My '64 and '67 were extra fun when one of the rear wheels left the ground. More dangerous than swing axles on Bugs were the Lilliputian brake drums.

Re:No seatbelt (2)

tom17 (659054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508306)

The reason he didn't make the turn is that it's a Beetle. They are known for suddenly understeering you, head on into trees.

I also doubt that a lack of seatbelt was the cause of death in this particular scenario (or at least, what I can assume about this scenario based on known car traits).

Re:No seatbelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508714)

he died because he was driving one handed.
http://electronicdesign.com/article/analog-and-mixed-signal/What-s-All-This-Driving-One-Handed-Stuff-Anyhow-21.aspx
he shoulda used both hands. oh well.

Re:No seatbelt (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508588)

I think his point was that we don't know in this particular case, which I think is a fair point.

Lemmings use coax? (1)

Max Hyre (1974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508350)

I didn't think they needed the shielding.

Re:No seatbelt (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508450)

First, seatbelts weren't standard in 1969 Beetles

Yes, they were.

The guy not only broke the law by not wearing a seatbelt, but even if his car didn't have them, that doesn't prevent him from knowing that they are a good idea to have installed and to use. I guess he paid the ultimate price for his idiocy.

Re:No seatbelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508846)

I'll just keep driving my ugly old box of Swedish steel and let the masters of nuance and edge cases fight to their death over whether not wearing seatbelts or driving small light cars is more suicidal.

Re:No seatbelt (0)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508084)

It's a silly insinuation that him wearing/not wearing the seat belt had any influence on the outcome. I'm tempted to think that he was either dead or dying for a bit before that turn came up. Let's wait for the police report to come out.

Re:No seatbelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508424)

It's a silly insinuation that him wearing/not wearing the seat belt had any influence on the outcome.

Yes, indeed, seatbelts remain unproven technology; there's zero evidence that deaths are reduced by them.

  In any event, he obviously wasn't terribly concerned about his safety; he was an old man who knew what he was doing, driving what was obviously a hobby car for him and probably perfectly comfortable with the risks he was taking. I see no reason to get all worked up about this; may he rest in peace.

Re:No seatbelt (2)

timeOday (582209) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508926)

According to the CDC, seatbelts reduce the risk of death by about 50% [cdc.gov] . So, without any further knowledge, I guess there's 50/50 chance the seatbelt would have saved him.

Re:No seatbelt (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508478)

He had just arrived a half hour late to the private funeral service for friend and fellow analog guru Jim Williams. While the most dedicated, most professional, most technical of engineers might be able to apply that skill to their day-to-day life on most days, maybe just this one day he was too distraught to run down life's usual safety checklist.

If anything, it shows that even the most independent of people shouldn't be left alone when a friend has passed.

Re:No seatbelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508532)

Wow, now I feel really sorry for their mutual friends. You get out of one service and get to go right back into another. I'm sure there's an analog joke in there somewhere....

Re:No seatbelt (2)

jimmyswimmy (749153) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508706)

Man, I am so bummed right now. These guys were some of the greatest in the field. Both were very well known in industry and had done a lot in their time to advance the state of the art. I always figured that if I ever got back into the semiconductor industry I'd try to work wherever they were - of course, I don't want to move to California very much, and Pease had sort of retired, but still.

I had no idea Jim Williams had died either. Williams' app notes were both clever and clear, just masterpieces of design and communications. One of my favorites was his AN45, which he worked on while up late with a baby; each circuit was preceded by a number of baby bottles indicating how many bottles he fed his son while working on the circuit. One of them - a CCFL supply built around a Royer oscillator - took more than 30 bottles, drawn lined up three rows deep, convinced me not to use that design in a related project. Just a few months ago Electronic Design or EDN published a paper by Williams describing how to build an ultrasonic thermometer - a technique for measuring temperature using the speed of sound in an olive jar full of dry air. Just neat stuff.

Pease was an interesting guy who I felt I knew better. You could call him up when he was at National and ask him questions - if you had a hard enough question. He had some crafty designs for VFC's and references, but I really remember him for his magazine articles. He once described a proposed highway as a mistake and showed a circuit model for traffic to describe how its construction would make things worse overall. Pease was a neat guy who I knew only through his articles and app notes, and boy would I have liked to go for a ride with him in his old VW. Course, I would have worn a seatbelt (did his car even have them?).

Man am I bummed right now! What a loss.

Two great people taken from us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507832)

First Ryan Dunn, and now this.

Always die in threes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507850)

Seymour Cray, the guy from Jackass and this guy

Re:Always die in threes (1)

arielCo (995647) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508298)

Cray died October 5, 1996 (age 71)

Not exactly contemporaneous.

of head and neck injuries suffered in a traffic collision

Same COD. Is that what you meant?

"Failed to negotiate a turn." (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507856)

I love this wording. Sorry, dead guy. :(

Died in a '69 Beetle (1, Insightful)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507858)

It sounds like he was a brilliant EE but, if he was driving one of those things, then he was a damned fool when it came to ME and physics.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507892)

Beetles were fairly safe for the era. Not like a modern car, but, then it wouldn't be a classic then, would it.

Wearing his seatbelt might have been a start, though.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (2)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507966)

Bullshit. They were deathtraps from day one.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508058)

i suppose comparable to other small cars from the era would have been better wording. superior to a motor bike at least :p

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508208)

No, even compared to other small cars and motorcycles, Beetles were dangerous.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508260)

Did a beetle run over your puppy or something? You're just trolling now.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (2)

tom17 (659054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508314)

Probably not, they are just known for hideous understeer. That's what you get for putting the engine in the wrong place.

And yes, I am aware that one of my favourite cars also has the engine in the same, wrong, place. I guess they have more weight up front to counteract it.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (2)

istewart (463887) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508462)

UNDERsteer, in a rear-engine car? I think you have a bit of confusion in terms there. Oversteer is what occurs when the rear of a vehicle loses traction due to weight imbalance. Additionally, Ralph Nader's criticism of the similarly rear-engined Corvair (and its contemporary Volkswagens) in "Unsafe at Any Speed" had a lot to do with that vehicle's use of a swing-axle transaxle, in which the rear axle's suspension only has one, vertical, degree of freedom and thus has a tendency to bounce upwards during oversteer incidents and risk overturning the whole car. 1969 and later Beetles had independent rear suspension, which does not exhibit this behavior. The Corvair was killed before it could be evolved in this direction.

Additionally, Porsche fanatics will tell you that the 911's rear engine placement is actually an advantage in terms of traction during corner exit, so long as you are not foolish enough to lift the throttle in mid-turn.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

quietlikeachurch (984657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508718)

The Corvair got IRS from '65-'69, which methinks inspired VW to make the change in their cars. Some folks say the late-model Corvairs are the best-handling american classics out there.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508318)

I'm not trolling. They were notoriously unsafe.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508114)

They were all deathtraps. Nader is our champion, there.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508686)

Well said, fellow AC. I own one of Nader's first causes, a '62 Chevy Corvair, complete with odd handling (don't jam the brakes whilst turning at high speed...due to weight transfer you must accelerate through turns to maintain full control, etc), a large empty space (trunk) and a great fire-hazard (gas tank) between the "firewall" and the headlights, and a steering wheel made of semi-pokey metal sitting 16 inches in front of my chest that is mounted on a non-collapsible steering column (!). There's not a seat belt in sight. As bad as all this sounds, it's not much worse than the majority of cars on the market at the time. I keep the Corvair because its driving experience is more engaging than most vehicles I've had the good fortune to pilot, and I fully accept the risks (I also have a few motorcycles, and wear a helmet). However, the US (and foreign) automakers of the '60s thought they could keep designing cars with essentially zero safety features, and deserved every single thing they got from Nader and his fellow consumer advocates. Oops, off topic! I love that Mr. Pease had the courage to drive an old Beetle on today's roads, and hope he gets some well-deserved rest.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508106)

You're a damned fool in making assumptions. There's nothing out there so far (else post links) that indicates that seat belts (or their lack) played any role in the outcome. Shut up.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1, Troll)

Twisted64 (837490) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508218)

Nothing out there except TFA. Read it. I've got nothing against people driving dangerous cars, really, but not wearing a seatbelt is the height of stupidity.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

Grygus (1143095) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508918)

Nothing out there except TFA. Read it. I've got nothing against people driving dangerous cars, really, but not wearing a seatbelt is the height of stupidity.

What a strange attitude you have. If a man is eaten by a shark, will you post that he was an idiot and had it coming because he wasn't wearing a life preserver? If he is hit by a bus, will it be his just desserts because his left shoe was dangerously untied? Simply because he was not wearing a seat belt does not mean that it had anything to do with his death. The article doesn't say, and you do not know. Your automatic disrespect says a lot more about you than his seat belt says about him.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

Twisted64 (837490) | more than 3 years ago | (#36509078)

I read in the comments that the '69 beetle didn't come with seatbelts, so OK, he did have a (bad) reason for not wearing one - he didn't have to. I stand by my point. Whether or not it had anything to do with his death, driving around without wearing a seatbelt is an unspeakably bad idea. I'm not going to bother fixing your broken analogies.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508922)

yes, there is a small chance you are correct. the problem is that other idiots may take what you say to mean they should stop wearing seatbelts. or is that a good thing? after all, they are idiots! wait a minute.. . .. oh, you are a genius. what better way to eradicate the mentally challenged than with slashdot comments urging them to drive little hitler beetles with no seatbelts!

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508166)

Does a '69 Beetle even have seat belts, People?

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (2)

PNutts (199112) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508228)

Yes, but typically they are tied to the door handles to keep the doors on or the ceiling grab loops to keep the seats from dropping out the bottom.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508232)

Weren't they mandated in '64 or 65?

I have a 73, it has (shoulder) seatbelts. not sure what would have come in a '69.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508384)

Analog designer Bob Pease, 71, killed by ADOLF HITLER.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (1)

Jstlook (1193309) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508524)

While I appreciate the Godwin'd article, saying Adolf was responsible is akin to suggesting that Palin owns the largest diamond mine in the world.

Re:Died in a '69 Beetle (3, Insightful)

retchdog (1319261) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508616)

a ridiculous godwin is a good godwin. and it was kind of meant as a joke on the heated trolling/discussion below regarding "seatbelts: useless, or nanny state murder device?"

Farewell Bob, we'll miss you... (4, Insightful)

jenningsthecat (1525947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507896)

As an analog designer, I've come to appreciate Bob's many contributions over the years. He was a good writer and a terrific engineer, and he knew both theory and hands-on practice better than most of us. He could explain complex concepts in simple language, and it seemed he was a no-nonsense kind of guy yet had a good sense of humour. The electronics field, from hobbyists, to other engineers, to semiconductor companies, owes him a debt of gratitude. He will be missed.

Sad Day (4, Interesting)

StonyCreekBare (540804) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507942)

I used to live for his regular columns. I loved his wit, and curmudgeonly attitude. I met him a few times and found him the same in person as he was in print. He will be missed. Yeah, VW beetles were dangerous little cars. I drove one for years (a 1964 model) and I was very careful, and knew what a death trap they could be. But how many of us ride motorcycles, or other dangerous vehicles. Life is a series of risks. I guess we could wrap ourselves in cotton balls and stay home. He was not a "damned fool" just a human being who chose to do something he knew was risky, who no doubt weighed the risks, and decided to go ahead.

Re:Sad Day (4, Insightful)

Canonical Coward (2057190) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508180)

Bob was the quintessential curmudgeon and he had the chops and credentials to do it well. But he was never spiteful or hateful.

He truly did dislike engineers who didn't make smoke and relied on Spice simulations to design things, but he knew what he was talking about. His floobydust stories were spot on. I just had the pleasure of rereading his take on the Taguchi method.

I never got to meet him, but I did manage once or twice to exchange mail. His column was the first thing I looked for, and his books are legend.

Goodbye Bob. Thank you Pease family for sharing him with us.

Re:Sad Day (1)

NixieBunny (859050) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508886)

He did put more miles on VW Beetles than perhaps a handful of people. So the odds were bound to catch up to him sooner or later.

No doubt his crash was due way more to his mental state after having just been to Jim Williams' funeral than to anything else.

It's a great loss (3, Informative)

50000BTU_barbecue (588132) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507956)

The worst part is that Mr Pease was coming back from the funeral of Jim Williams, another analog great working at Linear Tech.

Deep Loss (2)

MountainLogic (92466) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507970)

Bob was a great educator of working EEs. His passing is a great loss for all of us.

Passing of two analog greats (4, Informative)

labnet (457441) | more than 3 years ago | (#36507972)

Bob Pease and Jim Williams (who also died recently) were legends in analog electronics.
Bob was still an active contributor to many columns.
His last is here http://electronicdesign.com/article/analog-and-mixed-signal/What-s-All-This-Solo-Hiking-Stuff-Anyhow-.aspx [electronicdesign.com]

RIP Bob

Re:Passing of two analog greats (2)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508130)

Yeah, talk about coincidences. They both died within a week of each other. Someone selected nice pictures [blogspot.com] of both of them.

Re:Passing of two analog greats (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508498)

How is it a coincidence? Bob Pease died while leaving Jim Williams' memorial service, which he was late for, presumably because he was distraught. While there's no proof (and may never be), there's certainly enough correlation that I can postulate a reasonable hypothesis of causation.

Re:Passing of two analog greats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508972)

Was probably late because he was driving a shitty car with 50 hp.

Re:Passing of two analog greats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508320)

Yikes! His last column talks about discounting risks while enjoying a favored activity. He dies days later while driving a crappy little death trap of a car while not wearing a seat belt.

At least you can't call him a hypocrite.

re: died in a '69 Beetle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36507992)

'69 Beetles didn't have seat belts, thus he wasn't required to use one. Now it seems strange but there was a lot of reistance to seat belts, you were giving up some of your freedom. yes I know this sounds like a tea party talking point. Look at this from another angle, there are still old cars out there with old style headlights that don't really light the road, but it is illegal to upgrade them.

Thanks Bob (4, Interesting)

crisco (4669) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508026)

I appreciate all the insight you lent me and the fact that you opened my eyes to a better way to troubleshoot and think about systems.

he's not a negotiator. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508970)

damn it jim! i'm a circuit designer, not a negotiator!

Re:Thanks Bob (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36509352)

That, and he deserved to die.

God be praised.

wise guy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508104)

So who was the wise guy who made the wiki entry about him writing a book on safe driving? Your vandalism has been corrected.

Re:wise guy (3, Informative)

Man On Pink Corner (1089867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508148)

It wasn't vandalism. He did write such a book, which got decidedly mixed reviews. I haven't read it.

In this case the his driving (and seat belt) probably had nothing to do with it. He was 70, recently diagnosed with diabetes, and had just come back from a memorial for a good friend. He was most likely dead of a coronary event before his car left the road.

Re:wise guy (1)

tuxicle (996538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508640)

He would also write about defensive driving on occasion in Pease Porridge, his column.

So sad (2)

woboyle (1044168) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508136)

Bob will be missed. I have been reading his postings on EDN for many, many years (probably about 25 years now) and always found them interesting, informational, and often quite funny. The Silicon Valley and the industry has lost a real gentleman and guiding light.

That is hard-core analog there (2)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508190)

I can't think of anything digital in a 69 Beetle. From the sounds of it I'd be surprised if he even had an AM radio in there.

Re:That is hard-core analog there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508404)

The trafficators are digital: on - off - on - off...

Re:That is hard-core analog there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508454)

It had an AM radio, though why listen to it when you could be talking to Bob.

This may be the first time I wish I wasn't in China, I would have liked to have seen him one more time.

Re:That is hard-core analog there (2)

smellsofbikes (890263) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508546)

It didn't have a radio. (That I saw: I was looking over his shoulder.) The main reason he was so into it was precisely because he could fix everything on it -- and he did, too. He had a lot to say about why people shouldn't own anything they couldn't fix, and about how nice it was to be able to walk down to the corner auto shop and get most all the parts he needed to repair or replace anything on the Beetle.

Re:That is hard-core analog there (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508984)

It didn't have a radio. (That I saw: I was looking over his shoulder.) The main reason he was so into it was precisely because he could fix everything on it -- and he did, too. He had a lot to say about why people shouldn't own anything they couldn't fix, and about how nice it was to be able to walk down to the corner auto shop and get most all the parts he needed to repair or replace anything on the Beetle.

Sounds like his time was past if he couldn't own a car any more advanced than a 42 year old Beetle and be able to work on it.

Re:That is hard-core analog there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36509228)

Or you have a different definition of "work on it". Replacing an EFI module does not count as "work" in the books of those who prefer to understand everything to (and beyond) the component level. It's not a matter of being able to understand what is in a more modern car, but having to put up with the layers of obfuscation. A typical engineer doesn't want to trust Toyota's engineers to get their stuff right. He wants to verify it for himself, by looking inside the system. Probably because engineers know the internal crap that a shiny facade on a product can hide.

Re:That is hard-core analog there (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 3 years ago | (#36509390)

Again, there are plenty of automobiles for which one can work on the entire circuit, custom program EEPROMs and various other activities. Hell, there are more advanced vehicles available that use vacuum and centrifugal advance for ignition timing and carbs for fuel metering. The VW Beetle is a quaint relic that should be relegated to the scrapheap.

Re:That is hard-core analog there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36509264)

That's pretty cool and all but owning an old vehicle and driving it around is a bad idea. The technology that is put in today's cars compared to before is significant and the main reason why people don't die as often in a wreck. a '69 beetle is almost suicide.

We will miss you, Bob (1)

byteherder (722785) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508244)

Anyone who reads Electronic Design knows of Bob Pease. His column was the first thing you read, when you got the new edition. He was clever, witty and a brilliant engineer.

Bob, you will be sorely missed.

Coincidence? (0)

Hylandr (813770) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508294)

Interesting... Was he hit by a Porsche 911 in the morning?

- Dan.

Pease Porridge (2)

hammarlund (568027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508346)

I always enjoyed his columns. He was down to earth and not afraid to call bullshit when needed. It's true, always read his column first. He'll be missed.

Time to ban trees!!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508542)

He ran into a tree. What the hell was that tree doing there?!?!? A goddamn tree!

It's time to get rid of this brown and green menace. The sooner the better. We need to act NOW, or soon this new threat will overrun our safe concrete and cement surfaces, or crack them from below. Our planet's safety is at stake here!

Re:Time to ban trees!!!!! (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508736)

Bob was a great analog guy. What was he doing messing around with trees? Maybe he could have handled a simple linked list. But please, leave the trees to the CS people.

What's all this 'I'm dead stuff', anyhow? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508700)

RIP, Bob.

How to Drive Into Accidents (2)

naroom (1560139) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508726)

Bob Pease is also the author of the book "How to drive into accidents - and how not to" [amazon.com] .

A great author (1)

cstec (521534) | more than 3 years ago | (#36508770)

I learned so much more from Bob's writing for a couple of bucks than I ever did in school in EE. It's not that school was 'wrong', just that they taught and followed rules, and Bob actually understood what they meant. A loss of one of engineering's finest talents - the guy that both knew it, and could explain it in English.

54 68 69 73 20 77 61 73 20 6e 6f 74 20 61 6e 20 61 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36508778)

54-68-69-73-20-77-61-73-20-74-68-65-20-66-69-72-73-74-20-73-68-6f-74-20-69-6e-20-74-68-65-20-63-6f-6d-69-6e-67-20-64-69-67-69-74-61-6c-20-77-61-72-73-2e

57-65-20-77-69-6c-6c-20-6b-69-6c-6c-20-61-67-61-69-6e-2c-20-79-6f-75-20-66-75-6e-6e-79-20-6c-69-74-74-6c-65-20-61-6e-61-6c-6f-67-20-62-65-69-6e-67-73-21

41-6c-6c-20-79-6f-75-72-20-62-61-73-65-20-61-72-65-20-62-65-6c-6f-6e-67-20-74-6f-20-75-73-21

59-6f-75-20-68-61-76-65-20-6e-6f-20-63-68-61-6e-63-65-20-74-6f-20-73-75-72-76-69-76-65-20-6d-61-6b-65-20-79-6f-75-72-20-74-69-6d-65-21

01001111 01110101 01110010 00100000 01100011 01101111 01101110 01100100 01101111 01101100 01100101 01101110 01100011 01100101 01110011 00100000 01110100 01101111 00100000 01000010 01101111 01100010 00100000 01010000 01100101 01100001 01110011 01100101 00100111 01110011 00100000 01100110 01100001 01101101 01101001 01101100 01111001 00101110

Rest in Pease (1)

crazyvas (853396) | more than 3 years ago | (#36509326)

Rest in Pease, Bob.
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